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  1. 'We cannot eliminate all risk': B.C. starting to manage COVID-19 more like common cold, officials say B.C. shifts approach to pandemic Published Jan. 21, 2022 12:51 p.m. MST British Columbia is beginning to manage COVID-19 more like the common cold, the province's top doctor said Friday while explaining major shifts in the government's approach to the pandemic. While contact-tracing was a foundational part of the provincial COVID-19 response for the better part of two years, officials largely abandoned that tool weeks ago, deeming it ineffective in the face of Omicron's rapid spread and shorter incubation period. They began discouraging PCR testing for most of the population around the same time, reserving limited capacity for health-care workers, seniors and others at higher risk. Earlier this week, the government also updated self-isolation guidelines, removing the minimum length of time many adults need to stay home after catching the virus. "I absolutely recognize this as a shift. It means we have to change our way of thinking that we have been working on so intently together for the last two years," provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said at a news conference. "But we are all familiar with these new measures. They're much like how we manage other respiratory illnesses – influenza, or RSV, or enteroviruses that cause the common cold." For the time being, the province's recommendations largely revolve around self-management, meaning that individuals should be assessing themselves for symptoms on a daily basis. Anyone who has even mild symptoms, such as a sore throat, should stay home until they feel better. But for those who didn't experience severe symptoms and were never tested, there is no longer a minimum amount of time that they must keep away from the public. Previously, they were told to selfi-isolate for at least five days. "We cannot eliminate all risk," Henry said. "And I think that's something that we need to understand and accept. As this virus has changed, it's become part of what we will be living with for years to come." The same layers of protection that have been recommended since early in the pandemic remain important for reducing the spread, Henry said. That includes regular hand-washing, wearing quality masks indoors, and keeping groups small. People who are at higher risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19, such as the immunocompromised, are also advised to be extra cautious. Unlike colds and flus, COVID-19 is also still considered dangerous enough to warrant a number of impactful public health measures. Bars and nightclubs remain closed province-wide, while arenas, movie theatres and other venues are still limited to 50 per cent capacity. Organized events such as wedding and funeral receptions are still on pause, and providing proof of vaccination is required for many activities. While transmission for the Omicron wave is believed to have peaked in B.C. earlier this month, hospitalizations and deaths have yet to subside. The 15 coronavirus-related deaths reported Thursday pushed the province's seven-day average to a three-month high of 8.29 per day. The number of test-positive patients in hospital reached an all-time high of 895 on Wednesday, though many are what's known as incidental cases, meaning the patient was hospitalized for reasons unrelated to COVID-19. Health officials continue to strongly recommend vaccination, pointing to an ever-growing mass of "incontrovertible evidence" that it dramatically reduces the chances of severe illness from COVID-19. Vaccine protection also reduces – but does not eliminate – the chances of catching the virus and transmitting it to others, Henry said. This is a developing story and will be updated.
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  2. Jazz Aviation Named One of the Best Places to Work in 2022 – Canadian Aviation News (wordpress.com) Jazz Aviation Named One of the Best Places to Work in 2022 18 January 2022Canadian Aviation News HALIFAX, NS, Jan. 18, 2022 /CNW/ – Chorus Aviation Inc. (‘Chorus’) (TSX: CHR) announced that its subsidiary Jazz Aviation LP (‘Jazz’) has been honoured with a Glassdoor Employees’ Choice Award, recognizing the Best Places to Work in 2022 in Canada. The Employees’ Choice Award, now in its 14th year, is based solely on the input of employees, who elect to provide anonymous feedback by completing a company review about their job, work environment and employer. “Jazz is proud to be selected as one of the best places to work in Canada, especially with this recognition being based on the feedback of our employees,” said Randolph deGooyer, President, Jazz. “Employee well-being, work/life balance, career development, diversity and inclusion, and culture are all very important parts of what makes Jazz a great place to work.” Through Glassdoor, current and former employees voluntarily and anonymously share insights and opinions about their work environments by sharing a company review, designed to capture a genuine and authentic inside look at what a specific job may be like at a particular company. When sharing a company review on Glassdoor, employees are asked to rate their satisfaction with the company overall, and key workplace factors like career opportunities, compensation and benefits, culture and values, senior management, diversity and inclusion, and work/life balance. In addition, employees are asked to describe the best reasons to work at their companies as well as any downsides. About Chorus Aviation Inc. Chorus is a global provider of integrated regional aviation solutions. Chorus’ vision is to deliver regional aviation to the world. Headquartered in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Chorus is comprised of Chorus Aviation Capital a leading, global lessor of regional aircraft, and Jazz Aviation and Voyageur Aviation – companies that have long histories of safe operations with excellent customer service. Chorus provides a full suite of regional aviation support services that encompasses every stage