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  1. Dr Joetey Attariwala is quite an industry fluffer. The Kingfisher is an unmitigated disaster. The three aircraft that have actually been delivered are hangar queens. The get dragged out once a month, started up and then quickly rolled back in to hiding. Not a single line pilot has been trained on it. Testing has revealed multiple problems with basic airworthyness of the Airforce variant. If they ever get signed off, Operational roles will not include deploying SAR tech's without major alterations as jumpers risk being struck by the tail as they exited. It's what happens when Govt minions in charge of purchasing get overwhelmed by the glossy brochures of unproven prototype equipment.
    4 points
  2. The last time I checked viewing ANY section of this web site was voluntary. Your choice, you decide. Where is it written one is forced to read the non aviation forum? It’s not rocket science folks. I understand it’s 2022, and every sentence has to somewhere include the phrase “I feel” instead of the tried and true “I think” ….If the subject matter doesn’t make your innards feel all warm and fuzzy, maybe one shouldn’t go there. Topics based in reality outside the realm of “coffee room airplane chat” can be stressful to some, but that does not translate (In my opinion) to topics that should not be discussed. A few years ago, some were offended about certain topics creeping in here, so the non aviation section was formed as a compromise to pacify those few. It has served that purpose quite well. Even this thread could be construed as “political” and therefore should not be a part of this section if you really want to push it. Reading between the lines one has to presume some no longer want to read subjects based in reality regardless of where they are posted. In actual fact, those are the subjects that NEED to be discussed. What has the world become that providing people “safe spaces” must take priority over every opposing voice where the only option is to censor them out of existence? If this is what the generations born between 1940 to 1980 have become, it’s no wonder the world is such a screwed up place.
    4 points
  3. What is the rationale for that? Actually, that isn't even correct. A retired MP cannot receive a pension until age 55. Is it better to have somebody with no previous real work experience, who has lived off a trust fund he inherited all his adult life?
    4 points
  4. That looks like hors d'oeuvres..... only 370 cals, hardly worth the gas to drive over. Let's add 2 all beef patties special sauce....
    4 points
  5. Pacific Coastal Looking back on 35 Years 18 September 2022Canadian Aviation News 15 September 2022 Pacific Coastal Airlines History Timeline Pacific Coastal Airlines was founded by Daryl Smith 35 years ago. The truck logger in Bella Coola, a small community on the central coast of British Columbia, decided to get a pilot’s license and purchased a small seaplane to make it easier to get in and out of remote camps. Some friends chipped in for fuel to tag along and thus began the adventure that led to Pacific Coastal Airlines. Daryl earned his reputation through forty-two years of aviation experience as a pilot and owner of several regional carriers during the most significant era of aviation history in the province. That legacy of dedication and hard work continues with his son, President Quentin Smith, intimately involved in all aspects of the aviation business started by their father. A legendary figure in British Columbia aviation, Daryl received numerous awards and accolades from his peers and industry associations alike. It began in 1987, with the merger of Powell Air and Air BC Port Hardy seaplane operation. The name Pacific Coastal Airlines was chosen from five company names that Air BC owned at the time. “Pasco” was then born, providing floatplane service into the mainland communities and interline with Air BC’s Dash 7 scheduled flights between Vancouver and Port Hardy. The launch of our daily scheduled twin-engine wheel aircraft service from Port Hardy to Bella Bella and Vancouver started in 1988. This service utilized a seven-passenger Piper Navajo. In 1990, we introduced our first pressurized turboprop aircraft. The Beech King Air was purchased to meet increased demand and improve service levels on the Vancouver and Bella Bella route. Pacific Coastal’s corporate culture has always had a shared value of giving back to the people and the communities we serve. In 1992, the Pacific Coastal Airlines’ Annual Charity Golf Tournament was launched. Over the years, with the hard work of Pasco volunteers and the generous support of sponsors, hundreds of thousands of dollars have been raised to support BC-based charities. We introduced our first 705 aircraft in 1995 – the Shorts 360. This aircraft introduction was to help meet the growing demand on our central coast destinations as well as fishing lodge charter opportunities. In 1998, Pacific Coastal entered a Capacity Purchase Agreement with Canadian Airlines to operate as a “Canadian Partner” by providing service from Vancouver to Nanaimo, Comox, and Campbell River operating on the Shorts 360 aircraft. In 1999, we introduced the Saab 340A aircraft. Three Saab 340 aircraft were then added to further enhance service levels and to expand Pacific Coastal’s network “reach”. This began the replacement of the Shorts 360 aircraft and lead to the acquisition of a further seven Saab 340 aircraft. Our Community Sharing program was established in 2016. We support families in need within our network each Christmas and provide gift certificates for utilities, food, warm clothes, household items, and gifts from Santa for the children. This is all been made possible by internal fundraisers by staff. In 2017, Pacific Coastal Seaplane division obtains an independent