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It didn’t get much press, but when our finance minister showed up at the opening of Caribana in Toronto, she flippantly joked about donating $1 million to the parade……(not much press, because to the liberals, it’s only a million, like what’s the big deal?). Did this festival really need the money or is it just vote buying to another minority group.

Meanwhile, taxpayers are struggling with high gas taxes, food and rising interest rates.

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As part of the carnival kick off, Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland also announced $1 million in funding from the federal government’s Tourism Relief Fund. This money will be used to modernize the festival, expand its offerings, and enhance visitor experiences through the development of a new app as well as upgrades to its website to better support online ticket sales

Similar respect was given to our money when Trudeau casuallly tweeted $50 million to Trevor Noah …it’s hip to be cool.

 

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This week, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson was shunted out of office in the most dramatic caucus revolt to strike British politics since the 1990 defenestration of Margaret Thatcher.

 

The Canadian observer may note that our own prime minister has had no shortage of scandals rather similar to the ones that unseated Johnson, and yet Justin Trudeau remains firmly insulated against even the vaguest prospect of being kicked to the curb by his own MPs (hell, even the opposition has signed on to the idea of him staying in power for another three years).

 

So who’s the more scandal-plagued Commonwealth first minister? We rounded up the highlights below to let you decide.

 

SEXUAL MISCONDUCT

 

The spark for Johnson’s ultimate downfall was his support for Chris Pincher, a Conservative MP who was accused of groping two men at a party. Although Johnson initially claimed ignorance of the accusations, evidence soon emerged that Johnson knew full well about the Pincher accusations – but appointed him as the party’s deputy chief whip anyways (a position in which he would wield considerable power over other MPs).

 

Groping allegations have also hit the Trudeau government, and they notably involve the prime minister himself. In 2018, an archived news story in the Creston Valley Advance revealed that Trudeau was accused of groping one of their reporters in 2000 while attending a local brewery event. Trudeau denied any wrongdoing, famously saying that the reporter probably experienced the encounter “differently” than he had.

 

The Trudeau government has also been accused of ignoring sexual misconduct allegations against a senior appointee. In their case it was chief of defence staff Gen. Jonathan Vance, who faced a pair of “Me Too” allegations that he carried on an improper sexual relationship with a subordinate – and also sent a lewd email to another one. Trudeau's chief of staff and his minister of defence, Harjit Sajjan, were accused not only of ignoring the accusations, but of covering up the fact that they had known about them at all.

 

COVID HYPOCRISY

 

Many of the nails in Johnson’s political coffin were driven in by Partygate; a series of revelations finding that Johnson and his staff had held illegal drinking parties in direct violation of their own lockdown policies. Johnson himself was fined £50 for attending a clandestine birthday party in May 2020, when most of the country wasn’t even able to visit dying relatives in hospital on account of social distancing rules. It was the first time in British history that a prime minister had been found to break the law while in office.

 

Trudeau has been pretty cavalier about going maskless on international trips even while maintaining strict mask mandates at home. He’s picked up COVID infections while abroad and then brought them home to Canada – even while upholding onerous vaccine and testing mandates designed to restrict this precise occurrence. But there really hasn’t been any comparable episode of Trudeau openly flouting COVID rules that his own government imposed.

 

Which isn’t to say there haven’t been epic feats of hypocrisy in other areas. Just last year, Trudeau urged Canadians to spend the country’s first National Truth and Reconciliation Day in solemn reflection – before secretly slipping off to Tofino to spend his own Reconciliation Day at the beach.

 

POLITICAL INTERFERENCE

 

The signature scandal of the Trudeau government was the SNC-Lavalin affair. This was where Trudeau urged his justice minister, Jody Wilson-Raybould, to unilaterally suspend bribery charges against SNC-Lavalin, an engineering firm that just happened to be a major Liberal donor with plenty of employees in Liberal ridings. Wilson-Raybould not only refused, but would end up writing a whole book about how skeezy she found her former boss. And unlike many of the other scandals on this list, SNC-Lavalin actually got a fair bit of notice in the U.K. itself. The BBC even claimed at the time that the scandal could “unseat Canada’s PM.”

 

Johnson was once accused of compelling The Times to pull a story about his wife Carrie. In 2019, he was found by the British Supreme Court of having unlawfully prorogued the House of Commons until the deadline had passed for Britain to leave the European Union.

