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Malcolm

Jan 30 2 Air Tindi aircraft down

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Let us hope this turns out OK.

Charter flight with 2 pilots on board missing in Northwest Territories

Air Tindi has lost contact with a charter flight between Whati and Yellowknife. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/air-tindi-flight-incident-1.4999103?cmp=rss

The Air Tindi flight en route between Yellowknife and Whati has 2 pilots on board, no passengers

CBC News · Posted: Jan 30, 2019 2:22 PM CT | Last Updated: an hour ago

Air Tindi Ltd. has lost contact with a charter flight en route from Yellowknife to Whati, N.W.T.

There were two pilots on board and no passengers.

Air Tindi president Al Martin said contact with the King Air 200 was lost when the aircraft was approximately 24 to 32 kilometres outside Whati Wednesday morning sometime between 9 and 9:30. 

Martin said two Air Tindi planes are in the air looking for the aircraft. One of the search planes has medics on board.

The community government in Whati has been notified in case the community needs to provide service in any capacity. The pilots' next of kin have been notified that they are unaccounted for.

Martin said the Transportation Safety Board and search and rescue have also been notified.

Royal Canadian Air Force spokesperson David Lavallee said the RCMP contacted the air force midday to inform them of the missing plane.

Lavallee said a C-130 Hercules aircraft from Winnipeg is on its way to the area to help with the search. He said members of the Canadian Rangers are also joining the search, travelling by snowmobile from Whati.

It is –23 C with blowing snow in the area according to Environment Canada.

Flight from Yellowknife to Whatì missing, two on board

By Sarah Pruys and Ollie Williams – January 30, 2019 at 2:05pm

Air Tindi has lost contact with a charter flight from Yellowknife to Whatì.

The airline said one of its three King Air 200 aircraft, carrying two pilots and no passengers, lost touch with the company between 9am and 9:30am on Wednesday.

The plane was believed to be a little over 25 km from Whatì at the time contact was lost, the airline said.

 

Two additional Twin Otter aircraft are now in the air following search patterns to trace the missing plane. All of the airline’s flights are suspended for the time being.

“Lots of other resources are on standby ready to go as soon as we have more more information,” Air Tindi’s president, Al Martin, told Cabin Radio by phone.

“We’re concerned about the pilots very much and are trying to make sure all of our people are being kept informed.”

A map shows the locations of Whatì, left, and the Ekati Diamond MIne, rightA map shows the locations of Whatì, left, and the Ekati Diamond MIne, right.

What exactly happened to the aircraft and the condition of those who were onboard is unclear.

David Lavallee, a spokesperson for the Royal Canadian Air Force, confirmed the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre in Trenton, Ontario, was contacted by RCMP at Yellowknife at around 10am MT on Wednesday, half an hour after the plane’s reported disappearance.

A Hercules aircraft is on its way from Winnipeg to join the search.

“Weather conditions in the area are quite poor,” Lavallee noted. The temperature was below -20C with blowing snow on Wednesday afternoon.

The airline said the Transportation Safety Board and the local community government had been notified, as had the pilots’ next of kin.

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An update re Air Tindi

Air Tindi flight was en route to Whati from Yellowknife and has 2 pilots on board, no passengers

CBC News · Posted: Jan 30, 2019 2:22 PM CT | Last Updated: an hour ago
 

A Hercules searching for a missing charter flight in the Northwest Territories has spotted the aircraft, according to an official involved in the search.

Sgt. Alfred Beaverhoe, head of the Canadian Rangers in Whati, told CBC News early Wednesday evening that the plane has been spotted near Behchoko, N.W.T. The Air Tindi charter flight was en route from Yellowknife to the community of Whati. Whati is located about 75 kilometres northwest of Behchoko. There were two pilots on board and no passengers. Beaverhoe said there is no information about the pilots' condition at this time. He said Canadian Rangers are heading to the aircraft.

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Re the Alaska crash .

Airplane debris found in search for missing Alaska plane

Searchers in Alaska found airplane debris Wednesday during a search for a medical airplane that went missing with three people aboard, the Coast Guard said Wednesday.

