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"How can you tell if a political party’s election campaign is dying?

Well, there’s the big things, like when a Trudeau cabinet minister calls the Taliban — who literally killed 158 Canadians — 'our brothers.'

You know, the Taliban: the actual terrorist organization that subjugates, enslaves and rapes women."

Trudeau's campaign in critical condition

That’s the colourful phrase some politicos use — uncharitably, but not inaccurately — to describe a campaign in its death throes.

 

Justin Trudeau’s campaign? It’s not in the proverbial morgue, yet. But it’s definitely lingering near the Intensive Care Unit.

The Last Rites no longer seem impossible.

How can you tell if a political party’s election campaign is dying?

Well, there’s the big things, like when a Trudeau cabinet minister calls the Taliban — who literally killed 158 Canadians — “our brothers.”

You know, the Taliban: the actual terrorist organization that subjugates, enslaves and rapes women.

Trudeau’s minister for “women and gender equality,” Maryam Monsef, called them “our brothers” yesterday.

She did that.

For the Trudeau Liberals, that represented a really, really bad day on the campaign trail.

Whatever else they wanted to announce was blown up by Monsef’s outrageous, disgusting statement.

But that’s kind of how the Trudeau campaign has gone, this time. Something has gone wrong every single day. 👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏

 

https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/kinsella-trudeaus-campaign-in-critical-condition?fbclid=IwAR1WokO3TcCWRFaaHkihaaw2EZ4WZWNP0vwVtde4t12papoWmyLGSFeYFlw

 

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I have to admit that I'm a little tired of hearing about why we shouldn't vote for Trudeau and his Liberal party in this election. It isn't that I don't disagree that he is doing a particular poor job as PM and I don't see that improving. What I do want is a reason to vote for one of the other parties and here is something that resonates with me.

I am basically on the left wing of the Conservative party and I find that much of the policy that O'Toole has espoused appealing. I like that he wants to see labour representation of company boards. I like that he has a commitment to putting in more beds for the mentally ill and treating opioid addicts as patients and not criminals.

Here is an article that deals with that.

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/adam-zivo-a-pro-labour-conservative-party-invading-ndp-turf-is-hardly-surprising

 

Adam Zivo: A pro-labour Conservative party invading NDP turf is hardly surprising

The growing frivolity of progressive politics has become alienated from working class values

Author of the article:

Adam Zivo

Publishing date:

Aug 25, 2021  

Embracing government intervention more than anyone expected, the Conservative platform says the party would continue pandemic-related stimulus spending for two years before shifting into deficit-reduction mode.

The platform also contains several pro-labour policies that would typically be associated with the NDP, suggesting that reform conservatism, which sees a role for government in supporting those left behind by laissez-faire capitalism, is becoming more influential within Canada.

Reform conservatism acknowledges that unrestricted markets can sometimes unfairly deprive citizens of opportunities to flourish and has grown increasingly influential since the Trump era. It is currently advocated by Mark Rubio in the United States (who calls it “common good capitalism”) and Jason Kenney in Alberta.

Its slow ascendancy not only reflects voter frustration with worsening economic inequality, but also a rejection of the growing frivolity of progressive politics, which has become increasingly alienated from working class values.

Reflecting reformist views, the Conservatives have proposed a “Canada Job Surge Plan,” which would pay 25 to 50 per cent of the salaries of new hires for six months following the end of the Canadian Emergency Wage Subsidy. The Conservatives have also proposed increasing the Canada Workers Benefit, as well as an expanded employment insurance plan that would kick in when provinces go into recession, boosting salary replacement from 55 per cent to 75 per cent.

The Conservatives have said that they will work with unions to alter the Canada Labour Code so that they can have a more level playing field against multinationals. They have similarly promised to: make it easier to organize unions within firms that have a history of anti-labour activity; force companies to provide gig workers with financial contributions equivalent to CPP and EI; and ensure that large companies include worker representatives within their boards of directors.
These kinds of policies are not typically associated with conservative politics. Tackling unemployment through wage subsidization? Supporting businesses through generous financial aid rather than tax cuts? Fortifying the social safety net? Defending Canada’s labour movement? Giving workers a say in corporate governance?

It seems that the Conservatives have enthusiastically invaded the NDP’s turf.

Yet, unlike leftist approaches, reform conservatism is focussed on providing equality of opportunity, rather than equality of outcome — ensuring that hard work and personal responsibility remain key factors for success. Relatedly, it does not vilify the wealthy, since wealth-generation is still attributed to personal virtue, and while it believes that government interventions can be constructive, it is nonetheless attentive to fiscal discipline and individual freedoms.

