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Justin Trudeau


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1 minute ago, Seeker said:

It's cheaper to move stuff by train anyways - it just takes a little longer.  If we (society) had any brains we'd use rail for all inter-city and longer transport, keep the trucks off the road.

still need trucks from the train yard to final destination

the volume does not change just the distance

 

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9 minutes ago, boestar said:

still need trucks from the train yard to final destination

the volume does not change just the distance

 

Yeah, I know.  Still have the local trucks, just not the long-distance trucks.  Trains for terminal to terminal, trucks for local delivery.

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27 minutes ago, Seeker said:

It's cheaper to move stuff by train anyways - it just takes a little longer.  If we (society) had any brains we'd use rail for all inter-city and longer transport, keep the trucks off the road.

Perhaps but unless your city is on a rail line, long haul trucking is still very necessary.

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1 hour ago, Seeker said:

It's cheaper to move stuff by train anyways - it just takes a little longer.  If we (society) had any brains we'd use rail for all inter-city and longer transport, keep the trucks off the road.

True enough but since many industrial deliveries have evolved to "just in time" events, I'm thinking it would require a pretty big reset to inventory management in the manufacturing sector. Then there is the massive amount of fresh produce and expedited point to point deliveries of a broad range of goods that people have come to expect quickly.

In other words, I would see the biggest impediment being people's expectations, manufacturing costs and spinning up rail capacity. It would likely be more popular in theory than in practice and even the obvious environmental benefits would be a tough sell (IMO) if delivery times were increased or manufactured goods increased in price as a result.  

Edited by Wolfhunter
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10 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

True enough but since many industrial deliveries have evolved to "just in time" events, I'm thinking it would require a pretty big reset to inventory management in the manufacturing sector. Then there is the massive amount of fresh produce and expedited point to point deliveries of a broad range of goods that people have come to expect quickly.

In other words, I would see the biggest impediment being people's expectations, manufacturing costs and spinning up rail capacity. It would likely be more popular in theory than in practice and even the obvious environmental benefits would be a tough sell (IMO) if delivery times were increased or manufactured goods increased in price as a result.  

Yes, all true if one was to try to change the current system.  Transport, industry and expectations all evolved together.  Think what we would have if, say, back in the 50's it was decided that interstate highways were for car traffic only.  Rail systems would have been developed that were highly efficient.  Perhaps the cost savings from just-in-time manufacturing would have been offset by cheaper transport to begin with.  Manufacturing plants would have been located near train tracks and train tracks built to serve to others.  Anyway, just a mental exercise at this point.

 

It does however remind me of one of the most dastardly undertakings of the automotive industry.  General motors to be precise:  The Streetcar Conspiracy 

Think about how different our society would be if commuter rail was cheap, and available.

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8 hours ago, Jaydee said:

FLIP FLOP FLIP FLOP…nothing ever changes….the wheels on the bus go round and round. How long before the US does the same thing in this tit for tat diplomacy.

 

Canadian truckers crossing U.S. border now exempt from new COVID-19 rules, feds say

The federal government is backing down from mandating COVID-19vaccinations for cross-border Canadian truckers just days before the new rule was set to take effect.

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A spokesperson for the Canadian Border Services Agency told Global News Wednesday that unvaccinated Canadian truckers crossing from the United States will remain exempt from testing and quarantine requirements after arriving in the country.

Those requirements will, however, still apply to unvaccinated or partially vaccinated foreign nationals, including American truck drivers starting this Saturday, spokesperson Rebecca Purdy said.

Those truckers will be forced to turn back to the U.S. until they are fully Vaccinated


 

LMAO !!

Federal government now says all truckers crossing border must be fully vaccinated

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-truckers-vaccine-reversal-1.6313200

 

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I'm starting to see empty shelves at the grocery store in my little town now. Other people have noticed this too and I've observed them buying in bulk, I'll call it hoarding. 

For good or ill, right or wrong, what I'm hearing is that they are concerned about supply lines and don't want to get caught short.

In the process of not getting caught though, they will likely find they're actually aggravating a situation which would never have become a problem if they hadn't made it one. 