of an aircraft’s lifecycle, including aircraft acquisitions and leasing; aircraft refurbishment, engineering, modification, repurposing and preparation; contract flying; aircraft and component maintenance, disassembly, and parts provisioning. Chorus Class A Variable Voting Shares and Class B Voting Shares trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange under the trading symbol ‘CHR’. Chorus’ 6.00% Senior Debentures due December 31, 2024, 5.75% Senior Unsecured Debentures due December 31, 2024, 6.00% Convertible Senior Unsecured Debentures due June 30, 2026, and 5.75% Senior Unsecured Debentures due June 30, 2027 trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange under the trading symbols ‘CHR.DB’, ‘CHR.DB.A’, ‘CHR.DB.B’, and ‘CHR.DB.C’, respectively. www.chorusaviation.com About Jazz Aviation Jazz Aviation LP has a strong history in Canadian aviation with its roots going back to the 1930s. As the largest regional carrier in Canada, Jazz has a proven track record of industry leadership and exceptional customer service and has leveraged that strength to deliver value to all its stakeholders. www.flyjazz.ca
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  3. We will never know because pointing out inconvenient facts like your question, just doesn’t fit the narrative
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  4. X2 for the Ordinary Men recommend. But my concern goes one step beyond what he said, it’s the demand for these things that actually scares me. Those demands are (IMO) largely induced by fear and made in the absence of considering long term consequences. If you support the notion that individual rights can be defined by the number of voters in favour or against them, note that present day Germany is but one example of the potential downside. On its present trajectory, within 50 years, the German population will be majority Muslim. It raises the question: do you really want mandates and decrees (rigidly enforced) that define individual rights by majority consensus? And lest anyone think that's a slam against any group in particular, we could have an entire thread on historical evils and find ourselves scoped and doped in the reticle too. In short, things like freedom of expression and individual rights don’t stand in opposition to equality under the law, they are the very tool with which equality is forged. All you need to do is recognize that you inherited a valuable tool, sharpen it occasionally, and spread linseed oil on the handle once a year. Look in any shed across the nation and behold how few actually do that. I bet it runs at about 70% which (as it happens) appears to be the number of Canadian voters who have gone barking mad. And please don't put limits on the trajectory of madness. As it stands now, if a cat gender person meows at you and you refuse to meow back you can be fired.
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  5. Shhhsshhhhhh. There’s a simple solution to all this. Simply charge Mother Nature a carbon tax and all will be well in the Universe. Greta and Trudeau will be gushing with pride at the accomplishment.
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  6. It's exactly that simple IMO, it's what individual rights are all about. We can agree that it was a bad idea and we can agree on the reasons it was a bad idea. We can likely also agree that the downside you refer to was easily anticipated and has now come to fruition exactly as expected. Isn't it interesting how progressive madness has forced me to defend that which I previously opposed simply as a matter of integrity... and not because I actually agree with it. In short, I will never seek to sell other peoples rights down the river and all I ask in return is the same consideration. When I (and others) opposed this very measure on this very forum for those very reasons we roundly criticized for it. I will now go on record as predicting that none of those people (previously so vocal) will assist in defending my position as it currently stands. It really is that simple.
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  7. COMMON SENSE It used to be common. In the past, people who didn't have common sense, never used to live long. Few reached adulthood and reproduced. Their numbers were minimal compared to the people who had it. You know the type. They cross train tracks while the boom is down. Unfortunately, in our haste to make the world a safer place, we've allowed the common sense deficient, to proliferate at phenomenal speed. We've now reached the stage where a cup of coffee has to come with a warning label stating that the contents are hot. I dread the day when they become the majority.
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  8. I bet few people ever thought this would be the subject of debate in Canada. The far left has now become indistinguishable from the far right. https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/pandemic-covid-vaccine-triage-omicron-1.6319844 In order to cause the harm we are in peril of experiencing, we need to have majority opinion begin to trump the notion of individual rights. Many past evils resulted from this and the true irony here is watching those who defend it pull down statues dedicated to those who supported similar ideas in the past.
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  9. Logic would dictate, but since logic no longer exists, my bet says they will be back hands wide open screaming discrimination about something sooner rather than later.
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  10. The 40 Billion of our money that Trudeau just gave them should appease them somewhat!
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  11. The only ones who are against are some "Traditional Chiefs" (non elected of course).
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  12. Environmentalists claim that by opposing the Coastal GasLink pipeline, they are supporting local Indigenous people. They will never tell you that ALL of the elected band councils along the pipeline's route support the project.