 

The conservative embrace of labour unions and social spending is based on the belief that everyone who wants to move upward through hard work should be given a fair opportunity to do so — and this lionization of hard work remains a conservative value.

But why would working class voters think that conservatives can be better friends to them than socialists? It boils down to the uneasy dynamics that underpins contemporary progressive politics, which, broadly speaking, is an alliance between: the working class — often marginalized, earthy and pragmatic — and champagne socialists — often privileged, idealistic and grandiose.

Over the past two decades, growth in the knowledge economy has boosted the influence of the latter, aligning progressive politics with economic and cultural privilege. This trend is epitomized by the ascendance of “bourgeois bohemians” or “BoBos” (a term recently popularized by David Brooks in The Atlantic), who are the kind of people who advocate for the working class but would be mortified visiting a trailer park — aka: they want to be society’s saviours but condescend to people unfamiliar with their elite culture (i.e. post-industrial lofts, pretentious gastronomy, spicy Twitter essays).

In response, many working class voters have migrated to conservative circles where they feel culturally respected — with Trumpism being a messy example of that.

Conservative politicians have traditionally embraced these voters through pugilistic anti-elite rhetoric that, while emotionally satisfying, offers few actual solutions to working class woes. Trump’s failure to improve the rust belt’s economic conditions comes to mind, as does Maxime Berniers’ angry politicking.

In this context, the Conservative platform seems to treat the pandemic as an opportunity to more constructively pivot Canadian conservatism towards the working class — capturing disadvantaged voters who feel alienated by progressive elitism.

Should this reorientation succeed, an important question will be whether the Conservatives can fully reconcile their pro-business and pro-labour wings. How do you navigate between competing forces that disagree on the size and role of government?

Maintaining peace between these two factions would likely be doable in the short term, when higher spending is justified by the pandemic. Unlike the NDP, though, the Conservatives at least recognize that spending needs to be reigned in, but what would happen when cuts pit business against labour? It’s an interesting thing to think about, but likely too speculative at this point.

When Conservative leader Erin O’Toole first declared he was betting on union support last fall many were surprised, while others were skeptical. Yet, of all the political shifts created by the pandemic, the rise of a pro-labour Conservative party is in some ways not very surprising at all.

Edited by GDR
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22 hours ago, st27 said:
There aren't a lot of Muslim political journalists in Canada so I have to (regrettably) say something about Maryam Monsef. FACT: "brothers" is a term of respect FALSE: Muslims call the Taliban "brothers" OPINION: this was dumb SOLUTION: Move on; there's lives on the line

My sample size is only three guys one of whom called his Pakistani grandfather but none of them could imagine anyone other than a fellow traveller referring to the Taliban in that way. One of them suggested a word for a coercive family member that might be used sarcastically instead.

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20 hours ago, Jaydee said:

"How can you tell if a political party’s election campaign is dying?

Well, there’s the big things, like when a Trudeau cabinet minister calls the Taliban — who literally killed 158 Canadians — 'our brothers.'

You know, the Taliban: the actual terrorist organization that subjugates, enslaves and rapes women."

Trudeau's campaign in critical condition

That’s the colourful phrase some politicos use — uncharitably, but not inaccurately — to describe a campaign in its death throes.

 

Justin Trudeau’s campaign? It’s not in the proverbial morgue, yet. But it’s definitely lingering near the Intensive Care Unit.

The Last Rites no longer seem impossible.

How can you tell if a political party’s election campaign is dying?

Well, there’s the big things, like when a Trudeau cabinet minister calls the Taliban — who literally killed 158 Canadians — “our brothers.”

You know, the Taliban: the actual terrorist organization that subjugates, enslaves and rapes women.

Trudeau’s minister for “women and gender equality,” Maryam Monsef, called them “our brothers” yesterday.

She did that.

For the Trudeau Liberals, that represented a really, really bad day on the campaign trail.

Whatever else they wanted to announce was blown up by Monsef’s outrageous, disgusting statement.

But that’s kind of how the Trudeau campaign has gone, this time. Something has gone wrong every single day. 👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏

 

https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/kinsella-trudeaus-campaign-in-critical-condition?fbclid=IwAR1WokO3TcCWRFaaHkihaaw2EZ4WZWNP0vwVtde4t12papoWmyLGSFeYFlw

 

It seems to me in elections gone by that whoever is doing well in the beginning discovers in the last week that they are not doing so well anymore. We will see what happens this time but I expect a Trudeau comeback, at least outside of Quebec. But the vote could get split on the left and Quebec can be  very different. Trudeau probably has much of the Maratimes wrapped up.

