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  2. Well, that's exactly the point - no end. Look, we have the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary chiefs and the Wet’suwet’en elected Chief and Council. The Wet’suwet’en people themselves have chosen who is to be their leader and who is to represent them in negotiations. If they wanted the "Hereditary Chiefs" to be their leader and representative they would have chosen them. Why would we (Canada) negotiate with anyone other than the duelly elected council and can you imaging the outcry if some sort of agreement was negotiated with anyone other than the Elected Chief and Council? "How dare we shutout the "elected" Chief, as chosen by the people, when the "Hereditary Chiefs" clearly have no standing?" Except that they do have standing but only when it suits those who disagree with the elected Council.
  3. Major airlines say they're acting on climate change. Our research reveals how little they've achieved The Conversation AUView the full article
  4. At what point will the talks, the reconciliation, the polishing of the silver chain reach a conclusive end?? We have a national chief of the AFN, regional chiefs, chairs of elders and youths councils, hereditary chiefs elders, local band chiefs that have been negotiating on behalf of the First Nations....and now we have unelected band members, with no title and sympathizers with no status at all, holding TROC hostage because of their perceptions of governance and injustice....when will it end??
  5. These folks seem to believe that if you use a word over and over again (like settlers) and assert that "settlers need to" that it will somehow cause fundamental and lasting change in the opinion of their audience; sort of like "irregular border crossers" or "Bernie's a racist." They are the same people who prattle about this is an apple and this is an orange..... as if they are teaching a primary school class. The one huge takeaway from all this is that people who want action on climate change are simply not willing to put up with the inconvenience and cost of achieving it. I'm now absolutely convinced that all efforts directed toward achieving Paris Accord targets will fail, and they will fail in spectacular fashion because neither the government nor the people (who want it) are even willing to discuss it rationally. 79 is a whole bunch of megatons, in comparison to that, this little blockade is a whole bunch of nothing. What I'm suggesting is that Canada should shut this protest down and stop pretending we are on track to achieving accord targets. Only when that has been embraced, can we move on to something that might work.
  6. Misunderstanding over Indigenous sovereignty Calgary Sun 16 Feb 2020 LORNE GUNTER lgunter@postmedia.com @sunlornegunter Let’s say for a minute that the Wet’suwet’en people of northern B.C. had sovereignty over their land, as claimed by those Indigenous and non-Indigenous protesters across the country who oppose the Coastal GasLink pipeline. The protests along the route of the pipeline and at multiple other sites across the country are based, in part, on the assertion that the Wet’suwet’en never ceded control over their land and thus retain sovereignty to this day. It’s not quite that simple. Canadian courts do recognize Indigenous sovereignty, but only if individual nations have signed treaties giving them sovereignty, settled a land claim or gone to court to assert their sovereignty. The Wet’suwet’en have done none of those things. But let’s say for the sake of argument that the Wet’suwet’en people do have recognized sovereignty over their traditional lands. That still wouldn’t give them an automatic right to veto any proposed project across that land. Non-Indigenous property owners don’t have an unchallengeable right to prevent development on their land. Private property is expropriated or otherwise claimed by governments all the time for highways, power lines, wind farms, pipelines, subdivisions and other alleged public purposes, provided adequate compensation is paid. Indeed, if you told the lefty, non-Indigenous protestors who are demanding the Wet’suwet’en be granted unquestioned power over their land, that non-Indigenous land owners would be given that same level of control over their own property – a power that could potentially prevent most government action – those same hypocrites would accuse you of advocating Darwinian capitalism. As courts have said again and again, the duty to be consulted or even to be compensated is not the same as the power to veto. But the current gross misunderstanding of just what Indigenous “sovereignty” means comes mostly from myths and fallacies First Nations have told themselves over the last three or four decades; myths and fallacies that have been encouraged and reinforced by politically correct politicians, academics, activists and judges. This week, a group of Treaty 8 chiefs walked out of a meeting with Alberta Premier Jason Kenney over child welfare policy. They insisted they didn’t have to abide by changes in provincial programs because “contrary to what the Government of Canada and Province of Alberta says (sic), we did not cede or surrender our lands.” Good try. But Treaty 8, like most of the Prairie