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Justin Trudeau’s book was republished by a Chinese state-owned company after he became Prime Minister. The Globe and Mail revealed today that Justin Trudeau's book "Common Ground" was released in China through a Chinese Communist Party-owned publisher. 
 

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-the-legend-continues-how-a-state-owned-company-republished-justin/?fbclid=IwAR00-ZxRAPxDvR-6k7tkXCAA55pDGalTVHFgoabdsQRIYWRvzBh0q-cX2hw

 

ECAF68CE-E408-4E13-AEFB-295B521F292A.jpeg

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Not sure what’s happening in your personal circles, but in mine…change IS taking place ..one person at a time, and they are all female aged 60 and up…
 

My dear wife has voted Liberal her entire life…why?….just because…but this time around she has decided not to vote at all in protest. I consider that a win in my mind… For the first time since we met many moons ago my vote won’t be nullified by hers.

Another two very close female friends of ours are switching from Liberal to Conservative.

All have stated they just cannot bring themselves to vote for Trudeau and the Liberal party. 

EVERY male I’ve talked to, all ages groups have been adamantly against Trudeau. :Clap-Hands:

Makes me wonder who or what demographic the polling companies that show Trudeau in the lead are actually polling.

‘Waiting for the only poll that matters to reveal itself Monday night. Going to be a nail biter.
 

??????

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29 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

Not sure what’s happening in your personal circles, but in mine…change IS taking place ..one person at a time, and they are all female aged 60 and up…
 

My dear wife has voted Liberal her entire life…why?….just because…but this time around she has decided not to vote at all in protest. I consider that a win in my mind… For the first time since we met many moons ago my vote won’t be nullified by hers.

Another two very close female friends of ours are switching from Liberal to Conservative.

All have stated they just cannot bring themselves to vote for Trudeau and the Liberal party. 

EVERY male I’ve talked to, all ages groups have been adamantly against Trudeau. :Clap-Hands:

Makes me wonder who or what demographic the polling companies that show Trudeau in the lead are actually polling.

‘Waiting for the only poll that matters to reveal itself Monday night. Going to be a nail biter.
 

??????

An automated polling company called me two days ago. I told them that I was voting for Trudeau. That is how accurate the polls are.

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18 year high in inflation in August !!
 

Pierre Poilievre: The Liberal Party has been taken over by radical leftists


Pierre has been ringing the alarm bell about the threat of hyperinflation for months and his predictions are starting to come true. 

He breaks down the dire economic situation in Canada under Trudeau, including the inflation rate that just an 18-year-high, and makes the case for a free market recovery. 

Pierre doesn’t mince words in his criticism of Trudeau and his central bankers as well as a scathing assessment of the government-funded legacy media. He saves his fiercest words for the Liberal party, who he says have been “taken over by radical leftists who have a state-driven ideolog

https://tnc.news/2021/09/16/pierre-poilievre-the-liberal-party-has-been-taken-over-by-radical-leftists/

 

 

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"Canadians now have the highest level of consumer debt in the world — surpassing the spendthrift Americans. This debt, along with Trudeau’s excessive government debt due to his COVID-19 support giveaways, means that if global interest rates rise a couple of percentage points, Canada will be brought to the brink of bankruptcy."

 

https://financialpost.com/diane-francis/diane-francis-justin-trudeaus-track-record-of-failure?fbclid=IwAR0tfFtflJMwcbm1ji6xLq0t9XAVLKCADsNCxja-8aZrh2ZEE9bvajGZQW4

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Diane Francis: Justin Trudeau's track record of failure

Diane Francis  6 hrs ago

As Canadians go to the polls, it’s important to remind ourselves why Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau should never be prime minister again. Here are my picks, though this is far from a complete list of his government’s botch-ups and scandals.

Perhaps most unforgivably, the Liberals did nothing to crack down on money laundering, ignoring the United Nations’ Financial Action Task Force report on the country’s loopholes, lack of controls and remedies. The result is that illicit funds from abroad have contributed to our high real estate prices, which has made housing unaffordable for Canada’s middle class.

