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  1. It's the slippery slope feature of it that "conspiracy theorists" have always feared. Mostly they aren't wrong, just early. The obvious argument against their position (at least in the beginning) is the one you just made... and it's perfectly reasonable. But we have seen how perfectly reasonable can quickly morph into madness though. In short, I find your position to be reasonable, sound and compassionate, unfortunately though, I predict that it's the harbinger of things to come and those (like us) who may stand in favour of it now will seek reasonable limits on its future application (citing reasonableness and compassion in the attempt)... and fail. I had previously thought that reasonableness and compassion could (within a nominal margin) be defined and generally agreed upon. Now we can't even agree on what a women is... so who'd a thunk (say 30 years ago) that we'd be where we are right now? If slope still equals rise over run, the run portion of the equation is getting incrementally shorter and the rise stratospherically higher every year. Soon the pitch will be too steep to clean the chimney and we'll burn the house down with a huffy puffy chimney fire that sounds like a freight train.
    2 points
  2. I haven't been following this issue closely but I thought they were held back by the chief, who wrongly assumed a barricaded hostage scenario as opposed to active shooter. There's a difference of course. Invented by the military but a constant in all CQB operations... the mantra of surprise, violence of action, and overwhelming force isn't lost on police tactical teams... they sing that in the shower. If I had to bet (and again I don't know), my money would be on the side of them chomping at the bit and resenting every single passing minute that they were held back. Most of them would have taken this pretty hard. For elite teams, whether military or civilian, this scenario is what PTSD looks like. I bet that hour was the very definition of agony for them. In their place, I would have a hard time letting go of the "what if" demon, I'd be haunted by it. I remain profoundly grateful that I never had wrestle with one. I can't say that I know how they feel, but I can imagine how I would in their place... It would likely be a career ending event for me.
    2 points
  3. In a poll I received, they asked if there was a candidate I would never vote for, it was Brown for me.
    2 points
  4. LILLEY: Trudeau appointing cabinet committee to fix passport issues laughable Brian Lilley - 4m ago © Provided by Toronto SunA Canadian passport is pictured on top of a Canadian flag in this photo illustration. How many Trudeau cabinet ministers does it take to issue a passport? Sadly, this isn’t a joke, and shockingly, the answer is now 11 cabinet ministers to issue a passport. After initially denying there was a problem, then blaming Canadians, then a non-existent surge in applications, then blaming Canadians for not filling the forms out properly, the Trudeau government is striking a committee to speed up the process. On Sunday, the PM announced a cabinet committee of 11 ministers would work to ensure better service for Canadians. “We know service delays, particularly in recent months, are unacceptable. We will continue to do everything we can to improve the delivery of these services in an efficient and timely manner,” Trudeau said in a statement. “This new task force will help guide the work of the government to better meet the changing needs of Canadians.” I’m not sure what needs of Canadians changed when it comes to getting your passport in a timely manner. Seems like you should apply, pay your fee and get your passport within a few days, but now it’s months before many are getting their passports. “Despite the increased demand, 72% of Canadians who apply for a passport currently receive their passport within 40 working days,” Minister Karina Gould boasted two weeks ago. Forty business days works out to eight weeks, pretty much two months, as long as there are no stat holidays during the time period you are waiting. That is completely unacceptable and despite trying to pin the blame the delays on anyone and everyone else, this falls squarely at the government’s feet. “As I have mentioned several times in the House, we are experiencing an unprecedented volume in terms of passport applications,” Gould told the Commons last week. The problem is that they are not dealing with “unprecedented volume,” not by a long shot. The government’s own figures show that between April 1 and the middle of June there were 542,000 applications. That works out to an average of 54,200 applications per week. But the government has said some weeks went as high as 75,000 applications. Prior to the pandemic, Passport Canada handed out an average of 90-98,000 passports per week. Between 2013 and 2018 there were between 4.7 and 5.1 million passports issued annually. The volumes they are seeing now should be easy to handle. There is no staffing shortage, they assure me that 89% of their staff are working at the office and just 11% at home. There were no layoffs during the pandemic and there was no mass exodus due to vaccine mandate requirements, which have now been lifted. This is a workflow and efficiency problem that needs to be fixed and should be easy to fix given the department’s past track record. They also knew this was coming. “Forecasts predict that a recovery to pre-COVID-19 demand will begin in Spring of 2022, and that demand for passports will continue to increase over the next three years,” a department planning document stated last year. The department’s own staff predicted demand would recover and be driven by people who had let their passports lapse during pandemic and the wave of renewals from the first batch of people who received a 10-year passport a decade ago needing to renew. Even when warned, the department failed to prepare. Even with volumes lower than pre-pandemic, they haven’t been able to fix the problems that have been festering for months. So now we have a committee, more talking, more strategizing, more study, but likely no new solutions. Whether it’s passports, immigration, the airports, or running our military, the Trudeau government can’t get the basic things right. blilley@postmedia.com