It will be interesting to watch the trajectory in larger cities now. It seems to me that small towns would feel the effects of such a trend first and before it becomes noticeable in larger centres..

BTW, a 10% loss of capacity in an industry that is already heavily understaffed and highly reliant on TFWs is hardly statistically insignificant. Throw in the US based transients that will be lost shortly and add the reciprocal crossing restrictions sure to come and it has the potential to be significant.  

I guess I could also add unnecessary and self inflicted to that list but I've said all that before.

 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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32 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

add the reciprocal crossing restrictions

Ooops, I missed the reversal and that might account (at least partially) for the afternoon's run on grocery stores.

Frankly though, whether the Canadian position was reversed or not is largely irrelevant since they planned to restrict US transients anyway. That would never have flown more than a few feet... IMO, they got a phone call and simply decided to embrace firewall thrust stupidity across the board and be done with it.

And why not, got to love the sound of tink, tink, tink, tink eh?

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Canadian intellectuals worry about the U.S. becoming a dictatorship. Maybe they should worry about Canada.

“ There is no country on Earth whose intellectuals are more confident they understand the United States than the ones found in Canada. This is because the entire project of building a Canadian sense of nationalism has always required a cadre of professional thinkers capable of offering reasons to reject the lure of the larger country to the south, thus ensuring Canada has never been short of writers and academics who are, as the famous quote goes, “malevolently well-informed about the United States” — at least in their own heads.

 

Readers who think I exaggerate should browse the editorial page of the Globe and Mail, the Canadian newspaper with the most overt pretense of being a world-class journal of opinion. In the run-up to the anniversary of the Jan. 6 riot in Washington, the Globe and Mail recruited several of Canada’s brightest minds to opine on the state of “America in 2022” and — surprise! — their verdicts were not good. Each essay painted a dire portrait of a country in irreparable decline, coasting toward fascism, with the only uncertainty being how Canada should respond.

Stephen Marche, whom I’d describe as Canada’s most articulate and strident anti-American intellectual, says “the American experiment is failing” with the only question being “how, not if, the republic will end.”

Political scientist Thomas Homer-Dixon thinks he knows, predicting that “by 2030, if not sooner, the country could be governed by a right-wing dictatorship,” adding “some experts believe it could descend into civil war.”

“A terrible storm is coming from the south, and Canada is woefully unprepared,” he concludes.

Columnist John Ibbitson finds a similar opinion at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, whose director he characterizesas saying “Canada’s economic and political leadership must prepare now for the possibility of a postdemocratic America.”

The reason much of this hand wringing comes off as disingenuous — why it’s hard to take Ibbitson seriously when he theatrically states that “a future in which the United States is no longer a stable democracy is not a future any of us want to face” or when Michael Adams, who has been writing books about the superiority of Canadian values for decades, claims “I once saw the United States as a bustling place where exciting developments of all kinds were constantly taking shape” — is because the power of Canada’s patriotic thought leaders have always thrived when fear and hatred of America are at a peak. The American Revolution, Civil War, Vietnam, the war on terrorism, and even covid-19 have all been exploited as opportunities to pump new theories of Canadian exceptionalism, and with it, new, and often highly elitist forms of state power to “protect” Canadians from the troubles to their south.

“ So as long as we’re making wild premonitions about the future, allow me to offer my own: Any scenario in which the United States becomes a “right-wing dictatorship” will almost certainly be swiftly followed by Canada becoming some sort of left-wing dictatorship in response. American fascism would be blamed — as many of the Globe and Mail pundits openly do — on things such as conservative talk radio and Fox News, as well as an excess of “polarization” and disagreement among its politicians.

In response, it’s easy to imagine Canada’s rulers proceeding to ban a generous swatch of “dangerous” opinions from the country’s Internet, airwaves and bookstores, and turning Canadian elections into a sort of Iran-style sham, wherein only carefully screened candidates holding the correct political views are permitted by the state to run. A soothing and paternalistic Big Brother-type leader would propagandize the populace with endless finger-wagging about how good Canadians don’t undermine national unity with naughty “American-style” questions or thoughts.

