Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/29/2021 in all areas

  1. Whenever I observe resistance to wearing masks, (admittedly, a PITA, but...), self-isolation and vaccination being expressed as a limit on one's personal freedom, I am puzzled. Facts: It is a scientific fact that the currently-available, western vaccinations work with unexpected efficacy; Long-term, broad data establishes the fact that without vaccination, one is at risk of serious illness, hospitalization and death; The same data establishes that, with rare exceptions, vaccinated people will not require hospitalization and will not die; Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated can carry & transmit covid-19 Delta, through virus-loaded nasal passages. The claim of broad, public "confusion" when the CDC issues advice as reason for complaint and resistance is, in my view, a red-herring and just plain, bad thinking. I say this because eighteen months ago, nothing was known about covid-19. That's why it was/is called a "Novel" Coronavirus. So new information is being discovered all the time, as the Delta variant continues to teach us, harshly, it appears, leading to "new" advice from healthcare leaders and providers. It is puzzling to me that the introduction of new knowledge regarding Delta etc., is greeted with frustration, even anger. That response, while understandable is a real puzzle because it is misplaced. It is as though, having discovered the design-fault with the B737MAX, our frustration & anger is somehow touted as a "solution" when in fact, analyzing the design, determining solutions then fixing the problem is what will keep people alive. I would have thought that such discoveries and facts are being made, very swiftly, would be greeted positively because it would mean that we are closer to defeating this terrible scourge. Our healthcare leaders are telling us there IS a way to stay alive in the face of the Delta variant. How can one reasonably be angry with that? After all, if for example, one's cancer treatment wasn't working out as expected and one became aware of new information and new medicines regarding a "miraculous" treatment that really did work which prevented both hospitalization and one's death, wouldn't one want it? Wouldn't one welcome the news and gladly adapt to the changes that could cure one? It is not the CDC (or other agencies) that have changed; it is the science and the virus that has changed. I think this is a reasonable comparison and approach to hesitancy. Unfortunately, because public and private entities can't survive lockdowns forever nor can they accept the high risks of swift infections for all, from unvaccinated people and they are forced into what is mistakenly labelled "discrimination" which is a pejorative political term, not a healthcare term.* So I'm puzzled by the broad, political response and the unfortunate endurance of conspiracies that masking mandates as somehow a "loss of one's freedom", when the greatest loss of all freedom is one's death, and the way to keep one's freedom in the face of such a certain threat, is vaccination. *added: Seattle area employers rethink the rules on masking, vaccines as pandemic takes a new turn.
    5 points
  2. This is turning into a circus of the absurd, Talk about crap in motion......
    2 points
  3. Note the date on the following story re a fatigue problem at WestJet. So is this old news being given a 2nd life or>>>> ????? Concern over sleepy pilots Nicholas Johansen - Mar 8, 2016 / 10:21 am | Story: 160246 Photo: The Canadian Press Most travellers hold a well-rested pilot high on their list of wants when it comes to choosing an airline. But, pilots at WestJet suggest that's not always the reality. An internal report shows a high level of frustration among many of the company’s pilots over the heavy scheduling they face. A former WestJet pilot, Rob Scratch Mitchell, told CTV fatigue was one of the reasons he quit. He even said he has fallen asleep in the air. “There have been a few times I’ve woken up and I’ve seen the other pilot nodding off as well. That’s probably something people aren’t comfortable to hear,” Mitchell said. “We’re stretching our crews to the edge of safety.” Some in the report blame the issue on WestJet looking to cut costs and increase efficiency. “Fatigue is not a free fix,” said one unnamed participant in the report. “They know how to fix it, but it’s all about cost. And they don’t want to spend the money.” A total of 94 participants, from nine pilot groups in Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver, were involved in the report. All the groups had concerns about fatigue. “Participants were passionate and overwhelmingly negative with regards to increasingly difficult schedules and related fatigue issues,” the report reads. “Many pilots believe that the increased focus on delivering value to the shareholder has been made at a significant cost to morale, culture, and trust.” A WestJet spokesperson told CTV the airline is trying to address the issues. “A significant amount of work had already been done prior to these focus groups, and several changes have been implemented since, with more to come,” the spokesperson said in an email. “It is also important to note that all of our pilots are scheduled not only within regulatory requirements laid out by Transport Canada, but in accordance with our pilot agreements and, most importantly, through changes implemented in accordance with our fatigue risk management system.” Transport Canada currently allows pilots to work 14-hour shifts. Last year, the agency announced it was looking to update its rules, and reduce the limit to between nine and 13 hours, but it postponed the change. “Countries such as Morocco, Bangladesh, India all have flight and duty time regulations that are a lot more strict,” said Capt. Dan Adamus of the Airline Pilots' Association.
    2 points
  4. Meanwhile... BREAKING: Canada is officially the world leader in fully vaccinated. major kudos to all the community/frontline workers who made this happen at a rate that’s peerless.
    2 points
  5. Good Afternoon All: As if we didn't have enough on the Delta VoC cue the potential Lambda VoC. Explainer: What is the Lambda coronavirus variant? | Coronavirus pandemic News | Al Jazeera Explainer: What is the Lambda coronavirus variant? The Lambda variant has spread to 28 countries but it is not considered a variant of concern. Here’s what we know so far. By Elizabeth Melimopoulos 27 Jul 2021 Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, the virus that causes the disease, SARS-CoV-2, has mutated multiple times, with some strains being more infectious and deadlier than others. Currently, the World Health Organization (WHO) has classified four of those mutations as variants of concern: Alpha, Beta, Gamma and Delta. Four others – Eta, Iota, Kappa and Lambda – have been designated as variants of interest, and in recent weeks the rapid spread of the Lambda strain, first detected in Peru, has caught the attention of various experts. Lambda is currently the dominant variant in the Andean nation, which has the highest per capita coronavirus death rate in the world, while it has also spread to at least 28 other countries including Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and the United Kingdom. Here is what we know so far: Where and when was it first detected? The Lambda variant was first detected in Peru last December. It is a variation of the novel coronavirus that was first recorded in the country in August 2020. The exact origins of the Lambda variant, which was previously known as the Andean strain, remain unclear, but scientists say it first emerged in South America. Over the last three months, Lambda has grown to represent 80 percent of all cases in Peru, according to the country’s National Institute of Health. “When we found it, it did not attract much attention,” said Pablo Tsukayama, a doctor in molecular microbiology at Cayetano Heredia University in Lima and one of the people who documented Lambda’s emergence. “But we continued processing samples, and by March, it was in 50 percent of the samples in Lima. By April, it was in 80 percent of the samples in Peru,” Tsukayama told Al Jazeera. “That jump from one to 50 percent is an early indicator of a more transmissible variant,” he added. According to Tsukayama, the Lambda strain did not initially cause alarm because new strains are common in places with high infection rates. Latin America and the Caribbean, while home to eight percent of the global population, account for 20 percent of the world’s COVID cases, according to a June 24 report by the US-based Congressional Research Service. Where has it spread? According to data from the Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAID), a platform onto which countries upload their COVID-19 viral sequences, the Lambda strain has already reached 28 countries. That includes Brazil, Spain, the Netherlands, Aruba, Belgium, France, Portugal and the United States. What are the strain’s characteristics? Recent research on the Lambda strain has registered several mutations in its spike protein, the part of the virus that makes contact with human cells, binds to them, and then infects them. The mutation observed in the spike protein might be the reason for its “increased transmissibility… and it could provide a reduction of protection by current vaccines”, according to a study released in July by a team from New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine and released on the medical website bioRxiv ahead of peer review. According to virologist Ricardo Soto-Rifo of the University of Chile’s Institute of Biomedical Sciences, one of the mutations labelled as L452Q was similar to a mutation also shown in the Delta variant that is believed to have contributed to that strain’s high rate of infection. But Soto-Rifo cautioned that the real effect of the mutations remains unclear. “However we cannot tell yet what the real impact of these mutations are, since it’s a strain that has shown primarily in South America, and that puts us at a disadvantage, as we don’t have all the resources to execute the needed research,” he said. Are vaccines effective against Lambda? With a team of scientists, Soto-Rifo carried out preliminary studies – not yet peer-reviewed – assessing the effect of the Chinese-developed CoronaVac vaccine on the Lambda strain. The results showed that Lambda was able to neutralise the antibodies generated by the vaccine. Soto-Rifo said part of the vaccine efficacy can be measured by the immunisation response, but also by the responses of T-cells, which stimulate antibody production and help combat the virus-infected cells. “These results were expected,” Soto-Rifo said. “The virus has changed and that can make the vaccine not as efficient as it was with the original virus, but that doesn’t mean the vaccine doesn’t work any more. “As a matter of fact, we also know that CoronaVac still has a good percentage of