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38 minutes ago, Junior said:

It seems to me in elections gone by that whoever is doing well in the beginning discovers in the last week that they are not doing so well anymore. We will see what happens this time but I expect a Trudeau comeback, at least outside of Quebec. But the vote could get split on the left and Quebec can be  very different. Trudeau probably has much of the Maratimes wrapped up.

Well let’s hope not as we all know nothing is cast in stone, but at this rate, this is quickly becoming Otooles election to lose. If there’s any solace in all this, a Liberal MAJORITY is definitely off the table. I will sleep much better when the spread hits 10 puts 😄 

I predict once again the NDP will rule the country as they will be the power brokers to kept the narcissist in power.

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Edited by Jaydee
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Protesters chase Prime Minister Trudeau out of British Columbia event

A group of protesters heckled and jeered Prime Minister Trudeau during a campaign event in White Rock, British Columbia.

Video in link


https://www.rebelnews.com/protesters_chase_prime_minister_trudeau_out_of_british_columbia_event?fbclid=IwAR2YmsHiTnWubuzSy3wfdtHWgOPIFuvI99Adhuz0GCWKxMFWWdH5nuh1OLQ

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“ The Trudeau government spent years warning Canadians about the dangers of fake news and the need for government to crack down on it. It’s all too perfect that the Liberals are now being punished for pushing fake and misleading information during the federal election.”

 

 

 

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Trudeau finally being forced to listen to Canadians

 

At cancelled Trudeau rally, a level of anger not seen before 

In two decades covering federal politics, I have never seen the kind of frenzied contempt directed at a politician as that aimed at Justin Trudeau at campaign events in Ontario on Friday.

The hostility was focused on Trudeau’s vaccine policies but it was a broader, deeply malicious sense that Trudeau has changed the country in ways the protesters find unacceptable. The Liberal leader said he witnessed a level of anger he’d never seen – not in 12 years as a politician, or as the son of prime minister. He said the event was cancelled because the safety of the people in attendance could not be guaranteed.

There’s no doubt that if the 200 or so protesters in Bolton, a town 50km northwest of Toronto, had been able to get their hands on the Liberal leader, they would have torn him limb from limb, such was the manic rage. That was clearly the judgment of Trudeau’s security detail, which pulled the plug on a planned rally because of the threat.

 

Pre-election polls that suggested most Canadians are comfortable with the direction in which the country is heading clearly did not talk to anyone present at the campaign stop in Nobleton, Ontario, or in Bolton.

There is a level of coordination in the protests – many of the same people attended both. In Nobleton, one woman with a child screamed that the Liberal leader is a “f***ing a**hole.” Another with a baby on her hip could be seen flipping the bird in Trudeau’s direction.

The Liberal leader held an impromptu press conference with reporters and candidates on a Brampton sports field after the cancelled rally. He was asked about his impressions. “In the past 18 months, we have seen an increase in anxiety, anger and frustration – a sense of powerlessness in a bunch of people that the world is unfolding in ways that they can’t control,” he said.

He is right. But that feeling of being under siege by the engines of change is not happening in isolation. Trudeau wants to go forward and create a world made in his progressive image. “I’m ready to do big things,” he said.

Yet he has no tolerance for anyone who dissents from his vision of the future. Those who disagree are not just in error, but in sin. There is no recognition in this vision that it is as divisive, if not more so, than Stephen Harper’s brand of hardball politics.

The anti-vaccine protesters are a crackpot fringe. One woman in Nobleton bellowed that she had COVID. “It’s a f***ing cold,” she screamed. But they are only the most vocal representation of a significant minority of Canadians who don’t want to go forward into Trudeau’s brave new world; they would prefer to go backward to a world where their status and place in the world was more assured.

https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/election-2021/john-ivison-at-cancelled-trudeau-rally-a-level-of-anger-not-seen-before?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR0_p77iKfjjkwBHbQvcct6ggFnR7qAx3Fb0x74VGNYCcg8ztZLSq4LpXC8#Echobox=1630122152

 

These polling figures are not just one poll. They are an aggravate of numerous polls. 

 

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Edited by Jaydee
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And to help keep track:

 

  1. Members of Parliament
  2. Party Standings in the House of Commons

PARTY STANDINGS IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

Parliament is dissolved.

The party standings in the House of Commons shown on this page are displaying the membership at the time of dissolution.