    2 points
  5. You would have to be some kind of stupid to not see the intended message in this photo.
    2 points
  6. As a man, I used to think I was pretty much just a regular person, but I was born white, into a two-parent household which now, whether I like it or not, makes me privileged, a racist, and responsible for slavery. I am a fiscal and moral conservative, which by today's standards, makes me a fascist because I plan, budget, and support myself. I went to High School, University and have always held a job. But I now find out that I am not here because I earned it, but because I was "advantaged". I am heterosexual, which according to gay folks, now makes me a homophobe. I am not a Muslim, which now labels me as an infidel. I am older than 70, making me a useless eater who doesn't understand Facebook, Instagram, or Snapchat. I think and I reason, and I doubt much of what the ‘main stream’ media tells me, which makes me a Right-wing conspiracy nut. I am proud of my heritage and our inclusive Canadian culture, making me a xenophobe. I believe in hard work, fair play, and fair compensation according to each individual's merits, which today makes me an anti-socialist. I believe our system guarantees freedom of effort - not freedom of outcome or subsidies which must make me a borderline sociopath. I believe in the defence and protection of Canada for and by all citizens, now making me a militant. I am proud of our flag, what it stands for, and the many who died to let it fly, so I stand during our National Anthem - so I must be a racist. Please help me come to terms with the new me because I'm just not sure who I am anymore ! Funny - it all took place over the last 7 or 8 years! If all this nonsense wasn't enough to deal with, now I don't even know which restroom to use... and these days I gotta go more frequently.
    2 points
  7. IMO …. The real elephant in the room is controlling population growth…..stop immigration and avoid increasing the carbon footprint of the country as a whole: Of course this is counter to the narrative of current government to increase the tax base and be a good G7 member.
    2 points
  8. Plane catches fire after crashing at Miami airport would be closer to the truth.
    2 points
  9. Earlier this week, the federal government announced the first phase of its plan to reach zero plastic waste by 2030. This first phase involves a ban on straws, takeout containers, grocery bags, and other plastics. But a new Fraser Institute study out today finds that this plan will havelittle to no environmental benefit while imposing a large financial cost on Canadians! Not only is Canada's contribution to global aquatic plastic pollution virtually non-existent, but only 1% of Canada's plastic waste is everreleased into the environment as litter. And it doesn't stop there – the additional waste generated by the substitutes for plastic will increase costs for municipalities by $300 million a year, which is just one cost of this policy that will ultimately be a burden on Canadians. Learn more by checking out the full study here, and be sure to spread the word on social media. Sincerely, Niels Veldhuis President The Fraser Institute
    2 points
  10. My goodness, we have become a society of silly people... But people wanted this, remember? They elected leaders who promised it and they got exactly what they wanted. That said, this is mostly fluff with no real or lasting consequences other than hurt feelings and no trophy. That can't be said about other incarnations of the same silliness, like biological men in women's prisons. This ruling still allows people who transitioned prior to the age of 12 to compete with women though. Think about that, the absurdity of condoning someone 11 years old (or younger) to change their lives to this extent is morally bankrupt IMO. What if an 11 year old wanted to be a pirate, do we sanction removal of one eye and the amputation of one leg below the knee? Liberals are becoming dangerously deranged and now pose a threat to our children and, as a result of that, our collective future. It will eventually be their undoing, but before it is, they will ruin a bunch of lives in the process. How many people have the same values at 30 as they did when they were 11? Like none eh...
    2 points
  11. I understand that there is a new pilot equipment list out at Air Canada that will require a massive number, (as near as I can tell about 1000) new hire pilots with many even going into the right seat of a 777. Where are they going to get that number with any experience from. It can decimate the regionals. I doubt that there will be many coming from the RCAF. Also the problem becomes safety. If a low time pilot finds him or herself on a wide body getting 1 or 2 approaches a month how will he/she build up any actual piloting skills or are we content with them essentially be computer programmers. I can see more situations like what we saw on the Air France 330.
    2 points
  12. When the union's mindset at the table is "we don't negotiate for people who aren't here yet", it opens the door for the pay scale you are referring to.
