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Gas price pain is a direct result of Trudeau


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Posted (edited)


Let’s call a spade a spade, regardless of what the Extreme LEFT claims.

 

“ That pain at the pump you are feeling is causing squeals of delight in Ottawa as taxes from record high gas prices fill the federal coffers.

Inflation, an increased carbon tax and extra GST revenue may be taking their toll on your bank account, but they’re ensuring Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government can keep up their high spending ways. “

 

The price of gas hit record highs across Canada over the weekend and might go higher still later in the week.

 

The Trudeau government has been dismissive of the idea that the spike in the price of gas is anything but the result of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. While the impact of a war and the ensuing sanctions on a major player in the oil market is helping drive up the cost of gas, we’re also doing it to ourselves.

 

Proof of this can be seen in comparing gas prices on both sides of the border.

 

While motorists in Buffalo, N.Y., are currently paying the equivalent of about $1.51 Canadian per litre, just across the border in Niagara Falls, the price sits at $2.09 per litre. In Vancouver, prices have dropped to $2.25 per litre after topping $2.30 over the weekend, but in Bellingham, Wash., the price works out to $1.68 per litre Canadian.

Calgary and Edmonton have some of the best gas prices in Canada at just under $1.75 per litre, but head south to Montana, and you’ll pay the equivalent of $1.55 a litre in Great Falls.

 

The main difference is tax and our low dollar.

 

Hiking the carbon tax in the middle of an energy and affordability crisis was madness. Trudeau, though, is more concerned about being seen to do the right thing on climate than the impact his tax has on family budgets.

When gas spiked during the 2008 financial meltdown, our dollar was on par with American greenback; now, we’re lucky to buy it for 70 cents on the dollar. Gas price analyst and former Liberal MP Dan McTeague said the Canadian dollar no longer rises when the price of oil goes up because we’ve ceased to be a place oil and gas companies want to invest, and that is hurting us.

 

The devaluation of the loonie amounts to a hidden tax or loss of purchasing power equivalent to 30 cents a litre,” McTeague said Monday.

 

McTeague, president of Canadians for Affordable Energy, said that the cancellation of pipeline projects from Energy East to Northern Gateway — and even the delays on Trans Mountain — are costing us. He said if these projects were online already, as they should have been, Canada would be producing an extra 3 million barrels of oil a day.

 

“This would easily displace Russian blackmail barrels over Europe and drive oil down $40 a barrel … saving us another 40 cents a litre,” McTeague said.

 

Add in the extra carbon tax, it was increased on April 1, plus the extra GST revenue, and you can see why our prices are so high. GST revenues alone are filling government coffers full.

 

The GST is the last item charged on a litre of fuel and while for years we’ve complained about the tax on a tax — meaning charging GST on the federal excise tax — it is now charged on the excise tax and the carbon tax.

 

A year ago, the average price of gas in Toronto was just under $1.30 a litre. It now sits at $2.09 a litre, and the federal government takes an 5% cut on every penny of that increase.

 

The war in Ukraine is no doubt affecting the price of gas, but most of the pain we’re feeling is due to the bad decisions we’ve been making, including re-electing the Trudeau Liberals.

https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/lilley-gas-price-pain-is-a-direct-result-of-electing-trudeau-again?__vfz=medium%3Dstandalone_content_recirculation_with_ads

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Edited by Jaydee
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Allo,

 

Have you considered what oil prices are around the world? It seems disingenuous to blame a single politician for high fuel prices when they are up all over the world. https://www.globalpetrolprices.com/gasoline_prices/ 

Our bad lot of politicians can be blamed for lots of issues but fuel prices and inflation would be roughly the same under most government since they aren't local phenomenons. Prices are set at the international level.

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3 minutes ago, mrlupin said:

Allo,

 

Have you considered what oil prices are around the world? It seems disingenuous to blame a single politician for high fuel prices when they are up all over the world. https://www.globalpetrolprices.com/gasoline_prices/ 

Our bad lot of politicians can be blamed for lots of issues but fuel prices and inflation would be roughly the same under most government since they aren't local phenomenons. Prices are set at the international level.