Air Operator’s Certificate and rebranded as Wilderness Seaplanes Ltd. Today, as Pacific Coastal’s affiliate airline, Wilderness operates seaplane service to more than fifty coastal communities from bases in Port Hardy on northern Vancouver Island and Bella Bella. In 2018, Pacific Coastal Airlines enters a Capacity Purchase Agreement (CPA) with WestJet and becomes the operator of WestJet Link. WestJet Link was created to connect smaller cities in British Columbia and Alberta with WestJet’s domestic hub at the Calgary International Airport. Over the years, Pacific Coastal has provided air travel for Special Olympics BC athletes, coaches, and volunteers to attend events all over BC and help with ongoing fundraising efforts throughout the year. In 2019, we celebrated our 20-year partnership with SOBC and are a proud member of the Special Olympics BC Hall of Fame. Pacific Coastal Airlines also generously donates space on its flights to transport animals to and from BC SPCA shelters across the province. These flights allow animals to receive urgent medical care and gives animals their best chance of adoption by moving them to shelters in more populated areas. Today, Pacific Coastal operates a fleet of 19, which includes a mix of Saab 340A and B and Beechcraft 1900C and D. Our network continues to encompass major ski destinations, a multitude of fishing lodges, outdoor and wildlife adventure tours, and authentic Indigenous experiences. As we look back on our history and celebrate our 35-year anniversary, we’re proud to see the growth of Pacific Coastal Airlines. With over 400 employees in British Columbia and Alberta, Pacific Coastal continues to grow and provide essential service, and it all started with a former truck logger with a great passion for aviation. For our 35th anniversary, we’re not just recognizing how far we’ve come, we’re celebrating what lies ahead, and we’re starting our next chapter by thanking you. We’re offering 35% off our network for your next trip with us. Use promo code SUPERPROMO22 when booking your next flight for travel between January and March 2023. Terms and conditions apply. Visit our website to book today. We look forward to welcoming you onboard and thank you for choosing to fly with Pacific Coastal Airlines!
    3 points
  6. I think people used to be made of much tougher stuff. https://www.burnslakelakesdistrictnews.com/news/mercy-plane-sets-record-flight-from-burns-lake-made-in-five-hours/?utm_source=skies-daily-news-news-from-the-web&utm_campaign=skies-daily-news&utm_medium=email&utm_term=news-news-from-the-web&utm_content=V1
    3 points
  7. As expected. A first round Coronation The Ottawa-area MP secured the support of 68.15 per cent of voting members,
    3 points
  8. “the lack of participation is puzzling” possibly due to the fact that it is impossible to defend this guy anymore…..with all the scandals….VA Norman, SNC, WE charity, Emergencies Act, Mass Casualty interference and probably a few more I’ve lost track of…..how could anyone say, just a minute, the government had it right…. and more to the point, if they had evidence to back up their position, why would they hide behind cabinet confidence and not answer direct questions in a parliamentary committee?? Then there are the members that disagree with the current government and are just fatigued with the examples of constant mismanagement ……Wolfhunter come to mind. In the mean time….. the hits just keep on comin!
    3 points
  9. I think you can take the silence as mute agreement of what is posted. I agree with all the anti Trudeau posts, but don't feel the need to post more. I spend my energies trying to get PP elected as oppo leader to eventually kick Trudeau to the curb.
    3 points
  10. I am one of those recent retirees and I couldn't care less anymore about "pilot shortages" after the struggle I and so many of my former colleagues faced over the last 35 years to obtain decent working conditions and wages in the Canadian aviation industry. Serves the airlines and the traveling public right. Good riddance to the industry. I'll take the train. Or just drive.
    3 points
  11. All that snow and ice makes me wonder if I should start up the snow blower just to get ready or is it too soon?
    3 points
  12. So Trudeau unilaterally decides to ban personal property (no debate and no vote in parliament) and Alberta says wait a minute….good for them.
    2 points
  13. “ The government is arguing that, since most of the onerous parts of the mandates have been lifted, the lawsuit challenging them is now moot and should be dismissed," writes Rupa Subramanya. "It would allow the government to get away with anything, so long as it does so fast enough to avoid legal scrutiny." “ In layman’s language, the government is arguing that, since most of the onerous parts of the mandates have been lifted, the lawsuit challenging them is now moot and should be dismissed. On Sept. 21, the Federal Court of Canada, under Judge Jocelyne Gagné, began hearing submissions from Presvelos and lawyers representing the attorney general, which I attended via Zoom. In making the case that the suit should be dismissed, Robert Drummond, counsel for the attorney general, argued: “I think it’s fair to say that (there is) no evidence that such travel measures are returning. The statements made by ministers are political statements and press releases, not legal statements.” In other words, the government’s lawyers made the extraordinary argument that what politicians say should be ignored, since such statements have no legal force. Pushing back, Presvelos argued: “My friend (the attorney general) would like this court to believe that media statements don’t matter. They are not legal statements. (I’m) not sure what type of democracy we exist in if we cannot trust the truthfulness of statements being made by government ministers.”