    2 points
  13. Thanks for the reply Mitch. I do realize that the majority of the posts on this forum recently have come from the so-called right of the spectrum. However, as being someone that tended right I felt for many years that this forum tended somewhat left. What I always did realize though is that it was simply everyone expressing what it was they believed to be for the best, and that all of us have been influenced by our societal memes. Putting this forum aside I do think that those of us tending right have been put much more on the defensive and marginalized by a very left leaning media. The government under the current regime has doubled down on that agenda. Look at the rhetoric that our PM employed in dealing with the freedom convoy in Ottawa. Instead of understanding that this was a movement by a large group of working class Canadians that were concerned about the direction their government was taking them, he labelled them as terrorists, nazis, anti-vaxers and right wing extremists and refused to engage with them. The bulk of the mainline media went along with this approach. The result was that Canadians all across the country were severely divided and when it came to the vaccines it was particularly true. Those that were concerned that the vaccines were going to impact their long term health were being subjected to abuse, not only from their governments but also from their friends families and neighbours who felt that their health was being jeopardized by those not taking the vaccines. The result has been that people, both on the right and on the left, have been pushed to the more extreme and have real animosity towards one another. I know of siblings that were close no longer speaking to each other. The long term impact on our society by the mandates, the labelling and the demonizing of others will have a much greater long term impact than Covid ever would IMHO. Again, IMHO we should have focused more on a cure for Covid and we would have developed herd immunity in relatively short order, and again it is my opinion that the root cause of the problem was that our governments, in many cases with good intentions, wound up in bed with big pharma who realized that there was considerably more money in vaccines than there was in treating the virus. We are now in the position that our usual discourse is breaking down into a maze of extreme rhetoric and we are still having the vaccines pushed on us where it is becoming increasingly clear that they are no longer effective. As a society we are going to have to come to the realization that the majority of people on both sides of these issues are all trying to sort out what is the truth and what is right approach. We have to have civil discourse, without the labelling etc. Unfortunately our political leaders of all stripes are a huge part of the problem and it filters down, aided by the media. Maybe ultimately Mitch it will be up to people like you and me to bring civility back to our society, and we can agree to disagree with a handshake. Cheers Greg
    2 points
  14. Hi Mitch I have always enjoyed and thank you for your participation here. I am however disappointed in this post by you. I think your post exemplifies the massive problem we are having to face in our society no matter which side of the political divide we are on. Both sides label and demonize those that disagree with them. Those on the left label people as "extreme right wing fanatics". Those on the left label people like your self as communists. We see people doing what you seem to be doing here, which is to label those one disagrees with and break off discussion on issues instead of presenting your reasons for holding the views that you do. In all the years we have been on this forum I have never before seen you back down from an argument and I suggest that it is typical of what is happening in our society in general. I am sorry as I have always looked forward to your input here. Cheers Greg
    2 points
  15. “ Two Conservative MPs have defected from Brampton, Ont. Mayor Patrick Brown's team to support Pierre Poilievre, his main rival in the party's leadership race — a move that leaves Brown with just two MPs backing his candidacy. Hamilton-area MP Dan Muys and MP Kyle Seeback, who represents neighbouring Dufferin-Caledon in the House of Commons, both announced Tuesday they're abandoning Brown for Poilievre. Their departures come after Poilievre's campaign said over the weekend that it has sold an eye-popping 312,000 memberships in the race for the party's top job. Conservative sources told CBC News that roughly 600,000 party members will be eligible to vote in September's leadership election.”
