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Liberals knew exact details of guns used in Nova Scotia massacre within days 

Trudeau received a briefing document dated April 24, prepared by his then national security advisor, detailing what weapons were used and how they were acquired 

And like everyone is like surprised like... breaking news indeed.

Anyone who has created command briefing slides knew this 2 years ago.

The media knew it then as well... don't think for even a second that they didn't. Try to imagine a world where the Prime Minister isn't kept up to date on an investigation into the worst mass murder in Canadian history. The Conservative party knows how this works too, if they're feigning surprise now it's pure theatre.

I'm no longer sure which party I dislike the most now. At least JT and Co (however loathsome they may be) have remained true to form and are predictably predictable The conservative party has absolutely no excuse though, total failure at every turn and on all fronts over the last two years. They had a job to do and IMO, they failed miserably.    

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Jane's Revenge is an American militant[1] extremist[2] pro-abortion rightsgroup, which has claimed responsibility for several acts of firebombing, vandalism, and arson targeting crisis pregnancy centers.[3] It was formed in May 2022, in response to the leak of a possible ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States overturning the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling on abortion rights.[4] On June 24, 2022, the Supreme Court released a decision that did, as per the leak, overturn Roe v. Wade.[5]

They were formed at about the same time we started hearing about the white supremacist and white nationalist threat from the trinity.

Look at who is carrying the gas cans though and disregard the propaganda machine. Believe what you see with your own eyes.

It also helps to review the various definitions of terrorism, there's a common theme in those definitions and it doesn't include parents protesting "drag queen story time" and CRT. The looming threat IMO is L/W extremest violence in support of political aspirations.

It used to be that if you looked around and saw that media reports didn't coincide with what you could actually see with your own eyes that you were a young soldier in a foreign desert. Now you're a citizen of Canada and the US.

Here's why you likely haven't heard of them, imagine the coverage if this was Proud Boys doing exactly the same thing to abortion clinics. Liberals would be screaming domestic terrorism... AND THEY WOULD BE RIGHT. 

ABC, CBS, NBC, MSNBC avoid mention of Jane's Revenge in coverage of arson, attacks against pro-life groups

Far-left 'Jane's Revenge' has vowed 'open season' on pro-life pregnancy centers

https://www.foxnews.com/media/abc-cbs-nbc-msnbc-avoid-mention-janes-revenge-coverage-arson-attacks-against-pro-life-groups

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Hold on a minute, I thought it was christian white nationalists and white supremacists doing all of the attacking. 

We seem to be short of liberals who can explain the situation in simple terms that a dumb grunt can understand.

All I do is count the gas cans, see who's holding them and go from there. If you're carrying a gas can, I don't give a rat's behind what your political persuasion is. 

Christian and pro-life organizations under attack from pro-abortion activists in the U.S.

Since the Supreme Court ruled on Friday to overturn the legislation, Christian organizations have maintained vigilance over the possibility of new attacks as pro-choice activists campaign to stage protests across the country. 

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Posted (edited)

What to believe? Same source, one day apart.

From the CBC

Canada is adding jobs and growing its economy — yet doom and gloom overshadow the positives

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/canada-recession-narrative-analysis-peter-armstrong-1.6512467

 

Also from the CBC

 

“ Canada unexpectedly lost 43,000 jobs last month “

https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/canada-jobs-june-1.6514429

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This is maybe off-topic, but two days ago the Vancouver park board was triggered and had to cancel a meeting,

They were discussing bike lanes in Stanley Park, there was a report coming out the next day, but Phil Rankin accused them of already making their mind up because of the board and staff ideology. 

They felt threatened by this and had to cancel the meeting and disallow Rankin to attend any further meetings.

 

Sheesh.

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On 7/20/2022 at 1:22 PM, GDR said:

Here is a headline n a story from CTV.

Alta. woman has 'PTSD' after WestJet travel nightmare

This is so totally irresponsible equating this with the mental damage experienced by the horrors of war.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/video?playlistId=1.5995111

 

Well, if you watch the video it's clear she's making a joke.

Interviewer asks: "Are you going to travel again soon?"

Woman, laughing, "Hahaha, I have PTSD, I think, hahaha."

So, the woman herself is not suggesting or claiming she has PTSD however CTV is guilty for faking the headline to make it click-worthy.