    2 points
  14. “ People can attack my politics, they can call me names, they can protest my ideas and what I stand for. But threatening my wife and family is appalling and I will not tolerate it." — Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, on his decision to refer alleged rape threats concerning his wife to the RCMP. “
    2 points
  15. 'On the morning of the accident, the pilot conducted a routine series of pre-flight checks before proceeding to the active runway for a standard departure. Shortly after liftoff, the pilot confirmed a positive rate of climb and selected the landing gear up. Immediately after gear selection, the pilot heard a loud noise and the engine failed. The aircraft rapidly started decelerating and descending back to the runway. The pilot selected the landing gear back down and elected to land the aircraft straight ahead, however the landing gear did not have sufficient time to fully cycle back to the locked-down position. The aircraft touched down with only approximately 500 feet of runway remaining. The unlocked landing gear collapsed under the weight of the aircraft, and the aircraft skidded off the departure‑end. After approximately 1000 feet of travel, the aircraft impacted the airport perimeter fence at low speed and came to rest. The pilot secured the engine and immediately egressed the aircraft. The aircraft sustained very serious damage but the pilot sustained no injuries. The engine failure was due to an improperly assembled oil filter. The investigation is now analyzing the human factors that may have contributed to this occurrence.' CT-114 Tutor - 02 Aug, 2022 - Fort St John B.C.
    2 points
  16. Hi there... I just stopped by to check on the poll and noticed your post. This sort of thing is why I've cut back on reading the news for a while, the needle on my disbelief threshold gauge (DTG) is continually getting buried, it requires constant servicing and is usually broken. Pulling and tagging the breaker, covering your ears and singing LA,LA, LALALA is the only approved MEL action. I would have thought that the staunchest of Liberal voters would have buyers remorse by now, nope... they seem addicted to the tink, tink, tink tink sound that accompanies firewall thrust. As a result, my interest has now shifted to determining that magical point when they blink and ask: "like dude, like how much is like enough like eh? 68 churches in Canada have been either burned or vandalized, 32 young doctors have keeled over and died... have any of these folks noticed? Where is the media and for that matter, where is the opposition party... suggesting that they have been AWAL and stand in need of a good spanking is something of an understatement. Until voters start asking: "like dude, what did you do with my country like?" I'm guessing we will stay the course and test the full limits of stratospheric absurdity. In any case, I threw in a few aviation references to preserve the sanctity of "SFA" (safe for all). Cheers
    2 points
  17. 2 points
  18. Agree on all counts. Just a brief visit during a short absence but i evened up the score card, in doing so, I can't help but wonder where the notion that limiting participation results in increased participation hails from. IMO, the lack of interest in this poll is indicative of the lack of interest in banning the non aviation side. Does there always have to be a ban and need it extend to that which you freely admit to not reading? Sometimes getting along with your neighbours (especially the ones who want nothing from you) is as easy as giving them what they want.... you do you with my full support. All I want in return for that support is nothing, how easy is that? Best wishes.
    2 points
  19. Hey Greg, i thought this was going to be about your first solo.
    2 points
  20. From Mike Rowe..(dirty jobs) Years ago, I came across a transcript of a conversation between Tom Burnett, and his wife, Deena. Tom was a passenger on Flight 93, who was in contact with his wife moments before he and several others rushed the cockpit and brought down the plane. I shared their conversation here two years ago, because every time people say "never forget," this is what I think of. It's strange, because I have my own memories and my own personal stories about that day, but whenever I hear "never forget," I remember a conversation I didn't have. A conversation I hope to never have. A conversation between a man who caught an earlier flight, because he was so anxious to get home to his family, and the wife he would never see again. It's painful to read, but I'm sharing it again because I choose to remember, and hope you do, too. --------- 6:27 a.m.( pacific time) First cell phone call from Tom to Deena Deena: Hello Tom: Deena Deena: Tom, are you O.K.? Tom: No, I’m not. I’m on an airplane that has been hijacked. Deena: Hijacked? Tom: Yes, They just knifed a guy. Deena: A passenger? Tom: Yes. Deena: Where are you? Are you in the air? Tom: Yes, yes, just listen. Our airplane has been hijacked. It’s United Flight 93 from Newark to San Francisco. We are in the air. The hijackers have already knifed a guy, one of them has a gun, they are telling us there is a bomb on board, please call the authorities. 