To view changes in party membership, see Changes in Membership.

 Table Chart
 
 
 
Current Party Standings Lib.  CPC  BQ  NDP  GP * Ind.  Vacant  Total
Alberta   33   1       34
British Columbia 11 17   11 2 1   42
Manitoba 4 7   3       14
New Brunswick 7 3           10
Newfoundland and Labrador 6     1       7
Northwest Territories 1             1
Nova Scotia 10 1           11
Nunavut       1       1
Ontario 76 34   6   4 1 121
Prince Edward Island 4             4
Quebec 35 10 32 1       78
Saskatchewan   14           14
Yukon 1             1
Total 155 119 32 24 2 5 1 338

 

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She was a fixture on TV for more than a year telling Canadians what she thought was happening in the pandemic.
Now that the election has been called and COVID cases are on the rise, Dr. Tam is nowhere to be found. She will not do press conferences during the election. Trudeau has silenced her.

 


https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/kinsella-theresa-tam-disappears-as-election-seems-to-override-pandemic
 

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NDP immigration plan for seniors is fiscal suicide

In the current federal election, both the Liberals and Tories have promised to increase federal health-care transfers to the provinces by $6 billion a year. Jagmeet Singh and the NDP will see that $6 billion and raise their two rivals socialized seniors’ care.

 

Well, not exactly socialized. The provinces won’t be forced by Ottawa to take over the operation of every long-term care facility. Just the next best thing – non-profit care supervised by provincial bureaucrats according to policies set by Ottawa.

You thought your aging parents’ long-term care was sketchy now, just wait until it’s run by the equivalent of Canada Post.

But the NDP has added another twist. Singh and his party want Canada to become the extended-care provider to the world’s seniors.

The NDP has promised open immigration to Canada for aging parents and grandparents of existing immigrants. An NDP government would “end the unfair cap on applications to sponsor parents and grandparents and take on the backlogs that are keeping families apart.”

Getting loved ones back together sounds wonderful. Who wants clogged bureaucratic arteries holding up family reunifications?

Except as Nobel-winning economist Milton Friedman so aptly put it, “It’s just obvious you can’t have free immigration and a welfare state.” That’s fiscal suicide.

And fiscal suicide is exactly what Singh and the NDP are proposing.

The added cost of all the extra health care and all the extra seniors’ care, being proposed to varying degrees by every party, would have to come from somewhere. That somewhere, of course, is Canadian taxpayers.

But how are those taxpayers going to feel if the money being taken out of their pockets – money they would no longer have for a better home, groceries, gasoline, back-to-school clothes, a little vacation – was suddenly going instead to pay the health-care and nursing home costs of 50,000, 100,000, 200,000 additional elderly immigrants a year who haven’t contributed a dime to Canada’s tax base?

 

Wait times for referrals to specialists, diagnostic tests and surgeries get longer by the year (or at least seldom get shorter). Hospital systems and seniors’ facilities across the country can’t handle the demands of the aging Boomers we already have.

Over half of all medical costs occur in the last five years of life – especially the last six months.

This isn’t an argument for cutting old people adrift. Those stats also include patients injured in catastrophic accidents or suffering terminal diseases.

Yet by far, the greatest health-care costs are for seniors. So how does it make sense to invite in hundreds of thousands more who have never paid Canadian taxes?

Also, while an added $6 billion a year for health care sounds like a lot when a politician promises it, remember that the COVID benefit known as CERB that paid $2,000 a month to Canadians thrown out of work by the pandemic cost over $80 billion in one year.

Six billion extra dollars works out to just a 2% increase on the roughly $265 billion spent on health care in Canada every year.

I’m very pro-immigration. Newcomers contribute much to our economy and culture. And think of the compliment they are paying Canada by choosing to come here.

But I’m mostly in favour of what I would call win-win immigration – immigration that benefits both the newcomer and Canada.

Bringing in tens of thousands of aging health-care consumers who have little or no hope of contributing to the taxes that pay for their benefits is unfair to those who have paid taxes here all or most of their working lives and then arrive at retirement to find the system so oversubscribed it cannot provide the benefits they were promised.

https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/gunter-ndp-immigration-plan-for-seniors-is-fiscal-suicide?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR3WkfMokURP2hTERDHUTUl8bLpP5ahQQkM4yAXGa8WKN8x-6c4EVpYGBsQ#Echobox=1629836596

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The ‘Anyone But Trudeau’ Election, Canadians have a chance to bring Trudeau’s divisive, incompetent, and dishonest governance to an end.