protection against the virus.”Play Video Should we be concerned? Not yet, said Dr Roselyn Lemus-Martin, who holds a PhD in molecular and cell biology from the University of Oxford and is based in the US. “At the beginning, we were really concerned… We thought that due to its characteristics, Lambda could become more transmissible than Delta,” Lemus-Martin told Al Jazeera. “But right now, in the US, for example, we’ve seen that Delta keeps being the dominant strain, and what we’ve noticed is that Lambda is not spreading as quickly [in other areas].” But Tsukayama at Cayetano Heredia University in Lima remains cautious. He said Peru’s research capacity to measure the effect of Lambda is limited, which makes it harder to evaluate the variant’s spread. “Gamma showed up in Brazil and expanded throughout the region, and it’s already considered a variant of concern,” he said. “Lambda shares many of the characteristics of Gamma, and it has also spread in other countries. What we don’t have yet is the same amount of evidence Brazilians did. In the region, Brazil leads in their research capacity.” Where has it spread? According to data from the Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAID), a platform onto which countries upload their COVID-19 viral sequences, the Lambda strain has already reached 28 countries. That includes Brazil, Spain, the Netherlands, Aruba, Belgium, France, Portugal and the United States. What are the strain’s characteristics? Recent research on the Lambda strain has registered several mutations in its spike protein, the part of the virus that makes contact with human cells, binds to them, and then infects them. The mutation observed in the spike protein might be the reason for its “increased transmissibility… and it could provide a reduction of protection by current vaccines”, according to a study released in July by a team from New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine and released on the medical website bioRxiv ahead of peer review. According to virologist Ricardo Soto-Rifo of the University of Chile’s Institute of Biomedical Sciences, one of the mutations labelled as L452Q was similar to a mutation also shown in the Delta variant that is believed to have contributed to that strain’s high rate of infection. But Soto-Rifo cautioned that the real effect of the mutations remains unclear. “However we cannot tell yet what the real impact of these mutations are, since it’s a strain that has shown primarily in South America, and that puts us at a disadvantage, as we don’t have all the resources to execute the needed research,” he said. Are vaccines effective against Lambda? With a team of scientists, Soto-Rifo carried out preliminary studies – not yet peer-reviewed – assessing the effect of the Chinese-developed CoronaVac vaccine on the Lambda strain. The results showed that Lambda was able to neutralise the antibodies generated by the vaccine. Soto-Rifo said part of the vaccine efficacy can be measured by the immunisation response, but also by the responses of T-cells, which stimulate antibody production and help combat the virus-infected cells. “These results were expected,” Soto-Rifo said. “The virus has changed and that can make the vaccine not as efficient as it was with the original virus, but that doesn’t mean the vaccine doesn’t work any more. “As a matter of fact, we also know that CoronaVac still has a good percentage of protection against the virus.”Play Video Should we be concerned? Not yet, said Dr Roselyn Lemus-Martin, who holds a PhD in molecular and cell biology from the University of Oxford and is based in the US. “At the beginning, we were really concerned… We thought that due to its characteristics, Lambda could become more transmissible than Delta,” Lemus-Martin told Al Jazeera. “But right now, in the US, for example, we’ve seen that Delta keeps being the dominant strain, and what we’ve noticed is that Lambda is not spreading as quickly [in other areas].” But Tsukayama at Cayetano Heredia University in Lima remains cautious. He said Peru’s research capacity to measure the effect of Lambda is limited, which makes it harder to evaluate the variant’s spread. “Gamma showed up in Brazil and expanded throughout the region, and it’s already considered a variant of concern,” he said. “Lambda shares many of the characteristics of Gamma, and it has also spread in other countries. What we don’t have yet is the same amount of evidence Brazilians did. In the region, Brazil leads in their research capacity.” What are the strain’s characteristics? Recent research on the Lambda strain has registered several mutations in its spike protein, the part of the virus that makes contact with human cells, binds to them, and then infects them. The mutation observed in the spike protein might be the reason for its “increased transmissibility… and it could provide a reduction of protection by current vaccines”, according to a study released in July by a team from New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine and released on the medical website bioRxiv ahead of peer review. According to virologist Ricardo Soto-Rifo of the University of Chile’s Institute of Biomedical Sciences, one of the mutations labelled as L452Q was similar to a mutation also shown in the Delta variant that is believed to have contributed to that strain’s high rate of infection. But Soto-Rifo cautioned that the real effect of the mutations remains unclear. “However we cannot tell yet what the real impact of these mutations are, since it’s a strain that has shown primarily in South America, and that puts us at a disadvantage, as we don’t have all the resources to execute the needed research,” he said. Are vaccines effective against Lambda? With a team of scientists, Soto-Rifo carried out preliminary studies – not yet peer-reviewed – assessing the effect of the Chinese-developed CoronaVac vaccine on the Lambda strain. The results showed that Lambda was able to neutralise the antibodies generated by the vaccine. Soto-Rifo said part of the vaccine efficacy can be measured by the immunisation response, but also by the responses of T-cells, which stimulate antibody production and help combat the virus-infected cells. “These results were expected,” Soto-Rifo said. “The virus has changed and that can make the vaccine not as efficient as it was with the original virus, but that doesn’t mean the vaccine doesn’t work any more. “As a matter of fact, we also know that CoronaVac still has a good percentage of protection against the virus.” Should we be concerned? Not yet, said Dr Roselyn Lemus-Martin, who holds a PhD in molecular and cell biology from the University of Oxford and is based in the US. “At the beginning, we were really concerned… We thought that due to its characteristics, Lambda could become more transmissible than Delta,” Lemus-Martin told Al Jazeera. “But right now, in the US, for example, we’ve seen that Delta keeps being the dominant strain, and what we’ve noticed is that Lambda is not spreading as quickly [in other areas].” But Tsukayama at Cayetano Heredia University in Lima remains cautious. He said Peru’s research capacity to measure the effect of Lambda is limited, which makes it harder to evaluate the variant’s spread. “Gamma showed up in Brazil and expanded throughout the region, and it’s already considered a variant of concern,” he said. “Lambda shares many of the characteristics of Gamma, and it has also spread in other countries. What we don’t have yet is the same amount of evidence Brazilians did. In the region, Brazil leads in their research capacity.”
    2 points
  6. Good Morning All: From the Washington Post about a phone call between the former President Trump and Assistant Attorney General Rosen. I am most certain the arbitrators of history will have the final story of this but from one reader the following personal perspective " Virtually everything that can be said about tRump has been said. Not that it will ever happen, but he needs to step back and take stock of his life. You don't live your life by promoting fear, having no morality, empathy, compassion, etc. His inflated ego has made him a shell of a human being with nothing to offer but vitriol and raging tantrums. He makes accusations that others are nasty to him - perhaps a good long look in a mirror would be appropriate to reflect his shortcomings. He should have used some of his "executive" time for self assessment in addition to learning about the US government. No wonder some have turned on him as he has no loyalty whatsoever to anyone other than himself and the almighty dollar. We are tired of his tantrums, lies, grifting, and attempts to regain power through any means available. We are so tired of him. He needs to fade into the abyss of ignominy". Donoghue notes show Trump pressing Rosen, Justice on election-fraud claims - The Washington Post Trump to acting AG, according to aide’s notes: ‘Just say the election was corrupt + leave the rest to me’ By Devlin Barrett and Josh Dawsey Yesterday at 6:12 p.m. EDT 6.2k President Donald Trump pressed senior Justice Department officials in late 2020 to “just say the election was corrupt [and] leave the rest to me” and Republican lawmakers, according to stunning handwritten notes that illustrate how far the president was willing to go to prevent Joe Biden from taking office. The notes, taken by Justice Department official Richard Donoghue, were released to Congress this week and made public Friday — further evidence of the personal pressure campaign Trump waged as he sought to stay in the White House. In one Dec. 27 conversation, according to the written account, acting attorney general Jeffrey Rosen told Trump that the Justice Department “can’t + won’t snap its fingers + change the outcome of the election.” The president replied that he understood but wanted the agency to “just say the election was corrupt + leave the rest to me and the R. Congressmen,” according to the notes written by Donoghue, a participant in the discussion. The Washington Post first revealed the existence of the notes and the phone calls Wednesday. How Ashli Babbitt went from Capitol rioter to Trump-embraced ‘martyr’ The documents show the extent to which senior Justice Department officials “were on a knife’s edge” in late 2020 as Trump sought to prevent Biden from becoming president, said David Laufman, a former senior Justice Department official. “These notes reveal that a sitting president, defeated in a free and fair election, personally and repeatedly pressured Justice Department leaders to help him foment a coup in a last-ditch attempt to cling to power,” Laufman said. “And that should shock the conscience of every American, regardless of political persuasion.” He credited Rosen and Donoghue with devising “a mechanism to allow Trump to vent and spew his desired schemes to enlist their help to overturn the election without undertaking any course of action that would have facilitated that scheme.” The notes were made public by the House Committee on Oversight and Reform on the same day the Justice Department announced that it would support the release of Trump’s personal and business tax returns to a different Democratic-controlled House committee — another legal setback for the former president, who could continue to fight the issue in court. Donoghue also took notes on a meeting he participated in with White House officials two days after the Dec. 27 phone call. In that meeting, Trump officials repeatedly pressed the Justice Department to pursue various unfounded theories of election manipulation. Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney (D-N.Y.), chairwoman of the Oversight Committee, said the notes “show that President Trump directly instructed our nation’s top law enforcement agency to take steps to overturn a free and fair election in the final days of his presidency.” A lawyer for Rosen declined to comment. A lawyer for Donoghue did not respond to a request for comment, nor did a Trump spokeswoman. See Richard Donoghue’s handwritten notes of the Dec. 27 phone call Some of the notes taken by Justice Department official Richard Donoghue during a phone call with President Donald Trump. (House Committee on Oversight and Reform) The president and Rosen discussed Trump’s claims of voter fraud at other times as well, according to people familiar with the discussions. In the calls, Rosen was generally noncommittal, hearing the president out while not promising to take any specific action in response, these people said. His attempts to change the subject were mostly unsuccessful. “Trump was absolutely obsessed about it,” one person with knowledge of the calls said. Others close to Trump were also pressing the Justice Department to consider dubious claims of vote tampering. Mark Meadows, then the White House chief of staff, at times forwarded public claims of potential voter fraud to Justice Department officials, which some officials found exasperating, according to previously released emails. Meadows’s defenders have said he was just letting the department know about possible instances of illegality. Some of the notes taken by Justice Department official Richard Donoghue during a phone call with President Donald Trump. (House Committee on Oversight and Reform) The president and Rosen discussed Trump’s claims of voter fraud at other times as well, according to people familiar with the discussions. In the calls, Rosen was generally noncommittal, hearing the president out while not promising to take any specific action in response, these people said. His attempts to change the subject were mostly unsuccessful. “Trump was absolutely obsessed about it,” one person with knowledge of the calls said. Others close to Trump were also pressing the Justice Department to consider dubious claims of vote tampering. Mark Meadows, then the White House chief of staff, at times forwarded public claims of potential voter fraud to Justice Department officials, which some officials found exasperating, according to previously released emails. Meadows’s defenders have said he was just letting the department know about possible instances of illegality. Donoghue’s notes show the degree to which the president was personally involved in such efforts, however, and the ways in which Justice Department officials walked a tightrope of listening to him while not taking any concrete actions they considered unethical or partisan. The notes also say that Trump suggested to Rosen that he might be replaced at the helm of the Justice Department and even dropped the name of his possible successor. “We have an obligation to tell people that this was an illegal, corrupt election,” Trump said, according to the notes. “People tell me Jeff Clark is great, I should put him in. People want me to replace DOJ leadership.” As Trump pushed to overturn election, he called his acting AG almost daily Within a week, Trump was contemplating a plan to replace Rosen with Clark, already a senior official at Justice, who was more amenable to pursuing Trump’s unfounded claims of voter fraud. That possibility nearly touched off a crisis at the highest levels of federal law enforcement, people familiar with the matter have previously said. The president was ultimately dissuaded from firing Rosen after a high-stakes meeting with those involved, those people said. Clark, whom Trump had appointed to lead the environment and natural resources division and who later led the civil division, has denied that he devised a plan to oust Rosen or that he formed “recommendations for action based on factual inaccuracies gleaned from the Internet.” Donoghue’s notes show that Trump repeatedly brought up unsubstantiated tales of voter fraud in various states, which the Justice Department officials told him were not true. “You guys may not be following the Internet the way I do,” Trump responded, according to the notes. He also said people are angry and “blaming DOJ + for inaction.” The president urged the nation’s top law enforcement official to aggressively investigate Biden’s son Hunter, according to the notes, which recount the president saying: “You figure out what to do w/ H. Biden — people will criticize the DOJ if he’s not investigated for real.” Justice Department officials have been conducting a long-running investigation into Hunter Biden’s finances, but no charges have been filed. Trump and his lawyers could have sought to block the release of Donoghue’s notes to Congress. There were days of discussion among Trump advisers about whether to do so, one adviser said, but the former president did not believe that the notes showed anything problematic, even though some of his advisers feared that the disclosures would be damaging. “If it gets more attention on the election, he welcomes it,” this adviser said. At least some of the former Justice Department officials with knowledge of the phone conversations had privately hoped that Trump would seek to block the sharing of the notes, to prevent those former officials from having to testify on Capitol Hill about the exchanges, said people familiar with their thinking. Those people spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe internal discussions. But Trump did not attempt to stop the release. And the Justice Department informed Rosen and others this week that their conversations with the president about the election were not protected by executive privilege. In a statement revealing the content of the notes Friday, Maloney said that her committee “has begun scheduling interviews with key witnesses to investigate the full extent of the former President’s corruption, and I will exercise every tool at my disposal to ensure all witness testimony is secured without delay.”
    2 points
  7. You're way to kind Mitch, but the thought is mutual - & reciprocal! I think that lawyers have thick skin - and have behind me decades of dependence upon the goodwill of 'friendly' AME's Cheers - IFG
    2 points
  8. Lol... I'm sorry, but I have to throw this out there... Mr. IFG... I don't think I've ever told you how much I love your writing.. You make me smile every time you write, somehow. I can see your grins. I can hear your chuckles. ...and I feel like I can grok your point of view perfectly. ...at least until you frazzle me, that is. Then I'm lost.
    2 points
  9. Regarding the federal “green investment” in the Muskrat Falls project, the Globe and Mail makes some interesting points:
    2 points
  10. I bet if this involved a Non Christian Religion icon, it would be classified as a "Hate Crime"......
    2 points
  11. Stephen Harper blasts woke culture in latest podcast appearance By Caitlin Rose Morgante - July 28, 2021Linkedin Former Prime Minister of Canada Stephen Harper’s latest podcast appearance was filled with hard truths for Canadians. Harper tackled questions on the woke left, pandemic response, fiscal policy, China and globalization during his American Optimist interview with Joe Lonsdale. “What’s so threatening about…the far woke left,” according to Harper, is that “its goal is authoritarianism.” Harper connected the behaviour of the modern left to the totalitarianism at the root of Marx and Engels. Marx’s view was that his “opinions were not opinions, they were science… Therefore, since you’re arguing against facts, you get to the Soviet mentality that all dissent is essentially a mental illness or something that needs to be reeducated and corrected.” This is a startling trend in today’s COVID-era, as activists and politicians have dismissed serious concerns about government-mandated lockdowns and questionable public health orders. The Trudeau government has often dismissed its critics by accusing them of spreading “misinformation” and “conspiracy theories.” Regarding Canada’s COVID-19 response, Harper said, “this is bad macroeconomic policy on an enormous scale” and that the government reaction has “been overkill.” Harper expressed concern over consumer inflation, asset inflation, bubbles and the inevitable interest rate hikes which will impact investment. Sooner or later, he said, Canadians will come to realize that all of this supposed “affordable government spending is not so affordable.” Canada’s federal debt surpassed $1 trillion dollars this year following a frenzy of pandemic spending by the ruling Liberal government. Further, in its latest budget, the government revealed a whopping deficit of $354 billion with no plan to pay down the debt and balance the books. Harper is hardly the first to criticize the Liberal spending throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Economists from the Fraser Institute released a study in June 2020 saying that “stimulus spending will likely harm Canadian economy—not help it.” Harper struck at the root of the issue, saying that “what’s happening right now… [is that these] bastardized Keynesian fiscal policy guys or modern monetary theorists [are] trying to convince the population that the fundamental principle of economic science is untrue.” Harper goes on to discuss the problems of globalization: “At the end of the cold war, all common sense on economic interaction related to national security went out the window, and we just assumed everybody … is going to be a friend … so we can trust them with anything. That has to change.” One of the most criticized aspects of Canada’s COVID-19 pandemic response has been the Liberal government’s trust in China. While multiple countries were developing vaccines, the Canadian government chose to only pre-order doses from CanSino Biologics. The government even sent the company a cash advance for vaccines that were never delivered to Canada. According to Harper, we must ensure our supply chains do not depend on unreliable countries and that “we have redundancy in terms of sources of supply.” Despite his concerns, Harper believes that Canada has a “great future.” Still, Canadians must realize that “the adolescent ego of the woke university crowd is not an alternative governing philosophy for any society.”