6:31 Deena calls 911 6:34 The phone rang in on call waiting, Tom’s second cell phone call. Deena: Hello Tom: They’re in the cockpit. The guy they knifed is dead. Deena: He’s dead? Tom: Yes. I tried to help him, but I couldn’t get a pulse. Deena: Tom, they are hijacking planes all up and down the east coast. They are taking them and hitting designated targets. They’ve already hit both towers of the World Trade Center. Tom: They’re talking about crashing this plane. (a pause) Oh my God. It’s a suicide mission…(he then tells people sitting around him) Deena: Who are you talking to? Tom: My seatmate. Do you know which airline is involved? Deena: No, they don’t know if they’re commercial airlines or not. The news reporters are speculating cargo planes, private planes and commercial. No one knows. Tom: How many planes are there? Deena: They’re not sure, at least three. Maybe more. Tom: O.K….O.K….Do you know who is involved? Deena: No. Tom: We’re turning back toward New York. We’re going back to the World Trade Center. No, wait, we’re turning back the other way. We’re going south. Deena: What do you see? Tom: Just a minute, I’m looking. I don’t see anything, we’re over a rural area. It’s just fields. I’ve gotta go. 6:45 a.m. Third cell phone call from Tom to Deena Tom: Deena Deena: Tom! you’re O.K! (She thought at this point he had just survived the Pentagon plane crash). Tom: No, I’m not. Deena: They just hit the Pentagon. Tom: (tells people sitting around him “They just hit the Pentagon.”) Tom: O.K….O.K. What else can you tell me? Deena: They think five airplanes have been hijacked. One is still on the ground. They believe all of them are commercial planes. I haven’t heard them say which airline, but all of them have originated on the east coast. Tom: Do you know who is involved? Deena: No Tom: What is the probability of their having a bomb on board? I don’t think they have one. I think they’re just telling us that for crowd control. Deena: A plane can survive a bomb if it’s in the right place. Tom: Did you call the authorities? Deena: Yes, they didn’t know anything about your plane. Tom: They’re talking about crashing this plane into the ground. We have to do something. I’m putting a plan together. Deena: Who’s helping you? Tom: Different people. Several people. There’s a group of us. Don’t worry. I’ll call you back. 6:54 a.m. Fourth cell phone call to Tom to Deena Deena: Tom? Tom: Hi. Anything new? Deena: No Tom: Where are the kids? Deena: They’re fine. They’re sitting at the table having breakfast. They’re asking to talk to you. Tom: Tell them I’ll talk to them later. Deena: I called your parents. They know your plane has been hijacked. Tom: Oh…you shouldn’t have worried them. How are they doing? Deena: They’re O.K.. Mary and Martha are with them. Tom: Good. (a long quiet pause) Tom: We’re waiting until we’re over a rural area. We’re going to take back the airplane. Deena: No! Sit down, be still, be quiet, and don’t draw attention to yourself! (The exact words taught to me by Delta Airlines Flight Attendant Training). Tom: Deena! If they’re going to crash this plane into the ground, we’re going to have do something! Deena: What about the authorities? Tom: We can’t wait for the authorities. I don’t know what they could do anyway. It’s up to us. I think we can do it. Deena: What do you want me to do? Tom: Pray, Deena, just pray. (after a long pause) Deena: I love you. Tom: Don’t worry, we’re going to do something... http://www.tomburnettfoundation.org/
    2 points
  21. Are you sure DeSantis was talking about Biden?? You could insert Trudeau and the critique would still apply!
    2 points
  22. Any chance of an autograph?
    2 points
  23. When the union's mindset at the table is "we don't negotiate for people who aren't here yet", it opens the door for the pay scale you are referring to.
    2 points
  24. I find that I do not frequent the forums as much as I used to because of the divisive nature of the "NON AVIATION" posts. I do ignore them now when I come to the forum but IMHO those discussions are better left in the political forums.
    1 point
  25. I couldn't agree more! Lets hope they find out who they are!
    1 point
  26. Justin-flation Former Bank of Canada governor forecasts recession Former Bank of Canada (BoC) governor David Dodge told the Senate banking committee on Thursday that Canada faces an impending recession. According to Blacklock’s Reporter, Dodge predicted economic growth would flatline and unemployment will surge. “It’s not going to feel so good,” said Dodge. “Unemployment is going to rise and economic growth will flatten to zero.” Dodge also blamed his successors for incorrect forecasts, claiming they were “not very helpful.” Senator Clement Gignac (Que.), who was the chief economist for National Bank, criticized BoC executives for giving bad advice to Canadians. “In 2020 the central banks, not only in Canada, said interest rates would remain low for a while,” said Gignac. “As a result a lot of people bought houses at variable rate mortgages.” “In 2020 the Bank of Canada said, ‘You know what? Inflation will be transitory.’ Whoops,” said Gignac. “They give us the impression that they know a lot of things, and we start to realize they have no better clue than Wall Street economists.” Since 2020, Bank of Canada governors have issued the following inaccurate forecasts: “Interest rates are going to be low for a long time” (Tiff Macklem, July 15 2020) “Inflation is expected to remain less than two percent in 2023” (Tiff Macklem, July 15 2020) “Inflation will stay low” (Stephen Poloz, November 17 2020) “The inflation we’re observing right now is very likely to be transitory” (Stephen Poloz, May 18 2021). Senator Gignac asked Dodge about the BoC’s inaccurate predictions. “Do you think the central bank talks too much?” asked Gignac. “I think it’s very hard to give guidance other than, ‘We’re going to watch and see what happens,’” replied Dodge. “I think there were big mistakes made.” Dodge served as the Bank of Canada’s governor from 2001-2008 before retiring. Economists from Desjardins Group and the Royal Bank of Canada are now joining the growing number of experts who are telling Canadians to brace for an incoming recession. An official statement from the BoC also indicated more hikes were likely coming soon. “Given the outlook for inflation, the Governing Council still judges that the policy interest rate will need to rise further,” read the statement. https://tnc.news/2022/09/25/former-boc-recession/
    1 point
  27. Aviation related I guess Another prominent Russian dies, this time after falling down several flights of stairs 'Unfortunately, the workers did not have time to install the railings A top aviation scientist is the latest prominent Russian to die under suspicious circumstances, apparently suffering a fall “from a great height” at a building under construction. Anatoly Gerashchenko, the former head of the Moscow Aviation Institute, was working at the university this week as an adviser when he “died in an accident,” according to the group’s press release. The Russian newspaper Izvestia reports that the 70-year-old aviation expert “fell from a great height, flying down several flights of stairs” to his death. Gerashchenko is far from the only prominent Russian figure to lose their life in strange circumstances over the last few weeks. On September 14, the 68-year-old editor of the pro-Kremlin state newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda, Vladimir Sungorkin, died while on a business trip in Far East Russia. According to a colleague who wrote about the incident, Sungorkin “began to suffocate” while driving; a doctor later determined that he had suffered a stroke. The day before Sungorkin’s death, Ivan Pechorin, the 39-year-old managing director of the state-run Far East and Arctic Development Corporation, also died in the Far East, falling off a moving boat in the Sea of Japan. The most notable death in the ranks of Russia’s business elite came on September 1, when Ravil Maganov, the 67-year-old chairman of Lukoil, died after falling out the window of the sixth floor of Moscow Central Clinical Hospital. The Russian state news agency TASS reported the death of the leader of the country’s second-largest oil-and-gas firm as a suicide. Since Russia invaded Ukraine in February, around 15 Russian oil executives and bankers have died in at least moderately suspicious circumstances. In August, the Latvian Putin critic and banker Dan Rapoport fell to his death from his apartment in Washington, D.C. — though police say there’s no suspicion of foul play. Billionaire and former Lukoil executive Alexander Subbotin was found dead in a shaman’s home north of Moscow in May. Former Gazprombank VP Vladislav Avayev was found dead of a gunshot wound in April, along with his wife and 13-year-old daughter. Also in April, the former executive of Novatek, Sergey Protosenya, was found hanged from a handrail in the courtyard of an apartment in Spain, with his wife and daughter dead inside. The idea that he could have been responsible for the deaths, the company said, bears “no relation to reality.” To date, there’s no clear theory for the bizarre string of deaths, though some of those on the list have expressed criticisms of Putin or the war, and prominent dissenters of his regime have long faced mortal consequences. Rapoport was an outspoken supporter of the jailed critic Alexei Navalny and frequently denounced the invasion of Ukraine on social media. Though the late Lukoil executives do not have a history of criticizing the state in public, in March, the Lukoil board called “for the soonest termination of the armed conflict” in Ukraine and that they “express our sincere empathy for all victims.” The list is not packed with dissidents, however. Pechorin was reportedly picked by Putin himself to run the Far East oil-development firm, and Sungorkin led a paper that was staunchly pro-Kremlin. https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2022/09/prominent-russians-keep-dying-under-mysterious-circumstances.html
    1 point
  28. The word "assembled" is interesting. From a maintainers point of view, I would like to know if this indicates an error on the part of the person who installed the filter on the aircraft, or if there was a faulty assembly process involved before the technician received the filter for installation. I am not familiar with the oil system on the J85 engine.