 

FINANCIAL IRREGULARITIES

 

When it comes to scandals of personal enrichment, the crown for the Trudeau government belongs to the Aga Khan affair. Over Christmas 2016, Trudeau and his family were given the red carpet treatment at the private island of the Aga Khan, the billionaire monarchical head of the Shia Ismaili Muslims. A prime minister accepting thousands of dollars of in-kind gifts from a foreign billionaire is questionable enough, but this scandal was heightened by the fact that Trudeau’s government had just given $50 million in public funding to the Aga Khan Foundation. And although Trudeau would claim the Aga Khan was a family friend, they actually hadn’t spoken for nearly 20 years.  

 

The RCMP would consider charging Trudeau with fraud for the trip, which would have been the first time that a sitting Canadian prime minister faced criminal charges while in office. Nevertheless, the Mounties pulled back over an ambiguity in the law under which Trudeau might have had the authority to approve the trip regardless of whatever breach-of-trust unseemliness it may have represented.

 

Johnson has been accused of failing to disclose that a government contractor was also his mistress. Businesswoman Jennifer Arcuri received £25,000 in public funding to her tech firm while allegedly carrying on a relationship with the prime minister. While Arcuri may have been able to secure the £25,000 regardless of her intimate relations with Johnson, the prime minister got in trouble for not disclosing a potential conflict of interest.

 

INCRIMINATING PHOTOS 

 

Trudeau obviously dominates this category. It was during the 2019 federal election that a cascade of images emerged showing a pre-politics Trudeau in various states of blackface and brownface. At the scandal’s peak, Trudeau received international headlines for telling reporters that he wasn’t actually sure how many times he had ever worn blackface in his life.

 

The most damning photo of Johnson would probably be the one from 1987 where he’s posing with the fellow members of the Bullingdon Club, a cartoonishly elitist all-male dining club for Oxford University students. Bullingdon members are famous for going to gourmet restaurants in tailored suits, smashing up the establishments after their meal and then paying for damages on the spot. Notably, that 1987 photo also includes an image of another future Conservative prime minister: David Cameron.

 

 

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Ah, memories. (Handout)

 

 

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APOLOGY # 3478  This time to no one who would still even be alive, but it’s a great virtue signalling sound bite !!

 

Prime minister apologizes for anti-Black racism experienced by No. 2 Construction Battalion

 

The federal government has formally apologized to descendants and relatives of the men of the No. 2 Construction Battalion Saturday afternoon, 106 years after the formation of the historic battalion that faced anti-Black racism during the First World War.

The Nova Scotia-based battalion was the first military unit in Canada made up of mostly Black personnel. The battalion was primarily used in non-combat situations to clear trees, build roads, and maintain railway tracks.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the gruelling work of battalion members was invaluable to the war effort.

He said despite their hard work, members were forced to live in segregated camps and not provided with proper medical care, rations or equipment.

"We cannot ever let what happened to No. 2 Construction Battalion happen again," Trudeau said. "And we cannot let the service of any member of our forces ever be overlooked and forgotten."

3B14DBEA-7B44-463F-9191-32FC84CCFE0F.jpeg

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7 hours ago, Jaydee said:

APOLOGY # 3478  This time to no one who would still even be alive, but it’s a great virtue signalling sound bite !!

 

Prime minister apologizes for anti-Black racism experienced by No. 2 Construction Battalion

 

The federal government has formally apologized to descendants and relatives of the men of the No. 2 Construction Battalion Saturday afternoon, 106 years after the formation of the historic battalion that faced anti-Black racism during the First World War.

The Nova Scotia-based battalion was the first military unit in Canada made up of mostly Black personnel. The battalion was primarily used in non-combat situations to clear trees, build roads, and maintain railway tracks.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the gruelling work of battalion members was invaluable to the war effort.

He said despite their hard work, members were forced to live in segregated camps and not provided with proper medical care, rations or equipment.

"We cannot ever let what happened to No. 2 Construction Battalion happen again," Trudeau said. "And we cannot let the service of any member of our forces ever be overlooked and forgotten."