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  13. Canada is reportedly China's least favourite country A recent survey making the rounds online purports to show that Canada has just become China’s least favourite country . Global Times – the English-language mouthpiece of the Chinese Communist Party – recently published a survey by its own in-house research centre showing that Canada now ranked last among Chinese peoples’ favourite countries. “Only 0.4 percent of respondents (said) they like the country,” it reported. The favourite country? Singapore. Typically, Canada gets the opposite treatment in foreign likeability rankings, often for the singular reason that we’re too inconsequential to generate all that many strong opinions. A regular tally by the Reputation Institute has repeatedly ranked Canada as the world’s most reputable nation. Last year, we also took the top spot in the Best Countries Report published by U.S. News & World Report. And we just got the title of most “reliable partner” among developed nations Meanwhile, Canadians’ feelings on the People’s Republic of China are mutual. A recent Research Co. poll found that 68 per cent of Canadian hold an unfavourable view of China, and that more than two thirds are actively trying to avoid “Made in China” products. In October, a Nanos poll found that 87 per cent of Canadians favoured joining with the U.S. (or anyone else) to “contain China’s growing power. https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/first-reading-canada-is-reportedly-chinas-least-favourite-country
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  14. 'No dissent is allowed': School board bars teacher from raising concerns over transgender books Tom Blackwell 1 hour ago Like18 Comments| An Ontario school board is facing charges of censorship this week after shutting down a teacher’s presentation to the group, saying her comments about books on transgender issues violated the province’s human rights code. Carolyn Burjoski was discussing publications she said are available in the libraries of Kindergarten to grade six schools. She had begun to argue the books made it seem too simple and “cool” to medically transition to another gender when her presentation was cut short by the Waterloo Region District School Board’s chair. Scott Piatkowski ruled she could not continue and the board eventually voted 5-4 to back up his decision. The fallout has continued since. Though controversial and opposed by most transgender advocates, concerns have been voiced before — including by leading figures in the movement itself — that gender-dysphoric young people are sometimes pushed too aggressively into medical transition. Piatkowski later told a local CTV station , however, that Burjoski’s comments were actually transphobic and “questioned the right to exist” of trans people. Meanwhile, the organization took down its recording of the meeting — a regular, public session of elected officials — and had YouTube remove another copy of the video for alleged copyright infringement. And then the teacher was given what she calls a “stay-at-home order” and told not to communicate with colleagues or students, though she’s still being paid and is slated to retire soon. On Thursday, she says her union rep informed her the board had appointed an outside investigator to examine her actions. In her first interview on the affair, Burjoski said she was “flabbergasted” by what happened at the meeting and Piatkowski’s remarks afterward. “I am not a transphobic person. It’s crazy that just because you ask a question, the first thing people do is call you that,” she said. “We do need to have a conversation about the intersection of biology and gender. We’re not having those conversations in our culture because, look what happened to me.” She said the order to stay away from school was likely meant to make an example of her: “The message is clear: no dissent is allowed.” Piatkowski declined to comment Thursday, saying he was already the target of organized online harassment and didn’t want to feed it further. He referred to two previous interviews with local media outlets. The human rights code bars discrimination based on gender identity and other grounds in the areas of housing, employment and providing services. Asked to explain how Burjoski’s comments violated the code, the chair told 570 News radio station that he would not repeat or respond to her remarks and “give them oxygen.” But he said he stood by his decision, and that chairs of other boards in the province have told him they would have done the same thing. “This person was speaking about transgender people in a way that was disrespectful, that would cause them to be attacked and I really needed to ensure it did not continue,” Piatkowski said. “I’m quite confident it was the right decision.” He said Thursday he knew nothing about the board’s actions against Burjoski or removal of the video of the meeting. Canada's teen transgender treatment boom Canada too quick to treat gender dysphoria in minors with hormones, surgery: critics Two groups representing the LGBTQ community in Waterloo could not be reached for comment. Trans activists, however, often argue that statements questioning medical transition in any way can fuel transgender harassment, discrimination and violence. “I’m not sorry that someone who opened the door to transphobic comments was stopped from keeping that door open,” Laura Mae Lindo, the NDP MPP for Kitchener Centre, commented on Twitter. “That’s not over-reach. Protect the most vulnerable. Uphold human rights. If you can’t do that, sit down.” One Waterloo trustee who came to Burjoski’s defence on Monday, though, blasted the board’s decision and said he’s never seen a delegation silenced in that way before. “It’s censoring presentations that the chair doesn’t agree with,” said long-time board member Mike Ramsay, who has served as chair three times himself. “As decision makers, we have to make informed decisions.… If we’re going to just take one point of view and say that’s sufficient, that’s wrong on so many fronts.” Burjoski said she has worked for more than 20 years as a teacher of English as a second language, specializing in children who have immigrated from various countries affected by war and political unrest. She appeared as a one-person public “delegation” in a session discussing the board’s controversial decision to conduct a system-wide removal of books it considered “harmful.” Her comments focused on resources recommended by the board for a transgender awareness day. Trouble started when she turned to a book called The Other Boy by M.G. Hennessey and a scene that depicts a meeting between Shane, a transgender boy (born a girl), and a doctor. He voices excitement about starting on testosterone and when the physician says it would mean he likely wouldn’t be able to have children, he says, “It’s cool.” As Burjoski remarked that such books make it seem overly straightforward to take cross-sex hormones, Piatkowski interjected to warn she may be violating the code. The teacher then went on to say the book was misleading “because it does not take into account how Shane might feel later in life about being infertile. This book makes very serious medical interventions seem like an easy cure for emotional and psychological distress.” At that point, Piatkowski told her he was “ending the presentation.” The widely used “affirmation” approach to children who identify as transgender has raised some concerns in several countries, and not just among obvious critics. Two leading psychologists in the transgender medical community, one of them a trans woman, complained in a recent article about sloppy and dangerous assessment of young people presenting as trans, with overly hasty resort to hormones. Pam Buffone, whose parents group Canadian Gender Report highlights similar issues, said Burjoski raised legitimate questions about the appropriateness of school materials, as places like Finland restrict the use of puberty blockers and cross-sex hormones. “If there’s a reason to hide this discussion from public scrutiny, then there’s really something wrong,” she said.