    1 point
  29. Haven't looked at the Poll link for awhile. Have now cast my ballot.
    1 point
  30. I too go back to the Jim Wood days. I think that the non-aviation discussion forum is kept separate and can be disregarded completely. Also there just isn't that many here any more on the aviation forum. I have found many of the discussions interesting and informative. I do think though that the non-aviation part of the site should be restricted to discussions. Cartoons mocking public figures just detract from the subject and don't elicit any discussion. I suggested having a separate thread titled "Humour" and those that want to and stick their cartoons in there. Greg
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. Chorus Aviation Announces President & Chief Executive Officer Succession Français NEWS PROVIDED BY Chorus Aviation Inc. Sep 14, 2022, 19:00 ET HALIFAX, NS, Sept. 14, 2022 /CNW/ - The Board of Directors of Chorus Aviation Inc. ('Chorus' or the 'Company') (TSX: CHR) announced today that Joseph (Joe) Randell plans to retire as President and Chief Executive Officer, in the first quarter of 2023, following the Company's reporting of its 2022 year-end results. His retirement will follow a 37-year leadership career in regional aviation. Upon Mr. Randell's retirement, Colin Copp, currently the Chief Operating Officer, Chorus and President, Chorus Aviation Services, will be appointed President and Chief Executive Officer of Chorus. "I am delighted to announce Colin Copp as our next CEO," said Paul Rivett, Chair of the Chorus Board of Directors. Mr. Rivett continued, "Chorus is fortunate to have a CEO successor in Colin Copp, with such an in-depth knowledge of the business and its culture. Colin has played an instrumental role in Chorus' evolution, displaying a proven ability to think strategically, to communicate his vision and to successfully execute on the intended plans. The Board looks forward to working with Colin and is confident in Colin's ability to guide Chorus through the next exciting chapter of growth and diversification." Mr. Copp has been the Chief Operating Officer of Chorus and President of Chorus Aviation Services, including Jazz Aviation and Voyageur Aviation, since March 2019. Previously, he was the President of Jazz Aviation. He has been with the Company and its predecessors for over 30 years, with leadership experience in key roles across operations, administration, and labour relations. Colin holds a Masters' Degree in Business Administration, is a Certified Negotiator and Chartered Mediator and holds a designation from the Institute of Corporate Directors (ICD.D). He is currently a Board member of the Air Transport Association of Canada and the Aerospace Industries Association of Canada. "Colin has been an integral member of my leadership team for almost two decades and has proven to be an exemplary leader with demonstrated skills in handling complicated change management issues and multi-stakeholder negotiations," said Joe Randell. "He has built strong relationships across the aviation industry and elevated Jazz and Voyageur to new levels of performance. I am confident Colin will adeptly and successfully lead Chorus through the next transformative phase, and I look forward to working closely with Colin, and the rest of the executive team, as he transitions to the CEO role." Mr. Randell's regional aviation career spans four decades. He was the founding President of Air Nova, having started the Atlantic Canada-based airline in 1986 with two aircraft serving five destinations. He will retire having built a global company with approximately 5,000 employees, which includes the largest regional airline in Canada, a market leading aircraft asset management company and the world's largest aircraft lessor solely focused on the regional segment. Mr. Randell has provided stable leadership and successfully executed a long-term vision for Chorus through the most challenging periods for the aviation industry. In 2020, he was inducted into the Canadian Aviation Hall of Fame in recognition of his significant contribution in advancing Canadian aviation. "Joe is widely recognized as the founder and builder of regional aviation in Canada," said Mr. Rivett. "He has been a true visionary, continuing to re-invent the business through various cycles and trends in the industry. Joe is equally respected for his ethics and integrity, which has resulted in many strong industry and community relationships and partnerships. His own personal values have shaped an award-winning corporate culture. On behalf of the Board and the employees of the Chorus companies, I thank Joe for his long-standing dedication and commitment, including his support through the upcoming transition.
    1 point
  33. It is kind of ironic that there is an article in the National Post by Terry Glavin questioning how wealthy connected Iranians seem to appear in Canada: https://nationalpost.com/opinion/terry-glavin-ottawas-lush-welcome-mat-for-rich-iranians-linked-to-its-brutal-regime and an article in a Toronto paper which covered a deadly car accident involving a speeding, impaired, unlicensed driver who had just arrived from Iran: Yes, the accident was in 2019, but with the current government, who knows what has been going on with immigration….. More questions are being raised: https://nationalpost.com/news/iranian-vice-presidents-son-allowed-to-live-in-canada-despite-visa-rejection-for-others And of course, diversity is our strength…
    1 point
  34. 1 point
  35. It's not a conclusion. Just a suspicion born from the failing of our judicial system.
    1 point
  36. Well done Kip. It seems to me that you should repeat the retirement scenario and transfer out here with the boat to YYJ.