Owing at least partly to higher mortgage debt, Canadians now have the highest level of consumer debt in the world — surpassing the spendthrift Americans. This debt, along with Trudeau’s excessive government debt due to his COVID-19 support giveaways, means that if global interest rates rise a couple of percentage points, Canada will be brought to the brink of bankruptcy.

At the same time, foreign direct investment in Canada has cratered (other than in the case of real estate). “The Trudeau government has experienced the lowest average rates of growth of business investment — in fact, growth has been negative — of the past five prime ministers going back to Brian Mulroney,” wrote the Fraser Institute’s Jason Clemens, Milagros Palacios and Niels Veldhuis in these pages earlier this year.

“What’s even more worrying is that there seems to be no acknowledgement of this problem in Ottawa nor any interest in reversing course on policy to actually encourage and attract business investment to this country.”

Undaunted by the lack of investment, the Trudeau government proposed that Canada increase the number of immigrants it takes in to 400,000 a year. With high unemployment levels, this is a hair-brained scheme devised by a handful of rich Liberals who want Canada’s population to reach 100 million by 2100, which, without sufficient business investment, will ruin Canadian living standards.

So Trudeau gets a failing grade in terms of economic management, but consider some of the other scandals and bungles his government has been involved in:

  • Months of delays in getting vaccines because Trudeau signed a secret deal with China to make vaccines that the Chinese reneged on.
  • Ethical violations involving the WE Charity scandal, another involving the abrogation of the rule of law to mitigate charges against SNC-Lavalin for years of corrupt practices and another one after Trudeau took a luxury holiday freebie from the Aga Khan, whose organization ended up getting millions in grants from Ottawa.
  • The recent $5.2-billion bailout of the Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project in Newfoundland — which should never have been built and will never make money if finished.
  • Millions spent travelling and giving away foreign aid in pursuit of a useless, temporary seat on the UN Security Council.
  • Pledging $2.65 billion at a Commonwealth Leaders Summit to fight climate change even though Canada’s massive wetlands, farmland and vast forests act as a carbon sink.
  • Pledging $840 million to Syria for humanitarian assistance when so many Indigenous reserves in Canada don’t have clean drinking water.
  • Imposing draconian regulations and taxes on oil from Alberta, Saskatchewan and Newfoundland, but not on oil from Saudi Arabia.
  • Imposing tough environmental assessments on new infrastructure projects, except in the case of a cement plant in Quebec.
  • Attempting to hand an unneeded sole-source contract to WE Charity for nearly $1 billion after Trudeau’s mother and brother received around $300,000 from it for speaking gigs.
  • Proroguing Parliament and frustrating any attempts to investigate Liberal mismanagement.

The Trudeau Liberals have a track record of dismal leadership, yet this country has so much talent and potential. It’s time for a change.

Financial Post

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23 hours ago, Jaydee said:

Not sure what’s happening in your personal circles, but in mine…change IS taking place ..one person at a time, and they are all female aged 60 and up…
 

My dear wife has voted Liberal her entire life…why?….just because…but this time around she has decided not to vote at all in protest. I consider that a win in my mind… For the first time since we met many moons ago my vote won’t be nullified by hers.

Another two very close female friends of ours are switching from Liberal to Conservative.

All have stated they just cannot bring themselves to vote for Trudeau and the Liberal party. 

EVERY male I’ve talked to, all ages groups have been adamantly against Trudeau. :Clap-Hands:

Makes me wonder who or what demographic the polling companies that show Trudeau in the lead are actually polling.

‘Waiting for the only poll that matters to reveal itself Monday night. Going to be a nail biter.
 

??????

I sure as hell hope you are in eastern Canada with that welcome bit of news.

For most of us out west, our votes don't mean anything.

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Justin made the decision to ban and extend the ban on cruise ship traffic in Canadian Waters.  Evidenlty did not consider the "Monetary" impact.

Alaska cruise ship bill would have 'devastating' economic impact: B.C. port official

21 hrs ago

VANCOUVER — Two U.S. bills proposed by a congressman and senator aimed at allowing Alaska-bound cruise ships to bypass Canadian ports would have a "devastating" effect on British Columbia's economy, the head of Victoria's harbour authority says.

Alaska cruise ship bill would have 'devastating' economic impact: B.C. port official | CTV News

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18 minutes ago, mo32a said:

^He sure did consider it, it doesn't affect Ontario or Quebec so it doesn't matter.