treaties, explicitly says the signatories “hereby cede, release, surrender and yield up to the Government of the Dominion of Canada … all their rights, titles and privileges whatsoever to the lands …” That couldn’t be clearer. Yet for years now, bold-faced claims such as the Treaty 8 chiefs’, have been met with nodding acceptance by timid politicians and elites afraid of being called racist. There will be no meaningful reconciliation so long as these fanciful absolutes are accepted as truth and permitted to determine what constitutes success. You are never going to satisfy people who have convinced themselves the only way they can be sure they have been properly consulted is when governments and companies give into their demands fully. If you and you alone get to decide how much is enough, what is to prevent you from upping the stakes, then upping them again, endlessly? I’m all for self-governance by First Nations. Indigenous communities should have all the same rights as non-Indigenous ones to be consulted, to fight for their views, set policy and share in the rewards of development. But so long as the current false sense of rights is allowed to fester and grow — that it’s their way or no way — Canada will get nowhere. Most First Nations have under 500 members. They can function on a level similar to non-Indigenous towns and villages (with some inherent special status, such as mineral rights). But to insist they have special rights to hold up all development is a recipe for economic stagnation and political division.
  7. M.I.a. Trudeau dithers while rail blockaders hold nation hostage Calgary Sun 16 Feb 2020 LORRIE GOLDSTEIN lgoldstein@postmedia.com @sunlorrie In 1968, 7-Up had a successful ad campaign billing itself as the “Uncola.” In 2020, Canadians have, in Justin Trudeau, our very own, “Un-Prime Minister.” Don’t look at him, he said — from Munich while on a foreign tour to increase Canada’s chances of winning a temporary seat on the UN Security Council — to end the Indigenous blockades that have shut down much of Canada’s railway system. That’s the job of the police, Trudeau said, adding: “We are not the kind of country where politicians get to tell the police what to do in operational matters.” The late Christie Blatchford, writing in the National Post, summed up this attitude perfectly in relation to Indigenous blockades in Ontario years ago, where the then-Liberal government took a similar hands-off approach and the Ontario Provincial Police failed to enforce court-ordered injunctions. To wit: “The government mantra is hands off the police, the police are accountable to no one, including the courts, and no one is answerable to the people.” What Trudeau could have done, what a prime minister should have done, was to return to Ottawa immediately and take charge. To signal to Canadians he understood the blockades were not only inconveniencing the public but damaging the economy, endangering jobs and risking public safety by, for example, choking off vital supplies to hospitals and chlorine to water treatment plants. Trudeau could have met with Public Safety Minister Bill Blair to be briefed, given that the Trudeau-appointed RCMP commissioner, “under the direction of the minister (meaning Blair) has the control and management of the Force and all matters connected with the Force.” Following that, Trudeau could have told the public that getting the rail lines open was a national priority and he had instructed Blair to do everything possible to achieve this, within his lawful powers under the RCMP Act. That doesn’t mean telling Blair to interfere with “operational matters” by ordering the RCMP to immediately storm the barricades, regardless of any threat to the public, the protesters or the RCMP officers themselves. It does mean holding Blair, and through him, the PM himself, publicly accountable for getting the rail lines moving and informing the public of what actions they were taking, or not taking, to do so and why. Trudeau could have publicly acknowledged police cannot address the reasons behind these protests, which are the result of decisions by federal and provincial governments, and that the solutions are further complicated because of disputes within the Indigenous community between elected and hereditary leaders. Ever since Indigenous protester Dudley George was shot and killed by Ontario Provincial Police in the Ipperwash standoff in 1995 during the Mike Harris Progressive Conservative government, federal and provincial governments of all stripes, as well as police, have been terrified of taking action during Indigenous blockades. The result has been disasters like the Ontario town of Caledonia being held hostage by such protests for years. Meanwhile, we have a PM, who, as described by former ethics commissioner Mary Dawson in her report on Trudeau’s multiple violations of conflict-of-interest rules regarding his Aga Khan family vacations, doesn’t see himself as holding business meetings as head of his own government. Rather, Trudeau views himself as a relationship builder, “ensuring that all parties are moving forward together” while “specific issues or details are worked out before, subsequently or independently of any meeting he attends.” That’s Trudeau, all right. Our “Un-Prime Minister.”
