AvWatcher

Members
  • Content count

    26
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

11 Good

About AvWatcher

  • Rank
    1
  1. Am I missing something ? The baggage retrieval area in most airports can be accessed by anyone in the general public, especially in the US. So anyone in the general public could have walked in, and inflicted the same damage as the guy who checked his gun. Unless you are going to have metal detectors for anyone coming into an airport, this tragedy of people being shot in a baggage retrieval area by someone is not preventable by having trigger locks, not shipping bullets etc. He could have been handed a gun, bullets etc. by an accomplice, or simply started the shooting in Anchorage before he boarded the flight. Unfortunately, this was a mentally sick man who seemed to snap at the wrong time for those in FLL. Very sad, but not uncommon. While we hear about some gun attacks, do you know the number of mass shootings that have occurred in the US in 2016 (a mass murder is defined as more than 4 or more people killed or injured in one attack, not linked to drugs) ? 385, More than 1 a day. http://www.gunviolencearchive.org/past-tolls And that's not a unique year - in 2015 it was 333. And so far in 2017, there has also been more than 1 a day. To quote Barack Obama “Earlier this year, I answered a question in an interview by saying, “The United States of America is the one advanced nation on Earth in which we do not have sufficient common-sense gun-safety laws — even in the face of repeated mass killings.” And later that day, there was a mass shooting at a movie theater in Lafayette, Louisiana. That day! Somehow this has become routine. The reporting is routine. My response here at this podium ends up being routine. The conversation in the aftermath of it. We’ve become numb to this.”
  2. So here's the difference between Canadian and American healthcare. A friend of mine developed prostate cancer. He went to his GP, who referred him to a specialist, who indicated that he needed surgery, and the Surgeon told him there was a 50/50 chance could save his sexual function. And he could do it in about 6 months. So my friend went to the Cleveland Clinic, who told him that his sexual function was not even an issue - they would guarantee that he would retain it, and was he available the next day? So for $20K, he headed down to Cleveland. They put him up in hotel next to the clinic, the next day escorted him to the clinic, to the operating room. The surgeon was using a robot assisted laparoscopic process, and was viewing what he was doing on a screen the size of the wall opposite him. He was doing 15 surgeries that day, and did 1500 to 2000 a year. The Canadian physician was proud that he did about 100 a year ... In medicine, much like flying, normally the more you do, the better the outcome. And better the equipment used, the better the outcome. Every community in Canada with a Hospital wants to have all of their surgeries done there, and as a result, we end up with very few true specialists, unlike the US. And our Physicians and Hospitals can only dream about the quality of the equipment some US Hospitals have and use. I'm not saying that they have a better healthcare system, but there are advantages, and not all cons to theirs. A number of my friends have headed south, and have paid big dollars to have work done sooner, and by a more experienced physician, with far better equipment.
  3. And anyone who thinks the Hamilton Airport is a Hamilton Airport, is sadly mistaken. It's actually almost half way to Brantford, and its population of less than 100,000. It's almost faster to drive from downtown Burlington to Pearson than to go to Munro. With the limited frequency out of the airport, it's a tough sell versus Pearson.
  4. I, for one, liked Bean's posts. I didn't agree with them all the time, but then there are many posts that I don't agree with. I would have thought that this forum was to stimulate discussion - not only to allow those who think like us to post. That would be both boring, and very limited in scope. We all have our biases, and for sure Bean had his, but you knew that, and took it into account when you read his posts. I always found that his posts were backed up, in most part, by statistics or facts - something that not all posts are. At times some of the posts opposing Bean's were aimed at the messenger, not the message, which again is not what this forum is, or should be about. Regardless of Bean's past - and we all have one - he's smart, informed and has his perspective, so he was interesting to read. Sort of like Don Cherry - you may not agree with everything he says - but he provokes discussion - and that's a good thing. If Bean has left us for good - that would be a bad thing - so I hope he hasn't.
  5. It's funny - I would have sworn the topic of this thread was "Decline in WestJet Load Factor" ...