Overall the whole thing is pretty stupid;  They left Calgary, got IRROPED in Toronto, gave up and went home - total elapsed time 23 hours.  I've been stuck in winter storms for 3 days!  How would they handle that?  After hurricane Juan my family spent 7 days with no power - guess, what, no PTSD.  They got stuck in Pearson terminal 3 for a day - the HORROR!  You know, easy availability to food, drink, bathrooms, climate controlled, free wifi.

What's wrong with people?  Stuck in Toronto and can't get to NF?  Well, Toronto becomes the vacation then.  Go to Niagara Falls, Canada's Wonderland, the CN Tower - take advantage of the randomness of life.  The kids would probably enjoy it more than seeing relatives in NF anyway plus they get the life lesson of being resiliant and flexible.

 

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Once again CBC shows its true colours

 

CBC blasted for depicting white voters and Conservative voters as hateful

CBC’s Ombudsman Jack Nagler criticized the state broadcaster for publishing a commentary by an Elections Canada worker which painted elderly white voters and Conservative voters as hateful and racist. 

According to Blacklock’s Reporter, Nagler ordered the CBC to review its editorial practices as a result of the incident. 

“It was not okay to publish a headline that declared political parties and by inference their voters as ‘hating’ people,” said Nagler. 

Nagler found that the commentary was in breach of the CBC’s Journalistic Standards And Practices by being “neither fair nor precise enough to be considered accurate.”

“Declaring a politician to be hateful should be based on their policies and their actions not just the colour of their lawn signs,” Nagler argued. 
 

The decision was regarding an op-ed published in the fall written by Zeeha Rehman, an Elections Canada worker for the 2021 federal election. In the opinion piece Rehman argued that Conservative voters “hate people like me.” 

“On Election Day I greeted people who voted for parties that hate people like me. Elections provide numerical evidence of the rise of right-wing politics and that should worry us all,” wrote Rehman.

“During the first hour of my shift an elderly white woman came in with a walker. After she left I couldn’t help but wonder whether, despite our pleasant interaction, she was one of the people who hate people like me.

“It was jarring to realize that many of the people who had seemingly been nice to me throughout the day had chosen to vote for the Conservative Party,” she continued. 


(  🤬🤬🤬🤬 )

The network received a flood of complaints after the story was published. 

“This piece was not up to our usual standards,” said CBC managing director Andree Lau in response to the complaints. “We took corrective action right away.”

The piece was eventually republished in November with alterations. 

In a different decision in March regarding a viewer’s complaint that a CBC radio program discriminated against people of British descent, CBC director Treena Wood claimed that racism against white people “doesn’t exist.”

“The common and accepted sociological understanding of racism is that so-called “reverse racism” against privileged groups, especially white people, doesn’t exist. Racism must involve a privileged group showing prejudice against a historically underprivileged group,” claimed Wood.

 

https://tnc.news/2022/08/09/cbc-white-voters/

 

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“During the first hour of my shift an elderly white woman came in with a walker. After she left I couldn’t help but wonder whether, despite our pleasant interaction, she was one of the people who hate people like me.”

“It was jarring to realize that many of the people who had seemingly been nice to me throughout the day had chosen to vote for the Conservative Party,” she continued. 

Doesn't that just tell you everything you need to know about how the left and (some) minority groups see the world.  Even though this person (presumably a person-of-colour) had a perfectly pleasant interaction with a white person she still sees racism towards her - perfectly pleasant interactions with seemingly nice people who must be racist and hate her because they are white.  The irony is thick on this one!

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Too little, too late to close the gates…the cows( viewers)  have already left the barn :whistling:


“ New CNN CEO’s Bleak Message For Employees At Far-Left Network: You ‘Might Not’ Like What’s Coming “

 

New CNN chairman and CEO Chris Licht did little to calm the nerves of highly partisan employees at the far-Left network this week after the cancelation of Brian Stelter’s show “Reliable Sources.”

Licht started to evaluate the hyper-partisan so-called “talent” at the network shortly after he joined CNN as he aimed to dial down the extreme partisanship that has plagued the network in recent years.

I want to acknowledge that this is a time of significant change, and I know that many of you are unsettled,” Licht said, according to numerous people who attended Friday’s editorial meeting call. “There will be more changes, and you might not understand it or like it.”

A CNN staffer told Deadline, “No one is safe or secure right now.”