3B14DBEA-7B44-463F-9191-32FC84CCFE0F.jpeg

Slavery:

The slave population (hide)

The historian Marcel Trudel catalogued the existence of about 4,200 slaves in Canada between 1671 and 1834, the year slavery was abolished in the British Empire. About two-thirds of these were Native and one-third were Blacks. The use of slaves varied a great deal throughout the course of this period. For the entire 17th century, there were only 35 slaves of which 7 were Blacks. Between 1700 and 1760, some 2,000 were enumerated, including both Natives and Blacks, and about as many from the Conquest until 1834. After 1760, the number of Black slaves in the colony increased considerably, from 300 to more than 800. This increase is attributable in large part to the arrival of the Loyalists in Quebec after 1783 who brought their own slaves with them.

Demographic repartition of the slave populations in the St. Lawrence Valley.

Demographic repartition of the slave populations in the St. Lawrence Valley.

The slaves were generally very young: among the Panis, the average age would have been 14 years old and 18 years old for Blacks. The percentage of females among Aboriginal slaves was 57 percent. Among Black slaves the percentage of males was also 57 percent.

Slave, with a Weight chained to her Ancle, 1796, by John Gabriel Stedman

Slave, with a Weight chained to her Ancle, 1796, by John Gabriel Stedman

Tobacco, illustration from: Description de l’Univers contenant les différents systèmes du monde, par Alain Manesson Mallet

Tobacco

 

 

In Louisiana, in contrast, the number of Aboriginal slaves was always lower than that of Black slaves. Throughout the French regime, there were about 1,700, of which the majority were females who worked as household help and served as concubines for the French. They were often hardly ten years old. Their average age at death was 17 years, testimony to their vulnerability to European epidemics, as were the Panis slaves in Canada. Louisiana planters preferred slaves of African origin, who ran away in lesser number and who were healthier.

Between 1719 and 1743, the Company of the Indies (Compagnie des Indes), which held a monopoly on the slave trade, sent some 6,000 Africans to Louisiana. The majority of them were males since females were generally reserved for the slave trade in Africa and because field work required more robust manual labour. The majority were from Senegambia, the remainder came from the Angola-Congo region and the Bight of Benin. In contrast to Canada, which was a “society with slaves,” Louisiana was a “slave society.” The slave population, which was much higher, played an important role in the economic development of the region. Yet slavery was nevertheless less prevalent than in the French Antilles during the same period.

 

Who could buy a slave? (show)

Why were there so few slaves in Canada? (hide)

In Canada, the colonial economy did not favour the growth of slavery because the economy’s two principal industries required little manual labour: The fur trade was controlled by a small group of professionals and essentially relied on the labour of Native fur trappers. Manual labour in families was sufficient for small farming operations. Furthermore, the purchase of an Aboriginal or Black slave was an unaffordable expense for settler-proprietors. A Black slave cost from 800 to 1000 pounds, that is, twice as much as an Aboriginal slave. In the 18th century, the annual average income of an unskilled worker was about 100 pounds. That of a bona fide artisan was from 200 to 400 pounds.

 

Slavery | Virtual Museum of New France (historymuseum.ca)

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7 hours ago, Jaydee said:

APOLOGY # 3478  This time to no one who would still even be alive, but it’s a great virtue signalling sound bite !!

 

Prime minister apologizes for anti-Black racism experienced by No. 2 Construction Battalion

 

The federal government has formally apologized to descendants and relatives of the men of the No. 2 Construction Battalion Saturday afternoon, 106 years after the formation of the historic battalion that faced anti-Black racism during the First World War.

The Nova Scotia-based battalion was the first military unit in Canada made up of mostly Black personnel. The battalion was primarily used in non-combat situations to clear trees, build roads, and maintain railway tracks.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the gruelling work of battalion members was invaluable to the war effort.

He said despite their hard work, members were forced to live in segregated camps and not provided with proper medical care, rations or equipment.

"We cannot ever let what happened to No. 2 Construction Battalion happen again," Trudeau said. "And we cannot let the service of any member of our forces ever be overlooked and forgotten."

3B14DBEA-7B44-463F-9191-32FC84CCFE0F.jpeg

I read an article this week about this apology, the writer said blacks were not allowed to fight in WWI as it was seen as a "White War"  

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Black Canadians | The Canadian Encyclopedia

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Black Volunteers in the Canadian Expeditionary Force

 

During the First World War, up to 1,300 Black men volunteered for service in the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF). While the men of No. 2 Construction Battalion are the best-known example of Black participation in the war, another 300 to 500 enlisted in other units of the CEF. Of these, about 100 served on the front lines. Black soldiers participated in all major battles of the CEF, from its arrival in France until the Armistice. (See also Black Canadians and Conscription in the First World War.)