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  15. The claim that 150,000 Indigenous children were forced to attend residential schools between 1883 and 1997 now routinely appears in the media, embellished by descriptions such as children “forcibly removed from their families” or “ripped from their parents’ arms.” Cree artist Kent Monkman depicted this fiction in his painting “The Scream” showing priests, nuns, and Mounties grabbing little Indian children from their terrified mothers. But how true are these incendiary claims? At best misleading, and at worst, false. If “forced to attend school” simply means compulsory school attendance that applies to all children, then the claim is misleading. School attendance, or its equivalent in homeschooling, is required of all Canadian children, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, as it is of children in all modern societies. Indeed, school attendance was not even required of Indian children until 1920, when an amendment to the Indian Act made them subject to the same compulsory attendance as all others had been. However, prior to 1920 Catholic and Protestant residential schools had operated in one form or another for more than half a century. Indigenous children attended those schools because their parents wanted them to attend. Education was seen as a benefit. Even after 1920, enforcement of attendance for Indian children was weak. As late as 1944, records show that upwards of 40% of Indian children went to no school at all. Typically, Indian parents who wanted their child to attend a residential school filled out an application which was forwarded to Ottawa for approval. Not all applications were accepted, as there was insufficient capacity for all children wishing to attend. In a similar vein, dissatisfied parents sometimes withdrew their children from the school. In 1922, for example, all parents in the community withdrew their children from the residential school at Kitimat and refused to allow them to return until the principal signed a paper affirming that the children would be “properly fed.” Children who were “forced to attend” were mainly child welfare cases. From 1920 to the 1960s, the main option for Indian children from orphaned or troubled homes who could not be taken in by extended family was an Indian agent’s discretionary placement of a child in a residential school. And increasingly, from the 1940s until the mid 1960s, Indian agents took children out of homes that the agent deemed to be inadequate or dangerous and placed them in residential schools. For example, the 1967 Caldwell Report notes that in some Saskatchewan residential schools as many as 80% of the students were there primarily for child welfare reasons. Those neglected children were indeed forcibly removed from their parents, just as some children today, both Indigenous and other, are removed from inadequate parenting for their own safety. But most Indian parents did not have those problems. They simply wanted their children to have the same education that other children received to help prepare them for modern life. Joe and Balazee Highway were an example of such parents. They lived on a northern Cree reserve, where poverty and death were far too common, and they knew that education offered the best chance for their children to escape that fate. They loaded their children onto a silver Norseman floatplane and sent them south to the Guy Hill Residential School, near The Pas, Manitoba. Nine years later their son—acclaimed playwright and writer Tomson Highway—graduated at the top of his class. In his new book Perpetual Astonishment (reviewed here by lawyer Peter Best,) Highway described the time he spent at residential school as “nine of the best years of my life.” As we know, not every student who entered a residential school had such a positive experience. There were negative experiences as well. But the positive experiences, like those of Tomson Highway, must be remembered if we are to have a balanced historical portrait. The picture of 150,000 students being “forced to attend” and “forcibly removed from their parents” is simply not accurate. Kent Monkman’s painting is a work of mythic imagination, and should not be mistaken for history. Brian Giesbrecht is a retired judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba. Tom Flanagan is professor emeritus of political science at the University of Calgary.
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  16. Trudeau’s vaccine mandate for truckers will be a disaster
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  17. ...and a Dash 8 of all aircraft!
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  18. Which of you has this bedroom?