What will this federal election be about?

Afghanistan?

Our rights & freedoms?

Covid?

Taxes?

The deficit?

Corruption?

All of those things, and more.

But it increasingly seems that the key, defining issue of the election will be Justin Trudeau himself.

In the 2015 campaign, a critical mass of Canadians became fed up with Stephen Harper and the Conservatives.

Voters went looking for whomever could beat the CPC, first lining up behind the Tom Mulcair-led NDP, before moving to the Trudeau Liberals.

Now, in 2021, there are early indications something similar may be happening.

Trudeau’s personal popularity has tanked since calling the election, with his cynical & self-serving actions causing a significant backlash among many Canadians.

Conservative leader Erin O’Toole, who has long struggled to resonate with Canadians, is seeing a modest bump in his personal ratings, and the CPC is strengthening in the polls.

The NDP looks poised to gain back some of the ground they lost in 2019, with Jagmeet Singh seen by many as someone who actually has a core set of beliefs, in contrast to Justin Trudeau who will say literally anything if he thinks it will gain him some votes.

This is all up in the air of course. Justin Trudeau managed to survive the blackface controversy, and the more he struggles in the polls the more the establishment press will try and boost him up through a ‘Trudeau comeback’ narrative – in large part to protect all the taxpayer bailouts the Liberals have given them.

Still though, it’s clear that the Liberals have a real fight on their hands, rather than the easy win it seems they assumed when they plunged the country into an election.

Anyone But Trudeau

The biggest danger for the Liberals, and the biggest sign of hope for Canadians who want Trudeau out of office, is that this election could become the Anyone But Trudeau election.

When elections become focused on getting one specific leader out of office, their opponents don’t even have to be that strong.

With more and more Canadians seeing Justin Trudeau as dishonest, fake, and hypocritical, Erin O’Toole, Jagmeet Singh, and other federal leaders benefit simply by not being Justin Trudeau.

And, Canadians will put up with more from opposition leaders, since they are willing to take a chance in the hopes of getting the incumbent out of office.

Millions of Canadians clearly feel that there is something uniquely dangerous and divisive about Justin Trudeau, meaning the biggest imperative of this election campaign must be to defeat him.

To that end, the National Citizens Coalition has launched the Anyone But Trudeau campaign:

“Bad behaviour shouldn’t be rewarded.

Canada is now in an election that only Trudeau wanted.

While you’re taking summer holidays, harvesting your crop in a tough year, or trying to get your business back on its feet after repeated lockdowns, Trudeau is making a grab for power, hoping you’re not paying attention, to try and win back his coveted majority government.

But he’s got a big problem. We now have the power — not him. 

And we know his long list of failures…

Doubling the debt.

Broken promises to Indigenous Canadians.

Firing strong women.

Repeated instances of personal misconduct.

The WE charity scandal.

Sky-high inflation.

The SNC Lavalin scandal.

Trying to censor your internet.

And three — THREE — ethics violations.

Don’t let him get away with it. Don’t reward bad behaviour.

This election: vote ANYONE but Trudeau.”

 

Ending Trudeau’s hypocrisy

One of the key reasons so many Canadians want Trudeau out of office is his rampant hypocrisy.

It’s always been bad, but in the 2021 campaign his hypocrisy has hit a new level.

For example, consider how Trudeau is deliberately seeking to divide the country on vaccine passports and mandatory vaccinations.

Months ago, he said Canada isn’t a country that mandates vaccination.

But, as his political interests changed, he decided to make it a wedge issue, demonizing unvaccinated people for his own selfish political gain.

He ripped the Conservatives for not requiring their candidates to be vaccinated, claiming the party was putting Canadians at risk.

Yet, it turns out that Trudeau was once again being a massive hypocrite:

“@IvisonJ just asked @JustinTrudeau at a vaccine announcement if every #LPC candidate is vaccinated.

 

Answer: they’re not.

BOOM.”

 

So, Trudeau is attacking the Conservatives for something his party is also doing. It’s that unique Trudeau mix of dishonesty and incompetence, he’s dishonest enough to try and divide the country on the issue while being incompetent enough to do the same thing he’s attacking others for.

Blaming Harper

An article about Trudeau’s hypocrisy wouldn’t be complete without him blaming Stephen Harper, and Trudeau has once again obliged.

When asked about how Canada is abandoning Canadian Citizens in Afghanistan, Trudeau want into a tangent about how mean Stephen Harper supposedly was:

“Question by @glen_mcgregor: What will you do to help Canadian citizens left behind in Kabul?