Correct to a point, but as the article states, approximately 25% of the price increase can be attributed to Trudeau’s policies over the last 7 years.

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It's an opinion piece...

We aren't in a closed economy. Look at the rest of the world prices and you will find Canadian prices are pretty much on par with the rest of the world.

Even on a Taxation stand point, if Canada was the only country doing it it would constitute a valid point, yet most countries tax petrol and gas.

Regardless of who gets elected, with the ESG movement their is a lack of investment in Oil and Gas (low Capex). Add to that the cutting off of Russian oil and you have the perfect storm for higher oil prices for year to come. No politician will change that even if it feels good to point to one for blame.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, mrlupin said:

Look at the rest of the world prices and you will find Canadian prices are pretty much on par with the rest of the world.

From the chart posted in your article, there are 123 countries in the world that have LOWER prices than Canada. 48 countries have higher prices. The countries with the lowest prices are mostly the oil exporting countries. A large % of the countries with the higher prices are the ones dependant on Russian oil. 

Canada has the third largest oil reserves in the world, after Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Doesn’t take an MBA to figure out the main causal factor as to why Canadas prices are so high.  A direct result of overbearing, ridiculous, virtue signalling Government policy. 

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56 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

From the chart posted in your article, there are 123 countries in the world that have LOWER prices than Canada. 48 countries have higher prices. The countries with the lowest prices are mostly the oil exporting countries. A large % of the countries with the higher prices are the ones dependant on Russian oil. 

Canada has the third largest oil reserves in the world, after Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Doesn’t take an MBA to figure out the main causal factor as to why Canadas prices are so high.  A direct result of overbearing Government policy. 

Your point re exporting countires and their low cost of domestic product does not apply to Canada as most of our production can not be exported due to various restrictions imposed upon the industry. 🙃

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Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, Kargokings said:

Your point re exporting countires and their low cost of domestic product does not apply to Canada as most of our production can not be exported due to various restrictions imposed upon the industry.

Exactly my point. Government BS killing Canada 1 M$ at a time

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41 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

Exactly my point. Government BS killing Canada 1 M$ at a time

Applies to Federal and Provincial governments and fueled by those with do or little regard to consequences until it hurts their pocketbook.

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3 hours ago, Jaydee said:

From the chart posted in your article, there are 123 countries in the world that have LOWER prices than Canada. 48 countries have higher prices. The countries with the lowest prices are mostly the oil exporting countries. A large % of the countries with the higher prices are the ones dependant on Russian oil. 

Canada has the third largest oil reserves in the world, after Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Doesn’t take an MBA to figure out the main causal factor as to why Canadas prices are so high.  A direct result of overbearing Government policy. 

If you try to compare similar countries you will get a different picture. Try comparing the G7 countries or NATO countries with Canada.

For your second statement, Country Oil reserves do not have much correlation with pump prices unless you have a nationalized market or some sort of a dictator regime. I don't detect any desire in your writings for such a market.

It's an interesting list... Have a look at Norway at the extreme $$$ end... Good reserves, Gas producer and stratospheric prices. At the other end of the scale, you have Venezuala, Iran, Kuwait, Kazakhstan,Iraq, Qatar, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Russia, Pakistan and the UAE with sub 1$US per liter gas. Those countries don't really appear as comparable. As far as comparables go... Gas in Europe, NZ, much of the eastern bloc is mostly higher than in Canada. The list has a few countries with lower prices that "could" be compared to Canada. The US, Australia, China, South Korea, Turkiye, Brazil, Japan all have cheaper gas...

From most of the reading I have done, I am reaching the conclusion that high prices are going to be here for a while. The current Prime Minister is merely the figure head that was voted in prior to world prices sky rocketing. He's not going to fix it, and neither will a conservative government or the NDP...

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5 hours ago, Jaydee said:

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Those are  some of the reasons the Conservatives are stuck in the opposition role for a while... It's not like they have a sizable opponent in Trudeau, yet they still are unable to find a leader with any traction with Canadians east of Saskatchewan.