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  19. Will the Russians care about the sanctions. They would of course turn off the natural gas to Europe etc. Russia is facing ‘severe’ sanctions for Ukraine threats. Here’s what that could mean By Karin Strohecker and Andrey Ostroukh Reuters Posted January 20, 2022 11:41 am Growing tensions between Moscow and Western powers have raised the prospect of new sanctions being imposed on Russia, possibly the most severe yet, if it attacks neighboring Ukraine. U.S. Senate Democrats have unveiled a bill to impose sweeping sanctions on the Russian government and military officials – including President Vladimir Putin – as well as Russian banking institutions if Moscow engages in hostilities against Ukraine. “If Russia is using its conventional military to acquire land in Ukraine, that will meet a severe economic response,” a senior White House official said on Wednesday. Russia has massed tens of thousands of troops near Ukraine’s borders in what Kyiv and its allies fear could be preparation for a new military offensive. Russia, which denies planning to attack Ukraine, has been subject to sanctions since its 2014 annexation of Crimea from its neighbor. Further punitive measures were added after a former Russian spy was poisoned in Britain in 2018 and following an investigation into alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election won by Donald Trump. Russia has denied any role in the poisoning of ex-spy Yuri Skripal and his daughter, and denies trying to interfere in foreign elections. Here are some ways financial sanctions could target Russia. Sanctions could target semiconductor chips The White House has told the U.S. chip industry to be prepared for new restrictions on exports to Russia if Moscow attacks Ukraine, sources said. This includes potentially blocking the country’s access to global electronics supplies. Similar measures were deployed during the Cold War, when the United States and other Western nations maintained severe technology sanctions on the Soviet Union, keeping it technologically backward and crimping growth. Sanctions could hit Russia's big banks, assets The United States and the European Union already have sanctions on Russia’s energy, financial and defense sectors. The White House is floating the idea of curbs on Russia’s biggest banks and has previously mooted measures targeting Moscow’s ability to convert roubles into dollars and other currencies. Washington could also target the state-backed Russian Direct Investment Fund. 2:09Questions remain over how much more Canada’s military can help Ukraine Questions remain over how much more Canada’s military can help Ukraine Sanctions applied to individual firms often cause sector-wide pain, according to former U.S. State Department economist Mark Stone, as they make investors worry that the curbs will be widened or that they will be unable to differentiate. “Sanctioning all transactions with Russian banks and freezing assets would be more impactful and more targeted” than a cut-off from the SWIFT global messaging system, said Brian O’Toole, a fellow at the Atlantic Council think tank. Targeting Russia’s access to SWIFT, which is widely used in international financial transactions, would become useful really only following broad financial sanctions by the United States, Britain and the European Union, O’Toole said. Sanctions could zero in on individuals with bans, freezes Sanctioning individuals via asset freezes and travel bans is a commonly used tool and can sometimes resonate widely. Britain imposed sanctions in April 2021 on 14 Russians under a new law giving the UK government the power to penalize those it says are credibly involved in the most serious corruption abroad.
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  20. The following article will of course raise the question re why the prices are so high and why can we not get reduced prices. 1. As the title of this thread states, you don't want our oil so why the hell would you expect to reap it's benefits? However all Canadians will share some of the benefits due to the increased federal tax revenue. 2. As a Province we may achieve a balanced budget from this new money and then be able to afford more benefits and jobs for our citizens, along with those who commute here from other provinces to work. (win / win) for all. 3. Re the cost, that is of course based on the world market. At the retail end, it varies greatly from Province to Province, City to City.
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  21. Rex is asking questions that he knows will go unanswered. https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-why-is-it-canadas-duty-to-destroy-its-economy-and-confederation-in-the-pursuit-of-net-zero There's a simpler question here too, when asked, it shuts down all conversation and debate on the subject. It even silences politicians of all stripes and does it on all occasions. Here it is: What cuts are you willing to make and what are you willing to do without? Your answer must add up to the amount of carbon we need to shed? Can we have more than one quote of the day contender? This could easily apply to virtually every problem we currently insist on making worse. There is only one reason I religiously wear a mask in public... it's so I don't have to talk to Karen. The greatest part of that absurdity is how easily all bend to it, all speak the pious words of “net zero” as if they were summoning a genie, as our deluded leaders prate in foreign capitals about the brave new world they are about to call into being. The same leaders who can’t manage a payroll system, dig a few wells and provide clean water, who shut down Parliament but party abroad with maskless faces laughing at jokes — of which I suspect we are the butt. They do not have the intellectual competence to engineer this “transition.” As a minority government they do not have the mandate either.
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  22. Quote of the day award: When asked about the life-threatening situations that Ontarians are facing due to cancelled surgeries, a Ministry of Health spokesperson said "we know this difficult decision can be distressing for people requiring hospital care."