  8. Well we are on our way to the Democratic Republic of North American States. Let the secession begin
  9. I wonder at what point regular Canadians, who can't get to work, can't get groceries can't get heat for their homes will decide to enforce the laws that the RCMP won't? This, after all is the bargain we (society ) have made; we do not resort to vigilantism and person solutions to solve grievances and make people answer for wrongs committed because we expect the police and courts to do it expeditiously and fairly. If the police and courts do not hold up their end of the bargain, well, what is the expected end game? An example of what we can expect (and personally, I'm surprised it doesn't happen more often);
  10. A sample of the rhetoric our woke pm will have to reconcile....after all it’s his governments most important relationship .... nation to nation:
  11. Miguna sues Lufthansa, Air France over failed return to Kenya Daily NationView the full article
  12. Why Miguna wants Lufthansa, Air France landing rights suspended Daily NationView the full article
  13. RALEIGH, N.C., Feb. 16, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Chad Price, the CEO of Mako Medical, announced this week that Mako Medical Laboratories is launching a new DNA test focused on Nutrition. "This is a first step in helping people understand exactly what foods they should eat so they can optimize... View the full article
  14. Flight of fancy? Aviation industry tries to go green ARY NEWSView the full article
  15. Corruption charges force Airbus into loss for 2019 Asian AviationView the full article
  16. NETANYA, Israel, Feb. 16, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Cellcom Israel Ltd. (NYSE: CEL) (TASE: CEL) (hereinafter: the "Company") announced today that it is in negotiations with Golan Telecom Ltd.'s, or Golan Telecom, shareholders, in regards to possible purchase of their holdings in Golan Telecom.... View the full article
  17. NETANYA, Israel, Feb. 16, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Cellcom Israel Ltd. (NYSE: CEL) (TASE: CEL) (hereinafter: the "Company") announced today that it is in negotiations with Golan Telecom Ltd.'s, or Golan Telecom, shareholders, in regards to possible purchase of their holdings in Golan Telecom.... View the full article
  18. UkrInform: Canada says PS752's black boxes belong to Ukraine | KyivPost - Ukraine's Global Voice Kyiv PostView the full article
  19. TUNIS, Tunisia, Feb. 16, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Teleperformance, Novonordisk, Safran, EMKA electronics and Mezzo Tunisia were recognized as Best Places To Work in Tunisia for 2020 according to the annual workplace survey driven by the global workplace research firm Best Companies Group USA.... View the full article
  20. TUNIS, Tunisia, Feb. 16, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Teleperformance, Novonordisk, Safran, EMKA electronics and Mezzo Tunisia were recognized as Best Places To Work in Tunisia for 2020 according to the annual workplace survey driven by the global workplace research firm Best Companies Group USA.... View the full article
  21. REUTERS NEWS SCHEDULE AT 6 a.m. GMT/2 p.m. SGT Financial PostView the full article
  22. AMMAN, Jordan, Feb. 16, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Tamatem, the leading mobile games publisher in the Arabic speaking market, has raised a $3.5MM Series A follow-on round. The round was led by existing investor Wamda Capital, with participation from Modern Electronics Company (a subsidiary of... View the full article
  23. AMMAN, Jordan, Feb. 16, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Tamatem, the leading mobile games publisher in the Arabic speaking market, has raised a $3.5MM Series A follow-on round. The round was led by existing investor Wamda Capital, with participation from Modern Electronics Company (a subsidiary of... View the full article
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