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2 hours ago, mrlupin said:

Those are  some of the reasons the Conservatives are stuck in the opposition role for a while... It's not like they have a sizable opponent in Trudeau, yet they still are unable to find a leader with any traction with Canadians east of Saskatchewan.

And this too shall pass. Otoole was a huge disappointment I will agree. IMHO, the next leader, Pierre Pollievre , is the most dynamic, capable individual the Conservatives have put forth since Harper.

‘We shall soon see.

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On 6/8/2022 at 3:55 AM, Jaydee said:

And this too shall pass.

IMO, conservatives should hold to conservative values as opposed to morphing into liberal lite. Let the chips fall where they may. 

If people want more JT they should have it... in fact, part of me hopes they get exactly that. I want this madness over and IMO, the quickest way to get there is more self inflicted pain (lots of it). I'm hoping for sharp and short but fear liberals favour a slow approach to torture.

As to gas prices, those favouring the Paris Accord should be cheering. They aren't though and they should have a cold hard look at what they say they think they might maybe want. This is a drop in the bucket compared to what's required to hit the targets. It's not breaking news either, every ten year old with a hand held calculator knows it. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Doug Ford’s promised gas tax cut takes effect in Ontario this Friday
 

A cut to the provincial gas tax promised by Premier Doug Ford before the June election takes effect on Friday and experts say it may offer some relief to drivers facing sky-high pump prices, but the long-term benefits to consumers are unpredictable.

The government passed legislation this spring to lower the gas tax by 5.7 cents per litre and the fuel tax, which covers diesel, by 5.3 cents per litre for six months.

The changes will be in effect from July 1 to Dec. 31 with the government pegging the cost at $645 million.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ontario-gas-tax-cut-1.6506168

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Just now, Jaydee said:

but the long-term benefits to consumers are unpredictable.

Typical CBC…always have to throw a jab at Conservatives in their reporting. 🥵🥵

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For the head line skimmers …check the date on the article.


Trudeau reverses course, drops carbon tax as of April 1
 

A statement from the Prime Minister’s Office obtained in advance exclusively by the Sun reveals that inflation and the cost-of-living is what spurred Trudeau’s change of heart.

 

“I just can’t do it,” said Trudeau. “It’s become clear that an increase in the carbon tax at this point in time would only add to the hardships faced by Canadians who are already struggling to pay the bills.” The change comes into effect immediately.

 

Trudeau also explained that his policy reversal is “a teachable moment for all Canadians and an opportunity for reflection.”

 

A source speaking on background revealed that Trudeau went out to buy his own groceries on Thursday night for the first time in years and was flabbergasted by the price of goods. “He only took a $10 bill because he figured it would be enough for a block of marble cheese, but after tax he just didn’t have enough on him,” the source explained.

A bystander reportedly offered to buy the cheese for the PM upon seeing his struggles at the cash register. It’s unknown if Trudeau accepted the stranger’s money.

 

The carbon tax reversal comes after Alberta Premier Jason Kenney decided his province would temporarily stop collecting the provincial gas tax, which adds 13 cents per litre to the price of gas.

 

While the Liberals had previously touted that the federal carbon tax would be revenue neutral, a new report from the Parliamentary Budget Officer reveals that the majority of Canadians will now pay more in carbon taxes than they receive back in the form of rebates.

 

It remains unclear whether the elimination of the carbon tax is a temporary or permanent measure, but based on the publication date of this story we recommend you don’t let yourself be fooled.

EDITORIAL: Carbon tax increase is sadly no joke

 

We’d prefer to think that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s April 1 carbon tax increase is just a cruel April Fool’s Day joke.

 

But, alas, Trudeau’s carbon tax increased by 25% to $50 per tonne of greenhouse gas emissions on Friday, up from $40.

 

These increases have happened every year on April 1 since 2019, when the tax was introduced at $20 per tonne of emissions, and will continue to rise annually up to $170 per tonne in 2030.