“I think people are legitimately sad that Brian is leaving,” an anonymous person at CNN claimed to the Hollywood Reporter. “He was a big presence at the network — but understand that Chris has to put his stamp on the network.”

Deadline reported that billionaire investor John Malone — who is one of the largest investors in CNN’s parent company, Warner Bros. Discovery — said earlier in the year during an interview that he wanted CNN to “evolve back to the kind of journalism that it started with, and actually have journalists.”

Stelter whined in his newsletter at the time that Malone wanting unbiased reporting at the network “stoked fears that Discovery might stifle CNN journalists and steer away from calling out indecency and injustice.”

An insider told Deadline that the decision to can Stelter was “coming from above,” adding, “If this isn’t coming from John Malone directly, it sure represents his thinking with lieutenants doing his bidding.”

The changes come after Licht told CNN staffers over the summer that he understood the network had undergone a lot of changes in a short amount of time after Jeff Zucker was terminated from his role leading the company.

“You heard me say in my first town hall that I am going to make decisions slower than some would like,” Licht said at the time. “I know this organization has been through tremendous change over the last four months, which is why I am approaching this process slowly and thoughtfully as we look at all parts of the operation. We will realign where it makes sense to best serve our people and the business.”

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Peter Menzies: Countering the government’s incoherent media and online legislation—Advice for the next leader of the Opposition

There is now more than $200 million in annual government support for news platforms
 

The last Conservative that talked tough about defunding the CBC quickly disposed of that notion once it served its purpose, which was to win him the party leadership.

Some say it was Erin O’Toole’s abandonment of “true blue” Tory antipathy for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation that ultimately led to his demise. Perhaps. And, conceivably, the decision not to campaign on that red-meat-for-the-Tory-masses posture was pure pragmatism. Many Canadians do, after all, harbour good feelings towards the CBC, at least in theory.

So there’s every reason to suspect that the “defund the CBC” hellfire emanating from party leadership frontrunner Pierre Poilievre will wind up parked on the same shelf

 
 

After all, most of the files involved are political minefields built on francophone existentialist angst, and who, really, wants to poke that bear? 

On the other hand, the Trudeau government has so much contentious legislation flying around to regulate this, protect us from that, and generally “save democracy” by “making us safer” that eventually someone’s going to have to slop out the barns. So, whether it’s Poilievre, Jean Charest, or another candidate, the development of a sound, sensible, predictable national communications and news media industry strategy has to be a priority.

The problem isn’t so much that Bill C-11—the Online Streaming Act—is bad (which it is).1 Or that the Online News Act—Bill C-18—is based on a fantasy (it most certainly is).2 Or even that the ambitions fuelling Online Harms legislation have been so thuggish as to be compared to North Korea’s first instincts. It’s not even that pretty much every media outlet in the country is now dependent on the politicians they are supposed to hold to account.

Nope. The problem is that other than an apparent obsession with controlling the internet, none of these initiatives appear to be the spawn of a coherent economic vision. It all looks, and feels, like watching a train wreck in slow motion.

Here’s a roundup of what’s going to need fixing:

