Jump to content

Justin Trudeau


Recommended Posts

`An insult to Parliament'

Fast-tracking of C-10 to hit a Senate wall

  • Calgary Herald
  • 18 Jun 2021
  • ANJA KARADEGLIJA

The Liberal government's push to speed up the passage of its controversial broadcasting bill C-10 before Parliament breaks for summer is set to hit a wall at the Senate.

There is no appetite among a majority of senators to fast-track the bill, which they believe needs further study, senators from different groups told the National Post on a background basis.

“There seems to be a broad range of concern with this bill,” Conservative senator Leo Housakos said in an interview, referring to conversations with senators from a variety of Senate caucus groups. “There doesn't seem to be any momentum to pass this and rubber-stamp this without thorough review.”

Sen. Jane Cordy, leader of the Progressive Senate Group, said in an emailed statement that she would “not expect legislation to skip” the study stage, “as it is an important part of the Senate's work.”

The bill, which updates the Broadcasting Act and sets up the CRTC to regulate online platforms like Netflix the way it does traditional broadcasters, raised alarm in late April.

That's when the government removed an exemption for user-generated content, putting Canadians' online posts on platforms like Youtube under the CRTC'S regulatory authority.

Critics said that was an attack on free speech, and that a later amendment by the government to limit the CRTC'S powers over social media content didn't alleviate those worries.

Housakos said he is concerned both about the content of the bill, and the unusual process by which it has been amended in recent weeks. “Over on the House side, the process was completely unacceptable, and it should be deplored by any Canadian,” he said.

The bill has, “along the way, for a variety of reasons, become this multi-headed monster,” he said.

Concern about free speech issues led the House of Commons heritage committee, which was studying the bill, to put its clause-by-clause amendment process on hold. After it resumed, the Bloc Québécois and Liberals voted to limit debate time at committee to make sure the bill would pass through the House of Commons before Parliament recessed for the summer.

It was first time in 20 years the government imposed time allocation on a parliamentary committee.

When the debate time expired, the committee continued to vote on dozens of amendments that were not revealed to the public at the time. The Speaker later voided those amendments and ruled the committee overstepped its authority.

The government and opposition parties have given notice they will be asking for the House to put 22 more amendments back in the bill before the final vote.

Housakos said the Liberal government, along with the NDP and the Bloc, ignored parliamentary procedures and rules. “They took the rule book of Parliament and they literally threw it in the trash can,” he said.

Camille Gagné-raynauld, a spokesperson for Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault, said following the Speaker's ruling that the government remains “committed to the progress of Bill C-10, and will collaborate with all the opposition parties to have it adopted in the House and the Senate before the end of the parliamentary session.”

Housakos said it was “extremely arrogant on the part of Guilbeault's office to imply that they're just going to send this over for a proverbial rubber stamp from the Senate of Canada.

"It's insulting to the institution, it's insulting to our Parliament.”

Asked for comment Thursday about the reluctance of senators to fasttrack the bill, and about Housakos' criticism, Gagné-raynauld said the government would work to have the bill “introduced” in the Senate before the parliamentary session ends.

“We will ensure that the parliamentary process is respected, while ensuring it is done in a timely fashion,” she said.

The Liberal government has been arguing it's critical to pass the bill because it would ensure additional funding for the creative sector, which has been hard-hit by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Guilbeault has accused those opposed to the bill of not wanting to support Canadian artists, and argued that passing the bill would mean an additional $70 million a month for Canada's “broadcasting, audiovisual, music and interactive media sectors.”

He said in a press release earlier this month that instead, those $70 million would “keep flowing into the pockets of foreign tech billionaires.”

Bill C-10 still faces more debate and votes at the House of Commons before it even makes it to the Senate, and there are only four more scheduled sitting days before the end of the parliamentary session.

Housakos said senators should hear from stakeholders that didn't appear at the House committee. For instance, social media platforms didn't appear as witnesses because at the time that study began, they were exempted from regulation.

“My concern will be to call all those stakeholders that originally didn't think it was necessary for them to go before the committee, and make sure that everyone gets a proper hearing,” Housakos said.

“I want to see how we can make this bill a better bill. And quite frankly, there's been so much controversy and concern, ultimately, the question is how can we save this bill and bring it back to what its original objective was,” he said.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So whose fault is it??
 

Who is the tax and spend freak in Canada  **&**&**&8 this country for all time?