In actual fact he also screwed Quebec and some Atlantic Provinces. .in addition to BC ,

Port cities in Quebec brace for second year without cruise-ship dollars

https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/port-cities-in-quebec-brace-for-second-year-without-cruise-ship-dollars-1.5298358

Cape Breton and Halifax ports can plan for 2022 season with cruise ship ban ending

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Kelly McParland: Thanks Trudeau, $610 million for an election full of seething regional resentments

Kelly McParland  5 hrs ago

The CBC reports that Justin Trudeau has set another spending record: at $610 million, this election will be the most expensive ever, a full $100 million more than the vote the Liberal leader called just two years ago.

That’s $1.1 billion in total for two campaigns, not a big number for a government that shovels out money as readily as this one. And why not? Trudeau’s six years in power have already given the country the biggest deficits and the deepest debt in 154 years of trying, plunging us into the biggest financial hole in our history. So why not tack on a gold medal in running inconclusive elections?

Anything could happen Monday when the ballots are counted — or maybe it will be Tuesday or Wednesday before the mail-in votes can be tallied — but as of the weekend the 36-day race has the Liberals at 31.4 per cent support, with the Conservatives at 30.9 per cent, according to the national broadcaster’s aggregate of polls, both down slightly in the last hours of the campaign.

That’s half a percentage point, or, in polling terms, nothing. The Liberals could still eke out a victory given how the votes are spread, but it hardly suggests a ringing endorsement of Trudeau’s leadership, or his wisdom in forcing this shambles of a contest. The numbers say the Liberals are less popular at the end of the campaign than they were at the start, less popular still than after the 2019 campaign, and eons less popular than 2015, when Trudeau still came across as young, chipper, eager and hopeful, before the disappointment set in.

Still, $1.1 billion is truly wasted if you don’t get something for it, and we’ve learned some lessons from this exercise. Maybe I should rephrase that: the campaign has offered up some potentially valuable lessons; whether we learn from them is another matter.

One is the sense that the days in which Canadians fetishized their devotion to unity are well and truly dead and buried. The country appears to operate more as a loose alliance of regional interests that co-operate as they see fit depending on what’s in it for them. The Liberal survival system consists of Toronto, Montreal and the Atlantic provinces. Without the 45 seats they get from those two big cities — and maybe two dozen more when you count their closest suburbs — they’d be toast, lucky to cobble together a decent minority, much less a majority.

One entire side of the country — everything west of Ontario — is hostile territory. From Manitoba to Alberta the Liberals barely exist. In British Columbia they’re in third place behind Conservatives and New Democrats. That’s the reason they pour money — borrowing as much as they have to — into those three voter pools. Liberal policies are the policies of Toronto, Montreal and the Atlantic have-nots, mostly expensive urban programs that prioritize the demands of a specific demographic on top of all the pricy services they already receive.

All three major parties, meantime, continue to treat Quebec as a special case, meekly supporting its relentless quest for greater powers. The biggest personality to emerge from this campaign is Quebec Premier Francois Legault, who has established himself as a sort of provincial caudillo, whose party exists nowhere but Quebec and demands no pretense of concern for anything outside the province. Trudeau and Conservative leader Erin O’Toole have fallen all over themselves to keep Legault happy. The Liberal leader pledged an extra $6 billion (on top of $13 billion in equalization) for Legault to spend as he chooses, and then needled O’Toole for hesitating to do the same, forcing the Tory boss to write Legault with a pledge to comply.

Kelly McParland: For Trudeau, it is always the women, like Wilson-Raybould, who are to blame

Kelly McParland: Annamie Paul's shredding of Trudeau on feminism and Afghanistan was impressive

“Within the first 100 days of a Conservative government, I will sit down with you to conclude an agreement that will allow Quebec and Ottawa to attain their respective objectives,” O’Toole wrote . Translation: you’ll get your bribe.