    2 points
  12. For those left wing nuts that think we have to do our part, control the worlds climate, reduce GHGs, pay our carbon tax and choke the life out of Alberta in the name putting an end to dirty oil, while BC still employs thousands in the coal industry……here is an eye opener on Justin’s futile climate change policies…. Canada barely registers at about 1.6 per cent of the world’s carbon emissions, but this relatively piddling contribution to the climate crisis still puts Canada among the top 10 countries in the greenhouse-gas sweepstakes — and in no way absolves us from the responsibility of shouldering our fair share of the international effort to keep the planet cool. But while we’ve been busy beating up on those beastly Albertans, Beijing has been laughing at us…….. Widespread anger in China over its pollution-choked cities has moved coal plants away from many urban centres, and Beijing has made some less-than-convincing moves to uncouple its own economy from coal. But while all that was going on, China became the world’s largest investor in overseas coal projects. Over the past 20 years, Chinese state banks have laid out nearly $250 billion in overseas energy sectors, heavily favouring coal-powered generation. Since the Paris Agreement was signed in 2015, Chinese banks have emerged as the top 10 lenders for coal financing around the world. The main investors: the Bank of China, China CITIC Bank, and the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China. It’s a profitable racket, with no risk of furious Chinese masses choking on coal pollution. The Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air has found that China’s overseas coal projects, in some of the world’s poorest countries, produce pollution up to seven times as toxic as China’s domestic standards allow……. The U.S.-China talks in Tianjin this week went nowhere, and Beijing’s postures and demands made one thing abundantly clear. The idea that despite our differences with China, liberal democracies must somehow come to a co-operative rapprochement with Beijing is as much an obsolete cliché as the notion that it’s all about oil. Chinese diplomats hectored the American delegation. Sure, maybe we’ll get to carbon neutrality, 10 years after everybody else does. In the meantime, shut up about Hong Kong, shut up about the ongoing genocide in Xinjiang, shut up about Tibet, shut up about Beijing’s growing reach as a global police-state hegemon, roll back all your sanctions, and never mind about Iran, North Korea and Afghanistan. We are going to darken the skies with coal smoke and load the upper 9stratosphere with greenhouse gases, and there’s nothing to discuss except your submission. That is Beijing’s intention. The sooner the world comes to grips with what Beijing intends, the better. https://nationalpost.com/opinion/terry-glavin-coal-spewing-china-has-taken-the-worlds-climate-hostage
    2 points
  13. The pride a parent must feel..... Passenger Arrives Taped to a Seat and Is Charged With Assaulting Flight Attendants Maxwell Berry, 22, of Norwalk, Ohio, punched a Frontier Airlines flight attendant and groped two others on a flight from Philadelphia to Miami, the authorities said. Tue Aug 3, 2021 - The New York Times By Neil Vigdor frontier.mp4 A Frontier Airlines passenger assaulted three flight attendants, punching one and groping the breasts of two others, on a weekend flight from Philadelphia to Miami, prompting one crew member to tape him to his seat until the plane landed, the authorities said. Part of the altercation was caught on video by other passengers, who jeered as the man was restrained for the remainder of Flight 2289, which left Philadelphia at 10:41 p.m. on Saturday and landed 2 hours and 37 minutes later. Frontier Airlines said in an initial statement on Tuesday that the flight attendants would be “relieved of flying” while it investigated, which drew sharp criticism from the Association of Flight Attendants, the nation’s largest flight attendants union. Later on Tuesday, the airline said that paid leave was in line with “an event of this nature.” The Association of Flight Attendants said that the encounter was emblematic of the hostilities faced by airline crews since the loosening of travel restrictions that had been put in place because of the coronavirus pandemic. It came amid a surge of reports filed by airlines with the Federal Aviation Administration about unruly passengers, who have faced steep fines for disruptions. In one video, which was obtained by several television stations and received widespread attention online, the man, who police said had been drinking, repeatedly cursed at other passengers and at the crew. He said that his parents were worth “two million goddamn dollars.” The Miami-Dade Police Department identified the man as Maxwell Berry, 22, of Norwalk, Ohio, who it said in a criminal complaint had been charged with three misdemeanor counts of battery. It was not immediately clear if Mr. Berry had a lawyer. Messages left by phone at his family’s home in Ohio and by email on Tuesday were not answered. Mr. Berry was booked into the Miami-Dade Corrections and Rehabilitation Department on Sunday and was released later that day. Court date information was not immediately available from the department. The trouble began when Mr. Berry ordered his third alcoholic beverage of the flight and brushed his empty cup against a flight attendant’s backside, according to the criminal complaint, which said that the flight attendant told him “don’t touch me.” Mr. Berry, who had been sitting in seat 28D, then emerged from the bathroom shirtless after spilling his drink, prompting a flight attendant to tell him that he needed to be fully dressed, the complaint said. The flight attendant helped him get a shirt out of his carry-on luggage, and Mr. Berry walked around the cabin for about 15 minutes. That’s when he groped the breasts of another flight attendant, who told him not to touch her and to sit down, the authorities said. In the criminal complaint, officers wrote that Mr. Berry later put his arms around the same two flight attendants and groped their breasts. When a male flight attendant approached and asked him several times to calm down, officers said, Mr. Berry punched him in the face with a closed fist. Sara Nelson, the president of the Association of Flight Attendants, said in a statement on Tuesday that the encounter was one of the worst disruptions experienced by airline crews this year. “A drunk and irate passenger verbally, physically, and sexually assaulted multiple members of the crew,” Ms. Nelson said. “When he refused to comply after multiple attempts to de-escalate, the crew was forced to restrain the passenger with the tools available to them onboard. We are supporting the crew.” In their complaint, officers said that several other passengers had helped to restrain Mr. Berry, whom the video showed being secured to a seat by a male crew member with what appeared to be packing tape. A seatbelt extender was also used as a restraint, the police said. Some other passengers laughed and pulled out their cellphone cameras to record the scene. “Frontier Airlines maintains the utmost value, respect, concern and support for all of our flight attendants, including those who were assaulted on this flight,” the Denver-based carrier said. “We are supporting the needs of these team members and are working with law enforcement to fully support the prosecution of the passenger involved.” But the flight attendants union criticized the airline’s response. “Management suspended the crew as a knee-jerk reaction to a short video clip that did not show the full incident,” said Ms. Nelson, the union’s president. “Management should be supporting the crew at this time, not suspending them.” Frontier did not answer questions about the airline’s policies and procedures for restraining unruly passengers, including whether tape had been approved for that purpose. In the criminal complaint, the arresting officers said that they had referred the matter to the F.B.I., but that it had declined to pursue federal felony charges against Mr. Berry. Mr. Berry’s legal problems may be just beginning, though. The F.A.A. has fined several passengers tens of thousands of dollars this year for clashing with airline crews over mask requirements and other safety instructions. Earlier this year, the agency imposed a zero-tolerance policy for interfering with or assaulting flight attendants that carries a fine of up to $35,000 and possible jail time. An F.A.A. spokesman said in an email on Tuesday that the agency investigates all reports of unruly passengers, but that it could not comment on individual cases. “Cabin crews are responsible for deciding how to respond to unruly-passenger incidents,” said the spokesman, Ian Gregor. Mr. Berry graduated in May from Ohio Wesleyan University, where he received a values in action award from the Greek life community for being a “perfect role model” and for leading “the fight to dismantle fraternity stereotypes.” The university posted a Zoom video of the presentation. “Ohio Wesleyan is saddened to learn of this situation with one of our graduates,” Cole Hatcher, a spokesman for the university, said in an email on Tuesday. “The case does not involve the university, and the incidents depicted do not reflect Ohio Wesleyan’s values.”
    1 point
  14. Great post ad usual Mr Hudson. The only alternative to Trudeau was Pierre Polliviere but he was smart enough not to run for leader at this time. The future looks pretty bleak for Canada as a nation and quite honestly I secretly hope Trudeau wins so he has to take account for the disaster he’s created. That’s the real wake up call Canadians need . That being said, I don’t think it really matters who the Conservatives pick as a leader now or in the foreseeable future because the LEFT, who control the MSMs default position is to condemn any leader they pick. Conservatives could elect Jesus Christ himself and the CBC would probably blame him for cutting down the tree he was supposedly crucified on. Very sad times we live in right now as Sanity and common sense are now four letter words.