 

“More than nine out of 10 surveyed by Angus Reid say that over the past six months it has become more expensive to buy groceries (92%), fill up their vehicle with gas (93%), renovate their home (96%) or buy a new one (95%). “
 

https://financialpost.com/executive/executive-summary/posthaste-inflation-isnt-just-a-number-study-reveals-canadians-are-struggling-with-rising-prices

42CA3B16-6D20-4D8B-A8FD-55538BD43656.jpeg

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Jaydee said:

6E1ADB49-AC30-45C2-ACDA-B699AF542791.jpeg

That is not accurate at all.  The real Trudeau would have included the words; "from coast to coast to coast".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And the current favourites……”every step of the way” and “we have your backs”. Seriously, there must be a memo circulating to all cabinet members to include these phrases in statements to the press..to give the impression the liberals have a handle on this and government will look out for you.

As if they had a plan instead of making up s’lt as they go along.

Quote
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So much for open government

 

  • Calgary Sun
  • 20 Jun 2021
  •  
   

Speaker Anthony Rota last week ruled the Liberals were in contempt of the House of Commons and its committees in one controversy, and of wrongly attempting to ram through amendments to a controversial bill in another.

Meanwhile, the House of Commons censured Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan for mishandling allegations of sexual misconduct in the military. Even for the Liberals, it was a banner week for a government that plays fast and loose with the rules, led by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau who has repeatedly demonstrated his belief that the rules are for little people, not for him.

Two of the three controversies — one in which the Liberals failed to produce documents ordered by the House of Commons and the second in which they attempted to ram amendments into a bill without prior public disclosure — resulted from decisions by the Speaker, who's a Liberal MP.

So much for Liberal claims it's all about partisan politics.

In true Nixonian fashion, the Liberals are claiming national security for refusing to release unredacted documents to the Commons' Canada-china relations committee, related to the firing of two scientists from Canada's highest security lab in Winnipeg in 2019, due to a possible security breach. This despite the fact the opposition parties, who have the majority of votes on the committee, agreed to have the documents vetted by responsible parliamentary officials to ensure no information is released that endangers national security.

As for Liberal attempts to rush through amendments to Bill C-10, their controversial broadcasting legislation that critics say endangers free speech on the internet, that's hardly surprising given that Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault appears to have little idea of what's in his bill and keeps contradicting himself on what it will and won't do.

Sajjan was censured by the opposition parties for mishandling an allegation of sexual misconduct against former chief of defence staff Jonathan Vance, which Trudeau and the Liberals insist was handled properly. Trudeau and Co. are banking on Canadians paying little attention to these controversies when minds are focused on reopening society this summer in the wake of the pandemic.

By doing so, of course, the Liberals continue to mock Trudeau's 2015 election promise of delivering open and transparent government to Canadians.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Kargokings said:

So much for open government

 

  • Calgary Sun
  • 20 Jun 2021
  •  

   

Speaker Anthony Rota last week ruled the Liberals were in contempt of the House of Commons and its committees in one controversy, and of wrongly attempting to ram through amendments to a controversial bill in another.

Meanwhile, the House of Commons censured Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan for mishandling allegations of sexual misconduct in the military. Even for the Liberals, it was a banner week for a government that plays fast and loose with the rules, led by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau who has repeatedly demonstrated his belief that the rules are for little people, not for him.

Two of the three controversies — one in which the Liberals failed to produce documents ordered by the House of Commons and the second in which they attempted to ram amendments into a bill without prior public disclosure — resulted from decisions by the Speaker, who's a Liberal MP.

So much for Liberal claims it's all about partisan politics.

In true Nixonian fashion, the Liberals are claiming national security for refusing to release unredacted documents to the Commons' Canada-china relations committee, related to the firing of two scientists from Canada's highest security lab in Winnipeg in 2019, due to a possible security breach. This despite the fact the opposition parties, who have the majority of votes on the committee, agreed to have the documents vetted by responsible parliamentary officials to ensure no information is released that endangers national security.

As for Liberal attempts to rush through amendments to Bill C-10, their controversial broadcasting legislation that critics say endangers free speech on the internet, that's hardly surprising given that Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault appears to have little idea of what's in his bill and keeps contradicting himself on what it will and won't do.