    1 point
  37. Kip, The Sailor. A fine retirement to a proud RCAF vet! (Signed - son of an RCN HMCS Magnificent pilot)
    1 point
  38. I know it is frustrating to see this clown still in “power”, travelling the country and scattering millions here and millions there, and preaching how to be good Canadians….but if there is any consolation, try and find a positive news article about him ….. even the gays are **bleep** at him! https://nationalpost.com/opinion/adam-zivo-liberals-again-pretend-to-care-about-the-lgbtq-community
    1 point
  39. There’s always that other side of the equation greenies never want to deal with. Pick your level of “Green poison” you want to swallow…or as Al Gore would say….some inconvenient truths. Nickel, Cobalt and Lithium Unlike combustion engines that use lead-based batteries, EVs draw their energy from lithium-ion batteries – similar to the batteries used in smartphones. Three metals – nickel, cobalt, and lithium are required components to make an EV battery, and the extraction of these metals leaves significant environmental and humanitarian harm in its wake. In 2020, the CBC reported that nickel production results in “air pollution, water contamination and the destruction of habitats.” Nickel mines in Indonesia’s Obi islands are polluting the nearby Kawasi sea by dumping millions of tonnes of waste into the ocean, making the waters nearly uninhabitable for fish and disrupting the livelihoods of local fishermen. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, cobalt mine workers are subject to harsh working conditions while earning very little money for their efforts. The mines are rife with child labourers, and dangerous conditions routinely take workers’ lives – sometimes dozens of lives at a time due to mining accidents. Among other tech companies, Tesla was named in a lawsuit accusing them of aiding and abetting the death and serious injury of child labourers working in Congolese cobalt mines. Chilean lithium mining is also a problem. There they use a technique that requires massive amounts of water to extract the metal, resulting in Chile’s already dry regions drying out further and damaging the surrounding natural ecosystem. In Tibet, lithium mining has caused hydrochloric acid and other toxic chemicals to leak into the local water supply from the mine’s evaporation pool. Despite EV battery production being demonstrably bad for the environment, the Trudeau Liberals have instead championed an Ontario EV battery production facility in the fight to preserve the environment, pouring billions of dollars into the plant’s production. Insufficient infrastructure While the Trudeau government strongly encourages Canadian families to switch to EVs, it isn’t apparent that this is the most cost-effective and convenient decision for most people. Regarding the vehicle’s initial price, the average EV costs $10,000 USD more than the auto industry’s average car. Furthermore, high-quality EV battery chargers may require substantial upgrades to adapt the owner’s home to support the higher voltage and high-quality chargers needed – sometimes requiring overhauls to a neighbourhood’s entire electrical infrastructure. Experts predict that a rapid increase in EV ownership may inadvertently lead to blackouts if millions of EVs charge simultaneously. In California, a heat wave has state energy officials urging citizens to stop charging their electric vehicles, as the power grid faces strain and could possibly lead to a brownout or blackout. Inconvenience Since Canada gets very cold for multiple months of the year, Canadians have to worry about EVs battery performance potentially cratering in the chillier conditions. General Motors is being sued for their 2017 Green Car of the Year Chevrolet Bolt battery performance substantially dropping in colder weather – failing to reach the advertised range of 383 kilometres per charge. According to AAA, temperatures below 20°F (-6.7°C) can cut an EV battery’s capacity by up to 41%.
    1 point
  40. Poking the Chinese bear! “ Biden administration approves more than $1.1B in arms sales to Taiwan “ CNN)The Biden administration has approved more than $1.1 billion in arms sales to Taiwan, a move likely to further inflame already-heightened tensions between Washington and Beijing. The administration on Friday formally notified Congress of the proposed sales, which include up to 60 anti-ship missiles and up to 100 air-to-air missiles. Laura Rosenberger, the White House Senior Director for China and Taiwan, said this is the largest arms sale to Taiwan to date under the Biden administration, and they have "been in direct consultation and conversations with Members of Congress and Taiwan on its defense needs given evolving security circumstances." "This package was in the works for some time precisely because we expected it would be needed as the PRC increased pressure on Taiwan," she said, using the acronym for the People's Republic of China. "It reflects the U.S. government's assessment of Taiwan's defense needs and the threat posed to it by the PRC." Rosenberger noted that the proposed arms sale package "includes critical asymmetric defensive capabilities prioritized by Taiwan, including Harpoon missiles to support Taiwan's coastal defense; AIM-9X missiles to support Taiwan's air defense, and support for Taiwan's surveillance radar program central to Taiwan's C4ISR." "As the PRC continues to increase pressure on Taiwan -- including through heightened military air and maritime presence around Taiwan -- and engages in attempts to change the status quo in the Taiwan Strait, we're providing Taiwan with what it needs to maintain its self-defense capabilities," she said in a statement to CNN. A State Department spokesperson said the sales were in line with the United States' policy on Taiwan, noting the longstanding history of the US providing defensive weapons to the island. The "swift provision" of such arms, they said, "is essential for Taiwan's security and we will continue to work with industry to support that goal." "Consistent with the Taiwan Relations Act, the United States makes available to Taiwan defense articles and services necessary to enable it to maintain a sufficient self-defense capability," the spokesperson said, noting that "these proposed sales are routine cases to support Taiwan's continuing efforts to modernize its armed forces and to maintain a credible defensive capability." "For four decades, the U.S. one China policy has been guided by the Taiwan Relations Act, the three Joint Communiques, and the Six Assurances," they continued. "We urge Beijing to cease its military, diplomatic, and economic pressure against Taiwan and instead engage in meaningful dialogue with Taiwan." "The United States will continue to support a peaceful resolution of cross-Strait issues, consistent with the wishes and best interests of the people on Taiwan," the spokesperson said. Tensions between China and the US soared following House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan in early August. Earlier this week, two United States Navy warships entered the Taiwan Strait in what was the first US naval transit in the waterway since US-China tensions spiked over Pelosi's visit.