No. 2 Construction Battalion | The Canadian Encyclopedia

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7 hours ago, Kargokings said:

I read an article this week about this apology, the writer said blacks were not allowed to fight in WWI as it was seen as a "White War"  

 

D70343F1-5FDC-476B-9ABA-B5318A1F3AA9.jpeg

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I think it was one of Trudeau’s best acting performances to date…..the voice almost cracking with emotion, the cadence, the body language…after SSOOO many apologies, he has it nailed ….  truly an Oscar moment! 
 

Now, on to the next act at the Calgary stampede…better brush up on those lines…….”we have your backs from day one, high paying jobs in clean tech, green transition, diversity is our strength, multicultural, make the rich pay their fair share…”.     
HHHMMMMM…..TOUGH CROWD. Maybe he can try bribe them with some of their own money!

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18 minutes ago, Falken said:

         I love the " we have your back" when he really has his had in your pocket! 

The day Trudeau “has your back” is the time to duck…..INCOMING !!!!!

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2 hours ago, Jaydee said:

09CC8409-5EE4-489E-9630-3CA3C1DFD9A4.jpeg

She's absolutely right if liberal / NDP voters really want what they say they do. If they want to do this, The Netherlands are on the right track and serve as a model, we need to be doing that here too. 

Even so, higher gas prices, higher carbon taxes and confiscating 30% of active agricultural land isn't enough to hit the 2030 target.

7 years and change to go... we haven't even started to start. Every passing day means more pain required and any liberals who think our current situation is too much to bear haven't thought the situation through.

Why are Canadians surprised, our government campaigned on this... remember?

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On 7/8/2022 at 7:25 AM, Jaydee said:

“Singapore has once again executed people convicted of drug-related offenses in violation of international law, callously disregarding public outcry,” said Emerlynne Gill, Amnesty International’s deputy regional director for research.

What's "international law'?  I thought laws were created and administered by local governments.

On 7/8/2022 at 7:25 AM, Jaydee said:

“The death penalty is never the solution and we oppose it unconditionally. There is no evidence that it acts as a unique deterrent to crime,” Gill said in a statement.

 

Really, never the solution?  Just think about the thousands of people in Canada that have died from Fentanyl overdoses.  IDK, maybe I'm some sort of anacronism but the penalty seems entirely appropriate for someone who contributes to the death of thousands.  In my extended family alone there have been 2 young, troubled people lost to drug overdose - ask me (or the parents of those lost) how they would feel about capital punishment for the slime that imported and supplied the drugs.  IMO, the only problem with hanging is that it's too quick and not nearly painful enough.

No evidence it serves as a deterrent - well, personally, I think we should give it a try and see for ourselves.  Somebody with more time than I have could probably do the research but I'd bet dollars to donuts that the number of people and the quantity of drugs imported to Singapore is less than in Canada.

 

As an aside; the phrase "I'd bet dollars to donuts" no longer has any meaning since donuts cost more than a dollar.

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Canadians disapprove of Justin Trudeau’s job as prime minister and feel he is divisive, national opinion survey says

Adrian Humphreys - 30m ago
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Most Canadians disapprove of Justin Trudeau’s performance as prime minister and feel he is a divisive leader, with almost as many hoping he resigns before the next election, according to a new public opinion survey probing the legacy of Canada’s leader.

© Provided by National PostPrime Minister Justin Trudeau looks on at the start of the first plenary session of the NATO summit at the Ifema congress centre in Madrid, on June 29.

The results of the Postmedia-Léger survey suggest Trudeau faces challenges in his continued electoral success.

“When you take the results to these questions in their entirety, one can’t help but think the progressive coalition that elected Trudeau to his majority in 2015 and contributed to his back-to-back minorities is significantly strained, if not broken,” said Andrew Enns, an executive vice-president at Léger.

“His personal popularity with NDP and Green voters is poor, which leads one to question his ability to win another election, certainly difficult to see him ever winning a majority.”

More than half of all respondents in the national survey, regardless of their party support, disapproved of the job Trudeau was doing as prime minister and nearly half of them said they thought he should resign before the next election.

