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Justin Trudeau


Jaydee
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1 hour ago, Kargokings said:

And you forgot, Quebec being blessed to become a separate nation by Justin and Kenney. 

I’m all for letting Quebec separate. (and sadly I have family there, though I’m pretty sure they would move back under those conditions.)
 

If it had been up to me Quebec would have been given a “ Good-bye, Seeya “  and don't  let the loss of Equalization payments bite ya on the ass on your way out the door.

 Canada would have been a much wealthier/saner/content nation for it.

Edited by Jaydee
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34 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

I’m all for letting Quebec separate. (and sadly I have family there, though I’m pretty sure they would move back under those conditions.)
 

If it had been up to me Quebec would have been given a “ Good-bye, Seeya “  and don't  let the loss of Equalization payments bite ya on the ass on your way out the door.

 Canada would have been a much wealthier/saner/content nation for it.

Such wisdom is impossible to refute.  But if that had happened, this topic still might be entitled "Justin Trudeau" since he was born in Ottawa  and his mother was born in Vancouver (married to Pierre in North Vancouver.  ?

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1 hour ago, Kargokings said:

entitled "Justin Trudeau"

Make no mistake about Justin…the only province that matters to him is Quebec…the rest of us are simply conduits to feed the monster.  

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2 hours ago, Jaydee said:

Make no mistake about Justin…the only province that matters to him is Quebec…the rest of us are simply conduits to feed the monster.  

You are saying that Ontario doesn't count. I believe you are wrong because without Ontario, he would be toast.

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11 hours ago, Kargokings said:

You are saying that Ontario doesn't count. I believe you are wrong because without Ontario, he would be toast.

I am saying he plays Ontario and any other Liberal province like a fiddle to get what he wants for Quebec.. Liberal Ontarians are simply useful idiots. There’s a reason  why most immigrants have settled in Ontario. It’s common knowledge how they vote. They could also care less about Quebec politics as long as they get promised legal status.

” Ontario was the province with the most immigrants in 2020, with 139,071 immigrants arriving between July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020.“

Add the previous 4 years to the total and that makes one huge voting block when it counts.

None of the above is any secret as Canadians just don’t care…but they will someday. 

 

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In Alberta there is a town called Bruderheim, where there is a large German-speaking population.


One day, a local rancher driving down a country road noticed a man using his hand to drink water from the rancher's stock pond.

The rancher rolled down the window and shouted: "Sehr angenehm! Trink das Wasser nicht. Die kuehe haben darein geschissen."

This means: “Glad to meet you! Don't drink the water. The cows have shit in it."

The man shouted back: "I'm from Montreal and am down here campaigning for Trudeau. I can't understand you. Please speak in English."

The rancher replied: "Use both hands."

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Kelly McParland: Justin Trudeau's constitutional smorgasbord for the nation

Pierre Trudeau’s famous putdown of Conservative rival Joe Clark — that Clark’s vision of Canada would have Ottawa play “head waiter to the provinces” — was one of those taunts he was so good at: derisive, haughty and insulting, but also effective. It made Clark look small and blinkered, as opposed to Trudeau’s grand view of a more ambitious country

But it may be that Trudeau’s son, the current prime minister, is bringing Clark’s version of Canada to fruition, given his ready agreement that Quebec can unilaterally alter the Constitution his father introduced, by simply moving to do so.

One notable result of Pierre Trudeau’s initiative was to generate a rich and reliable income source for constitutional lawyers and experts of various stripes — Lord knows how many cottages have been paid for out of court challenges to obscure codes and codicils — and the constitutional industry is already weighing in eagerly on the current Trudeau’s position. To those of us who aren’t recognized authorities, however, one outcome seems clear enough.

If Quebec can change the Constitution at will, it follows that other provinces can do so as well. That opens the way for 10 provinces and three territories, each deciding which individual items they will select from the constitutional menu.

It’s hard not to imagine Alberta will want to quickly place its order; it’s already planning a referendum on the equalization system, which it deems grossly unfair and in need of change. Equalization will send $13 billion to Quebec this year and next, and nothing to Alberta despite a bitter recession now in its fifth year. Equalization is protected by the Constitution, but Trudeau’s eager acquiescence to Quebec’s claim suggests the Liberal government is open to ignoring such things. Besides, there’s always the handy notwithstanding clause, which already allows provinces to ignore the document any time it proves inconvenient to provincial plans.

There are other complications, of course. Quebec maintains it can declare itself a nation, and set French as the only official language, because the Constitution allows such things on matters pertaining specifically to an individual province. You don’t need to be a paid expert to realize there are years’ worth of arguments — and legal fees — to be made out of fighting out whether Quebec’s determination to identify as a nation actually makes it a nation, and whether that could be said to have no relevancy to the rest of the country. As Calgary Herald columnist Don Braid noted, “The only province that has never agreed to the 1982 Constitution will change it with no approval from nine provinces that accepted it.”

