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Yeti Airlines ATR72 Crash Nepal


J.O.
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Black box and cockpit voice recorder from plane that crashed in Nepal found

 
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The black box and cockpit voice recorder of the plane that crashed in Nepal have been found, a Kathmandu Airport official has said.

The ATR 72 aircraft, operated by Yeti Airlines, was carrying 72 people when it crashed.

Rescuers called off their search on Monday evening local time with two people still unaccounted for, and the operation will resume on Tuesday, according to an airport official.

Video on local media showed thick black smoke billowing from the crash site as rescue workers and crowds gathered around the wreckage of the aircraft.

Teknath Sitaula, a Kathmandu Airport official, said the so-called black boxes "are in a good condition now. They look
good from outside".

The data on the recorders may help investigators determine what caused the plane to crash.

Nepal declared Monday a day of mourning and has set up a panel to investigate the disaster and suggest measures to avoid such incidents in future.

The plane, on a scheduled flight from Nepal's capital Kathmandu to Pokhara, the gateway to the scenic Annapurna mountain range, was carrying 57 Nepalis, five Indians, four Russians, two South Koreans, and one person each from Argentina, Ireland, Australia and France.

Pokhara police official Ajay KC said the search and rescue operation, which stopped because of nightfall on Sunday, has now resumed.

He said: "We will take out the five bodies from the gorge and search for the remaining four that are still missing."

The other 63 bodies had been sent to a hospital, he said.

As it crashed the aircraft's fuselage was split into multiple parts which were scattered down the gorge.

Tek Bahadur KC, a senior administrative officer in the Kaski district, said he expected rescue workers to find more bodies at the bottom of the gorge.

Gaurav Gurung, a witness, said he saw the aircraft spinning violently in the air after it began to attempt a landing.

He added he saw the plane fall nose-first towards its left and then crash into the gorge.

"The plane caught fire after the crash. There was smoke everywhere," Mr Gurung said.

Nearly 350 people have died since 2000 in plane or helicopter crashes in Nepal - home to eight of the world's 14 highest mountains, including Everest - where sudden weather changes can make for hazardous conditions.

Experts say air accidents are usually caused by a combination of factors, and investigations can take months or longer.

 
 
Sun, January 15, 2023 at 11:15 p.m. MST·2 min read
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The pilot of the downed flight had lost her husband – a co-pilot for the same airline – in a similar crash in 2006, according to a Yeti Airlines spokesperson.

Anju Khatiwada had decided to become a pilot after the death of husband, Dipak Pokhrel, and used the insurance payout money to travel to the US for her training, Sudarshan Bartaula told CNN. She had been with the airline since 2010 and had more than 6,300 hours of flight experience.

“She was a brave woman with all the courage and determination. She’s left us too soon,” he said.

Khatiwada was a captain and was flying with an instructor pilot for additional training at the time of the crash, Bartaula added.

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On 1/17/2023 at 11:25 AM, Kip Powick said:

Khatiwada was a captain and was flying with an instructor pilot for additional training at the time of the crash, Bartaula added.

Not often you hear of a crash with an instructor as a crew member.

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On 1/20/2023 at 11:02 AM, Seeker said:

Not often you hear of a crash with an instructor as a crew member.

The only case I heard about was the AC  DC-8  training accident at YOW back in 1967  . I believe the IP was a Captain, occupying the right seat, and I think both his "students" were high time pilots as well but I guess they were probably transitioning to the DC-8 

I was based in YYB at the time and we did fly over the crash site a few days later as we did many flights to YOW and YUL.

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TC lost a Twin Otter in February 1981. Instructor pilot in right seat failed an engine with the fuel shut-off. Pilot flying reached up and feathered live engine. Insufficient time to restart shut down engine. Both pilots killed.

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6 hours ago, Moon The Loon said:

TC lost a Twin Otter in February 1981. Instructor pilot in right seat failed an engine with the fuel shut-off. Pilot flying reached up and feathered live engine. Insufficient time to restart shut down engine. Both pilots killed.

Hi, Moon' - I remember that time. There was a third inspector on board who survived, though badly injured. I believe he'd scramnbled to the back of the aircraft.

My recollection is hearing that the second engine was also shut down by fuel cutoff. A feathered-but-running PT6 will unfeather fairly quickly, but when the fire's out in both ...

IAC, it did generate some discussion (and reflection) for many of us involved in instructing, and in-aircraft airline training, about how 'realistic' those scenarios and configurations really needed to be. & IMO, no abnormals should ever be simulated on the line (& no indication so far that happened here).

Cheers, IFG - 🍺

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7 hours ago, J.O. said:

That was a tragic day. I had met John Miller a few times around the flight school, very nice guy.

John was a prince of an inspector for flight training institutions. Inspector O'Brien had his own reputation. The third pilot observing was on his first flight after being involved himself in a previous crash where he was severely injured. This was a re-intro flight for him.

 

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