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  23. Cathay Pacific Is On Life Support, and Hope Is Running Out Hong Kong’s unofficial flag carrier lacks the attributes that have helped other airlines weather the pandemic. All dressed up and nowhere to go. Photographer: Kyle Lam/Bloomberg By David Fickling January 18, 2022, 3:00 PM MST Listen to this article 5:36 Share this article David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian. @davidfickling + Get alerts for David Fickling In this article 293 CATHAY PAC AIR 6.42 HKD -0.04-0.62% 753 AIR CHINA LTD-H 5.84 HKD +0.00+0.00% RYA RYANAIR HLDGS 16.22 EUR -0.18-1.10% SIA SINGAPORE AIRLIN 5.07 SGD +0.02+0.40% 1055 CHINA SOUTHERN-H 4.97 HKD -0.15-2.93% Open Is any airline on the planet in a more impossible situation right now than Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd.? The carriers that have coped best during the pandemic have two qualities in common. They either have a substantial domestic or quasi-domestic market, such as Interglobe Aviation Ltd., Spring Airlines Co. or Ryanair Holdings Plc; a reliable government shareholder, like Singapore Airlines Ltd. or Emirates; or, ideally, both, like China’s big three airlines Air China Ltd., China Southern Airlines Co. and China Eastern Airlines Corp. Hong Kong’s unofficial flag carrier has neither. A pandemic that shuttered international travel was always going to be tough for an airline that crosses a border every time it flies. Still, rivals have been slowly getting back on their feet. Singapore Air was running at 37% of pre-Covid capacity in November before climbing to 45% the following month, buoyed by a government determined to return the city to its status as a global hub. Cathay was at just 12% of pre-pandemic levels in November — and the border rules have since been tightened. On Jan. 8, all flights from several of Cathay’s biggest markets — including Australia, Canada, the Philippines, the U.K. and U.S. — were suspended for a month. A week later, even transit flights — one of the few areas where Cathay was able to operate, given Hong Kong’s zero-Covid strategy involves a three-week quarantine — were suspended to a list of 150 countries, leaving the city almost cut off from air traffic: Cathay is a relatively rare example of a full-service airline that’s never been nationalized, but it’s always been able to count on an attitude of benign neglect. When Qantas Airways Ltd. tried to set up a budget carrier in the city in 2013, Cathay blocked it in the courts. When it funded trips to Europe for members of Hong Kong’s legislature amid that lobbying effort, the city’s future Chief Executive Carrie Lam said no rules had been broken. She’s now far less indulgent, promising this month to take legal action against the airline after outbreaks of the omicron variant were traced back to members of its crew who’d been allowed to skip quarantine protocols. The former flight attendants were arrested Monday and released on bail. Once upon a time, Cathay Pacific was treasured as a cherished part of Hong Kong’s unique identity as a laissez-faire center of free speech and free markets. With that identity itself now seen as a threat to Beijing, the airline has about as much value to the territory’s government as Lennon Walls, Tiananmen Square memorials and muckraking media tycoons. If there’s one aspect of Hong Kong that hasn’t changed, it’s that big money often speaks most freely. While Cathay Pacific’s shares have barely responded to the change in conditions, the airline’s 4.875% notes due in 2026 have been slumping, from 99.1 cents on the dollar on Jan. 5 to 93.9 cents now. That shift arises from a growing recognition that Hong Kong's one major favor to Cathay Pacific turned out to be a poisoned chalice. That the airline is operating at all right now is largely down to the HK$40.95 billion ($5.3 billion) bailout it received in 2020. Generous terms mean that the interest-like dividends on the HK$19.5 billion of preference shares at the heart of that package don’t even have to be paid until conditions improve. The sums owed are quietly accruing, though, and the interest rate will start ramping up in August 2023, from 3% currently to 9% by 2026. If Cathay keeps deferring preference dividends and adding them to its sum of debt, the annual interest bill alone on the prefs will top HK$2 billion by the middle of 2025 — roughly equivalent to its average net income in the last five pre-pandemic years. Those obligations will rank ahead of any dividends Cathay could hope to pay to its ordinary shareholders — and it’s also going to have to start paying down the principal, too. Cathay Pacific’s only hope to avoid its prefs turning into an ever-growing money pit is to see earnings spring back at lightning speed. But even a return to something resembling normal when international traffic gets back to pre-Covid levels around 2024 seems optimistic. With Hong Kong turning ever more into a hermit city indistinguishable from the authoritarian mainland of China, the business-class travelers who’ve helped make flights turn a profit are quitting for more welcoming locations. What future does Cathay Pacific have in that situation? It seems impossible that it will ever pay off its debt to the government. The most likely option is that a weakened airline finally falls into the arms of state-controlled Air China, which could turn it into a premium carrier and use it to extend its own cargo operations.