Sajjan was censured by the opposition parties for mishandling an allegation of sexual misconduct against former chief of defence staff Jonathan Vance, which Trudeau and the Liberals insist was handled properly. Trudeau and Co. are banking on Canadians paying little attention to these controversies when minds are focused on reopening society this summer in the wake of the pandemic.

By doing so, of course, the Liberals continue to mock Trudeau's 2015 election promise of delivering open and transparent government to Canadians.

 

58459E6E-44E5-42F6-B50A-37476A53C580.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In addition to the examples of the current government to ignore the rules of parliament in the previous post, here is another one that isn’t getting much publicity. It involves a challenge to the Order in Council that banned “assault weapons”:

Quote

In a surprise move 10 days before a deadline to produce the material, the government served notice this week that it will not comply with a Federal Court order to provide cabinet documents and records behind the sudden imposition of the sweeping firearm ban.

https://ipolitics.ca/2021/06/18/government-refuses-to-comply-with-court-order-for-cabinet-docs/

Is it because there are no documents and Trudeau did it on a whim for political purposes??

 

Who the f@#k does this guy think he is?? When he said he admires the Chinese dictatorship, people didn’t realize this would become the norm for government here.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, st27 said:

Who the f@#k does this guy think he is?? When he said he admires the Chinese dictatorship, people didn’t realize this would become the norm for government here.

 

C5621BF7-3BA3-40C9-8C7D-9511E9A5CCDD.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, the Liberals are stone walling our government at every opportunity NOT to release documents relating to the firing on the two Canadian scientists…now this….What are they hiding??

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Listening to the liberals in the last couple days, it’s all about the conservatives playing partisan games,  obstructing, delaying and blocking government from serving Canadians.

This should be required reading for voters before we go into another election:

Quote

On top of this, no one wanted a lockdown election, and the Liberals knew it. Consequently, they behaved more like a majority government than a minority one, ramming through a leviathan budget bill , shutting down debate on Bill C-10’s changes to the Broadcasting Act, and tabling sweeping changes to the Official Languages Act days before Parliament was set to recess for the summer.

 

They behaved more like a majority government than a minority one

 

 

Canadians were also treated to the bizarre spectacle this week of a Health Canada official being summoned to the House to provide documents that the government refused to disclose, about the firing of two Chinese microbiologists from a government lab in Winnipeg two years ago. Health Minister Patty Hajdu claimed that national security issues prevented the release of the documents; the Opposition parties suspect that embarrassing the government, at a time when Canada’s relationship with China is under serious scrutiny, is the real concern.

 

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/tasha-kheiriddin-trudeau-will-probably-miss-our-unaccountable-pandemic-parliament

And no wonder sockboy doesn’t want to release documents re Chinese scientists working at our top labs, it might reflect badly on our new relationship badly with the communist regime he so admires:

Quote

The high-profile scientist who was fired from Canada’s top infectious disease lab collaborated with Chinese government scientists on inventions registered in Beijing, but closely related to her federal job, intellectual property documents indicate.

Xiangguo Qiu, who’s also under investigation by the RCMP, is listed as an inventor on two patents filed by official agencies in China in recent years.

Qiu was a long-time federal civil servant when the patents were registered in 2017 and 2019 for innovations related to the Ebola and Marburg viruses, key focuses of her work at Winnipeg ’s National Microbiology Laboratory.

Qiu’s ouster from the lab remains cloaked in mystery and has been the subject of ongoing debate in Parliament, as opposition parties try, largely in vain, to obtain information on why she and husband Keding Cheng — another scientist at the lab — were let go.

Qiu had extensive dealings with China and Chinese scientists in recent years, including repeated trips to the Wuhan Institute of Virology, a “level-four” disease lab like Winnipeg’s.

Qiu immigrated from China in 1996 with medical and immunology degrees and worked at the NML since at least 2003. With colleagues there, she helped develop an Ebola treatment based on so-called “monoclonal antibodies,” which became part of a drug called Z-Mapp. For that work she was awarded the Governor General’s innovation award in 2018 — the year between the two China patents.

 

 

Oh, and let’s not forget the financial mess the country is in, courtesy of sockboys largesse.

  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And now that parliament has recessed for the summer, we have yet another scandal (at least in my opinion)..no wonder the turd wasn’t answering questions !!

And it wasn’t just butts and telford that oozed over from the provincial debacle:

Quote

Data Sciences Inc., a firm owned by a close friend of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, was contracted by the Ontario Liberal Party and paid hundreds of thousands of dollars via taxpayer funds over a period of five years.