Thirty-two per cent of respondents said they strongly disapproved of Trudeau’s performance with another 23 per cent saying they somewhat disapproved.

That compares to seven per cent who said they strongly approved of how Trudeau was doing and 33 per cent somewhat approved, according to the survey results.

Dislike for Trudeau was strongest in B.C. and Manitoba and Saskatchewan, at 60 per cent, followed closely by Alberta and Quebec at 58 per cent.

“A clear majority disapprove of his performance — higher in key electoral regions of BC and Quebec. One might say these numbers can improve as we get clear of the hard road of the pandemic, but when one considers the economic challenges ahead this is not a certainty,” said Enns.

More than 60 per cent of respondents agreed that Trudeau has been divisive during his time in office, and more than 40 percent felt Canada became a worse country since his election, according to the survey.

A total of 33 per cent of respondents strongly agreed and another 28 per cent somewhat agreed the statement: “Prime Minister Justin Trudeau often favours certain groups and regions of the country over others, which has created national unity issues.”

Agreement was strongest in Alberta and the Prairies.

There were 22 per cent of respondents who disagreed with the statement, 15 per cent somewhat in disagreement and seven per cent strongly objecting. There were also 17 per cent saying they didn’t know.

“There is evidence of a national unity divide in the country. Across the country there is a strong view the Trudeau government has stoked unity tensions, but this is particularly acute in Alberta and the Prairies,” Enns said.

When asked if they felt Canada was a better, worse, or no different a place to live, work and raise a family than when Trudeau was first elected in 2015, 44 per cent of respondents selected worse.

Only 17 per cent said it was a better place, with 30 per cent selecting no different and nine percent saying they didn’t know.

Almost half of respondents (49 per cent) said Trudeau should resign as Liberal party leader and let someone else lead the party into the next election. Thirty per cent wanted him to remain as leader in the next election and 21 per cent said they weren’t sure.

“It’s interesting that this is the one question NDP voters are more tempered in their negativity, perhaps a reflection of uncertainty what this would mean for their parliamentary deal,” Enns said.

Respondents were also questioned about several policies and issues during Trudeau’s time as prime minister and were asked to select which they see as his greatest accomplishment and which is his greatest disappointment.

Legalizing recreational marijuana was chosen as his greatest accomplishment by 16 per cent, followed closely by managing the COVID-19 pandemic at 15 per cent.

Affordable daycare/childcare as well as reconciliation with Indigenous peoples were both selected by seven per cent, followed by Canada’s reputation internationally (6 per cent), gun control (5 per cent), climate change action (4 per cent). Canada-U.S. relations tied with purchasing the Trans Mountain oil pipeline at the bottom with two per cent each.

It was Conservative and NDP supporters who pushed marijuana legalization to the top of Trudeau’s achievement list, with Liberal supporters more likely to say pandemic response was his highlight.

The greatest disappointment with Trudeau was integrity issues.

Seventeen per cent named integrity issues, such as Trudeau’s handling of the WE Foundation controversy, Jody Wilson-Raybould and SNC-Lavalin affair and others.

A failure to keep his promises and too much focus on style over substance were both named as their biggest disappointment by 11 per cent. Purchasing the Trans Mountain pipeline disappointed nine per cent of respondents the most.

There was a three-way tie at six per cent for invoking the Emergency Measures Act during the convoy protests, pandemic management, and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

Respondents were also asked to compare Trudeau’s time as prime minister since his election in 2015 to that of his father, Pierre Trudeau, who was prime minister from 1968 to 1979 and from 1980 to 1984.

While 31 per cent said father and son performances have been equal and 28 per cent said they didn’t know, Pierre Trudeau’s time in office was favoured by 28 per cent of respondents and Justin Trudeau’s tenure by 12 per cent.

Enns said this isn’t a particularly insightful finding since prime ministers tend to get more popular the further back in history they are.

The public opinion survey studied responses from Canadian residents 18 years and older by 1,501 online surveys through Léger’s online panel between June 30 and July 3, 2022. Results were weighted according to age, gender, and region to ensure a representative sample of the population.

