It is time to end extractive tourism


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https://news.google.com/articles/CAIiEB8yReGqhHqKyCYXyzvHMBEqFAgEKgwIACoFCAowhgIwkDgwob0I?hl=en-CA&gl=CA&ceid=CA%3Aen

Vijay Kolinjivadi is a post-doctoral fellow at the Institute of Development Policy at the University of Antwerp.

 

The pandemic presents us with a great opportunity to do away with the destructive mass tourism industry.

Ultimately, addressing the damage of global mass tourism requires taking stricter climate action against the aviation industry and encouraging more domestic and regional leisure travel. Introducing more fuel-efficient aeroplanes would simply reduce costs and increase demand. The urgency required to scale back emissions before 2030 means flying has to be phased out. The pandemic grounded flights; responding to climate change demands the same.

The post-pandemic world must continue to keep air travel reserved for essential purposes, such as family reunification and repatriation. This is the only way to transition to a post-pandemic tourism sector that makes a serious effort to meet commitments to the Paris Agreement’s goals.

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Interesting that the (non-controversial), question is now being raised.

Some thoughts...

Does the notion of "trade" include tourism? I should think so, as many countries survive almost exclusively on such. So examining the meaning of "survive" is implied, in this context.

Aviation delivers two things: Goods, & "people visiting elsewhere to experience what isn't at home, (including families)". The prefix "eco-" has gradually become attached to the latter but is more about marketing perceptions than describing the actual activity of "going away".

The pandemic bares the uncomfortable question asked in the article: wither aviation, or at least some of the reasons for...? Clearly it is uncomfortable because almost everyone here relies on aviation for a living. Some here are contemplating entry or have just done so, some are in the midst of establishing a career, the course of which has been seriously disrupted leading to changes in jobs/careers/professions for some, and some are (or were!), retired.

An example of this same kind of question was asked today, February 21, 2021, on CNN's "GPS", (Fareed Zakaria's Global Public Square), regarding Bhutan's "happiness index". Against the world's most powerful economies, is Bhutan "successful", and "surviving"?

But the question posed by the article has to be at least tolerated. The "negotations" now on the horizon that are about future policy on C.C. can be dictated by circumstance rather than by informed, blunt discussion energized by an honest willingness to raise some eyebrows while doing so. In almost all cases, it is better to be "at the table".

I don't think for a moment this portends the "end of aviation" , but it does signal a shift from recent trends which have developed since the deregulatory "age" of the eighties.

Read the article. It's a good one, even with the obvious, "yes,...but" 's.

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It might come as a surprise to some how big tourism is in Canada. Although it would help solve our governments carbon emissions goals, it would create an another problem with unemployment the country moved away from tourism as a major jobs provider:
 

Quote

The travel restrictions have likely had the biggest impact on the tourism industry. The tourism industry includes transportation, accommodation and food services, travel arrangement and reservation services, and recreation and entertainment (Statistics Canada 2017). In 2019, tourism activities accounted for about 2% of Canada’s GDP and generated about 750,000 jobs (Statistics Canada n.d.a and n.d.b).

The demand for tourism activities has been greatly affected by the travel restrictions and limitations. For example, in March 2020, the number of international arrivals to Canada from other countries fell by 54.2% from February 2020, the largest single monthly drop since 1972 (Statistics Canada 2020). Most hotels were empty: by the first week of April 2020, the hotel occupancy rate was below 20% across Canada (STR 2020).

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/11-626-x/11-626-x2020023-eng.htm

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4 hours ago, st27 said:

It might come as a surprise to some how big tourism is in Canada. Although it would help solve our governments carbon emissions goals, it would create an another problem with unemployment the country moved away from tourism as a major jobs provider:
 

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/11-626-x/11-626-x2020023-eng.htm

Unfortunately most of the tourism industry pays poorly to ensure it is competitive with other destinations worldwide. Of course there are exceptions to this but minimum wage and tourism are often tightly knit. 

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On 2/21/2021 at 9:38 AM, Turbofan said:

The post-pandemic world must continue to keep air travel reserved for essential purposes, such as family reunification and repatriation. This is the only way to transition to a post-pandemic tourism sector that makes a serious effort to meet commitments to the Paris Agreement’s goals.

No.

The most interesting thing about Covid is how every crackpot who has been flogging the same radical agenda for years feels that somehow Covid proved them right.

I recall a post I read elsewhere back in the Fall explaining how given that travel and especially business travel will never recover the time has come to close YTZ... and spend tens of billions to build high-speed rail to Montreal, Ottawa and NYC for all the people who won't be travelling ever again.

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