Data Sciences is owned by Tom Pitfield, one of Trudeau’s friends since childhood. The firm’s former president, Azam Ishmael, has been national director of the federal Liberal Party since 2017. He also held various positions with the federal and Ontario Liberal parties on voter identification and digital platforms.

 

From 2014 through 2016, Ishmael was executive director of the Ontario Liberal Caucus Services Bureau. It was at this time that Data Sciences began showing up in the public accounts as a contractor for the Liberal Party at Queen’s Park.

A total of $808,308 of taxpayer’s money was paid to Data Sciences between 2014 and the 2018-2019 fiscal year when the Liberals lost power. The payments were made from the Ontario Legislative Assembly to the firm and were listed as caucus support for the Liberals.

The connections between the firm and the Liberal Party came to light earlier this week when the Globe and Mail first reported that more than $30,000 was paid by federal Liberal MPs to the firm. That amount is from fourth-quarter filings by individual MPs for the 2020-21 fiscal year.

 

Changes to reporting requirements revealed these payments but any previous payments from public coffers to the firm have not been disclosed. It’s likely the amount paid from federal coffers is larger than what was paid by Ontario taxpayers.

According to sources, the federal Liberals have been using the firm Data Sciences since at least 2016 if not earlier. A total of 149 Liberal MPs, or 97% of the party’s caucus, have signed up for contracts with the firm. The Liberals say it is for constituency services though some MPs aren’t sure what they get for the money.

Data Sciences was also used by the Trudeau Liberals in the 2015 and 2019 election campaigns with several members of the company’s staff joining the campaign. Pitfield himself is credited with running the Liberal digital operations in both campaigns that successfully targeted voters using their online footprint.

 

The connections between Pitfield, Trudeau and the Liberals runs very deep.

Pitfield’s father, Michael, was clerk of the Privy Council, the top civil servant in the country under Pierre Trudeau. It was through this close connection that Tom Pitfield and Justin Trudeau became friends with a bond that has lasted to this day.

Pitfield and his wife, Anna Gainey, a former Liberal Party president, were guests of the Trudeau family when they vacationed on the Aga Khan’s private island. In 2006, Pitfield helped found Canada 2020, a left-leaning think tank that also has given positions to close associates of Trudeau from former staffers, to spouses of friends and associates.

Canada 2020 has been described by Maclean’s Magazine as “the ‘progressive’ think tank that really runs Canada.” It only gets to run Canada if it helps keep Trudeau in power, which helps keep taxpayer money flowing to companies like Data Sciences and think tanks like Canada 2020.

 

Asked about all of this in the House of Commons, Trudeau called it all unfair attacks. That prompted Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole to hold up contracts between Data Sciences and the offices of two ministers — Seamus O’Regan and Marc Miller.

Miller and O’Regan were members of Trudeau’s wedding party, just like Tom Pitfield.


And people are too pre occupied with Covid to g a s about another scandal …. it’s just those conservatives playing petty partisan games…

 

We get the government we deserve.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now this is unprecedented:

 

Quote

Liberals take House Speaker to court to block release of unredacted records about fired scientists…….

The Liberal government is taking the House of Commons Speaker to court, in an unprecedented move to prevent the release of uncensored documents to members of Parliament that offer insight into the firing of two scientists from Canada’s top infectious-disease laboratory. The government said in a court filing that the disclosure of this information could not only jeopardize national security but also, possibly, Canada’s international relations. The Attorney-General’s office filed an application in Federal Court on Monday requesting that information demanded by Speaker Anthony Rota on behalf of the House of Commons stay secret.

The legal challenge against a ruling of the House stunned opposition MPs, who were notified about the court application late Wednesday afternoon. An order of the House backed by a majority of MPs last Thursday called on the Public Health Agency to produce records it has been withholding from a Commons committee for months. Mr. Rota called the court action an “urgent matter” and vowed to vigorously fight the government, saying House of Commons law clerk Philippe Dufresne will prepare a legal defence. “The Speaker’s Office will defend the rights of the House. That is something I take very seriously,” Mr. Rota said. “The legal system does not have any jurisdiction over the operations of the House. We are our own jurisdiction. That is something we will fight tooth and nail to protect and we will continue to do that.” Conservative House Leader Gérard Deltell said he was taken aback that the Trudeau government would go to the federal court to challenge parliamentary privilege. “If the government does not respect the orders of the House of Commons, why should Canadians’ respect laws voted upon by the House of Commons?” he said. In the court filing, the government said the disclosure of the unredacted information would be “injurious to international relations or national defence or national security.” Mr. Dufresne told MPs before a Commons committee Wednesday that “to his knowledge” the Canadian government has never before gone to court to try to elude an order of the House to produce documents.