    2 points
  16. Working in the Diablo Canyon reactor control room turned this mom into a nuclear advocate PUBLISHED TUE, JUN 7 202211:00 AM EDT Catherine Clifford@IN/CATCLIFFORD/@CATCLIFFORD SHAREShare Article via FacebookShare Article via TwitterShare Article via LinkedInShare Article via Email KEY POINTS Heather Hoff was working in the control room of the nuclear plant near Avila Beach in San Luis Obispo County, Calif., named the Diablo Canyon power plant, during the days when an earthquake caused a tsunami that shut off the power supply cooling three nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Hoff has worked at Diablo Canyon for 18 years and she’s come to see nuclear energy as a critical component of a clean energy future. Hoff went on to co-found the advocacy group, Mothers for Nuclear, in 2016 with her colleague and friend Kristin Zaitz, who also works at Diablo Canyon. “There’s so much fear and so much misinformation… it’s a convenient villain,” Hoff said. “It’s okay to be scared, but that’s not the same thing as dangerous.” WATCH NOW VIDEO21:22 How nuclear power is changing Heather Hoff was working in the control room of the Diablo Canyon nuclear plant near in San Luis Obispo County, Calif., when an earthquake caused a tsunami that shut off the power supply cooling three nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Three nuclear reactor cores at Fukushima melted down. “It was super scary,” Hoff told CNBC in a video interview. “It’s my worst nightmare as an operator — to be there and think about these other operators just across the ocean from us. They don’t know what’s going on with their plant. They have no power. They don’t know if people are hurt.” In the first days after the accident, “what I was hearing on TV in the media was pretty scary,” Hoff said. Heather Hoff, co-founder of Mothers for Nuclear, has worked at Diablo Canyon nuclear power reactor for 18 years. Here she is seen in approximately 2014 in the control room simulator. Photo courtesy Heather Hoff But as time passed and information about the meltdown became more available, the consequences of the accident became clear. While three employees who worked for the Tokyo Electric Power Company died because of the earthquake and resulting tsunami, nobody died because of the nuclear reactor accident. “Three plants had meltdowns and that’s scary and horrible and expensive, but it didn’t really hurt anyone,” Hoff said. “And that was really surprising to me.” In the wake of the Fukushima accident, Hoff went from fearing that she would need to leave her job to being committed to the potential of nuclear to be a safe, clean contribution to the global energy supply. “Now I feel even more strongly that nuclear is the right thing to do and that the damaging parts about nuclear are actually not the technology itself, but our fear, our human responses to nuclear.” After going through her own evolution in her thinking about nuclear energy, Hoff went on to co-found an advocacy group, Mothers for Nuclear, in 2016 with her colleague and friend Kristin Zaitz. “There’s so much fear and so much misinformation… it’s a convenient villain,” Hoff said. “It’s okay to be scared, but that’s not the same thing as dangerous.” Why Hoff started working at Diablo Canyon Hoff did not anticipate her career in nuclear energy. Hoff came to San Luis Obispo, Calif., to attend California Polytechnic State University, where she graduated in 2002 with a degree in materials engineering. After graduating, she worked “random jobs around town,” she said, including a clothing store, winery, and manufacturing animal thermometers for cows. Hoff applied for and got a job as a plant operator at Diablo Canyonn in 2004. From the outset, Hoff was not sure what her job would entail and how she would feel about it, and her family was nervous about her taking a job working at a nuclear plant. So she decided to deal with the uncertainty by seeking out information herself. “I’d heard a lot of stories of scary things — and just didn’t really know how I felt about nuclear,” Hoff told CNBC. “I spent the first probably six years of my career there asking tons and tons of questions.” For a while, she assumed it was only a matter of time before she would discover some “nefarious thing” happening at the nuclear reactor facility. Her change in sentiment about nuclear energy was a gradual process. “I started feeling proud to work there, proud to help make such a huge quantity of clean electricity on a really small land footprint,” she told CNBC. Nuclear power actually is “in really good alignment with my environmental and humanitarian values,” she said. Heather Hoff, co-founder of Mothers for Nuclear Photo courtesy Heather Hoff As of now, Hoff has worked at Diablo Canyon for 18 years and she’s clear with herself that she’s a believer in the importance of nuclear energy. From 2006 through 2008, Hoff took training classes from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to be able to operate the reactor. Now she writes operations and engineering procedures for Diablo Canyon, a job she’s had since 2014. Diablo Canyon provides 8% of California’s total electricity and 15% of California’s carbon-free electricity, which is enough to power about 3 million homes, she told CNBC. Nuclear is a ‘convenient villain’ Hoff and Zeitz founded Mothers for Nuclear in 2016 to share what they had learned about nuclear energy. “We’re not utility executives. We’re not guys in suits. We’re not mad scientists,” Hoff told CNBC. They’re mothers. They understand the doubt and the fear that nuclear power arouse, and then educate people about the science of nuclear energy in compassionate language. The Mothers for Nuclear group has a couple thousand followers on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. The group has evolved since its founding. “When we first started Mothers for Nuclear, I think I was picturing our job as mostly being outreach to the public, but we have also grown into a role of being advisors to our own industry, and we spend a lot of time sharing about how we should all be communicating differently,” she told CNBC. Not only does the nuclear industry do a poor job of advertising the benefits of nuclear energy, but it has, in many ways, hurt its own image by focusing on the safety precautions. Those extra layers of backup add cost, are often cases of operational redundancy, and send a subtle message that nuclear power must be terrifying and dangerous. “It’s completely shot us in the foot,” Hoff said. Heather Hoff, co-founder of Mothers for Nuclear, standing by the Unit 2 main transformer during a regularly scheduled maintenance and refueling in approximately 2017. The steam behind Hoff is not typical during normal operation, she said. Photo courtesy Heather Hoff Given that Diablo Canyon is facing a very controversial closure, she knows some might think her nuclear advocacy group is cover for a public effort to protect her own job. But she says it would be “a lot easier for me” to get a job working on a plant decommission or at another nuclear power plant elsewhere. Instead, she says, she believes she has a calling to tell the story of nuclear power as a solution to climate change. “The more I learn about nuclear and our energy options, the more worried I get and the more passionate I get, and the more I feel like it’s my duty to to speak out and help change people’s minds and help us realize that keeping existing plants open can help us address climate change — can help us reach our energy goals,” Hoff told CNBC. Despite all the hurdles, Hoff is optimistic about some of the new advanced nuclear reactor technology being developed. And she says the energy sector really needs to get “a new bad guy.” Notably, Hoff does not want to target fossil fuels as that bad guy. “I also don’t want fossil fuels to be the enemy, because I think energy is so important for people to have a good quality of life and we need more energy,” Hoff said. “I don’t know, maybe the enemy is extremism — like people that aren’t willing to talk about the options and what’s the best combination of all the stuff that we have to do to make people’s lives better while also protecting the planet.”