None of the parties show any hint of embarrassment in bowing to Quebec’s eternal demands any more. In the past Ottawa regularly caved to its quest for special treatment, but usually made an effort to at least pretend to resist. No longer. The only mention of Quebec’s Bill 21 — the law that openly discriminates against certain religious groups in public sector jobs — was when Bloc Quebecois leader Yves-François Blanchet got on his high horse that anyone would dare raise the matter at the only English-language debate the party leaders consented to attend. Rather than support the notion of religious freedom, Trudeau, O’Toole and NDP leader Jagmeet Singh all demanded the moderator of the debate apologize to Quebec for the temerity of asking such things.

Blanchet made clear at the debate that he doesn’t care a fig for the rest of the country, and his party’s strength in the province suggests voters feel the same. As the National Post’s Christopher Nardi revealed in an illuminating report, Quebec’s English-speaking minority feels increasingly abandoned by the Liberal party, which it has long supported in return for protection against the relentless incursions of Francophone demands.

“Why is Mr. Trudeau, his cabinet and the Liberal Party of Canada and the Government of Canada abandoning one of its language minorities?” Colin Standish, a Liberal supporter from Quebec, asked Nardi in reference to two new bits of legislation — one from Quebec and one from Trudeau’s Liberals — that seek to further strengthen the imposing wall of defences already protecting the use of French.

The federal Bill asserts that “the French language requires a special approach, including in Quebec,” to ensure its equality to English, while the Quebec law stipulates that Quebec is a nation and French is the only official language. “Equality” in Canada thus means being excluded as an official language in the second most-populous province.

If Premier Jason Kenney weren’t so busy bungling Alberta’s COVID response, he’d be well placed to use Quebec’s conquest of Ottawa to further Alberta’s own festering resentments. Even without Kenney it seems certain western anger will grow. It can hardly do otherwise given eastern attitudes to the region’s crucial resource economy. As it is, Canadians got little indication during the campaign that the worrying state of the economy is something any of the leaders want to deal with. Trudeau famously said he wastes little time worrying about monetary policy, just before federal figures showed inflation surging to an 18-year high. O’Toole responded to every Liberal spending plan by promising one of his own. The notion that “the budget will balance itself” is now official dogma for Liberals and Tories alike, and an irrelevance for the NDP.

The Liberals and Conservatives have each had just one solid federal win in the past 20 years, across six elections. We’ve had four minorities and may be looking at a fifth. Disenchantment, disengagement and distrust dominate an electorate whose faith in Canada’s leadership seems to lessen with each passing intrusion. In 2015 Trudeau vowed to bring in electoral reform, and then reneged on the promise, but voters appear to have done it for him, dividing their hopes among five or six suitors, effectively diluting the authority of whichever party emerges as the putative “winner” and turning governance into a juggling act among competing interests.

Spoilers abound: Maxime Bernier’s looney-right People’s Party of Canada now has as much support as Blanchet’s separatist Bloc, enabling Bernier — without winning a single seat — to undermine O’Toole and potentially hand victory to the Liberal establishment his followers despise. Blanchet will continue to wag the dog from his single-issue redoubt in Quebec, while Singh’s best hope is for a weak Liberal minority beholden to his third-place finish to keep it in office.

All this for $600 million. Money poorly spent. But we’re used to that in Canada, aren’t we?

National Post

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FX traders are falling out of love with the loonie 

The star of the G10 for the first half of the year, Canadian dollar is now the worst performer

The loonie has been one of the worst-performing developed-market currencies in the second half of this year. After outstripping all its Group-of-10 counterparts in the first six months of 2021, it’s fallen 3.6 per cent since June 30. And activity within derivative markets suggests there could be more pain to come for the currency even as the Bank of Canada starts to pave the way for monetary policy tightening.

https://financialpost.com/investing/fx-traders-fall-out-of-love-with-loonie-as-canada-goes-to-polls?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR1Ql9efFOh5FUYUhl7tOiCSRFQoqsSuBxcjB4MZ8zWAgevK16R02FXidjE#Echobox=1632158993

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The Liberal electoral anchor will take Canada down with it 

Trudeau's next budget will be the biggest vote-buying, tax-the-rich document since his father pillaged the oilpatch in 1980

“ What’s apparent is that Canada’s left-wing base of voters is as entrenched as America’s right-wing base of voters. Neither contingent can be budged, even in the face of poor leadership, facts, hazards or smarter alternatives. That’s a formula for decline on both sides of the border.”