 

He said the House “has exclusive authority” when it comes to matters that fall under parliamentary privilege. Justice Minister and Attorney-General David Lametti distanced himself from the court proceeding, saying officials in his department evoked a section of the Canada Evidence Act that is often used in national-security matters to keep sensitive information tightly under wraps. “As Attorney-General that decision has been delegated to department officials as is the normal course, so it is not going to be a decision that is partisan in any way,” he said. “I will never play politics with national security.” For months, opposition MPs have been seeking unredacted records from the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), that explain why Xiangguo Qiu and her husband, Keding Cheng, were fired from the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg. The two scientists lost their security clearances, and the RCMP was called into investigate, in July, 2019. They were dismissed in January. More than 250 pages of records have been withheld in their entirety and hundreds of others have been partly censored before being provided to MPs. They also relate to the March, 2019 transfer of deadly virus samples to the Wuhan Institute of Virology that was overseen by Dr. Qiu. On Monday, PHAC President Iain Stewart was called before the Commons and admonished by the Speaker for his repeated refusal to provide the requested records to MPs on the special committee on Canada-China relations, including information on the transfer of Ebola and Henipah viruses to the Wuhan facility. MPs had put in safeguards that would require the Commons law clerk to review the documents and redact information that could harm national security or a criminal investigation before making them public. However, Mr. Stewart notified the Attorney-General’s office on Sunday night that “sensitive or potentially injurious information” could be disclosed if he obeyed the order of the House of Commons. Former House of Commons law clerk Rob Walsh said the Federal Court should deny the Trudeau government’s request. “If the court is cognizant of parliamentary privilege, which is not always the case … then the government’s application won’t succeed,” he said. “This is House business; it’s not the court’s place to interfere.” He said the government may try to argue that there is a committee created by statute – the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians (NSICOP) – which has clearance to read confidential documents. NSICOP, however, is not a committee of Parliament and is under the control of the Prime Minister’s Office. “The answer back to that of course is that statutory committees do not take priority over … the rights of the House.” Mr. Rota was expected to rule on a motion on Wednesday to instruct the Commons sergeant-at-arms to search PHAC offices and seize unredacted documents. However, the Speaker told MPs that he needed more time to provide a thoughtful ruling as the House adjourned for the summer break. If an election is called before Parliament resumes sitting on Sept. 20, Mr. Rota said it would be up to the next Speaker to decide whether to proceed with the ruling. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told Question Period Wednesday that he was willing to work with opposition parties to find a compromise. On Monday, Government House Leader Pablo Rodriguez said the government was prepared to allow the Commons law clerk to examine hundreds of censored documents under oversight from national-security officials. Mr. Rodriguez also suggested MPs could also use a process followed in 2010, when the Harper government allowed a group of MPs and a panel of arbiters to determine what information could be made available to the Commons about the Canadian military’s transfer of Taliban prisoners. The government previously said it would only turn over unredacted documents to NSICOP, which does not report to the House. Mr. Trudeau has the power to prevent the committee from releasing information to the public.

 

Like SNC, WE, Gropegate, and the sex assault….when the libs go to these lengths, there must be something that threatens their political career.

The last line of the article makes a joke of the liberal claim they have released the unredacted documents to a national security committee…..unlike a parliamentary committee, Trudeau decides what info is released!!

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Liberal government targets Muslim charities

Trudeau's anti-hate message comes up empty, Dr. Mukarram Zaidi writes.

  • Calgary Herald
  • 25 Jun 2021
  •  

Last week's vigil in London, Ont., for the victims of an Islamophobic mass murder drew many leaders who expressed solidarity with the Muslim community. Chief among them was Prime Minister Justin Trudeau himself, who reassured everyone that his Liberals are crusaders against hate.

But his message does not line up with recent media reports that his government has presided over some of the worst targeting of Muslim charities in Canadian history.