    2 points
  17. Hi there, good to see you on the dark side of the forum. IMO, the AR-15 is the "Good Year Tire" of the rifle world, seeker has covered this very well in a previous reply to you so I won’t rehash what he said… I can add nothing of substance. The fact that many impaired drivers use Good Year tires is analogous here, I get that you don’t see it that way but to me, both items are tools; elevating both, or either one to the status of “cause factor” seems like a big leap that fails to address the root cause . As for being a "weapon of war," If you can name a single military in the world who uses the AR15 with a 5 round magazine, I’d appreciate being schooled on it. This critter is nothing more than a semi-automatic rifle with a detachable box magazine and black plastic stock. In real terms, its technology hasn’t changed a whole lot since 1907, nor has pistol technology changed much since 1911. I bet we can both agree that society has though. If I recall, seeker covered that quite well too. In terms of "need," I guess we could have a whole thread on that and compare drowning deaths to pools, golf courses to dwindling farm land, engines larger than 2.0 litres with our commitment to the Paris accord and a host of other "needs" that many (right here) would characterize as a hobby. Muscle cars driven by bank robbers fleeing police custody shouldn't reflect on responsible drivers. I guess it would be a long thread eh? Comparing Canadian regulations with the US is the very definition of false equivalency despite the popularity of doing so. It’s the road to nowhere in terms of comparison, and given the cost of gas, it's a detour that few who are familiar with the Canadian rules consider worthy of traveling. While I’m proficient with the type, I don’t have much use for it, there are better legal options available IMO... I'm pretty sure you would like them even less than the AR. Cheers
    2 points
  18. Consider the following book cover, its from 1937. If released in schools today it would cause a firestorm of offence nation wide. Individual views on the subject matter may vary, but my point in posting it is simply to illustrate that society has changed far (and I mean FAR) more than firearm technology. Now consider the Winchester model 1907 (from the year 1907). It's a semi automatic rifle with a detachable box magazine, the cartridges were designed the previous year. In any case, for some reason, people back then didn't run around shooting each other's children. There has been a perfect storm of change in society, if listed individually, their causal effects would be instantly ridiculed, if listed in totality, the length of the dissertation would ensure that no one would take the time to even read it.
    2 points
  19. How long before we see the kids encouraging their parents to take MAID to either relieve them of the responsibility of caring for them, and/or to inheriting earlier. In today's self focused society I'd say it's inevitable.
    1 point
  20. NATO leader says defence spending target applies to all allies, including Canada All NATO members agreed in 2014 to increase their defence spending to two per cent of their national gross domestic product within the decade, a target that Stoltenberg says NATO leaders recommitted to during a summit in Spain today. But while Stoltenberg says the vast majority of NATO members now have plans to meet that target, the Liberal government has refused to publicly commit to the target, let alone lay out a schedule for meeting it. In fact, a report released by Stoltenberg on Monday projected Canadian defence spending will fall as a share of GDP to 1.27 per cent this year. That compares to 1.32 per cent last year and 1.42 per cent in 2020. Asked about Canadian defence spending, Stoltenberg told reporters that he understands the desire to spend taxpayer dollars on health care and education, but that NATO members need to invest in defence as the world grows more dangerous. While the NATO secretary-general praised Canada for leading a NATO battlegroup in Latvia, he nonetheless says the two per cent target is a floor, not a ceiling. https://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/nato-embarks-on-greatest-overhaul-since-cold-war-but-canadas-role-remains-uncertain This idiot just doesn’t get it !