Social Sharing

Medical airplane went missing Tuesday, searchers could not confirm debris is of missing plane

The Associated Press · Posted: Jan 31, 2019 11:04 AM CT | Last Updated: 2 hours ago
 
anchorage-alaska-map.png
Anchorage, Alaska. The King Air 200 twin-engine plane took off from Anchorage on Tuesday and was expected to land in the community of Kake to pick up a patient, but it never arrived. (CBC)
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Searchers in Alaska found airplane debris Wednesday during a search for a medical airplane that went missing with three people aboard, the Coast Guard said Wednesday.

Searchers could not immediately confirm the debris found Wednesday is of the missing King Air 200 plane operated by operated by Guardian Flight, Chief Petty Officer Charly Hengen said. The debris was found in the water near the south tip of Admiralty Island about 35 kilometres west of the tiny southeast Alaska village of Kake.

The search is continuing for the missing plane, despite the discovery of debris, Hengen said.

The King Air 200 twin-engine plane took off from Anchorage on Tuesday and was expected to land in Kake at 6:19 p.m. to pick up a patient, but it never arrived, the Coast Guard said.

Guardian Flight released the names of those onboard in a statement Wednesday evening: pilot Patrick Coyle, 63, flight nurse Stacie Rae Morse, 30, and flight paramedic Margaret Langston Allen, 43. All were based in Juneau, according to the statement.

Federal accident investigators on Wednesday were reviewing radar flight information received from the plane, but no clues to what happened to the plane were immediately found in the search of data showing the plane's flight pattern, said Clint Johnson, chief of the National Transportation Safety Board in Alaska.

Crash not confirmed

"We don't even know for sure that we have an accident," he said.

The Coast Guard said no electronic locating transmitter signal has been activated from the missing plane.

When the plane failed to arrive in Kake, residents in a dozen boats went out Tuesday night to search, and some went back out Wednesday, city administrator Rudy Bean said.

"It's just a sad situation," he said.

The search by boats, ferries and aircraft was focused on an area of sea about 32 kilometres west of Kake, Hengen said.

"We're just diligently still continuing the search and hope that we find the overdue aircraft and individuals," she said.

Guardian Flight's other Alaska aircraft were grounded during the search, company spokesman Jim Gregory said.

The Utah-based company initially grounded all of its 85 aircraft across the U.S. as a show of respect for the missing. It gradually re-started operations with aircraft based outside of Alaska.

"That really gave our employees time to reflect on what's happened to the missing crew members and to pray," Gregorysaid.

Light rain, 11 kilometre-per-hour winds and 16-kilometre visibility were reported in the area around the time the plane was due in Kake, Hengen said.

The Kake clinic did not immediately respond to a telephone message seeking information about the patient who was supposed to be picked up by the plane.

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Update re Air Tindi

 

The Transportation Safety Board has deployed a team of investigators to look into the disappearance of a charter flight in the Northwest Territories, but the fate of the plane and its pilots has not been confirmed.

The TSB said in a statement Thursday that the team is being deployed to the place where the aircraft was reported spotted Wednesday to "gather information and assess the occurrence."

The Air Tindi King Air 200 was bound for Whati, about 75 kilometres northwest of Behchoko and 140 kilometres northwest of Yellowknife, when it went missing Wednesday morning. Only two pilots were aboard.

David Lavallee, spokesperson for the Royal Canadian Air Force, said Thursday that two search and rescue technicians parachuted from a Hercules aircraft to the area on Wednesday night. 

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A sad end

Search teams reach Air Tindi plane, report two fatalities

By Sarah Pruys and Ollie Williams – January 31, 2019 at 1:21pm

Search and rescue teams have arrived at the wreckage of an Air Tindi aircraft missing since Wednesday morning. Neither of the two pilots on board are believed to have survived, RCMP said.

Police made the announcement shortly after 1pm on Thursday, following a day-long mission to reach the site of the downed King Air 200 near Behchokǫ̀.

The identity of the pilots has not been released. The plane, which had been flying from Yellowknife to Whatì, was not carrying passengers.

What happened to bring the aircraft down has not been confirmed. The Transportation Safety Board of Canada is sending investigators to the scene.

Air Tindi said all of its flights are suspended until further notice, though one aircraft remains on standby for medevac operations.