    1 point
  41. The only appropriate place to post this was under Justin Trudeau thread. Apparently the 85% that don’t use one are not part of civilized society. Please call me Captain Vast majority of Canadians do not use gender pronouns in their email signatures: poll There's a vast disconnect between policymakers and the public on terminology surrounding gender and race The vast majority of Canadians do not add their gender pronouns to emails or share them at meetings, nor do they believe that adding pronouns should be compulsory, says new polling. The polling, done by the Association for Canadian Studies (ACS), comes at a time when there is considerable sensitivity and discussion around the way people discuss gender and race, and the data suggests there are substantial differences in acceptance for these changes across age groups. It found, for example, that 84.9 per cent of Canadians don’t add their pronouns to their emails. A separate poll, also by ACS, found that people who are attempting to understand the more modernized language around race are also unsure about social expectations. Jack Jedwab, president and CEO of the ACS, said Canadians need more guidance from academics and policymakers about the language changes, including information on what these terms mean and why it is important to understand their use. The act of sharing gender pronouns — in email signatures, at meetings, and on social media, for example — has become more commonplace across government, businesses and civil society. Sharing gender pronouns by identifying whether someone prefers, for example, she/her or they/them pronouns, is meant to help prevent stigmatization and mitigate tensions that could arise from misgendering. While some organizations urge or require the sharing of pronouns, others feel it may make some people uncomfortable, especially those that may be questioning what they identify as and are not ready to share. Of respondents, 84.9 per cent say they do not add gender pronouns to emails or share at meetings and 15.1 per cent say they do. Similarly, the majority of Canadians (85.4 per cent) do not believe adding pronouns should be compulsory. Canadians who do add their pronouns to emails and share in meetings think it should be required to do so: 58.8 per cent of those that share said it should be compulsory. “A lot of people who do use gender pronouns feel very strongly about the need for them to be used as widely as possible,” said Jedwab. When discussing race, there is a disconnect between the terms Canadians currently use and the terms that policymakers want Canadians to be using. Within the federal government, the Employment Equity Act (EEA), which is meant to promote equity in workplaces, and Statistics Canada, use the term “visible minorities” to define “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.” In July 2021, the Liberal government created a task force to review the use of the term “visible minority” in the EEA and determine whether it should be replaced. In Ontario, the Ontario Human Rights Commission recommended “racialized person” or “racialized group” as an alternative when it is necessary to describe people collectively because these terms express “race as a social construct rather than as a description based on perceived biological traits.” Yet, according to another ACS poll, the term “racialized” does not resonate amongst Canadians. Of all respondents, 43.6 per cent believe the term “persons of colour” makes the most sense when referring to those who are Black or Asian. Roughly 30 per cent of respondents said “visible minorities” is best, 10.7 per cent said “non-white,” 8.6 per cent said “racialized groups,” and seven per cent said “racial groups.” The act of sharing gender pronouns — in email signatures, at meetings, and on social media, for example — has become more commonplace across government, businesses and civil society. Sharing gender pronouns by identifying whether someone prefers, for example, she/her or they/them pronouns, is meant to help prevent stigmatization and mitigate tensions that could arise from misgendering. https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/disconnect-between-policymakers-and-public-on-terminology-surrounding-gender-and-race-polls-find?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=National Post - Posted 2022-08-29&utm_term=NP_HeadlineNews
    1 point
  42. When even Ozzy Osborne thinks it’s bad…you know there’s a huge problem Ozzy Osbourne is leaving a 'f---ing ridiculous' United States: 'Fed up with people getting killed every day' Osbourne and wife Sharon listed their $18 million California home earlier this summer https://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/ozzy-osbourne-leaving-ridiculous-united-states-fed-up-people-getting-killed-every-day?intcmp=fb_fnc&fbclid=IwAR0Ko9px6cHB85FZ7J8C081dtt4-mVsL-2Ju0vgWYPDfq3csujDQ-gnwLZA
    1 point
  43. Maybe just a tad sensitive and you're reading something into it that wasn't intended. I agree, Westjet is a great airline as is AC. I have flown on WJ several times and it was always a good experience. My post was not meant in any way to diminish Westjet. Greg
    1 point
  44. Strike averted after WestJet reaches tentative agreement with Unifor service workers Sun July 24, 2022 - Canadian Press CALGARY - There will be no strike at WestJet this week now that the airline has reached a tentative labour deal with the union representing hundreds of workers at the Calgary and Vancouver airports. Both the airline and Unifor Local 531 announced the deal on Sunday evening, days before nearly 800 baggage and customer service staff could have walked off the job. Unifor announced last week that workers had voted 98 per cent in favour of a strike as early as this Wednesday if a deal could not be reached. Neither side disclosed specific terms of the tentative deal, which is still subject to ratification. The union issued a release saying the agreement “brings long overdue wage increases and improvements to working conditions.” The deal, touted as the first between the two sides, will be presented to union members later this week. Unifor has said wages were a key issue, with current salaries starting at $15.55 an hour and topping out at $23.87 an hour after seven years. Spokesman Scott Doherty said last week the pay scale has not increased for more than five years, making WestJet’s wages among the lowest in the Canadian aviation industry as inflation soars.
    1 point
  45. I would imagine that Cahill is going to "disappear" after the case is over. His testimony is going to upset a lot of people. I guess he was the first one to "flip" on his buddy's and thus got the deal. He is just as guilty as the rest of them.
    1 point
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