    1 point
  21. Never got much coverage but a Rebel news reporter was following up on a lead involving Patrick Brown. During the height of covid, when all public facilities were locked down, brown was playing regularly with his buddies at a public rink. Brown said he was just checking out the facilities, but at the 8:00 mark, there is his equipment laid out on the floor…coincidence, I guess. Never liked the guy either.
    1 point
  22. Canada can now seize, sell off Russian assets. What's next? | CBC News
    1 point
  23. Indeed, but a bit late I'd say. Doctors should have stayed in their lane and put science and patient care first and foremost.... resisting any and all government coercion and disciplinary measures aimed in their direction as a professional body. Unions should have stood up as well. The Conservative party failed entirely (unforgivably actually) and the NDP has forever ruined their brand IMO. Add two things to the above quote and I completely agree: 1. Refusing to answer the most basic of grade 13 biology questions and de-platforming those who tried... and for me the worst of all: 2. The ridicule (and meanness) of 70 percenters who were themselves unable to discuss the issue at the most basic of levels. Nothing but T-shirt slogans and attitude. Just had another double vaccinated, relatively fit (actually athletic) acquaintance (late 30's) drop dead with a heart attack yesterday leaving a wife and four children behind. I think I'll be able to add "bold faced liars" to the other two parameters in about 18 months.
    1 point
  24. Review: Air Canada Signature Suite Vancouver [2022] by Gary Leff on June 25, 2022 Wow. The Air Canada Signature Suite Vancouver provided me with one of the best meals I’ve ever had in an airport. After spending a couple of nights in Vancouver, breaking up the trip from Austin to Sydney on an Air Canada Aeroplan business class award, we were on our way to visit family Down Under. Air Canada has one of the best lounge experiences anywhere for business class passengers at their Toronto and Vancouver hubs, dubbed ‘Signature Suite’ dining. Gaining Access These lounges are only open to paid business class tickets, and to Aeroplan flexible award tickets (generally a 10,000 – 12,000 mile one way premium). Upgrades and partner award redemptions don’t gain access. The introduction of access to Signature Suite dining as an option on award tickets came with the launch of the new Aeroplan program. I paid the extra miles on our Australia redemption so that we could visit the Signature Suite in Vancouver because I enjoyed the lounge in Toronto so much five years ago. Once you’re already spending 80,000 miles the extra 10,000 miles per ticket doesn’t feel like that much (really, an extra 30,000 miles on top of the quarter million I was already spending for the 3 of us). At a value of 1.4 cents per mile I was actually spending $420 for my family’s dinner, which seems nuts, but it didn’t ‘feel’ that expensive. That’s an actually really important point about the psychology of loyalty programs. Arriving At Vancouver Airport The Vancouver airport isn’t super busy in advance of an 11:00 p.m. departure. In fact, the international check-in area was deserted and a single premium check-in queue was operating for domestic and international business class and elites. All things considered I was happy being assisted after about a 10 minute wait. It didn’t take long to work through our Australian predeparture approvals. Security for the international terminal was quick and painless. And we were on our way to the Air Canada Signature Suite. Visiting The Air Canada Signature Suite Vancouver The lounge is located just past security near gates 52 and 53. It is upstairs from Air Canada’s Maple Leaf Lounge. We showed our boarding passes at the desk downstairs and were invited up to the Signature Suite. We took the elevator rather than the stairs. Inside we were welcomed. My wife and daughter were with me. It was late – about 11:30 p.m. Central time (our home time zone) at this point – and our daughter was tired so she was in her stroller. Lounge staff invited us to use the private dining room. The lounge was mostly empty, but I presumed this invitation (which would allow us to be more comfortable) was more for the benefit of other passengers in the lounge. I had seen claims that the VIP room is highly restricted for access and also that it is available to families with young children. I absolutely loved the Signature Suite in Toronto when I was there in late 2017, but it was a dark space without windows. The Vancouver Signature Suite has a fantastic windowline. Here’s the view from inside the VIP dining room. And here’s the bistro seating area beside it, which you can see has the same windowline. The bar is actually situated between