Yes, it's true. The government that has spoken against Islamophobia for years has quietly and consistently continued to dismantle Muslim organizations doing good work and that are dependent on charitable status to function, a direction that started under the Harper government.

Revoking this status, among other tactics, has been a common way to “keep the Muslims in check” after 9/11. The government kicked it into high gear in 2015 when the Department of Finance released a “National Risk Assessment (NRA)” that arbitrarily determined, without providing much by way of evidence or allowing any public debate, that a “nexus in Canada” exists in connection to Islamist terrorist financing.

The result? The CRA has been going to town on Muslim charities, including mosques and relief organizations, to look for this “nexus” with an aggression that amounts to Islamophobia.

A major report by the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group — a coalition of civil society organizations — details how the CRA'S Charities Directorate and Review and Analysis Division (RAD) have, with impunity, selected Muslim organizations based on their faith and revoked their status while presenting flimsy evidence. Since coming to power, the Liberals pumped money into the RAD division, which then revoked the charitable status of at least four major Muslim organizations from 2016-2019 — a pretty alarming rate compared to the six they shafted between 2008-2015. None of these groups has ever been charged with giving terrorists money, but the RAD division doesn't have to explain itself, which means that for some of these organizations they can't even see the evidence marshalled against them.

So much for due process.

It's misleading to call any of this a huge revelation.

The University of Toronto and the National Council of Canadian Muslims (NCCM) recently published their own independent report on how the CRA undertakes “random” tax audits that undermine Muslim-led charities while providing “evidence” that looks a lot like age-old Islamophobic stereotypes. The Muslim community has long claimed that the CRA'S audit practices are biased and their revocations are killing valuable resources relied upon by the most vulnerable or the community at large.

Needless to say, this doesn't do much for trust between community members and the government. They're much more likely to accuse government institutions of perpetuating the same ideas and assumptions that contribute to an Islamophobic climate, which in turn fuels anti-muslim hate.

For years the government has relied upon the Muslim community to help in combating extremism and radicalization. By suffocating the community by revoking respected organizations and destroying the reputation of its leadership, the government is sending the wrong message that “all Canadian Muslim institutions are a threat until proven otherwise.”

So how do we get out of this mess? Well, it all comes down to accountability. The government created the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians (NSICOP) in 2018 and the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA) in 2019 with the explicit purpose of keeping a closer eye on Canada's security apparatus. According to the ICLMG report, the RAD division works closely with security agencies and has its own surveillance activities, but neither of these entities have done much to oversee how RAD picks its targets and how it does its job.

The RAD division needs to stop its audit of Muslim charities pending an independent investigation and review of its conduct. Genuinely random audits should obviously continue, but the pretence of “randomly” selecting Muslim-led organizations for audits needs to end. Additionally, audit findings must be based on credible evidence. Blog articles by conspiracy theorists and Islamophobes don't count. Organizations must be given adequate opportunity to rebut the evidence against them.

The same goes for that deeply harmful 2015 NRA, which basically gave RAD a green light to swipe at Muslim charities. It's due for a public review and debate. Such sweeping mandates should be regularly reviewed, along with the RAD and the CRA'S other anti-terrorism activities.

These are basic asks for a government that courts the Muslim vote with so much enthusiasm. It can't be allowed to get away with perpetuating hidden, entrenched and systemic Islamophobia while Justin Trudeau continues to reassure everyone that things are running perfectly fine.

Dr. Mukarram Zaidi serves as the chairman of Calgary-based Think for Actions, the chairman of Canadian Muslim Research Think Tank, and the general secretary for Calgarians Against Racism, Violence and Hate. Dr. Zaidi practices family medicine in Calgary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

More Sunny ways from our elected dictator….don’t want any messy details getting in the way of his re-election strategy:

Quote

Cabinet refuses to release “millions of pages” of documents on pandemic mismanagement in defiance of a House order, the Commons health committee was told. The Commons’ lawyer said cabinet aides simply stopped handing over records though a deadline for full disclosure expired last December 7: ‘At this rate it will take 58 years.’ 

This content is for Blacklock’s Reporter members only. Please login to view this content. (Register here

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Jaydee said:

Please tell that you see that we’ve thrown away our children’s freedom?


If we have to obey and inject ourselves to recover a small portion of the freedoms we were once guaranteed then we never really had those freedoms to begin with.. A nation of cowards will get their due at some point very unfortunately.