  • To assist traditional news media in financial peril, the government created $120 million worth of annual tax credits that were intended to cover, primarily, print media for five years while they transitioned into viable digital operations. No transition occurred and the credits are now permanent. (As Ronald Reagan said, there is nothing more permanent than a temporary government program.) The same will likely happen with the $10 million per year Local Journalism Initiative that subsidizes the Canadian Press. Throw in the longstanding Canadian periodicals fund and there is more than $200 million in annual support for news platforms (approved by government appointees), many of which have business models that no longer make sense.
  • Bill C-18 is built on the unproven assumption that tech companies such as Google and Facebook profit unfairly from the news produced by the likes of the Toronto Star, Postmedia, the CBC, Bellmedia, etc. The bill forces foreign big tech companies to reach “commercial agreements” with domestic news providers and is based on Australian legislation where news media are now convinced they don’t need to innovate; they just have to tie on the Facebook feedbag. In Canada, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), which has no experience in online industrial matters, will approve the agreements and how newsrooms spend the proceeds.
  • Bill C-11 (the Online Streaming Act) amends the Broadcasting Act by defining all audio and video on the Internet as “broadcasting” and putting it under the control of the CRTC which—and this cannot be overemphasized—has no experience in this area. It came into being when the Liberals were convinced by a largely Montreal-based lobby that the billions of dollars streaming companies have been investing in Canada over the past decade weren’t enough. Or, to be more precise, the normal quota of one-third French, two-thirds English wasn’t being fulfilled by market forces. That meant, Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez and others thought, that large streaming companies such as Netflix needed to be brought into “the system.” But instead of just doing that, Heritage Canada staff created a sweeping piece of legislation that interferes with free expression, provokes retaliatory action from the USA, has even some of its proponents worried it gives the CRTC too much power and—oops—puts the incomes of about 100,000 creators making money on YouTube at risk.3
    • Coming up is the Online Harms legislation. It sells itself on the need to crack down on child pornography, non-consensual sharing of intimate images, hate speech, incitement to violence, and terrorism, all of which are already illegal under the Criminal Code and cracked down on daily. Behind that beard, though, is a determination to create a “digital safety commissioner” to patrol the internet for behaviours and comments of which the government disapproves but falls short of being illegal (lawful but awful). Rodriguez is now on his third round of consultations, having been cautioned at every stage so far to, basically, stop thinking like a third-world thug. The government is, however, determined to think like one. How a new regulator would interact with the CRTC, which under the Broadcasting Act is already bound to ensure content under its supervision is of “good standard”, is unknown and very confusing.
    • While legacy media try to build subscriptions, the government continues to subsidize the CBC which then floods the market with free news and competes for advertising. The CRTC, meanwhile, insists that virtually every radio station it licenses—regardless of market size—covers news whether it wants to or not.

    There’s more, much more. And the Liberals have smuggled in all kinds of booby traps such as moving to ensure the Canada Media Fund—the largest government source of funds for TV and film production—delegates 40 percent (up from 33 percent) on francophone productions (serving 22 percent of Canada), leaving the other 60 percent (down from 66 percent) for the rest. Just try to pry Montreal’s hands off that pot of gold once that falls into place.

    Where should the new Tory leader start?

    Work under the overarching values of consumer choice, personal liberty, and innovation.

    When it comes to the news industry, affairs are urgent and the CBC is a priority that has to be dealt with. Its dual commercial/public broadcaster role is distorting the market and has to end.

    That’s job one and, if handled swiftly and correctly, will inform the next steps.

    Job two? Kill Bill C-11. If francophone producers need more money, just give them more money; there’s no need to regulate the internet to make that happen.

    Third? Table a Social Media Responsibility Act that ensures online platforms support free speech and moderate misconduct in an even-handed fashion.

    And, last but not least, create a new Canadian Communications Commission to replace the CRTC.

    Simple, isn’t it?

https://thehub.ca/2022-08-23/peter-menzies-countering-the-governments-incoherent-media-and-online-legislation-advice-for-the-next-leader-of-the-opposition/?utm_source=The Hub&utm_campaign=a2423dec25-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2022_08_22_07_16&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_429d51ea5d-a2423dec25-522638043&mc_cid=a2423dec25&mc_eid=09433e3d5d

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Posted (edited)

A quarter of Canadians are tuning out ‘too depressing’ political news: Poll

 

As Conservative leadership frontrunner Pierre Poilievre zig-zagged across the country this year, from community centres in Nova Scotia to hockey rinks in Alberta, there was at least one similarity in these disparate parts of the country: raucous chants of “defund the CBC” spontaneously erupting around the room.

Along with his promise to axe the CBC, Poilievre hasn’t shied away from criticizing other media outlets and even individual journalists.

But while many Canadians share Poilievre’s skepticism about the mainstream media, it’s not necessarily for ideological reasons, according to a recent poll produced by The Hub and Public Square Research and conducted with LEO, Leger’s online panel1.

In fact, most Canadians who are tuning out the news say they’re doing it because the sheer negativity is turning them off from politics.

One-fifth of Canadians engage with political news “throughout the day,” while a third of Canadians engage with it daily and 22 percent engage with it a few times a week.

About a quarter of Canadians are almost entirely disengaged from the news, though. Ten percent of Canadians actively avoid political news, five percent engage with politics only through conversations with friends and ten percent read the news a few times a month.

Fifty percent of the people who are disengaged say they are “tired of the negativity in politics” and 38 percent say the news is simply too depressing.