 

https://financialpost.com/diane-francis/diane-francis-the-liberal-electoral-anchor-will-take-canada-down-with-it?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR2wPD9ViaglyrHqyx4-nngR_ovc6JYPQaPaoe_O8-MQGxR8t3YqFj4hyl8#Echobox=1632253830

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image.thumb.png.19d9f1a2b22f5162a14546dc1f90451f.png

 

At least the movie Groundhog Day was rewarding

 

  • Calgary Herald
  • 22 Sep 2021
  • TASHA KHEIRIDDIN Tasha Kheiriddin is a Postmedia columnist and principal with Navigator Ltd.
img?regionKey=VqEbqM2p1t5L44T9Sg4lxA%3d%3d  

In 1993, Bill Murray starred in the film Groundhog Day, about a man who wakes up every morning to find that he is back at the start of the previous day, doomed to repeat the same events over and over. Groundhog Day cost $19 million to make 25 years ago, or $36 million in today's dollars: a bargain, when you consider the price of the 2021 version, a.k.a. Canada's 44th federal election, expected to cost more than $600 million. The movie was also a lot funnier, featured less hostility, and had a happier ending.

Let's start with Liberal Prime Minister

Justin Trudeau. While he clung to power, he barely budged the needle: as of midday Tuesday, the Liberals were leading or elected in 158 seats, one more than at the dissolution of the last Parliament. It could have been worse: had they won fewer, the Liberal Party would have likely engaged in a spirited game of knife-the-leader. At 32 per cent of the popular vote, 900,000 fewer than the party got in 2019, the results are a clear indictment of Trudeau's decision to call an election. However, as Maclean's columnist Paul Wells put it, a win's a win, and it's probably a safe bet that Trudeau will not only lead the next government, but lead the party in the next election, whenever that will be.

For Conservative Leader Erin O'toole, it's a different story. Even before all ballots were cast Monday his advisers were spinning the line that keeping Trudeau from a majority would count as a Conservative “victory,” a defeatist message if there ever was one. With 800,000 fewer votes than 2019, the Tories didn't lose as much support as the Liberals did. And they again won the popular vote, with 34 per cent. But their seat count of 119 also

The big question for next time is, will changing the characters alter the plot?

didn't improve (they won 121 in 2019). The question for the party is: was it the message or the messenger? O'toole tried to shift Conservatives to the centre, chasing Liberal voters, but he did so after winning the party leadership by campaigning to the right of his Tory rivals. Alienated right-wingers had other options, such as Maxime Bernier's People's Party of Canada, which combined anti-vaccine and anti-government sentiment to scoop up enough voters to spoil Tory hopes in up to 25 ridings across the country.

Then there's Jagmeet Singh of the NDP.

With the collapse of Annamie Paul's Green party (including Paul losing her own bid for a seat), you'd think the NDP would have made greater gains. But by the most recent count, it had 18 per cent of the popular vote, up from 16 per cent in 2019, and, 25 seats — an increase of just one. It was far from the orange wave Singh hoped to inspire with his innumerable Tiktok clips. The NDP remains a non-factor in Quebec and didn't make headway in the key markets of Toronto and its 905 suburbs, which also explains why the Liberals mostly held on to those ridings. But Singh is likely to stick around, in part because he managed to retain the party's balance of power in the House.

Finally, there's Yves-françois Blanchet of the Bloc Quebecois. In the campaign's last days predictions were rampant of a Bloc surge, driven by a now-infamous English-debate question asked of Blanchet about his support for Quebec's discriminatory secularism and language laws. But instead of a tsunami, the controversy produced a ripple, leaving the party with 34 seats in the new Parliament, well shy of the 40 it sought to capture at the start of the race. Insiders were already grumbling about Blanchet's unpopular position on a proposed underwater tunnel in Quebec; his leadership could be on the line in the months to come.

The big question for next time is, will changing the characters alter the plot? Hopefully, by the next federal election, the pandemic will be in the rear-view mirror, but the crises of affordability, inequality, and division it has fuelled will surely remain. And that's something all parties need to keep in mind as they ponder who their leading man — or woman — should be.

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