the bistro area and VIP room. Beyond the bistro area, bar and VIP dining room is the lounge’s dining room. What the space lacks, at just 4400 square feet and seating for 105 guests, is work or relaxation areas. This really is a special dining room inside of a lounge rather than a standalone lounge as such. Amazing Dining What makes the Signature Suite special isn’t that it’s an exclusive space within the Air Canada lounge. What makes the lounge is the food – a nice buffet, sure, if you’re in a hurry but a menu to order from that’s a cut above other lounges with sit down dining. The food here is better, for instance, than I’ve had in United Polaris lounges or Qantas First Class lounges (and the latter can be quite good). Signature Suite dining is curated by Canadian chef David Hawksworth. First, here’s a look at the buffet: If you can, though, take he time to order off of the menu: My Meal At The Air Canada Signature Suite Vancouver I had really been looking forward to seared foie gras. I tried it in the Toronto Signature Suite four and a half years earlier and remembered it as very good. I had just been talking to my wife a week earlier about how I had a craving for seared foie gras, not thinking that I’d have an opportunity here. I didn’t order it, though, because we were told they had a special tomahawk steak available, and would we like them to prepare it for us along with some sides? I didn’t feel like I could say no to that, and indeed it was excellent, but I missed out on the foie. First, though, cocktails. I ordered the mandarin old fashioned which was excellent. To pair with dinner we went with the Domodimonti Passione e Visione petit verdot. I was told they were down to a few cases, and they’d been cellaring since right before the pandemic when the lounge first opened. Often in lounges and on planes they’re dealing with such quantities of wine that they are served too young. This bottle was aged perfectly, so I guess the lounge being closed for two years had an upside. It was enjoyable on its own and complemented our steaks perfectly. We started with an amuse bouche and then staff brought out a couple of sides and salads served family-style for the three of us to eat (my three year old skipped the amuse’). The lounge chef proudly brought out the tomahawk steak, which isn’t something they normally have. The meal was fantastic and our hour in the lounge was just enough time, or so we thought (the flight wound up being delayed about half an hour but there was no advance indication of this). Enjoying dinner before such a late departure is perfect, in order to skip the onboard meal and go right to sleep. Enjoying dinner before such a long flight is perfect, too, because we were able to ask the crew to save our meals for later in the flight. For a roughly 15 hour flight a meal at the start, one at the end, and 11 hours in-between really doesn’t seem like enough. To be sure there are snacks but it was so much nicer to have dinner, then have the inflight dinner around 8 hours later. I questioned my sanity spending an extra 10,000 miles per person for access to this lounge, but I definitely enjoyed it enough that it was worth it and would pay the premium again.
    1 point
  25. Easy to cover the cost, just deduct it from the PM perks.
    1 point
  26. Remember Dominion Day? The celebrations, which news reports have said will be called “New Day,” will feature “spaces for healing, with Indigenous-led music, dance, and sacred fires,” food trucks and picnic spots, “family-friendly, multicultural entertainment,” including Indigenous games, a chalk and bubble station and an oral history tour with Indigenous elders. https://nationalpost.com/news/cancel-cultures-new-target-renaming-canada-day-events-in-winnipeg-sparks-controversy Or, we could address real issues, maybe fix the clean water problem and honour promises previously given in the form of treaty rights... remember Donald Marshall and the eel nets? That had to go to the supreme court. Re-read the bold type paragraph.... let me suggest by way of analogy that veterans don't care if you rename a highway (at least I sure don't). Give that old gunner the hearing aids he needs and stop blowing liberal smoke into my nether regions.
    1 point
  27. At my age, a lot of my friends etc. are elderly and their children are in their mid 40s. Neither group (to the best of my knowledge) has died from covid related vaccinations. None either have, except for a very few, suffered sudden death no matter the cause.
    1 point
  28. WH…..you forgot sockboys first interference in process..VA Mark Norman…..still would like to see Marie Heinens notes going in to trial!
    1 point
  29. https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-pierre-poilievres-good-fortune-his-supporters-dont-see-his-hypocrisy/