“Search efforts yesterday resulted in the location of a crash site believed to involve the previously reported missing aircraft,” read the RCMP statement.

“All occupants on board are believed to be deceased and the RCMP is now working together with the NWT Coroner’s Office and the Transportation Safety Board.

“As the investigation remains ongoing, and out of respect for the families of those on board, no further information is being released at this time.”

Deep snow

The company lost contact with the missing plane between 9am and 9:30am on Wednesday morning.

A Hercules aircraft with trained search and rescue technicians was dispatched from Winnipeg later that morning, joining a search which already consisted of Twin Otter aircraft conducting search patterns above the missing flight’s intended route.

On Wednesday afternoon, technicians acting on a sighting from the Hercules parachuted in to a “site of interest” which proved to contain the plane.

Poor weather conditions – including deep snow on the ground – made progress toward the site difficult, both for search and rescue technicians and Canadian Rangers coming in from Behchokǫ̀ by snowmobile.

Teams made their way to the crash site using light from an overhead Hercules aircraft overnight.

The overnight low in the area was -24C, with a wind chill down to -33C.

The pilots’ next of kin have been informed.

“The Transportation Safety Board is deploying two investigators to the site where the aircraft has been found,” spokesperson Chris Krepski told Cabin Radio.

“They are leaving this morning from our regional office and making their way up to the Northwest Territories and then travelling to the site,” Krepski added.

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There but for the grace.

Could have been almost any one of us, a few years back in our careers.  So sad that their time came now. 

I hope families, loved ones, and the team at Tindi get the support they need.  Hopefully there will be answers soon.

With you in spirit tonight

Vs

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Flying in the north for young pilots can be a rewarding and an educational experience. However, the harsh conditions encountered especially at this time of year expose pilots to numerous threats. Letting your guard down even for a just a moment can be disastrous. Always my dear mother’s greatest worry about her youngest. 

I lost two friends in a similar King Air on a flight from Sanikiluaq (formerly Belcher Is.) to Churchill. Aircraft went missing enroute and was not found until the last day of the search. A CAF SAR Herc did one last pass near the departure airport where they noticed a crater like circle on the ice. The Beechcraft had flown straight down into the water. The wreckage was finally retrieved the following summer by the same ship which found Air India’s 747. The cause was never confirmed but it was suspected to be either a left prop overspeed or an elevator failure/jam.  

My sympathies to the families and friends of this Air Tindi flight crew. 

Edited by blues deville

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An update:

Quote

Pilots in fatal N.W.T. plane crash died on impact, says investigator

An official with the Transportation Safety Board (TSB) says that a fatal plane crash in the Northwest Territories was "not survivable" and that both pilots died on impact, according to an initial assessment of the crash site.

Charter flight crashed Wednesday morning while en route to community of Whati from Yellowknife

CBC News · Posted: Feb 01, 2019 10:20 AM CT | Last Updated: 28 minutes ago

An official with the Transportation Safety Board (TSB) says that a fatal plane crash in the Northwest Territories was "not survivable" and that both pilots died on impact, according to an initial assessment of the crash site.

Jon Lee, manager of the TSB's regional operations for Western Canada, made the comments Thursday morning on CBC's The Trailbreaker, after two inspectors travelled to the site by helicopter on Wednesday.

"Given the type of accident that we're dealing with, the accident was not survivable," said Lee. "So, unfortunately, the flight crew were deceased on impact."

When asked for details of the crash including velocity, Lee only said that it was "high," but that his team couldn't make any determinations at this early stage of their investigation.

"It's only one piece of the puzzle," he said. "We have to of course correlate that and combine it with other pieces of supporting information to start to develop the picture of what went on."

The crash occurred Wednesday near the community of Behchoko, N.W.T. A King Air 200 aircraft operated by Air Tindi was bound for the community of Whati from Yellowknife when it went missing. It was later located by a Royal Canadian Air Force Hercules as part of the search effort.

marion-lake-crash-site-map.jpgThe plane was bound for the community of Whati, about 140 kilometres northwest of Yellowknife. It crashed near Marian Lake and James lake, near the community of Behchoko. (CBC)

The pilots were the only people on board, and on Thursday afternoon, they were confirmed deceased by RCMP.