  6. I think the point being made is not that WJ's May's L/F is down, but that it's down as compared to last May, almost 2%. AC on the other hand is down only 1%, after starting a number of new very long haul routes in the month. Not the end of the world, but interesting.
  7. Hockey coins - too funny. I think they came in boxes of Shirriff Pudding ... our family ate more Shirriff pudding than you can imagine so I could finish my hockey coin collection. And what about the "Weekend Magazine" that came in most newspapers - which had full page pictures of, in our case, the Maple Leaf players each week. That's why my favourite Leaf in those days was Billy Harris - and I always wondered how Al Arbour could play hockey behind those glasses ... Did anyone else listen to hockey games on Chrystal radios? And you talk about the milk man, bread man, ice man, we had an egg man ...
  8. It's too bad that this thread, which started out recognizing Air Canada as the Number 1 preferred airline in the US as voted in the Brand Keys survey of 36,000 people in the US, and WestJet, who tied for 3rd, has been hijacked into a profitability, break even load factors and operating margin discussion. As a Canadian, I'm proud of both airlines, and kudos to them and all their employees.
  9. As soon as you see a start-up airline calling itself a ULCC with a CEO, President, COO, CAO, CFO and a VP OPs - you know they aren't serious.
  10. In that area, Paestum is a must - relatively unknown, but has the best Greek ruins in Italy (and some say in the world). Puglia is famous for its Primitivo wine, which is the same grape as the wonderful Zinfandels made in California. It tends to be a slightly lighter version of the Zins - but just as tasty. I'm not sure when you are going, but July and August are swamped with Italians on vacation. We were there in October, and many sites/locations were closed up since there were no tourists left. You'll marvel at the number of olive trees, which like Spain - are everywhere. We stayed at a B&B and were lucky enough to be able to make some olive oil with the owner, knocking olives from the trees, taking it to the processing "plant" which a large round rock wheel which crushed the olives. If you have a choice, I would not spend much time in Naples - very high crime rate, especially pick-pockets. Go from Positano to see Capri. There is also a hike that ends back in Positano called "Walk of the Gods", which is one of the most interesting and breathtaking hikes you will ever go on. It basically traces the tops of the hills surrounding Positano. We took a local bus from Positano to Bomerano, which was wonderful as well, packed a lunch with wine, and the hike lasted about 5 hours with a long, long lunch. Down near Salerno and Paestum, you have to try the Buffalo Mozzerella, which is to die for - especially with the Primitivo. In Italy, everything always comes back to food and wine! Enjoy!
  11. The issue for Toronto was that it had very mild weather - with freezing rain and then rain - and then it got cold - which turned any concrete surface into a skating rink - and salt didn't help. So it wasn't just the temperature - it was the weather just before the cold snap.
  12. The Air Canada Unions need to realize that they have to quit winning the battles (if you call it winning) - and losing the war. The public is getting fed up with strikes, potential strikes, strike notices, strike votes, and are walking away from the airline due to the uncertainty. Which in turn means Air Canada's revenue drops, which means that Air Canada's expenses must drop, which means that Air Canada will lay more people off, and ask for concessionary contracts, which means the Unions will take more action. It's a vicious circle which will not end until CCAA - again, and they are forced into taking concessionary contracts - and away they go again. There needs to be far more behind the scenes dialogue between the Unions and Air Canada to discuss mutual issues, and quit squabbling in public - which only helps their competition grow and prosper.
  13. Zip

    I believe one may have been the 737 in the First Air accident.
  14. You obviously forget that Porter is one of the Star's more prolific advertisers - with almost daily full page ads. Only softball questions were allowed.
  15. Jennifer Beautiful part of the world. We spent 10 days touring the Andalucia region which is SouthWest of where you are staying. If you feeling adventurous - you should see the Alhambra in Granada which is the most popular tourist attraction in Spain. Be sure to buy your tickets online before you go if you do. The Rock of Gibraltar is wonderful to see - and the beaches near it are a kite-surfers dream. If you do make a swing through Andalucia, try to hit Cadiz, Seville and Cordoba in addition to the above. The churches are amazing - many are part Muslim, part Catholic, and in some cases, part Jewish, back in the days when religions actually got along. The history of the area is wonderful as well, as the Moors and Christians taking turns capturing various cities. Enjoy!