 

For families living in the four provinces where Trudeau imposed his carbon tax — Alberta, Ontario, Saskatchewan and Manitoba — gasoline prices because of the federal carbon tax will rise by 2.2 cents per litre to 11 cents per litre, on its way to 37.4 cents per litre in 2030.

 

https://torontosun.com/opinion/editorials/editorial-carbon-tax-april-fools

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And the beat goes on.....

Of course for Justin (rich kid) and the highly paid Liberal and NDP MPs, there is no down side to this.   However for the rest of us on fixed pensions and most of the middle / lower (not sure of the new term) there will be large costs.

Quote
 

 

With Canadian gas prices continuing to hit historic highs, the Trudeau government has quietly rolled out a latticework of new fuel standards that are expected to permanently raise gas prices by an amount equivalent to the federal carbon tax.

 

The new Clean Fuel Regulations, unveiled last week, would force energy companies to reduce the “carbon intensity” of gasoline and diesel.

 

To do this, companies can reduce the amount of emissions they emit during the process of getting petroleum from the ground to the gas station (think carbon capture or renovating refineries to be more energy efficient). Or, they can dilute the amount of fossil fuels in their product entirely by mixing it with biofuels.

 

The regulations (which come in at 227 pages overall) get particularly complicated in drafting up a scheme to buy credits from cleaner producers.

 

An “impact analysis” accompanying the regulations estimates that it will raise gas prices by between six and 13 cents per litre, while diesel will go up between seven and 16 cents.

 

At the top end, that’s higher than the current federal carbon tax rate of approximately 11 cents per litre. Per household, the Clean Fuel Standard will cost between $132 and $301 per year by 2030.

 

“The Regulations will increase production costs for primary suppliers, which will increase prices for households and industrial users,” it reads.

 

Complying with the Clean Fuel Standard is forecast to shrink the Canadian economy by $9 billion; the equivalent of 0.3 per cent of GDP. With the standard expected to reduce emissions by 26.6 megatonnes, that’s about $338 in economic pain per tonne.

 

For context, the federal government’s current carbon pricing scheme is based on a price-per-tonne of just $50 per tonne.

 

While the Clean Fuel Standard has been decried by Canadian farmers as an anticipated spike to their production costs in the agricultural sector, it has nevertheless been welcomed by farmers who grow biofuel. A recent statement co-signed by the U.S. Grains Council called the standard a “victory” for low-carbon biofuels.

 

Over the Canada Day weekend, the average Canadian price for gas remained just above $2 per litre — which may explain why the new standard was announced last week with minimal fanfare.

 

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau did not mention the new regulations on his Twitter feed, and Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault limited his announcement to a one-page press release that stressed that the measure would have “no immediate impact on fuel prices.”

 

The idea of a clean fuel standard has been in the works since the earliest months of the Trudeau government.

 

Originally pitched as a way to “stimulate greater use of biofuels,” it was part of a wider package of Trudeau government climate policies including the carbon tax and a phase-out of coal-fired power.

 

But the Clean Fuel Standard has been significantly defanged from its earlier incarnations to the point where some in the environmentalist camp have decried the standard as a sop to Big Oil.

 

In March, a statement co-written by the Pembina Institute’s Carolyn Kim said the Clean Fuel Standard would act “as a de facto subsidy for the fossil fuel sector.”

 

Last month, Bloc Québécois MP Kristina Michaud called the standard “a system that will enable oil companies to keep polluting, but to buy credits that will hide their real greenhouse gas emission numbers.”

 

Perhaps tellingly, Big Oil doesn’t seem to be all that bothered by the new standards. On Monday, the energy giant Suncor announced the opening of a new facility in B.C. that would turn natural gas into hydrogen — one of the low-carbon fuels targeted by the Clean Fuel Standard.

 

“Hydrogen has the potential be a significant part of the future energy mix and is a key part of Suncor’s strategy to be a net zero GHG emissions company by 2050,” was how Suncor executive Kris Smith put it in a statement.

 

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The Liberals are out to lunch on high gas prices 

Does Chrystia Freeland really believe climate change is what people are thinking about when paying exorbitant prices at the pumps?