    1 point
  30. This has left me shuddering in my boots.
    1 point
  31. I can personally confirm from an inside source the meltdown IS happening as we speak. “ Federal Conservatives grow strong as Liberal meltdown continues “ While an election is three years away, there appears to be wind in the sails of the Conservative party In recent weeks, the Conservative Party of Canada has signed up hundreds of thousands of new members, as the candidates raced to enrol supporters before last Friday’s deadline. While official data are not yet available, it appears that the majority of new members have been enrolled by front-runner Pierre Poilievre, whose campaign claims to have signed up 311,958 new Tories, followed by Patrick Brown, who said he added 150,000. If these numbers are accurate, the CPC will have surpassed the record 269,469 members it had in the 2020 leadership race. It would even surpass the 300,000 members the Liberal party bragged it had going into the 2015 election. It appears that Canadians are hungry for change. After two elections in which two different Conservative leaders managed to win the popular vote but couldn’t win the election, there’s a sense that a reinvigorated Conservative party, facing a Trudeau-led government that increasingly seems fatigued, adrift, arrogant and complacent, has a chance at sniffing victory. Issues that have galvanized conservative-leaning voters at the grassroots include rampant inflation, the federal government’s continued instance on vaccine mandates in the face of evidence that they’re now useless and anger at the harsh overreaction of the Trudeau government to the Freedom Convoy in Ottawa in the form of its draconian use of emergency powers. According to a recent Nanos poll, the top three issues that Canadians care about are inflation, jobs and health care. While the Liberal government can be credited with a decent effort at job creation, that’s come at the cost of an outsized fiscal stimulus that is contributing to inflation. The consequence of high inflation is that many poor and middle-class households are finding it hard to pay rent, buy gas and put food on the table. This is literally a bread-and-butter issue. While an election is three years away, assuming that the Liberal-NDP alliance holds together, there appears to be wind in the sails of the Conservative party, which now has legitimate issues such as inflation with which to attack the incumbent Liberal government. It appears increasingly that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his government are like the ancien régime, a few years before the French Revolution. You can sense the desperation in the liberal commentariat, who are reeling from the devastating Ontario election, which saw incumbent Progressive Conservative Premier Doug Ford trounce the opposition. It’s that kind of desperation that animates ludicrous suggestions like making voting mandatory. While this has been mandated by some countries with very different political systems and histories, the only countries with Westminster-style parliamentary systems that have mandated voting are Singapore, Thailand and Australia. But so what? If these countries want to curtail individual liberty and force them to come out to vote even if they don’t want to, why should this be any reason for Canada to go down this illiberal path? In a free society, the right not to vote is as much a right as the right to vote is. The suggestion by some advocates of mandatory voting that those who don’t like any of the choices on offer are free to spoil their ballots shows just ridiculous the proposal is. Yet others in the collective liberal meltdown pointed out that Ontario saw record low turnouts, as if this somehow invalidates the election result. That is the kind of nonsense that sore losers tend to spew, but there is a useful kernel in the midst of the bile, which is that low voter turnout tends to benefit the incumbent party. In Ontario’s case, the beneficiaries were the incumbent Progressive Conservatives. By the same token, low turnout would presumably serve the Liberals well in the next federal election. What’s working in favour of the Conservatives is just how out of touch the Liberals seem to be. This is why it’s crucial for the Conservatives that all of the new members who were just signed up actually come out to vote in the next election. https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rupa-subramanya-federal-conservatives-grow-strong-as-liberal-meltdown-continues
    1 point
  32. And this too shall pass. Otoole was a huge disappointment I will agree. IMHO, the next leader, Pierre Pollievre , is the most dynamic, capable individual the Conservatives have put forth since Harper. ‘We shall soon see.
    1 point
  33. Allo, Have you considered what oil prices are around the world? It seems disingenuous to blame a single politician for high fuel prices when they are up all over the world. https://www.globalpetrolprices.com/gasoline_prices/ Our bad lot of politicians can be blamed for lots of issues but fuel prices and inflation would be roughly the same under most government since they aren't local phenomenons. Prices are set at the international level.
    1 point
  34. If Canada was serious about cutting emissions at airports, an easy starting point would be to limit APU operations on the ground. It's what happens all over the world. It forces Airports to actually have serviceable aircraft ground air conditioning (hot or cold) at each gate. It would save countless dollars in both Fuel and APU hours of operation.
    1 point
  35. In the US, here's an excellent article written by a card-carrying member of the NRA in favour of either banning or re-classifying AR15 type weapons: https://www.cnn.com/2022/06/05/opinions/guns-ar-15-uvalde-school-shooting-fanone/index.html
    1 point
  36. 1 point
  37. The fact that JT either did or would do all of things alleged is bad enough, but what really worries me is the willing cooperation of the media and the support of what I see as too large a contingent of voters. Media integrity, even at the lowest level of what reasonable people would deem acceptable, was largely absent from most outlets and completely AWOL from the CBC. The deliberate sabotage (excavator scandal) undertaken by the RCMP has now entered the twilight dimension of POOF and currently resides with factual reporting surrounding the NS and Danforth shooting events... SNC security operator activities in Libya during OUP come instantly to mind as well. The unholy trinity of government, media, and security forces is on full display here and the implications of that should garner far more concern than what I perceive there to be.
    1 point
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