Lee said that his team made it to the crash site on Thursday just before noon and began an initial walkthrough, but was hampered by difficult conditions. About four centimetres of snow had fallen since the accident, making identifying parts of the plane difficult.

"It's pretty early stages in the investigation," said Lee. "At this time, we're focusing on collecting perishable information as best we can, and arranging for the disposition of the wreckage."

Lee said that his investigators would head back to the site Friday to continue to collect information, including a cockpit voice recorder on the aircraft.

Locating the recorder is a "key task" for investigators, said Lee, as it may give some insight into what caused the plane to go down.

The TSB is also expecting to receive a radar file from Nav Canada Friday, which will give information on the plane's flight path. Lee said that his team is also sharing information with the families of the pilots.

The investigation will also look at the response to the crash, including how the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre was notified and the steps taken to locate the plane.

Lee said that it's too early to determine how long the investigation into the crash might take, and that winter conditions could mean his team has to return to the site in the spring months to continue to recover parts and information.

"It's too early to say how long things are going to take to start to fully understand what happened, and more importantly why it happened," he said.

 

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Is there anything about this aircraft type that could have contributed to the incident?  Reason I ask is that 2 crashes involving the same type of aircraft in   Northern operation at opposite sides of North America within 2 days is almost a unbelievable coincidence. Now followed by an incident (feb 01, 2019) also involving the same aircraft type.

Kenn Borek Air plane makes emergency landing in Sachs Harbour, N.W.T.

Engine troubles were reportedly to blame, according to a Transport Canada incident report.

No damage or injuries were reported

CBC News · Posted: Feb 01, 2019 2:04 PM CT | Last Updated: 19 minutes ago
 
A Kenn Borek Air Ltd. airplane made an emergency landing in Sachs Harbour on Thursday. No injuries were reported. (Kyle Bakx/CBC)

A Kenn Borek Air Ltd. airplane made an emergency landing in Sachs Harbour, N.W.T. on Thursday.

According to a Transport Canada incident report, the plane, which took off from Sachs Harbour, was enroute to Inuvik.

The pilot declared an emergency about 60 nautical miles southwest of Sachs Harbour after an engine failure, and made the decision to turn back.

The report says the plane landed safely at 12:35 p.m.

There were no injuries reported and no damage to the aircraft.

The plane, a Beechcraft King Air BE200, is similar to the Air Tindi King Air 200 plane that crashed near Behchoko N.W.T. on Wednesday, killing its two pilots.

 

Another King Air 200 plane went missing in Alaska in Alaska on Tuesday.   

The Kenn Borek Air website says the Calgary-based airline offers medevac, survey, paradrop and float plane services, as well as maintenance.

The airline has offices in Calgary, Iqaluit, Resolute Bay, Rankin Inlet, and Inuvik.

Brian Crocker, vice-president of operations and the airline's spokesperson, was not immediately available for comment.  

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Are these northern operators feeling the effect of so much hiring elsewhere? What is the experience level or source of spares for those having to maintain these planes?

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Alaska ....Parts of the missing aircraft apparently  found amid floating debris field.. Based on the article there appears to be little, if any,  hope for the three persons on-board.

 

 

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — An air ambulance with three people aboard that vanished in Alaska was presumed to have crashed and the owners said Thursday that they will look for the bodies of the crew.

After an air and sea search of hundreds of square miles, the Coast Guard announced it was suspending the search for the twin-engine King Air 200, which went missing Tuesday while heading to the tiny community of Kake to pick up a patient.

“This was an extensive search effort in some very challenging conditions,” said Coast Guard Capt. Stephen White in a statement. “Suspending a search for any reason is one of the most difficult decisions we have to make.”

A wing part and other aircraft debris were found near the plane’s last known position.

The Coast Guard couldn’t confirm whether it came from the missing plane.

However, Guardian Flight, the medical flight company that owns the plane, announced late Thursday that it will try to recover the bodies of the missing: pilot Patrick Coyle, 63; flight nurse Stacie Rae Morse, 30, and 43-year-old Margaret Langston, the flight paramedic.