About a third of Canadians who have less interest in the news agree that they don’t know where to go to get the truth or that there is too much media bias. About 31 percent of Canadians who don’t watch the news say they just have too much going on in their life to find the time.

The poll also shows that only 26 percent of Canadians said they were concerned about the CBC’s status as the public broadcaster.

“The CBC is not an issue of concern for them,” said Heather Bastedo, who runs Public Square Research and produced the survey for The Hub. “The CBC is a little bit different. If you open up the debate about defunding them you do appear to look small because there is a romantic attachment to the CBC.”

The poll also finds a mismatch between the issues dominating the headlines and what Canadians are concerned about.

Only 16 percent of Canadians said they were concerned about the Pope’s visit to Canada and 35 percent said they were concerned about the backlog in immigration processing in Canada.

“The role of the news isn’t always to give people the news they want to hear,” said Bastedo. “But the media needs to make the connection to people’s lives with these stories. Most people aren’t flying out from Pearson, but the fact that the government can’t run things should be an issue.”

Thirty-four percent of Canadians said they were concerned about the long lineups at passport offices, while 21 percent said it doesn’t concern them at all, 18 percent said it’s not really a concern and 22 percent said it may affect them in the future.

The number one issue for Canadians right now is rising interest rates. Forty-five percent say they are very concerned about it, while 26 percent say they are concerned and 13 percent say it may affect them in the future.

The war in Ukraine is similarly pressing for Canadians. Forty percent of Canadians are very concerned and 35 percent are concerned, while nine percent say it may affect them in the future.

Younger Canadians are least likely to be highly engaged news consumers, with only 13 percent of people aged 18 to 34 reporting that they read the news throughout the day, compared to 27 percent of people over the age of 55.

Young people are less likely to be totally disengaged than people aged 35 to 54, though.

Among people under the age of 35, about 11 percent report having no interest in politics at all, compared to 14 percent of people aged 35 to 54. Younger people are also more likely to check in on the news when something big happens or to get informed via social media or by talking to friends.

The research involved an online omnibus survey of 1,520 people, which was fielded between July 29 and Aug. 2.

 

https://thehub.ca/2022-08-24/a-quarter-of-canadians-are-tuning-out-too-depressing-political-news-poll/?utm_source=The Hub&utm_campaign=c0b9fd9a19-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2022_08_23_04_57&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_429d51ea5d-c0b9fd9a19-522638043&mc_cid=c0b9fd9a19&mc_eid=09433e3d5d

 

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28 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

In fact, most Canadians who are tuning out the news say they’re doing it because the sheer negativity is turning them off from politics.

Fear is what makes a population malleable and avoiding reality is a sign of weakness that inevitably leads to that sort of fear... I would go so far as to call it cowardice but that's just me.

Much of this has become circular with a rapidity I didn't expect to see. At this juncture, I don't have a solution and further identification of the pending crisis or symptoms of it (on my part or that of others) is likely redundant, tedious, boring  or perhaps all three.

Time for a break... I look forward to watching it all play out and I'll be back in the new year.

Best wishes to all. 

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7 hours ago, Wolfhunter said:

Time for a break... I look forward to watching it all play out and I'll be back in the new year.

Sure…leave all the heavy lifting to the plebes…..No time for R & R boss… The wars just beginning 😇

😇

 

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The legacy media is up in arms because a photo surfaced of Conservative leadership frontrunner Pierre Poilievre and a controversial podcaster at a Poilievre campaign event.

 Thousands of people attend Poilievre’s campaign events and Poilievre has condemned far-right extremism on a number of occasions, but that didn’t stop so-called journalists in the legacy media from lThey’ve written several reports about this photo and some have even gone as far as accusing Poilievre of attracting far-right extremists. 

 Why weren’t the legacy media just as upset when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had a photo taken with a pedophile?

 Or a neo-Nazi?

 Or a terrorist?

 Am I making the assumption that Trudeau is a pedophile, terrorist and extremist because he has photos taken with these individuals?

 Of course not. It would be absurd to make that assumption.

 So why is the legacy media leaping to the same outrageous conclusions about Poilievre after shaking hands with someone he didn’t know at a public event attended by hundreds of people?

 Cosmin Dzsurdzsa

Senior Researcher 

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1 hour ago, GDR said:

Why weren’t the legacy media just as upset when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had a photo taken with a pedophile?

 Or a neo-Nazi?

 Or a terrorist?