    1 point
  15. Let us hope they convert to cleaner burning petroleum products such as LNG. but of course...
    1 point
  16. China burns us again Reliance on coal making climate goals useless Calgary Sun 1 Aug 2021 LORRIE GOLDSTEIN lgoldstein@postmedia.com @sunlorrie JUSTIN TRUDEAU Whenever human-induced climate change is discussed during Canada's upcoming federal election, keep in mind the country that matters most on this issue is China and the fossil fuel that matters most in China is coal. The reason is that whatever China does makes whatever Canada does irrelevant in terms of greenhouse gas emissions. That's because coal — not oil — is the most carbon-intensive fossil fuel and the main contributor to global emissions. In China, coal-fired electricity supplies 57% of its energy needs. In Canada, it's 7.4%. China consumes more coal than the rest of the world combined. In 2019, China was responsible for 27% of global emissions. The next largest emitter was the U.S. at 11%. Canada contributes 1.5%. In 2019, China for the first time generated more emissions — 14.09 gigatonnes — than the entire developed world combined — 14.06 gigatonnes — including the 38-member nations of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development and the 27 members of the European Union. According to the international research company Rhodium Group, China's emissions in 2019 more than tripled compared to 1990 levels with a 25% increase over the last decade alone. China is also building coalfired power plants at a faster pace than the rest of the world combined. In March, energy journalist Michael Standaert, writing in Yaleenvironment360, published by the Yale School of the Environment, reported that China in 2020 “brought 38.4 gigawatts of new coalfired power into operation, more than three times what was brought online everywhere else. “A total of 247 gigawatts of coal power is now in planning or development (in China), nearly six times Germany's entire coal-fired capacity,” Standaert wrote. “China has also proposed additional new coal plants that, if built, would generate 73.5 gigawatts of power, more than five times the 13.9 gigawatts proposed in the rest of the world combined.” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has committed Canada to reducing our emissions up to 45% below 2005 levels by 2030 and to net zero by 2050. (No federal government — Liberal or Conservative — has ever achieved a single target it has set in more than three decades.) China's defenders argue that the country's reliance on coal has been decreasing over time (mainly because of public anger about air pollution), that China's per capita emissions are much lower than Canada's, that most emissions in today's atmosphere were put there by developed countries and that China is a global leader in developing wind and solar power. That said, it's also a major investor in coal plants around the world. A better argument, based on realpolitik, is that China's focus is on having enough energy to feed its 1.4 billion people today, not global temperatures 80 years from now. Chinese President Xi Jinping said China's emissions will peak before 2030 and they will achieve net zero by 2060. But given China's record on COVID-19, Hong Kong, Uighurs, Tibet, Taiwan and its appalling treatment of Canadians Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, it's best to take what Xi says with a huge grain of sand. China's reliance on coal makes everything Trudeau is doing in Canada irrelevant — including his national carbon tax/price — a policy the Americans have refused to implement to this day. That said, many Canadians agree with Trudeau that regardless of what China does, we have to do something given rising global temperatures. Fair point. Just remember that what Canada does is irrelevant, other than as a symbolic gesture.
    1 point
  17. LETTING HIM SKATE Media continue to give PM a pass on groping allegations Calgary Sun 1 Aug 2021 BRIAN LILLEY blilley@postmedia.com @brianlilley JUSTIN TRUDEAU I don't know what is more audacious: That Justin Trudeau felt he could condemn hockey player Logan Mailloux and his being drafted by the Montreal Canadiens or that much of the media wrote about this without mentioning Trudeau's past. Mailloux was drafted by the Canadiens in the first round despite asking every NHL team to give him a pass this year over his actions while in Europe. While playing for a Swedish team during Ontario's COVID-19 lockdown, Mailloux engaged in a consensual relationship with a young woman. He also took an intimate photo of the woman and shared it with his teammates, something that's against the law in Canada, but he was only served with a fine in Sweden. Mailloux issued a statement before the draft saying that he has shown he isn't deserving of being drafted into the NHL and that he regrets his error. The decision of the Habs has rightly caused controversy, started a national conversation and seen the team denounced. Given his past, one person who shouldn't have been condemning Mailloux or the Canadiens was Trudeau, yet he couldn't resist when asked. “As a lifelong Habs fan, I am deeply disappointed by the decision,” Trudeau said Tuesday. “I think it was a lack of judgment by the Canadiens organization. I think they have a lot of explaining to do to Montrealers and fans right across the country.” That statement from our prime minister is stunning in its lack of self-awareness. This isn't a defence of Mailloux, his actions or the decision by the Canadiens to draft him, but our PM has a history with women that should make him think twice before condemnations like this. This is the same Trudeau who said in a CBC interview in January 2018 that there were no incidents from his past that he should be worried about and that everyone should be held accountable for their past actions. “There is no context in which someone doesn't have responsibility for things they've done in the past,” Trudeau said at the time. Of course, when the story broke that he had groped a woman in the early 2000s and then said that he wouldn't have been so forward if he had known she was working for a national media outlet, Trudeau brushed it off. “There's a lot of uncertainties around this. In terms of my recollection, there was no untoward or inappropriate action, but she was in a professional context. Who knows where her mind was and I fully respect her ability to experience something differently,” Trudeau told TV station CP24 just six months after the CBC interview. He basically said he doesn't remember doing anything wrong and she experienced it differently, now let's move on. Trudeau faced criticism from conservative commentators like myself, but not other government officials. Feminist groups were silent and most of the media just moved on with his explanation. Voters then gave Trudeau the second chance he doesn't think Mailloux deserves. After Trudeau raised this issue Tuesday, I expected his Kokanee grope to figure prominently in coverage of his comments, given the sharp juxtaposition of his words and his actions. It didn't happen, though. I haven't found a single media mention of it despite reading multiple write-ups from multiple outlets. Conservative MP Candice Bergen, who has grilled Trudeau in the House of Commons over his groping, called the media silence unbelievable — and she's right. “Both women and men in the media continue to provide cover for Trudeau on his treatment of women by refusing to ask him about how he's groped women,” Bergen tweeted Wednesday. By giving Trudeau cover and not even mentioning his problems in passing, the reporters who cover Parliament Hill full-time have shown their bias. It's hard to keep calling yourself objective when your actions prove that claim to be patently false.
    1 point
  18. Maiden flight with escorts. includes video from chase planes and from the concord itself. This hobby at this level is definitely not a pursuit for the poor.
    1 point
  19. Good Afternoon All: I have always enjoyed the writings that Conrad Black produces and here is another one for your reading. Conrad Black: With America in decline, this is Canada's time to shine | National Post As the U.S. suffers through its first period of outright decline since the Great Depression, this is our chance for Canada to be an important and positive world leader Author of the article: Conrad Black Publishing date: Jul 31, 2021 • 8 hours ago This is the time Canada has awaited for 350 years: the United States has momentarily subsided into a state of juvenilism and self-flagellation. Instead of wallowing in our own tears every time unmarked graves are discovered and prancing around gas-lighting and virtue-signalling over nebulous questions of climate change, and claiming to be a post-national state, we should take advantage of the first time in our history when we are not preoccupied with the Americans. We should resume the upward rise of Canada in the world, not out of any spite for the U.S., but to fulfill our long-perceived destiny and serve the common interests of the West. As anyone who knows anything about the history of Canada is aware (and too few Canadians are), apart from settling and building Canada, the great struggle of this country has been to maintain its independence from the Americans, and more recently to have any serious raison d’etre independent of the U.S. That is not because of hostility to the U.S., or because being a part of the United States would be a pitiable fate. By most measurements, the United States is the greatest nation in the history of the world and those Americans, undoubtedly the great majority, who still honour their flag and their anthem are rightfully proud of their country. But there was always the feeling in Canada, from the times of Samuel de Champlain, that something different and in some respects better, though not as grand, could be done here, partly because of the unbroken British connection, partly because of the French fact, but mainly because of the propensity of Canadians to be sensible, peaceable, tolerant and comparatively prosperous. Louis de Buade de Frontenac repelled an American attack on Quebec in 1690. Guy Carleton, with the help of the French-Canadians, repulsed the American revolutionaries in 1775 and the following years. General Isaac Brock and others narrowly prevented the Americans from taking over Canada in the War of 1812. And for the following 50 years, the United States was walking on eggshells trying to manage the crisis of slavery and of the Union, culminating in the noble but terrible Civil War (1861-1865). Thereafter, while there were occasional annexationist noises, Canada was enjoying the challenges and pleasures of nation-building and the United States did not wish to go from its Civil War into combat with the British Empire over Canada and therefore left us alone. By the beginning of the 20th century, Canada had made its point and was welcomed as an inoffensive and commendable kindred spirit by the Americans. Yet the challenge continued: the United States almost tripled in population between the Civil War and the First World War and regularly ran eight per cent annual GDP growth rates. Canada kept pace with this despite our comparative lack of a mystique, and without the genius of the spectacle that the Americans have always possessed, which in some ways makes Canada’s achievements even greater than the unheard of rise of America, with which we remained in lock-step. There has never been anything like the huge numbers of volunteer warriors Canada sent to the world wars, even though we were ourselves under no threat. We were one of the four or five most significant allied powers in the Second World War, and a valued ally in the Cold War. Canada has never been involved in anything other than a just war, never been on the losing side, never sought anything for itself except the defence of freedom and always fought with distinction. Throughout this time, the assurance of our national security has come from the United States, ever since President Franklin D. Roosevelt said in Kingston, Ont., in 1938 that the United States “would not stand idly by if Canada were attacked.” (This was the origin of that endlessly invoked expression.) This position was formalized with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in 1949, with Canada as a co-founder; NATO has gone on to become the most successful alliance in the history of the world. It is doubtless its extraordinary originality and adaptability that has enabled the United States to launch itself into a time of utter silliness and mindless nonsense. Under the current administration, the United States has hurled open its southern borders to a flood of unskilled and largely desperate people who are rarely proficient in English and take jobs away from hard-working Americans, usually Blacks and Hispanics, who are in the country legally. At the same time, the country’s police departments have been subjected to a fiscal and public-relations assault that has produced a tremendous jump in violent crime; and huge money supply increases have arguably caused inflation to reach eight or nine per cent, if gasoline and building materials, especially lumber, resume their rightful share of the consumer price index. China has effectively proclaimed itself to be the world’s most powerful and best-governed country, while the United States has invited United Nations human rights authorities, influenced by those sterling upholders of the rights of man — China, Russia and Iran — to rate America’s performance on matters of racism. The fact is that the United States has made the greatest and most successful effort of any country in the history of the world to raise up long-wronged ethnic minorities. This notoriously proud and often boastful country, which has spent centuries telling the rest of us about its “exceptionalism,” is going through this time of dangerous absurdity, as some sort of national primal scream therapy, to exorcise what is left of its slave-holding guilt. It will pass quickly. In the meantime, all the haters of former president Donald Trump may celebrate the disaster of the last six months since their electoral wishes came true. This is not an irreversible Spenglerian decline and the United States does not have a death wish. Because of the confluence of a number of non-recurring political and sociological events, this great country, which has long been so well self-pleased, is indulging in the often-useful habits of confession and repentance, but is carrying them to unjustifiable fits of self-reproach. This is a time when the world should contemplate what it would be like if Western, ultimately Judeo-Christian, values, the Western languages and alphabet and the whole civilization of the West, including popular culture and the free market economy, all ceased to be pre-eminent, and the system most admired and aspired to in the world. If the totalitarian Communist regime in China were to become the model for the world’s political and economic system, the long night of its oppression would produce a new Dark Age, which, in the words of Winston Churchill, would be “made more sinister and more protracted by the lights of perverted science.” Europe is exhausted, the United States is momentarily a neurotic version of President Richard Nixon’s famous “pitiful helpless giant,” and our turn has come to acquire national self-confidence and pride, not arrogance or complacency. We should enhance our Armed Forces, which is the best form of technological and economic stimulation, and the fast track to gaining influence in the wobbling Western alliance. We should stop agonizing over confected gender issues and mawkishly sensationalized Native questions. Canada can be a positive influence in the world, but only if it is strong, innovative and distinctive. As the U.S. suffers through its first period of outright decline since the Great Depression, this is our chance for Canada to be an important and positive world leader. We must not squander it. National Post
    1 point
  20. Maybe the strategy is one of "salting and plowing" the fields so as to make recovery impossible for any party that might beat the Liberals in an election or perhaps even to dissuade candidates from running.