Canada would become a country with little freedom of speech or political choice, but the oppression would be justified by a compliant media insisting that the American form of dictatorship is worse, and that anyway the only true measure of freedom is a single-payer health-care system and a lot of restrictions on firearm ownership. So long as nobody’s property was seized and taxes didn’t get too high, there’d probably be fairly broad middle-class acceptance of this argument.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2022/01/06/canadian-intellectuals-worry-about-us-becoming-dictatorship-maybe-they-should-worry-about-canada/

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A soothing and paternalistic Big Brother-type leader would propagandize the populace with endless finger-wagging about how good Canadians don’t undermine national unity with naughty“American-style” questions or thoughts.

This has already happened in Canada imo……when was the last time there was an open press conference, without the pmo picking and choosing which organizations could attend, or heaven forbid ask questions that weren’t screened?  Just ask Rebel news….or read through the recent piece on the resignation of a CBC journalist and ask how politically independent the coverage is.

Refer to pgs 44-46 of this thread.

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https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/in-for-a-rough-winter-ottawa-clears-up-confusion-on-trucker-vaccinations-but-shortages-loom

Soldier 101 suggests that Canadians will now over react and make this worse.

Despite protestations from the MBA crew, shortages, hoarding and inflation are traveling companions. Supply lines dwell on either side... they can either be causal or the end result.

In our case, it appears they will become both.

Edited by Wolfhunter
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38 minutes ago, st27 said:

Like so many issues

Yet unlike most of them, this will be noticeable because it will likely effect the masses, and because of that people may ask questions, demand answers and test those answers against the standard of truth they already acknowledge as truth due to life experience. The tendency of doing the worst possible thing at the worst possible moment may get examined in greater depth than it previously has.

That critical examination, in the absence of foundational narrative is usually the missing ingredient... and it's an ingredient that's forged into a tool by selective communication efforts. Nothing is more illustrative of that than gun control initiatives. Were I to apply those initiatives (and the stated reasons for them) to any aviation related subject, the depth of knowledge that exists on this forum would quickly undo my best efforts. 

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8 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

Yet unlike most of them, this will be noticeable because it will likely effect the masses, and because of that people may ask questions, demand answers and test those answers against the standard of truth they already acknowledge as truth due to life experience.

You're dreaming.  The average Canadian will tune in to the CBC and come away blaming Ford, the unvaxxed and Trump for the empty shelves and inflation and their cancelled surgeries.

As you've said many times, the pain needs to be a lot greater than we've seen - pain on the order of starvation and no gas at the pumps not just a little more expensive.

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19 minutes ago, Seeker said:

You're dreaming.  The average Canadian will tune in to the CBC and come away blaming Ford, the unvaxxed and Trump for the empty shelves and inflation and their cancelled surgeries.

As you've said many times, the pain needs to be a lot greater than we've seen - pain on the order of starvation and no gas at the pumps not just a little more expensive.

LOL, you just had to shatter the dream eh?

When I reflect on conversations I've previously had with Greek and Venezuelan colleagues though I'm reluctantly forced to admit that you're right.

Could it possibly be that when it comes to future prospects you are more cynical than I am or did you shatter my dream simply because it existed?

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2 hours ago, Wolfhunter said:

Could it possibly be that when it comes to future prospects you are more cynical than I am 

Depends on the day I would guess.  I've been pessimistic about our chances since I first read Atlas Shrugged at age 17.  In later years reading/learning about the Roman Empire and world history did nothing to change that! I try to put on a brave face, of course.

There's no doubt in my mind that western civilization (as we know it) is doomed.  A few decades or a few centuries - just a question of how long.  The vast majority of human history has been life under oppression and there's no reason to think that we have reached stability simply because the last few centuries have been relatively free for the Western subset of the population of the world.  The priviledge to have lived at this time and in this country is not lost on me as I know it's not the norm.