It makes me sick to think about😣

Edited by Eddy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So much for Trudeau's pledge to be open and transparent

 

  • Calgary Sun
  • 27 Jun 2021
  • LORNE GUNTER lgunter@postmedia.com @sunlornegunter
img?regionKey=holCG8p9HMilO9QKkG4c9Q%3d%3dCANADIAN PRESS FILES  

The Liberal government is suing the House of Commons and the Speaker to prevent MPS from getting their hands on documents pertaining to the firing of two scientists with connections to China from their jobs at Winnipeg's National Microbiology Lab.

No one, not even the librarian of Parliament, can find an example of the cabinet of the day defying a directive of Parliament to disclose documents, then taking Parliament to court to prevent the papers' release.

Talk about a lack of transparency. This is the lead-shielding of government decisions in the extreme.

And it is the ultimate hypocrisy from a government that campaigned in 2015 on the promise of being the most open government in Canadian history.

Justin Trudeau charged that his predecessor, Stephen Harper, had operated the “most secretive, divisive and hyper-partisan government in Canada's history.”

If elected, Trudeau pledged his Liberals would “make information more accessible by requiring transparency to be a fundamental principle across the federal government.”

“We will clean up Harper's mess,” Trudeau boasted.

Now his government is doing something Harper never dreamed of — suing the very core institution of our democracy in order to keep secret the RCMP'S and CSIS'S findings about just what information Dr. Xiangguo Qiu and her husband, Keding Cheng, may have shipped from Canada's most sensitive lab to the Wuhan Institute of Virology, the Chinese government lab many suspect was the source of the COVID pandemic.

The Trudeau government won't even divulge whether Qiu and Cheng were Canadian, only saying the pair were legally entitled to work in Canada during their tenure in our most secret lab.

Of course, it was Iain Stewart, the head of the Public Health Agency of Canada, which runs the lab (and employs Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada's Chief Public Health Officer) who was summoned before Parliament this week for a reprimand, the first such “shaming” of a civil servant in over a century.

But that is just the tip of the Liberals' contempt-for-parliament iceberg.

It was reported this week by Blacklock's Reporter, that the Trudeau government is also refusing to turn over “millions of documents” on its handling of the pandemic — including its very slow acquisition of vaccine. The papers were requested by the Commons Health committee for last December, but apparently ministerial aides and civil servants have just stopped complying, presumably because if the Liberals win a majority they will then be able to reverse the committee's demand.

The Liberals bristle with contempt for Parliament, the Speaker, MPS and, ultimately, for the people those institutions represent — Canadians.

When a government defies the Commons, it also defies Canadian citizens.

But neither of these examples is anything new for the Trudeau Liberals.

There is also the way the Liberals rammed through Bill C-10, their internet regulation bill, using gag tactics not employed in a quarter century. And their new censorship bill, introduced but not passed in the final hours of Parliament, restricts free speech even more tightly than C-10.

Prime Minister Trudeau also prorogued Parliament last spring to avoid the controversy over the WE Charities, then kept it from meeting in-person during a national emergency.

In 2008, when then-prime Minister Harper prorogued Parliament to prevent the Liberals and NDP from conspiring with the separatists to overturn the results of that year's election, several academics signed an open letter claiming “no Prime Minister has so abused the power to prorogue.”

But curiously, when Trudeau commits far worse abuses of power (let's not forget Snc-lavalin), most of those same “experts” seemingly shrug it off.

And all of this while the Liberals are a minority. Imagine how much worse it will be if they win a majority this fall, as they almost surely will.

The Liberals bristle with contempt

for Parliament, the Speaker, MPS and, ultimately, for the people those

institutions represent — Canadians. When a government defies the Commons,

it also defies Canadian citizens.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I can only imagine his reaction if instead two Mosques had been burnt to the ground 


 

“ Justin Trudeau has expressed frustration that Pope Francis has declined to offer an apology for the Catholic church’s role in residential schools.

“As a Catholic, I am deeply disappointed by the position that the Catholic church has taken now and over the past many years,” the prime minister said earlier this month. “We expect the church to step up and take responsibility for its role in this and be there to help with the grieving and healing, including with records.”

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jun/22/canada-church-fires-first-nation-reserves

 

 

74376B46-71C0-4E18-945A-B1717325AD3F.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...