As an online survey, traditional margins of error do not apply, according to Leger. If the data had been collected through a probability sample, the margin of error would be reported as ±2.5 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

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Poll finds many disapprove of Trudeau's job as PM

Poll shows most give PM a poor job rating

  • Calgary Herald
  • 14 Jul 2022
  • ADRIAN HUMPHREYS
img?regionKey=Gerd81xRUgxFKFZdjG1TeA%3d%3dADRIAN WYLD / THE CANADIAN PRESS Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's personal popularity among Green and NDP voters is low, according to a recent Léger poll.

Most Canadians disapprove of Justin Trudeau's performance as prime minister and feel he is a divisive leader, with almost as many hoping he resigns before the next election, according to a new public opinion survey probing the legacy of Canada's leader.

The results of the Postmedia-léger survey suggest Trudeau faces challenges in his continued electoral success.

“When you take the results (of) these questions in their entirety, one can't help but think the progressive coalition that elected Trudeau to his majority in 2015 and contributed to his back-to-back minorities is significantly strained, if not broken,” said Andrew Enns, an executive vice-president at Léger.

“His personal popularity with NDP and Green voters is poor, which leads one to question his ability to win another election, certainly difficult to see him ever winning a majority.”

More than half of all respondents in the national survey, regardless of their party support, disapproved of the job Trudeau was doing as prime minister and nearly half of them said they thought he should resign before the next election.

Thirty-two per cent of respondents said they strongly disapproved of Trudeau's performance, with another 23 per cent saying they somewhat disapproved.

That compares to seven per cent who said they strongly approved of how Trudeau was doing and 33 per cent somewhat approved, according to the survey results.

Dislike for Trudeau was strongest in B.C., Manitoba and Saskatchewan, at 60 per cent, followed closely by Alberta and Quebec at 58 per cent.

“A clear majority disapprove of his performance — higher in key electoral regions of B.C. and Quebec. One might say these numbers can improve as we get clear of the hard road of the pandemic, but when one considers the economic challenges ahead this is not a certainty,” said Enns.

More than 60 per cent of respondents agreed that Trudeau has been divisive during his time in office, and more than 40 per cent felt Canada became a worse country since his election, according to the survey.

A total of 33 per cent of respondents strongly agreed and another 28 per cent somewhat agreed with the statement: “Prime Minister Justin Trudeau often favours certain groups and regions of the country over others, which has created national unity issues.”

Agreement was strongest in Alberta and the Prairies.

There were 22 per cent of respondents who disagreed with the statement, 15 per cent somewhat in disagreement and seven per cent strongly objecting. There were also 17 per cent saying they didn't know.

“There is evidence of a national unity divide in the country. Across the country there is a strong view the Trudeau government has stoked unity tensions, but this is particularly acute in Alberta and the Prairies,” Enns said.

When asked if they felt Canada was a better, worse, or no different place to live, work and raise a family than when Trudeau was first elected in 2015, 44 per cent of respondents selected worse.

Only 17 per cent said it was a better place, with 30 per cent selecting no different and nine per cent saying they didn't know.

Almost half of respondents (49 per cent) said Trudeau should resign as Liberal party leader and let someone else lead the party into the next election. Thirty per cent wanted him to remain as leader in the next election and 21 per cent said they weren't sure.

“It's interesting that this is the one question NDP voters are more tempered in their negativity, perhaps a reflection of uncertainty what this would mean for their parliamentary deal,” Enns said.

Respondents were also questioned about several policies and issues during Trudeau's time as prime minister and were asked to select which they see as his greatest accomplishment and which is his greatest disappointment.

Legalizing recreational marijuana was chosen as his greatest accomplishment by 16 per cent, followed closely by managing the COVID-19 pandemic at 15 per cent.

Affordable daycare/childcare as well as reconciliation with Indigenous peoples were both selected by seven per cent, followed by Canada's reputation internationally (six per cent), gun control (five per cent), climate change action (four per cent). Canada-u.s. relations tied with purchasing the Trans Mountain oil pipeline at the bottom with two per cent each.

It was Conservative and NDP supporters who pushed marijuana legalization to the top of Trudeau's achievement list, with Liberal supporters more likely to say pandemic response was his highlight.

The greatest disappointment with Trudeau was integrity issues.

Seventeen per cent named integrity issues, such as Trudeau's handling of the WE Foundation controversy, the Jody Wilson-raybould and Snc-lavalin affair and others.

As an online survey, traditional margins of error do not apply, according to Leger. If the data had been collected through a probability sample, the margin of error would be reported as 2.5 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

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