Never a good career choice to “out” the guy that signs your pay check.

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KARMA !!


“ Network-Wide Purge’: CNN Staffers Panic As ‘Woke’ Employee’s Heads Roll Under New Company Chief “

 

Employees at CNN are reportedly panicking as Chris Licht, the company’s new chairman and CEO, is continuing to cut some of the network’s most hyper-partisan leftist “talent.”

The Daily Mail reported that staffers at the far-left network, which is trying to become more nonpartisan, “fear a network-wide purge” of “woke” talent at the company.

People are freaked out,” one CNN journalist said. “It almost feels like there’s a pattern. Is there a purge going on? They seem to be sending a message: ‘Watch what you say. Watch what you do.’”

“Longtime CNN personalities are disappearing, and the viewers don’t know why,” another CNN employee said. A producer for the network said it was an “unsettling time from top to bottom at CNN” and that no one “is happy right now.”

The panic comes after CNN parted ways with hard-left White House Correspondent John Harwood this week following hyper-partisan remarks from Harwood, including a tweet in which Harwood claimed, “Biden’s assertion that Trump and extremist Republicans pose a threat to American democracy is, undeniably, true.”

During the 2016 presidential campaign, Harwood reached out to Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman, John Podesta, and asked him, “What should I ask Jeb?” The Hill noted at the time that Jeb Bush, at the time the email was sent, was the leading Republican contender to take on Clinton.

Harwood’s departure comes weeks after former CNN “Reliable Sources” host Brian Stelter recorded his last show and exited the network. Stelter’s exit reportedly came at the behest of CNN chief Chris Licht, who took over the network in February after Jeff Zucker’s exit. Licht has reportedly been driving CNN toward adopting a more nonpartisan stance in its news coverage.

Licht started to evaluate the hyper-partisan so-called “talent” at the network shortly after he joined CNN as he aimed to dial down the extreme partisanship that has plagued the network in recent years.

I want to acknowledge that this is a time of significant change, and I know that many of you are unsettled,” Licht said, according to numerous people who attended Friday’s editorial meeting call. “There will be more changes, and you might not understand it or like it.”

Warner Bros. Discovery canceled CNN’s new subscription streaming service, CNN+, earlier this year after it experienced significant struggles in attracting an audience.

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Here is an interesting article in the CBC. I wonder if the CBC is very concerned with Polievre's leadershop to defund them and is now starting to try and move the Liberals to a more centrist position in the hopes of trying to stop a Conservative win.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/liberal-mps-less-woke-1.6566633

With Poilievre's victory, some Liberal MPs hope party will pivot to the centre

One MP says party needs to be ‘less woke’

Some Liberal MPs say the party needs to refocus as it prepares to go head-to-head against a new brand of Conservatives — including being "less woke," according to Radio-Canada.

A handful of MPs spoke to the French-language arm of CBC — most on the condition that they not be named — as the party gathers for a caucus meeting in the coastal resort town of Saint Andrews, N.B.

The meeting is meant to underline the party's priorities ahead of the fall sitting, which will see a new face leading His Majesty's Loyal Opposition: Pierre Poilievre.

With his firebrand style, Poilievre has promised to fire Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem, accusing him of failing to rein in inflation, railed against COVID-19 restrictions and the federal government's vaccine mandate for travellers and public servants, and vowed to take on the elites.

With a new Conservative leader making inflation a central theme, some Liberals said they believe that economic issues, such as the cost of living and labour shortages, must be brought back to the heart of government priorities. 

Another said the party needs to be better at showing it's listening to Canadians and their concerns. 

"You have to go back to the basics, to a more direct link with the people," they said.

Within the Liberal ranks, some said they would like to see the party adopt more centrist positions to counter Poilievre.

"We must return to a federal centre, centre-right party," said another MP, also on the condition they not be identified. "We need a government that is down to earth and less woke."

"Poilievre's party can't fill the centre," said another.

Earlier this year, the Liberals struck a deal heading in the other direction. The party has agreed to launch a new dental care program for middle- and low-income Canadians and advance a number of other NDP priorities in exchange for New Democrats propping up the federal government until 2025.

Opinions on the deal were divided at caucus in New Brunswick.

Passport delays, airport chaos 'hurt us:' Liberal MP

"I am very comfortable with the alliance with the NDP for the stability of the government," said Alexandra Mendès, MP for Brossard-Saint-Lambert.