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  24. I've been thinking about this for a while now. Consider the notion of some (yet to be identified) problem which serves to eliminate vaccinated blood from the blood supply. Or maybe it would only apply to a small (but important) segment of the population, say pregnant women, infants, or those with severe allergies etc. Would the people in question then support the idea of capturing purebloods and holding them in internment camps to ensure continued access to the blood supplies they need? Or, after being abused, segregated and imprisoned, would the magnanimous purebloods forgive, forget and willing submit to having their blood harvested. Once you cross the first threshold, the rest of it gets easier. Maybe I should write the screen play for" Pureblood" eh? In the mean time, Ordinary Men should be compulsory reeding.
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  25. Would probably be a huge improvement in intelligence
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  26. Add to this..Propane…25% jump in one month from Dec to Jan
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  27. https://www.wsj.com/articles/ev-electric-car-battery-charge-hypermiler-11642517385?mod=Searchresults_pos1&page=1
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  28. https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/health-canada-approves-pfizer-anti-viral-pill-for-treatment-of-covid-19 The irony here is superb. The very company that makes leaky vaccines now makes pills to defeat the virus its vaccine was designed to defeat in the first place. And just imagine what JT would have to say about a Conservative government that refused to disclose those costs. Something about tyranny, Nazis, and lying to Canadians I bet. Anyway, maybe more charter violations will prove effective... if you find yourself in Quebec after 2200LT just remember, no meowing outside.
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  29. And in other news, the NCAA Board of Governors has contracted a 10 year old to provide long overdue perspective on women sports: Trans women athletes hold competitive edge, even after testosterone suppression, scientists say NCAA board of governors to review transgender athlete policy this week, spokesperson says
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  30. LOL, maybe they're too busy writing a piece about the 300 million dollars we spent on field/mobile respiratory hospitals. As I recall 15 (or so) were ordered but only about 4 were ever built... none of them ever got used. Then again, It was a single source contract to SNC... so maybe not. Calling out the military had a nice ring to it too, maybe they could cover that eh? People thought hundreds of critical care nurses were about to HALO into the parking lot of their local hospital. There were 8. That's 8 total BTW, not 8 per drop.
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  31. Anybody want a fixer up’er?? …tug/mooring/island not included. Key words in listing……”1913” and “aground”. https://www.boatdealers.ca/boats-for-sale/457375/1913-106-x-21-historic-houseboat-project-boat-rockport-ontario
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  32. All I have to say to that is "MEOW"
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  33. How’s that workin out for ya Joe ? https://publish.twitter.com/?query=https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2Fjohnschreiber%2Fstatus%2F1481770817767698435&widget=Tweet
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  34. What is interesting is that climate wise and frost levels are almost the same as in Canada in Germany. The difference is that the foundation under the road is almost 3 times deeper and of different materials than we use here in Canada. Our roads are 5 year roads where in Germany they are 25+ year roads. There is no money in longevity. Also the driver training and awareness over there is FAR superior to what one gets here and there is no sense of entitlement on the highway. and "Autobahn" style highway would never work over here. Especially in Ontario
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  35. When the cover doesn’t match the book.
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  36. Here is the real reason the oceans are warming and becoming more acidic: https://www.cnn.com/asia/live-news/tonga-tsunami-warning-volcano-eruption/h_7b4aeb43e652d1ec18407f5a3ed69199 Every year, there are a dozen or more similar eruptions that are much deeper and aren't as apparent on the surface as was this one.
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  37. I know, there is always someone who want to up the ante but, the required test in Maui was $US 180. We were triple vaccinated and aware before we left that it was a bit of a risk when you enter the US with a relatively simple test and have to take a much more sensitive one to come back, getting stuck there in quarantine would have been a very unwelcome bill. I realize no one forced us to go and jurisdictions set their own standards so Caveat Emptor I guess, just as long as the rules are available, understandable and can be relied upon.
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  38. Compared to….I consider myself a Fiscal Conservative with an interest in conserving traditional values. If that’s far right…I wear that badge proudly. At least I know what I stand for.
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  39. Case in point. There is lots of this going on... lots of it. Even within my little circle I know of several cases; one has already died. A cynical tinfoil hat guy might say "look at the reporting." Instead of this case being the predictable result of predictable systemic deficiencies, it can be weaponized and redirected toward the villains I mentioned above. Individual cases are showcased because they help focus opinion. Overall trends of large proportion can then be ignored because they focus opinion (and inquiry) at the very issue you seek to avoid having subjected to scrutiny. It's a subtle form of STRATCOM and it needs to be managed carefully. A tearful JT can now be expected to use this case in a daily briefing to vilify those Trump loving anti-vaxxers. This kind of evil (and I can't think of another word for it) thinks nothing of harnessing personal tragedy, weaponizing it, and redirecting it for diversionary purposes or in support of short term political gain. A little serves his purpose, a lot works against it. The obvious counter to my observation is that even pointing it out stands as proof that I'm insensitive to the tragedy unfolding for this person and their family. Nothing could be further from the truth and he damn well knows it even as he's saying it.
