Say Again, Over!

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Say Again, Over! last won the day on August 16 2016

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About Say Again, Over!

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  • Birthday 06/30/1970

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    Movin' tin in the Nation's Capital

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  1. Maybe just being alone at home while going through a divorce didn't please her at all and the one thing she looked forward to was the routine of a flight and the friendly banter on the flight deck as well as the order of things that would contrast with how she might view her life. Replacing her on the flight deck is a must, but making sure she has someone to talk to when she gets of the airplane must also be a priority.
  2. Outstanding point, GDR! Most of the liberties granted to the media are to protect them from undue influence from those in power. What we see now is a complete meddling of media and politics. Most don't mind because they like what they hear but fail to realize that when the media has such an influence on the masses and is equally manipulated by politicians, it's just as bad as if not worse than when the church did.
  3. DEFCON, I've heard the argument about arming everybody before and I cringe every time. Adding more guns to a gun fight will more than likely dramatically increase the numbers of deaths or injuries. Sure, one or more trained police officers might be a good defence to an armed attacker but a bunch of untrained yahoos with pistols shooting in a crowded area will create a deadly crossfire with a bunch of innocent bystanders in the middle. They might be good shots and be able to shoot pop cans from wherever but for a combat situation (which this becomes) even our soldiers spend a lot of time just learning how not to shoot each other.
  4. Very interesting discussion. We have, of course, to bring it down to the lowest common denominator. While the bulk of our traffic uses FMS and other apparatus that give an artificial magnetic compass, there remains a sizable portion of GA traffic that still relies on magnetic data to get around the airways. The operational hurdle would be minimal, and by that I mean that we would only have to get used to a different set of numbers and map orientation on radars. It would probably take less than a week. However, the costs, in terms of infrastructure, would be huge. Runway signage at all airports (at least in North America) and a whole renumbering of all air navigation data as the proximity of many airports and airspace could create confusion if using different formats. As it stands, there is an amazing workload with just the design changes to approaches and regular upkeep. Imagine a whole redesign... I do believe we'll eventually move away from magnetic bearings and headings. After all, we got rid of primary radar in many sites as the transponder became common place. We will more than likely replace radar altogether with ADS-B as the technology becomes more affordable to GA pilots. It's only a question of time until we start ignoring that moody Magnetic North Pole.
  5. I too work with a group spanning three generations and I find it all to be a gross generalization. To use paperwork as an example, I have seen sloppy work by yound and old as well as detailed through work from both groups. It is true that the younger generation is more at ease with new technology but that was also true 60 years ago when my grandfather got a heavier framing hammer so the screws would be easier to put in... (he thought you only needed to twist them to remove them). In Malcolm's context I disagree there too. Young (youngish) people take risks everyday as evidenced by the hazardous selfies from the top of towers and different Redbull challenges. I agree that there is a VERY vocal minority however that would like to make the world a safer place by removing all hazards. They are representing a group of people of all ages, however, and not a generation in particular. This "warning label" syndrome is a social one, not a generational one. JMHO
  6. To my non-expert eye, this Gen-X, Millenial thing is all about perception. Baby-boomers were carefree and self-absorbed in their teens and early twenties and as they got older started resenting the same from the generation following them. Gen-X folks who are now in their mid- to late-forties resent the Millenials for the same perpetual reasons. It's not about the date you were born, but rather the age you're at now and how you perceive the younger members of society. The expression "Kids, these days" transcends generations and labels. At least that's how I see it....
  7. ACS, I've had to work with Chinese students who come in the area for training. The language barrier is indeed HUGE! Keeping it simple, as you describe, is the way to go.
  8. HST, I've caught "bad readbacks" where in the end it wasn't that the pilot had readback wrong but rather that I had made a mistake in the instruction I gave. Either way, listening closely (actively, I might add) for a readback that reflects the desired action is key to pluggin' the hole!
  9. I am a firm advocate of using whatever means necessary to be understood. I make it my responsibility as the controller on duty to make sure that there is no confusion; in the end, if the pilot misunderstood, I choose to ask myself how I could have said it so it was clear and I have, over the years, built my phraseology tools accordingly. Not surprisingly, it is close to the ICAO standard with a few additions where required and an extra transmission to confirm if need be. Working in a bilingual environment, I'm often in situations where people are using their second language and have learned to not let anything slip. Never heard of the Romeo and Lima trick. Neat!
  10. From an ATC perspective: EVA015, after take-off 07R, was given a heading of 180. The crew made a mistake in reading back a left turn where a right turn would have been quicker; The controller did not catch the bad read-back and therefore lost her opportunity to correct the error. Conflict resolution started with EVA015 stopped at 5000 and turning right; away from ACA788 that had taken off 06R; EVA015 was then given a left turn heading 270 (I'm here presuming that it was meant for ACA788 but she misspoke in the heat of the moment) EVA015 readback the turn to the left (which would have put them back over the mountains) and the read-back (revealing the wrong aircraft responding to her plan) was once again missed. The controller then asked "What are you doing?" to which the answer could have legitimately been: "We're doing what you told us to do and have been doing so all along"! Read-back and hearback is a huge item in basic and recurrent training in ATC. I tell all my trainees to insist on a proper readback at all times and then actively listen to it. These left/right errors or wrong altitudes or headings are quite common; we're talking double digits per day! They are in fact part and parcel of the everyday business of aviation. We expect them as part of the routine. It is our job, however, as controllers to catch and correct missed instructions.
  11. Ha ha ha!! I kept trying to cross my eyes to see a 3D airplane pop up! Now I have a head-ache!
  12. Don, Interesting point you make. It's a fairly common thing in mountainous areas to have vectoring altitudes that are way below the 100nm MSA or even the approach quadrantal MSA . In CYQB, for example, the lowest MSA is 4500 for the RNAV06 while we can vector as low as 2200 to the south west of the airport. While we will often go down to that altitude, it will almost always be for vectors to final. We teach our students that if given the approach using one of the base leg fixes, the pilot would probably, climb to the MSA or at least the next segment altitude, or at the very least ask. I did it once for icing reasons with a light single and I was specific in the approach clearance that the altitude he was at, although below MSA, satisfied obstacle clearance requirements. You are right that, at this point, we are the only ones aware of this information. If ever anything didn't work or didn't feel right from your end, I would expect you to discontinue the approach.
  13. Who writes "$40,000 down and ONLY $3,888 per month". I understand that most sales pitches throw in the "ONLY this or that" to make people think they have a bargain but in this case, it just looks stupid. Nice car, though! If ONLY I had $4000 to put on a car every month (That's the correct use of "ONLY" in this context).
  14. Wow! Great story! I must admit to getting REALLY teary eyed reading through the story of their mission. We've been a foster family for 14 years and while most kids have stayed with us permanently, we've had to return a few to their family. You can't stay detached; kids deserve to have someone love them enough to cry when they leave. We force ourselves to rejoice that they are now in a (fixed up) family and that it's not only natural but right. There are still tears though... Good on the Dee's for experiencing Love with an intensity not everybody gets. Good job getting Carl care he certainly would not have had on the island. They done good! Bon travay, zanmi!
  15. Other than confirming the type, I think I better keep some confidentiality. Sorry to whet your appetite...