    1 point
  21. Back in the day, some unlimited hydroplanes were powered by the Merlins.... a number crashed and sank. Looking at this one I wonder if the shape is the result of exposure to salt water. Rolls-Royce Merlin/V1650 Engine - Hydroplane and Raceboat Museum (ning.com) Roostertails Unlimited: Chapter 5 - The Powerplant (lesliefield.com)
    1 point
  22. 'Its ethics are entirely nihilist': Stephen Harper slams 'woke' left in rare interview Harper said Western societies should strive to make 'constant progress,' but it should not be premised on the assumption that 'everything is wrong and terrible and awful In a rare and uniquely candid interview, former prime minister Stephen Harper warned of a “nihilist” modern left bent on “ripping everything down” and seeking to “end the democratic system “If it plays out, our societies fail,” Harper said in a Tuesday edition of the podcast American Optimist. He added, “the adolescent egos of the woke university crowd is not an alternative governing philosophy for any society The former Conservative leader rejected the claim — taken up in recent years by many senior Democratic politicians and organizations such as Black Lives Matter — that the United States is fundamentally racist. “What I see is all these supposedly repressed races trying desperately to become Americans,” said Harper. Harper said that he has sympathy that governments would make mistakes in tackling the novel crisis of COVID-19, noting that the pandemic is far more complicated than the Great Recession. “This is a combination pandemic and economic crisis, the solutions for one often being contrary to the solutions for the other,” he said. Nevertheless, he pointed to continued high spending in both Canada and the United States as “bad macroeconomic policy on an enormous scale.” At a time when the adult populations of both countries are mostly vaccinated, Harper said that governments should be switching gears towards policies that prioritize economic recovery. “I think it’s actually pretty straightforward, but it’s the opposite of what governments are doing,” he said. While the 62-year-old former leader said Western societies should strive to make “constant progress,” it should not be premised on the assumption that “everything is wrong and terrible and awful.” “I can see lots of things wrong with my own country … and yet you travel around the world and there’s no other time in history and no other place you’d rather be,” he said. The 40-minute interview also included a veiled criticism of the government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. While Harper said he tries not to critique his “successor government,” he implied that a Conservative administration would not have suffered delays in securing adequate doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. Instead, Harper said, governments have emerged from a period of unprecedented economic intervention with a sense of “why can’t we just do this forever?” The consequences, he said, will inevitably come in the form of inflation, rising interest rates and the end of “affordable debt.” “People believe the United States can continue to borrow countless trillions of dollars at zero per cent interest,” said Harper. “Not only do I believe that’s not true, I believe that’s actually coming to an end much quicker than people think.” https://nationalpost.com/news/its-ethics-are-entirely-nihilist-stephen-harper-slams-woke-left-in-rare-interview?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR0FkhV_kpqyvmO2VPmJ0xiR7Ft4SCXzT_wgc0LTysA2QyKzFExFwAWHoBU#Echobox=1627639689
    1 point
  23. Forgive me but yet another editorial comment... Within a thread called; "Travel in the pandemic", wouldn't it make sense to focus on the travails of travel? What is required of one to travel NOW to France or the Maldives or Dubai? Let's keep it updated-- a useful resource created by people who have gone through the process. I may want to go to CDG in August. I know I can't get on the crew bus to the hotel....but what should I know about clearing in....what docs are required? I already know that travellers will attempt to avoid restrictions....it's a common theme in the press ( damn typesetters)....but collectively as travellers, we are better-served by knowing what are those restrictions.
    1 point
  24. Don't rely on the Canadian govn't website. The biggest issue is the EMU standard for full vaccination. If you're a hybrid....research that closely. My understanding is that for entry to Ireland, you need 1) proof of full vaccination more than 14 days prior; or 2) negative 72 hour PCR....possible quarantine; or 3) evidence of recovery from infection within 180 days. Coming home...vaccination. At the least. I can't figure out whether you also ( still) need a 72 hour PCR if you're a citizen. Great fun, no? Doesn't matter what I've posted. Obviously, you will independently confirm but I do emphasize....go to the website of Ireland Tourism to get entry info; don't rely on Canada. After all...they told you that mixed vaccines were just fine...4 months apart!!
    1 point
  25. Something driving me to post this:
    1 point
  26. SO I hear a stat today that I did not bother to research because....well...Don't really want to but it does make some sense. Per Capita China produces less Carbon than the rest of the G7 countries...PER CAPITA. when you look at the numbers that makes the USA the number 1 Carbon producer. This does not take into account the carbon produced in China on behalf of American interests. One day I might dive into the stats but not today
    1 point
  27. Ya think? I understand that military readiness is a priority somewhere equal to human life, but if this were a civilian airliner wouldn't it be grounded until it was demonstrably fixed? There may be "wheels-within-wheels" in the decision-making process but this seems outright reckless.
    1 point
  28. Not surprised by the trend of educated professionals in “clean tech” bailing for more lucrative waters……this was from 2018: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/technology/article-canada-facing-brain-drain-as-young-tech-talent-leaves-for-silicon/ I don’t imagine things have slowed considering the lack of investment capital and the deficit spending which has become a way of life for the government. The slogan “make the rich pay” is not lost on a young professional that has options.