“ My perspective, this price increase … in fuel costs is a reminder of why climate action is so important, and why as a country we have to work even harder, and move even faster towards a green economy.”
— Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, speaking in Brampton, Ont., on Tuesday.

 

Does Chrystia Freeland, can Chrystia Freeland, actually think that this is what goes through the minds of people when they see gas costing more than eight bucks a gallon? That they are glad, they are grateful, that emptying their wallets or fattening their credit-card debt is “reminding” them of “why climate action is so important?”

 

I’m trying to imagine a couple of people in Gander or Weyburn or Prince George heading to the cash at the local gas station after a fill-up, having a chat. “Wow, over a hundred bucks, and mine is a Civic.” The other guy: “I know. Cost me a $160 for the old pickup. Never seen the like.”

Both pause and reflect. In unison, they break out: “Aren’t high gas prices just great? I was near forgetting. These fierce increases are just the reminder I needed. I mean, about how important climate action really is.” They throw an arm around each other’s shoulder and cheerily waltz to the register.

Such an exchange just might, considering the state of Canadian comedy, work as a skit. But in no other context.

 

Does Freeland actually think this is what goes through the minds of people?

 

What, really, does the rise in fuel prices remind most people of? Well, the first thing of course is that they can’t afford the rises. Secondly, that their so-empathetic leaders, obsessed with their high-minded parade on climate change, have lost all contact with how most people are actually reacting to this new crisis. That government is one world, and theirs another, and making life difficult in their world is what the world of government is all about.

 

It’s also a reminder that their government’s manic fixation on climate virtue-signalling is less a policy than something approaching a medical condition.

 

Have you not noticed that moving harder and faster to this delirium called a green economy has left Germany at the mercy of Vladimir Putin’s Russia, and is now driving Germany back to oil and gas? And more than any other factor it gave Putin the leverage for his wild foray into Ukraine.

 

This drive to a green economy, and wedding governments to “climate action” will prove to be, perhaps already is proving, to be one of the great blunders of our age. It has produced in some countries the exact opposite result of its stated purpose: pushed countries back to “sensible economies,” seen a rise in the production and reliance on coal, and seen countries rethinking their precious “Paris commitments.”

Green — as a policy — is a deliberate and (for Ukraine) dangerous folly.

 

Freeland’s remarks also virtually endorsed inflation as a “good thing.” Because, if as she said, the rise in fuel prices reminds us of the need for climate action, why then would not even greater rises be an even stronger reminder? By that reasoning, today’s surging inflation is to be welcomed. Just the thing to get us going “harder and faster” to the fantasia of a green economy.

 

And then there was the robotic and inescapable reference to climate action. It is a hallmark of every Liberal cabinet minister that they drop this empty, flat, vaporous phrase. They must imagine it has the power of some sorcerer’s or witch’s spell — merely utter the magic formula and presto, all argument disappears, all objection vanishes, all need to explain dies when the proper set of words is said. Climate Action. Open Sesame. Same thing.

The minister’s remarks also extend another delusion. That Canada has, or can have, any significant part to play in this climate crusade.

 

Even if a climate Armageddon is a real possibility, it is demonstrably far beyond the competence or capacity of Canada to make any significant contribution to solving it. Our country is peripheral, at best, in this ‘war.” We don’t count. Freeland and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau continually assert Canada is a key player. We are not.

 

Merely utter the magic formula and presto, all argument disappears

 

It’s tiresome to repeat this, but China, India, all developing countries, hold all the leverage, and they are not, repeat not, joining in this Davos-IPCC crusade to plant windmills.

 

Verily, I believe there is something delusionary about those in high office. Have they wandered so far from the people whom they represent that — in effect — they are celebrating the economic hits raining down on the majority of Canadians?

 

So here we are. As ordinary Canadians are taking out bank loans before going to the gas station, the finance minister is extolling fuel prices, telling them this is a great thing.

 

And — hard to believe, I know — some people are puzzled why so many showed up to listen to a certain candidate for the leadership of the Conservative party. Damn populist.

 

National Post

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