All were based in Juneau.

“Our hearts are heavy, and we respectfully offer our deepest thoughts and prayers to our lost employees and their families,” Randy Lyman, a company vice president, said in a statement.

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On 2/1/2019 at 2:09 PM, Malcolm said:

Is there anything about this aircraft type that could have contributed to the incident?  Reason I ask is that 2 crashes involving the same type of aircraft in   Northern operation at opposite sides of North America within 2 days is almost a unbelievable coincidence. Now followed by an incident (feb 01, 2019) also involving the same aircraft type.

Kenn Borek Air plane makes emergency landing in Sachs Harbour, N.W.T.

Engine troubles were reportedly to blame, according to a Transport Canada incident report.

No damage or injuries were reported

CBC News · Posted: Feb 01, 2019 2:04 PM CT | Last Updated: 19 minutes ago
 
A Kenn Borek Air Ltd. airplane made an emergency landing in Sachs Harbour on Thursday. No injuries were reported. (Kyle Bakx/CBC)

A Kenn Borek Air Ltd. airplane made an emergency landing in Sachs Harbour, N.W.T. on Thursday.

According to a Transport Canada incident report, the plane, which took off from Sachs Harbour, was enroute to Inuvik.

The pilot declared an emergency about 60 nautical miles southwest of Sachs Harbour after an engine failure, and made the decision to turn back.

The report says the plane landed safely at 12:35 p.m.

There were no injuries reported and no damage to the aircraft.

The plane, a Beechcraft King Air BE200, is similar to the Air Tindi King Air 200 plane that crashed near Behchoko N.W.T. on Wednesday, killing its two pilots.

 

Another King Air 200 plane went missing in Alaska in Alaska on Tuesday.   

The Kenn Borek Air website says the Calgary-based airline offers medevac, survey, paradrop and float plane services, as well as maintenance.

The airline has offices in Calgary, Iqaluit, Resolute Bay, Rankin Inlet, and Inuvik.

Brian Crocker, vice-president of operations and the airline's spokesperson, was not immediately available for comment.  

 

The B200 is the work horse of the north these days. Great range, reliable Pratt’s and there’s not much else out there that’s easier to fly. Lots of power and forgiving. It would be my choice for a personal airplane if I had the $$$.  It’s about the best plane these low time pilots could be flying in the North and many have autopilots to help out.

Several operators have upgrade the avionics and have put the G1000 avionics package ($400k) into these machines. An amazing upgrade that matches or exceeds what you’d find in a CRJ or Dash 8. VNAV descent to the LPV with moving map and synthetic vision.

I always cringe when I hear about a plane with just two pilots onboard crash in what appears to be good weather. There’s too many planes that have crashed with people doing stupid things. I hope I am wrong.

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I'm looking for common patterns.  The only thing I can think of relates to fuel and cold.   My King Air days are too long ago.  Any chance they ended up with fuel flow issues related to either water in the fuel freezing or the FCU's choking due to fuel getting too cold?

I know, all speculation, but the coincidence is disturbing.

Vs

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56 minutes ago, Vsplat said:

I'm looking for common patterns.  The only thing I can think of relates to fuel and cold.   My King Air days are too long ago.  Any chance they ended up with fuel flow issues related to either water in the fuel freezing or the FCU's choking due to fuel getting too cold?

I know, all speculation, but the coincidence is disturbing.

Vs

I think your suspicions about fuel freezing are indeed a possibility considering the sub-zero temps experienced across the north in recent days. Contaminated fuel being another possible cause.

Wouldn’t be the first time. My only single engine plane failure (C185) far above the tree line was likely due to contaminated fuel and probably my own fault.

In 1981 Calmair landed an HS748 on to a frozen Churchill River because someone mistakenly dumped deicing fluid into a drum labeled ‘Jet A-1’.

Edited by blues deville

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Voice recorder from fatal plane crash near Whati, N.W.T., recovered

The recorder is designed to preserve data on the flight crew conversations, radio transmissions and sounds heard in the cockpit.