    1 point
  29. Fortunately I have dual citizenship ( thankfully also my children)!
    1 point
  30. 12 steps to raising a conservative daughter – from my very wise daughter Parents must teach their daughters how to be courageous defenders of individual freedom Never suggest to your daughter that she’s oppressed. Or a victim. It will taint her entire worldview. Instead of feeling brave, optimistic and hopeful, as if she can accomplish anything, she will become timid, angry and despairing. You will instill feelings of weakness, powerlessness, and entitlement. Talk about ideas and events around the dinner table. Your girls will learn that ideas are important and they’ll know how to talk about them and things other than their feelings or their day at school. Don’t protect your daughter from current events. Help them understand what’s happening in their country and the world, and that it’s important. Start early. You can’t expect your daughter to start standing up for her beliefs in front of her peers or authority figures in high school when she’s never really thought about what they are in the first place. They have to become HER ideas in order for her to risk defending them. Set an active example – live out your ideas. Go to rallies. Take your girls to hear conservative speakers. They are never too young! They may not understand the content, but they see you engaged and caring. Don’t let your girls be wimpy. There’s an epidemic of wimpy girls who want, at all cost, to be liked. Not to offend. Let them experience some conflict and disappointment. Teach them that conflict can be navigated, rather than avoided. Help your daughter separate what is personal from objective points. Girls take differences of opinion personally. They will follow the crowd to avoid being perceived as wrong. Unless you have raised them to be strong, and to understand ideas, and not to take differences personally, they will absolutely post the black square on Instagram (having no idea what BLM actually stands for) because they will care more about the popularity contest. Tell your daughter she is smart. Lucy says, "I was told I was pretty, but mostly I was told that I was smart. And strong. And brave. That became what I wanted to live up to." Never tell your child to moderate her opinion in order not to offend someone. Don’t tell her that her teacher won’t appreciate it or her grades may suffer. Defend her, and teach her to defend herself and her ideas. Tell her, "You are strong and brave. And smart. Now go get ‘em!" Teach your daughter about the founding of our country – that it was a radical experiment, for the first time acknowledging that individual liberty comes from God, not government. Honor the United States and her Founding Fathers in word and celebration. Lucy, having grown up from age 4 to 14 with a single mom, has a special warning for two-parent, stable families – I was fascinated by this one. Do not shield your daughter from an understanding of what it took to achieve that stable life. We can make it look easy, but it’s not obvious to our children. They need to understand the value of hard work. Of what it takes to have a happy, healthy marriage. Traditional values, too often taken for granted, need to be instilled through discussion. Introduce her to God from the beginning, and make Him the loving, fun, very real center of your family life. Make sure she knows He created her just the way He wants her to be, and He loves her. That, right there, will give her all the courage she’ll ever need. https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/12-steps-raise-conservative-daughter-kate-obenshain?cmpid=fb_fnc&fbclid=IwAR00zhF4JTLKJoxLoWsWja3S8dYtmYrlCCk17KpL58q0xJMCuGyxIhjwqok
    1 point
  31. Aerial Scouting of 'Raised Ridges' for Ingenuity's Flight 10 by Teddy Tzanetos | Ops Lead at Ingenuity Pasadena CA (JPL) Jul 28, 2021 This annotated image of Mars' Jezero Crater depicts the ground track and waypoints for Ingenuity's planned tenth flight - scheduled to take place no earlier than Saturday, July 24. Ingenuity has come a long way from its original airfield, "Wright Brothers Field," which is 0.64 miles (1.04 kilometers) to the northeast of our current location. We got here during Flight 9, an endeavor that had our helicopter breaking several of our own records as we relocated to the far side of the "Seitah" geologic unit. Covering 2,051 feet (625 meters), Flight 9 was executed so that Ingenuity could provide valuable imagery and information for the Perseverance science team. Flight 10 will allow us to reap the benefits of our previous flight. Scheduled for no earlier than this Saturday (July 24), Flight 10 will target an area called the "Raised Ridges" (RR), named for the geographic features that start approximately 164 feet (50 meters) south-by-southwest of our current location. We will be imaging Raised Ridges because it's an area that Perseverance scientists find intriguing and are considering visiting sometime in the future. From navigation and performance perspectives, Flight 10 will be our most complex flight to date, with 10 distinct waypoints and a nominal altitude of 40 feet (12 meters). It begins with Ingenuity taking off from its sixth airfield and climbing to the new record height. It will then head south-by-southwest about 165 feet (50 meters), where upon hitting our second waypoint, take our first Return to Earth (RTE) camera image of the Raised Ridges, looking south. Next, we'll translate sideways to waypoint 3 and take our next RTE image - again looking south at Raised Ridges. Imagery experts at JPL hope to combine the overlapping data from these two images to generate one stereo image. Flying farther to the west, we'll try for another stereo pair of images (waypoints 4 and 5), then head northwest for two more sets of stereo pairs at waypoints 6 and 7 as well as 8 and 9. Then, Ingenuity will turn northeast, landing at its seventh airfield - about 310 feet (95 meters) west of airfield 6. Total time in the air is expected to be about 165 seconds. Ingenuity has survived 107 sols (Martian days) since deployment from Perseverance, 76 sols beyond the original technology demonstration mission it was designed for. It has also successfully executed two separate flight-software updates, improving the aircraft's ability to execute flights and capture color imagery (collecting 43 13 MP images to date). It's flown a total distance of 0.997 miles (1.605 kilometers), with total time aloft of 842 seconds (14 minutes, 2 seconds), in nine flights. Should we be successful, we'll cross the 1-mile total distance metric with Flight 10.
    1 point
  32. Ontarians want Line 5 to keep operating: poll By Harrison Faulkner - July 27, 2021 Ontarians disagree with Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s attempts to shut down Enbridge’s Line 5 pipeline, according to a recent poll by Angus Reid. In November 2020, Governor Whitmer issued an executive order to Enbridge to shut down the project, citing environmental concerns. At its peak operation, the pipeline carries 540,000 barrels of oil from Sarnia, Ontario to Superior, Wisconsin and supplied energy to Ontario and Quebec. According to the Angus Reid poll, when asked if the pipeline should stay open or be shut down, 49% of Ontario residents said “keep it open,” 28% favoured shutting it down and 22% were unsure. Michiganders echoed similar sentiments, with 48% saying “keep it open,” 25% wanting to shut it down and 27% unsure. On the other hand, when Quebeckers were asked the same question, only 36% were in favour of keeping the pipeline open. A shutdown of the cross-border Enbridge Line 5 pipeline would have a profound impact on both the Canadian and US economy. Ontario estimates that 5,000 direct jobs and over 23,000 indirect jobs will be put at risk if Line 5 shuts down. A shutdown will also lead to increased truck and rail traffic. According to IHS Markit, 45,000 additional trucks or 15,000 more railcars would be required to deliver resources between the regions should Line 5 halt operations. The Angus Reid poll also revealed that if Michigan turns off the tap on Line 5, three-quarters of Ontarians (76%) and 58% of Quebecers believe the Energy East project should be revived. Energy East was a 4,500-kilometre pipeline proposed to carry 1.1 million barrels of crude oil per day from Alberta and Saskatchewan to Eastern Canada. Due to stringent regulations set out by the Trudeau government, TransCanada cancelled the Energy East pipeline in 2017.
    1 point
  33. Time the electorate wakes up to Trudeau's socialist agenda “ Trudeau, if re-elected to the predicted majority, will continue on the path towards socialism and a communist dependency upon the state.” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, supposedly destined for a majority government, does not even deserve to be personally re-elected. There is no sense rhyming off all the Trudeau Liberals’ ethics breaches and various scandals because their narratives, if put to paper, would fill the corner of a library. Yet they must be remembered by all Canadians who will soon step into a voting booth to mark their X on their ballot. Jody Wilson-Raybould, the first Indigenous woman to ever be the attorney-general of this country (but later bounced by the party for refusing to cheat justice during the SNC-Lavalin cock-up), had it dead on the money when she described the House of Commons as a “toxic” environment, and that she would not be seeking re-election. The Trudeau Liberals, for sure, are Wilson-Raybould’s toxins. They are the virus. They are the ones who need to be defeated, even if you think The Liberal collective is not, and Trudeau is their Pied Piper socialist leader with an admiration for China’s brand of communism. Any Canadian who believes Trudeau’s feigned sorrow over the finding of hundreds of “unmarked” children’s graves outside now-defunct residential schools is real grief needs to give their head a shake. It’s all an act. He studied drama. He knows how to fake it. https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/bonokoski-time-the-electorate-wakes-up-to-trudeaus-socialist-agenda
    1 point
  34. Yep…plenty of examples in history and we all know how that worked out. Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini,, Saddam Hussein , Idi Amin….the list is endless…. Now we have Trudeau and Biden. Pretty sure there were millions who thought their ideas were good…..until they weren’t. Is humanity really that weak? …that Stupid? Have the past few generations learned nothing from history? Do they even still teach history?
    1 point
  35. There are apparently many people who are quite ok and even think that it's a good idea to have the state determine what I child should be taught about moral issues or whether or not a child should be vaccinated or not. I contend that what is happening is a large foot in the door and will go further. I don't see any thought be given to the long range unintended consequences of what is happening right now. I find it very troubling, (regardless of my own feelings about the subject), that 3 of our 4 political parties will not allow candidates to hold pro-life views. I would feel just as strongly if a party were to say that you can only hold pro-choice views and run for the party. None of this is democratic and we are bit by bit losing our democracy and our freedom to make our own decisions. However we should have a thoughtful dialogue with those we disagree with, and by labelling each other we lose the opportunity to do that and we just go on getting further and further apart.
    1 point
  36. Sugarcoat it all you want, if that makes you feel better, but I call it as I see it. To call them “Well meaning people” simply blows my mind. IMO, we are way past the point of civil discussion with an ideology that is intent on destroying any semblance of normalcy. One thing for sure…mental health spending has to increase exponentially before it’s too late.