"Sometimes, we are so preoccupied with petty politics that we forget big politics." 

Several Liberal sources said they believe that the delay in issuing passports was particularly damaging to Liberal voters, including many newcomers who were waiting for their travel documents to visit relatives abroad. 

"We had a difficult summer and it's not over," said Mendès. "After two years of confinement, what were we expecting?"

Behind the scenes, some elected Liberals whispered that the minister responsible for the file, Karina Gould, was not up to it.

"It hurt us. It could have been avoided," said one MP, who didn't want to be named.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Cutting CBC would give twice 

The benefits to Canadians of defunding the CBC likely would greatly exceed $1.4 billion annually

Cutting government spending is almost always beneficial but new Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre’s proposal to eliminate the CBC’s public funding is doubly so. Many other government-run institutions are so blatantly inefficient and do so badly that there is at least the silver lining that they sow public skepticism about further government expansion. The CBC is also inefficient and does badly but it is in the business of pushing stories and promoting ideas, and the ideas it promotes are those favouring government expansion. As Milton Friedman wrote, “Any institution will tend to express its own values and its own ideas … A socialist institution will teach socialist values.”

An entity that gets $1.4 billion of its $1.9 billion in annual revenues from the federal government could not possibly have an internal culture favourable to free markets or antagonistic to large disbursements of public money for pet causes. Thus the double dividend of cutting the CBC’s funding: first, the savings to taxpayers and, second, less teaching of socialism.

 

Of course, to say the CBC is in the business of teaching socialism is to paint with an overly broad brush. Some people at the CBC are not socialists, while others teach much more than socialism, notably: climate alarmism, identity politics, and especially the singular importance of diversity above all other considerations.

 

The diversity promoted at the CBC is not diversity of thought, however, or the diversity that spontaneously arises as a result of bringing together many unique individuals, but rather the tiresome top-down diversity of the kind enforced by most modern university administrators. To work at the CBC today, former employee Tara Henley wrote in the National Post earlier this year, is “in my newsroom, to fill out racial profile forms for every guest you book” and “submit to job interviews that are not about qualifications or experience — but instead demand the parroting of orthodoxies, the demonstration of fealty to dogma.”

On top of the CBC’s existing obsession with diversity, its regulator, the CRTC — yes, Mr. Poilievre, another government institution to put on the chopping block — is imposing additional diversity requirements on its staffing and programming. Its new requirements of the CBC include, among other things, minimum levels of expenditure on producers from “equity-seeking communities” (as if there were communities that don’t seek or deserve equity).

 

The CRTC has also established something called a “woman intersectionality credit” to “incentivize expenditures on productions produced by Indigenous Peoples, racialized persons, persons with disabilities, and persons who self-identify as LGBTQ2, who also self-identify as women.” The double self-identification methodology — or perhaps it’s self-identification squared — presumably is intended to promote equity by opening the door for anyone and everyone to attain the enviable status of being exponentially qualified for government-funded affirmative action.

 

Friedman’s observation about socialist institutions teaching socialist ideas was actually in reference to the public school system. In Canada schools are a provincial responsibility but Friedman’s observation should provide Conservatives with an excellent idea on another government spending cut that would deliver the double dividend: university funding. In 2020-21, universities received $5.3 billion in federal funding on top of the $15.2 billion they already received from provincial governments.

The CBC will of course always have its cheerleaders for government funding. On the day Poilievre was elected Conservative leader, CBC panellist and Toronto Star columnist Althia Raj juxtaposed his proposal to defund the CBC with her view that the broadcaster’s content (she gave no specific examples) shows “precisely why it is valuable.” But that’s a pure non sequitur. Something should receive public funding because it is valuable? The McDonald’s Corporation is worth US$181 billion, making it far more valuable than the CBC. Should it get federal funds, too?

 

In a 2003 article in The Journal of Law and Economics four economists, including Andrei Schleifer of Harvard, examined media ownership in 97 countries, testing two competing theories of government ownership of media. According to the public interest theory, the government is providing a service that the market has failed to provide; according to the public choice theory, government ownership of media “undermines political and economic freedom.” The data, the authors concluded, support the public choice theory. Thus the benefits to Canadians of defunding the CBC likely would greatly exceed $1.4 billion annually.

 

Financial Post

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