Trudeau: Stephen Harper dislikes Syrians”

 

Suffice it to say, if you’ve been in power for 6 years, and you’re blaming your current failures on your predecessor, chances are you are a failed leader.

Rules for you, not for him

And of course, we’ll close this article with another example of Trudeau’s obvious belief that the rules apply to you, but not to him.

As he goes around the country campaigning on fear of Covid, dividing Canadians, and making any alternatives seem too dangerous, he’s breaking Covid regulations at the same time:

“Trudeau asked by @CBCRaffy if he’s breaking provincial health guidelines by cramming this many people into a tight space for a campaign event.

Trudeau completely sidesteps the question… twice. #cdnpoli #Elxn44″

 

One reporter expressed her concern about the conditions on the Liberal campaign:

“I am fully vaccinated, as are my reporter colleagues. We were all wearing masks. But respectfully, I don’t want to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with them during a fourth wave as an immune compromised journalist trying to do my job.”

 

This is quintessential Justin Trudeau:

He wants you to be afraid of Covid, but he sure doesn’t seem afraid of it.

He thinks you should follow the rules, but he and his campaign don’t have to follow the rules.

Simply put, he thinks he’s better than everyone else, and he thinks everyone in this country is dumb enough to keep falling for his BS.

This election is our chance to prove him wrong and decisively end his destructive political career.

This election is our chance to vote Anyone But Trudeau!

Spencer Fernando

 

 

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Barbara Kay: Trudeau the fake feminist ignores female inmates' concerns 

Female prisoners protest placement of sex offenders in their midst

 

“ Nobody in Canada cares more about women’s interests than Justin Trudeau. Just ask him. Especially when he’s on the campaign trail (“feminist budget,” “she-cession,” “she-covery”). His personal record of, ahem, he-haviour with certain actual women is another story, but never mind all that. It’s election time. The women’s vote is crucial. Unleash the ministerial sheepdogs to herd all those grazing Canadian ewes, away from the Conservative wolves, and into the safety of the Liberal corral.”

” Maryam Monsef, minister for women and gender equality — presently under fire for referring to the Taliban as “our brothers” — obligingly plunged early, fiercely and baselessly into demonizing Conservative Party Leader Erin O’Toole on the abortion file. A “woman’s right to choose” was under threat, she assured Canadians on Twitter. Women’s rights “ARE up for debate,” she tweeted ominously. In fact, O’Toole is solidly pro-choice, nobody doubts it, and Monsef’s ploy was treated with the ridicule it deserved (although not a patch on the mockery she is receiving for her “our brothers” remark.)“

 

Notice something, though? It’s suddenly women, women, women. Not cis-women. Just women. And it’s “women’s rights, women’s choices” not “menstruators’ rights” or “uterus havers’ choice’s.” That’s because in elections, ideological activists have little clout beside ordinary Canadians, the overwhelming majority of whom think such terminology is insulting to, you know, women.”

 

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/barbara-kay-trudeau-the-fake-feminist-ignores-female-inmates-concerns

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Brian Lilley

Given how many times I've seen pension plans fail and workers be left high and dry while execs get bonuses, this is a policy that is past due. Read and SHARE O'Toole's plan on pensions. 
 

It’s the kind of story that has been told too many times in Canada: A company goes under and employees who have been paying into pensions are left high and dry when the company goes under. Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole is saying never again if he’s elected.

Canadian workers who have paid into a pension plan on every paycheque should be able to rely on it being there when they retire,” O’Toole said Tuesday. “Far too often, we have seen workers, through no fault of their own, forced to take big cuts to their pensions when the company they worked for goes bankrupt.”

 

The Conservatives pointed to the example of Sears Canada’s bankruptcy proceedings in 2018. In that case, executives were paid $2.8 million in retention bonuses while pension plan payments were cut by 30%.

Nortel’s 2009 bankruptcy saw 20,000 pensioners saw deep cuts to their payments and a seven-year-long court battle to attempt to get money they felt they were owed.

The Conservatives are promising to change the legislation to give pension plans and employees better protection, and status, if a company is in bankruptcy proceedings. They also propose to ban executive bonuses during a restructuring operation if the pension plan is not fully funded.

https://torontosun.com/news/election-2021/otoole-promises-to-protect-workplace-pensions-from-corporate-elites?fbclid=IwAR0lWSedkNSoUN9YlJlfaX8oeml5acezIx693xg5o_fX4CwqJaEho2CpPX4

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