The Transportation Safety Board says the voice recorder will be sent to Ottawa for analysis

Richard Gleeson · CBC News · Posted: Feb 12, 2019 6:00 AM CT | Last Updated: 3 hours ago
 
air-tindi-cockpit-voice-recorder-whati-c
The recorder will be sent to Ottawa for analysis. (Submitted by the Transportation Safety Board)

Investigators have recovered the cockpit voice recorder from the wreckage of a fatal airplane crash last month near Whati.

The Transportation Safety Board (TSB) announced the find on Monday. It said the recorder will be sent to a lab in Ottawa for analysis. The recorder is designed to preserve data on the flight crew conversations, radio transmissions and sounds heard in the cockpit.

The TSB says the parts of the plane will be recovered and sent to its office in Edmonton for examination. The investigation of the crash is being overseen by veteran TSB investigator Barry Holt.

The Jan. 30 crash claimed the lives of the two young pilots, Will Hayworth and Zach McKillop. They were the only people aboard the Air Tindi charter. They were flying from Yellowknife to Whati. The airline lost contact with the plane as it neared the the tiny Tlicho community.

A search began shortly after that ultimately involved two Twin Otters, a Hercules aircraft from the joint rescue co-ordination centre in Winnipeg, as well as Canadian Rangers from Whati and Behchoko.

Despite frigid temperatures and blowing snow, spotters in the Hercules located the wreckage of the plane just before dark Jan. 30.

A celebration of life is being planned for Hayworth and McKillop for this Friday afternoon in Yellowknife.

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On 2/4/2019 at 12:51 PM, blues deville said:

I think your suspicions about fuel freezing are indeed a possibility considering the sub-zero temps experienced across the north in recent days. Contaminated fuel being another possible cause.

Wouldn’t be the first time. My only single engine plane failure (C185) far above the tree line was likely due to contaminated fuel and probably my own fault.

In 1981 Calmair landed an HS748 on to a frozen Churchill River because someone mistakenly dumped deicing fluid into a drum labeled ‘Jet A-1’.

Just a small correction, I think. I remember being told they used what was supposed to be water meth but it was waste fuel stored in a WM barrel. When the WM kicked in - end of story. They hauled it off the ice, ferried it to Field Av in Yyc and rebuilt it. HS748 are some tough, tell ya wut.

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1 hour ago, Southshore said:

Just a small correction, I think. I remember being told they used what was supposed to be water meth but it was waste fuel stored in a WM barrel. When the WM kicked in - end of story. They hauled it off the ice, ferried it to Field Av in Yyc and rebuilt it. HS748 are some tough, tell ya wut.

That’s correct. It was a contaminated water meth drum used for the 748’s RR Dart engines. The Brits love to boost their engines. 

After the crash I was there the next day to operate the sked service for several weeks until a replacement Hawker was found. Saw the infamous drum in the YYQ hangar which according to my watch was....37 years ago. After the work was completed in YYC it was the queen of the fleet.

31713228-5547-4A2D-AA87-77CEA586E1A8.jpeg

Edited by blues deville
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4 minutes ago, blues deville said:

That’s correct. It was a contaminated water meth drum used for the 748’s RR Dart engines. The Brits love to boost their engines. 

I after the crash I was there the next day to operate the sked service for several weeks until a replacement Hawker was found. Saw the infamous drum in the YYQ hangar which according to my watch was....37 years ago. After the work was completed in YYC it was the queen of the fleet.

31713228-5547-4A2D-AA87-77CEA586E1A8.jpeg

My outfit had an office the the Field hangar. Never saw soooo many rivet heads in my life as on that airplane. 😉 

Our G1 showed some metal being made in the oil. I called RR in YUL to ask if we had a serious problem. A Scotsman asked me "Does it have a part number on it?" I asked back "Does what have a part number?" He said "The metal in the oil". I said, confused, "No". He said "@#*$ing call me back when it does" and hung up on me. Gotta love the Darts.

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18 hours ago, Southshore said:

Just a small correction, I think. I remember being told they used what was supposed to be water meth but it was waste fuel stored in a WM barrel. When the WM kicked in - end of story. They hauled it off the ice, ferried it to Field Av in Yyc and rebuilt it. HS748 are some tough, tell ya wut.

why would the need water meth up north.  Thats normally for hot climates.

 

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