    1 point
  37. The quote was from 2019 and today: Trudeau government claims the CBC is under immense financial pressure By - July 26, 2021 Despite receiving $1.2 billion annually from Canadian taxpayers, the Department of Canadian Heritage claims the CBC is under immense financial pressure. “The Covid-19 pandemic and the challenges of covering it put immense pressure on CBC’s workforce, operations, finances and systems,” said the April 20 briefing note Funding Support For The CBC, which was first reported on by Blacklocks Reporter. “The postponement of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics also put additional pressure on its cash flow.” The CBC was steadily losing advertising revenue long before the pandemic, with CBC TV revenue decreasing 53% between 2014 and 2019. Previous reports have shown that the CBC engages with very few Canadians, with less than 4% of Canadians regularly watching CBC TV in 2019 and only 0.8% tuning into its evening newscasts. In addition to receiving $1.2 billion annually from taxpayers, the Trudeau government recently gave the state broadcaster an additional $21 million in its latest budget. “Budget 2021 proposes to provide $21 million in 2021-22 as immediate operational support to the CBC/Radio-Canada,” the budget document reads. “This funding will ensure its stability during the pandemic and enable it to continue providing news and entertainment programming that keeps Canadians informed.” The government briefing note claims the CBC is a source of “trusted news and information,” but also acknowledged widespread complaints from Canadians. “The CRTC received more than 10,000 public interventions, many of which were critical of a perceived left-wing bias in CBC’s news reporting,” the briefing note reads. Earlier this month, CBC Ombudsman Jack Nagler’s 2021 Annual Report noted how the state broadcaster often does not provide enough information to viewers about its panellists. Various CBC programs have featured pundits that have received contracts from the Liberal government without making those contracts apparent to the viewers.
    1 point
  38. Canadians realize he’s a liar…problem is they don’t care. Apathy will kill this country.
    1 point
  39. Justin Trudeau's sociopathic dismissal of sexual misconduct in the military Rather than acknowledge or share in women’s anger, Trudeau went on to accuse the media Prime Minister Justin Trudeau lost his credibility as a self-proclaimed “feminist” long ago, but this week he stooped to a new low. In an interview Global News’ Farah Nasser, he was downright offensive on the subject of the military’s sexual misconduct crisis. Astonishingly, when asked if he’s angry he didn’t know about a 2018 allegation of inappropriate behaviour against former chief of defence staff Gen. Jonathan Vance, he said, “No.” There’s really no way to sugarcoat this: Our prime minister is very probably lying to the public in order to cover up a cover up of a #MeToo complaint. That he, or at least his office, didn’t know the allegation against Vance was a sexual misconduct complaint simply beggars belief. The military ombudsman described it as sexual misconduct, the clerk of the the Privy Council described it as sexual harassment, and Trudeau’s own staff described it as sexual harassment in their emails. If he’s not angry, there are only three credible explanations as to why not. One: The entire question is based on a false premise. He’s not angry because he knew all along. Two: His staff didn’t tell him in order to shield him and he’s not angry because he prioritizes protecting himself and his seat of power at all costs. Three: He’s not angry because he lacks empathy and really doesn’t give a flying fig about women. Clearly, none of these answers are flattering to the prime minister. He’s either complicit, self-serving, or callous. He’s also wildly out of touch with the very real and righteous anger women across Canada feel as, five years into the #MeToo movement, allegations are still swept under the rug in favour of powerful men. The fury we feel that, 23 years after Maclean’s first wrote about rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment in the military, the pattern still holds. Rather than acknowledge or share in women’s anger, Trudeau went on to accuse the media — and Nasser herself — of unfairly “latching on” to the story. Whew! Where to start on this one? The level of sanctimonious self-absorption it takes to accuse a female journalist of unfairly latching on to a sexual harassment story staggers the mind. The amount of gumption it takes to gaslight journalists for covering a major scandal and human rights concern in the nation’s military would be almost impressive if it weren’t so sociopathic. Just weeks ago, Canadian Forces ombudsman Gregory Lick released a scathing statement that accused “vested political interests” of impeding his office’s work in addressing issues like sexual misconduct. According to Lick, “The erratic behaviour of leadership defies common sense or reason. The concept of Ministerial accountability has been absent.” Rather than address any of this in the interview, or lay out a plan for future accountability, Trudeau uttered platitudes like saying everyone in the Canadian military deserves to be treated “with respect.” To be clear, the sexual misconduct crisis is not a crisis of respect. To downplay it as such obscures the severity of the charges at hand and the trauma experienced by, at minimum, hundreds of female officers over the years. Moreover, it ignores the broken power dynamics at the root of the crisis. This isn’t about teaching colleagues proper e-mail etiquette or asking them to nod politely at one another in the hallway; it’s about superior officers not intimidating, harassing, assaulting, or raping women (or men) under their command. Teaching “respect” isn’t going to cut it. Such a statement suggests Trudeau either misunderstands the real issues at play or lacks the fortitude to properly address them. It’s rare these days for a politician to reveal their true nature in a sit-down interview. Undoubtedly, it wasn’t Trudeau’s intention to broadcast his utter contempt for anyone who questions him or his team’s handling of the Vance allegations. Nor did he mean to telecast his lack of resolve when it comes to stopping sexual misconduct in the military. However, that’s exactly what he did. It’s pretty clear that, as long as Trudeau is in charge, the sexual misconduct crisis won’t be solved until it’s politically convenient for him to do so. Sorry, ladies, but it seems the prime minister has better things to do than stand behind women who risk their lives to serve our country. https://nationalpost.com/opinion/sabrina-maddeaux-justin-trudeaus-sociopathic-dismissal-of-sexual-misconduct-in-the-military
    1 point
  40. Study blows hole in PM's climate plan “ But that’s not the purpose of Trudeau’s ever changing climate plans which from the beginning have treated Canadians like mushrooms — covering them with manure and keeping them in the dark — while making unrealistic promises which make no sense to anyone who can do math.” “ To add insult to injury, the billions of dollars federal and provincial governments plan to spend subsidizing the manufacture and sale of zero emission vehicles, as well as create the massive, cross-Canada infrastructure needed to charge them, is one of the most expensive and least efficient ways to reduce emissions. A 2017 study by the Montreal Economic Institute called electric vehicle subsidies (meaning zero emission vehicles) exactly that. “It’s just a waste,” a senior associate MEI researcher said. “Not only do these programs cost taxpayers a fortune, but they also have little effect on GHG emissions.” https://torontosun.com/opinion/editorials/editorial-study-blows-hole-in-pms-climate-plan?fbclid=IwAR1F28URJNJ0N3hyOAFxwMdCVSKb-8KNjlt0VBhisE-sFPdDkhD0BoJn1Yw
    1 point
  41. “ A major new study of the economics of solar, published in Harvard Business Review (HBR), finds that the waste produced by solar panels will make electricity from solar panels four times more expensive than the world’s leading energy analysts thought. “The economics of solar,” write Atalay Atasu and Luk N. Van Wassenhove of Institut Européen d'Administration des Affaires, one of Europe’s leading business schools, and Serasu Duranof the University of Calgary, will “darken quickly as the industry sinks under the weight of its own trash." Conventional wisdom today holds that the world will quadruple the number of solar panels in the world over the next decade. “And that’s not even taking into consideration the further impact of possible new regulations and incentives launched by the green-friendly Biden administration,” Atasu, Wassenhove, and Duran write in HBR. But the volume of solar panel waste will destroy the economics of solar even with the subsidies, they say. "By 2035,” write the three economists, “discarded panels would outweigh new units sold by 2.56 times. In turn, this would catapult the LCOE (levelized cost of energy, a measure of the overall cost of an energy-producing asset over its lifetime) to four times the current projection.” The solar industry, and even supposedly neutral energy agencies, grossly underestimated how much waste solar panels would produce. The HBR authors, all of whom are business school professors, looked at the economics from the point of view of the customer, and past trends, and calculated that customers would replace panels far sooner than every 30 years, as the industry assumes. “If early replacements occur as predicted by our statistical model,” they write, solar panels “can produce 50 times more waste in just four years than [International Renewable Energy Agency] IRENA anticipates.” The HBR authors found that the price of panels, the amount solar panel owners are paid by the local electric company, and sunlight-to-electricity efficiency determined how quickly people replaced their panels. “Alarming as they are,” they write, “these stats may not do full justice to the crisis, as our analysis is restricted to residential installations. With commercial and industrial panels added to the picture, the scale of replacements could be much, much larger.” What about recycling? It’s not worth the expense, note the HBR authors. “While panels contain small amounts of valuable materials such as silver, they are mostly made of glass, an extremely low-value material,” they note. As a result, it costs 10 to 30 times more to recycle than to send panels to the landfill. The problem is the sheer quantity of the hazardous waste, which far exceeds the waste produced by iPhones, laptops, and other electronics. The volume of waste expected from the solar industry, found a team of Indian researchers in 2020, was far higher than from other electronics. “The totality of these unforeseen costs could crush industry competitiveness,” conclude the HBR authors. “If we plot future installations according to a logistic growth curve capped at 700 GW by 2050 (NREL’s estimated ceiling for the U.S. residential market) alongside the early replacement curve, we see the volume of waste surpassing that of new installations by the year 2031.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelshellenberger/2021/06/21/why-everything-they-said-about-solar---including-that-its-clean-and-cheap---was-wrong/?sh=65d7b3585fe5
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...