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  40. This is what happens when you listen to the lefties. We have one posting right on this forum. Is is bad enough when there are economic consequences, here is an article about the victims of crime due to them. Adam Zivo: In the U.S., champagne socialists pursue soft-on-crime policies at the expense of vulnerable communities Adam Zivo 22 hrs ago Being soft on crime is fashionable among champagne socialists. Within their circles, there are few easier ways to win social clout than to declare that the police ought to be literally abolished, or to rhapsodize that what criminals need, more than anything else, is more leniency and understanding. Conversely, the idea that policing might make communities safer, or that criminals bear some personal responsibility for their actions, is treated like blasphemy. %7B This softhearted approach, which in practice prioritizes the interests of criminals over victims, would be unobjectionable if it demonstrably led to better outcomes for vulnerable communities. However, when these beliefs are put into practice, they predictably result in more crime and violence — harms that low-income communities bear the brunt of. This was brutally illustrated in San Francisco last year. After the city redirected US$120 million ($151 million) away from its law-enforcement budget in 2020, it was swept by an unprecedented epidemic of violent crime. Crime became so unbearable that San Francisco Mayor London Breed, a Democrat, made a volte-face last month and launched a police crackdown. She acknowledged that aggressive law enforcement may “make a lot of people uncomfortable,” but that cops need to get tough on “all the bulls–t that has destroyed our city.” San Francisco’s experiences are mirrored by a number of other liberal cities in the United States, including New York and Baltimore, which recently have also pivoted away from defunding the police. If these cities had listened to low-income communities to begin with, this course-correction could have been avoided. A 2020 YouGov poll , conducted just weeks after the George Floyd protests erupted, found that a clear majority of low-income respondents (78 per cent) opposed abolishing the police, with 63 per cent of respondents preferring to reform existing systems. In contrast, those making over $100,000 were 50 per cent more likely to prefer abolition compared to lower income groups. Examining policing from a racial lens yields similar results. A 2020 Gallup poll found that 81 per cent of Black respondents did not want less policing in their neighbourhoods. Yet it turns out that when it comes to making the world a safer place for the marginalized, politicians prefer to listen to vocal, well-off activists who are alienated from the interests, beliefs and values of the very communities they’re ostensibly advocating for. It’s not hard to understand why marginalized communities consistently show high levels of pro-policing sentiments. Economic vulnerability begets vulnerability to crime. Those who have visceral concerns about being robbed, assaulted or raped are less prone to clasp hands with their would-be assailants and sing “Kumbaya.” The costs of bleeding-heart utopianism may not be felt on Twitter or in university seminar rooms, but they are nonetheless real. Nor is this pro-policing sentiment anything new. Former U.S. president Bill Clinton’s 1994 crime bill, which led to more punitive policing methods, is decried by contemporary progressive activists as an example of irredeemable racism. Yet the bill was largely supported by Black lawmakers at the time — including a coalition of African-American mayors who governed large cities such as Detroit, Atlanta and Cleveland. This shouldn’t imply that low-income and racialized communities are uncritical of the police. Distrust of the police remains high, because the country has a long history of racism that has eroded institutional credibility. Rather, support tends to conceptualize policing as a public service that is being inadequately provided and, as such, should be improved rather than eliminated. You would never guess any of this if you listened to a champagne socialist, though. Within their bubbles, it’s axiomatic that law enforcement is inherently unjust and should probably be abolished. But why does this belief persist, despite its unpopularity with the very constituencies it’s meant to help? Perhaps it’s because there is a kernel of truth to what they believe. Yes, there is injustice in law enforcement. And yes, to some extent, crime is symptomatic of structural inequities — people are shaped by the opportunities available to them, or lack thereof. Some sympathy ought to be given to those who were thrust into lives of crime by forces outside their control. Yet these are not the only factors at play. Sympathy for criminals must be balanced with sympathy for victims. To ignore the impacts of crime is to consign entire communities to violence and harassment. Champagne socialists ignore this because their privilege blinds them to the realities of crime. Cloistered in safe neighbourhoods, they rarely feel the costs of their own radical politics. Those costs are, conveniently, offloaded to the poor. Champagne socialists tend to be hyper-sensitive to privilege, so it’s fair to ask why they have this particular blind spot. Perhaps the answer lies in “ luxury beliefs .” Coined in 2019, the term refers to beliefs that upper-class individuals use to signify social status — the ideological equivalent of a fur coat. Being soft on crime has all the hallmarks of a good luxury belief. It imbues people with an air of moral righteousness and social benevolence, while imposing no real costs on their lives. It evokes the aesthetics of war and of resistance against occupation, which helps champagne socialists role play as the revolutionaries they so desperately want to be. Being soft on crime is a way for indolent champagne socialists to feel consequential and morally whole. The fact that the poor reject these politics is irrelevant — in the end, what matters is the navel-gazing vanity of well-off activists
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