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I will admit over the course of the last few years, I have become disillusioned and embarrassed with this country. Frankly, , I am not optimistic about its future. Yes, Covid has been an epidemic that has caused chaos for governance but other countries seem to be coping without having government grind to a halt and revert to a basic dictatorship. Our national ability to function has been hampered by ideals that run counter economic success. Covid is being used as a cover for national socialistic welfare programs.
We talk the talk but seemingly cannot follow through, with our present leader becoming a joke on the international stage. Witness our inability to ban Huawei 5g while our allies move ahead, excluding Canada in the process, our promise to extricate the Afghan allies or our promises to NATO. Our military is a shadow of its former self….a navy made up of antiques and an airforce which has 40 year old aircraft as its first line of defence, unable to attract capable recruits. This is illustrated by an ongoing fiasco with the replacement of handguns for the military:

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There is no better example of our atrophied state capacity — the ability (or lack thereof) for Canadian governments to get stuff done — than our decade-long failure to buy a pistol for the Canadian Armed Forces.

The Armed Forces use Browning 9mm pistols as its standard-issue sidearm. Some specialized units use other pistols purchased for a specific purpose in smaller batches, but the Browning 9mm is the standard.

Let’s repeat that for explicit clarity: the pistols in the Canadian military’s inventory were built during the Second World War, which ended, as you may recall, 77 years ago. They are old, they’re worn out, they break down a lot and spare parts are increasingly hard to find.


https://nationalpost.com/opinion/matt-gurney-on-military-sidearms

Our spending is out of control and unsustainable, despite what our deputy pm might say. Our immigration is at record levels (and will continue) while housing prices prohibit citizens from purchasing their first property due to lack of availability. The economy will grind to a halt as people are hit with more and more taxes (trying to satisfy the green policies), the shutdown of our largest resource sector, and the inevitable increase in interest rates back to “normal” levels. 
 

Quote

On average, two of every five Canadian households do not pay anything towards federally and provincially funded expenses such as health care, education, community and social services, national defence, public safety and even the good old Canada Revenue Agency. One household of every five pays much more than 70 per cent of all of those costs.

 

Our present trajectory is unsustainable. Sadly, I’ve lost confidence in the country.

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“ On Monday, Conservative ethics and public services critics demanded to know why the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) secretly accessed location data from 33 million mobile devices, a fact confirmed by the agency in December 2021. MP John Brassard demanded answers for why this was done in secret, who authorized it and with whom the data was shared. PHAC said it did this to monitor Canadians’ movements during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

 

https://globalnews.ca/video/8500659/conservative-ethics-critics-demand-answers-on-phac-location-tracking

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1 hour ago, st27 said:

There is no better example of our atrophied state capacity — the ability (or lack thereof) for Canadian governments to get stuff done — than our decade-long failure to buy a pistol for the Canadian Armed Forces.

The Armed Forces use Browning 9mm pistols as its standard-issue sidearm. Some specialized units use other pistols purchased for a specific purpose in smaller batches, but the Browning 9mm is the standard.

Let’s repeat that for explicit clarity: the pistols in the Canadian military’s inventory were built during the Second World War, which ended, as you may recall, 77 years ago. They are old, they’re worn out, they break down a lot and spare parts are increasingly hard to find.

Appears there is a fix on the way.  

Canadian Military Picks SIG P320 As Its New Pistol, Invites Bids | TheGunBlog.ca. However like most things promised to the CAF, this will only happen in the fullness of time. 🙃

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Appears there is a fix on the way.  

I think this is the problem …the military  knows what it wants…..but politics gets in the way. Look no further than the VA Norman fiasco or the Arctic supply vessel procurement:

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The navy’s Arctic and Offshore patrol ships are going to be delayed and will face cost increases while the delivery of its new supply ships could also fall behind schedule, a new National Defence report on procurement warns.

The price tag for the project had been steadily climbing from $108 million in 2008 to $144 million in 2011 and then to $331 million, according to federal government figures. On Feb. 18, though, the cost to taxpayers for the offshore oceanographic science vessel or OSSV project took its steepest jump yet with new figures showing it had climbed to $966.5 million.

South Africa is constructing a similar oceanographic vessel with an ice-strengthened hull in a project with a budget of around $170 million.

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/more-delays-expected-on-new-navy-ships-dnd-report-warns

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