Once Quebec and Alberta have their own individual constitutional  dishes, it’s inconceivable that others wouldn’t follow suit. For instance, once English has been officially demoted to secondary status, and Anglo-Quebecers along with it, the desirability of protecting French services in other provinces fades considerably. It’s expensive and it only serves a minority of people; if minority Anglos don’t rate equal status in Quebec, why should minority Quebecers deserve special status elsewhere?

Personally I have no beef with Quebec, which operates like a canny financier constantly on the lookout for opportunities it can seize on to turn a profit. Or, to use the inevitable hockey analogy, Quebec premiers are like coaches skilled at dissecting opposing defences for flaws to be exploited. You can’t blame it for wanting to protect itself, and you have to admire its determination to protect the unique culture it has created for itself. It would be nicer if it wasn’t constantly doing so at the expense of the rest of the country, but given Ottawa’s willingness to regularly give ground, why not take what’s on offer?

One characteristic that has emerged over Justin Trudeau’s five years as prime minister is a failure to think things through. Whether through reluctance or inability, it has surfaced time and again. The trip to the Aga Khan’s island. The botched visit to India. The eager trade advances to China, and the naive faith in its willingness to jointly develop a vaccine. The scandals over SNC-Lavalin, WE Charity and sexual misconduct in the military. His ongoing faith that Canada can borrow billions to satisfy short-term aims because existing conditions are favourable, without concern that conditions never stay the same forever, and unexpected events regularly intervene.

His eagerness to embrace Quebec’s latest demands show all the same hallmarks. Appeasing the province’s voters should benefit the party’s chances when Liberals seek re-election. It eliminates a confrontation Trudeau would like to avoid, given his popularity has been battered by the COVID crisis while Premier Francois Legault’s handling of the pandemic has made him the most untouchable provincial leader in the country. Legault would easily win a new majority if a vote were held today, while Trudeau has spent months manoeuvring in search of a safe moment to risk an election. He needs a majority, since a second successive minority might be enough to unleash doubts among party members who figure he’s already been granted enough second chances.

Thinking too deeply about the consequences of his Quebec concessions might complicate matters. Given Canada’s 600-plus First Nations, the prospect of an official Nation of Quebec, the potential for moves towards a Nation of Alberta, and the scramble for nationhood that could unleash, Canada’s future looks less like a menu of choices with Ottawa serving as head water, and more like an all-you-can eat smorgasboard with everyone stuffing themselves on whatever they can get.

@kellymcparland

 

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On 5/22/2021 at 11:53 AM, Jaydee said:

I’m all for letting Quebec separate. (and sadly I have family there, though I’m pretty sure they would move back under those conditions.)

Me three

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It’s all hypothetical but at some point it in the past, it was pointed out that an argument could be made in a separation, Quebec would only be entitled to the historical land area of settlement, which is about 100 miles either side of the St Lawrence River. The rest belongs to Indigenous/First Nations......

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Trudeau le québécois

Paul Wells  8 hrs ago

Everyone’s wondering, yet again, what Justin Trudeau’s game is in Quebec. I doubt he’d have it any other way. Here’s my best attempt to discern the Prime Minister’s thinking on what will probably be the main battlefield of the next federal election. I will need to go into some detail. Settle in.

Trudeau le québécois - Macleans.ca

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“ Mr. Singh came out this weekend, from behind Justin Trudeau’s chair “

 

“ However Mr. Singh came out this weekend, from behind Justin Trudeau’s chair, to explain to Canadians that Quebec unilaterally amending the whole of the Canadian Constitution is quite fine with him and his party. And his logic was impeccable. It amounted to declaring it OK because it is Quebec that is proposing the amendment.

Which leads to the corollary that were it any other province — particularly Alberta — it would be an unthinkable assault on the very foundations of Canadian governance, and for that matter, Canadian history.”

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-singh-takes-a-leap-beyond-logic-on-quebecs-constitutional-superpowers

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From abroad, Canada looks like a country drowning in its own self-pity 

What I’ve been reading about Canada has seemed puzzling, to say the least, and often outright absurd.

MIRAMAR BEACH, INDIA — I’ve spent my entire life living beyond a 10,000-kilometre radius of Canada, so you’ll have to forgive me if I never cared too much about what you people were up to. But a couple of years ago, my sons started school in Canada and I began to ping Google News Canada (and read the National Post) as avidly as I consumed the media in Goa, the sleepy, tropical beach-side state where I live in India. And what I’ve been reading about Canada has seemed puzzling, to say the least, and often outright absurd.

The most recent item that caught my attention was last week, when the mayor of Vancouver apologized for the brief hand-cuffing of a Black retired B.C Supreme Court justice, due to a case of mistaken identity

Apologizing for a mistake is wonderful. But declaring without investigation that it’s clearly the result of “systemic racism” is strange. And then adding the astonishing statement that, “As someone who continues to benefit from colonialism, I recognize my privilege,” boggles the mind.

Canada itself was created out of a colonization of the land. But did Canada ever colonize any country in the world? Nope. And unless I missed a news flash, there is currently no country in the world that’s colonized by another, much less Canada (despite what I hear some Quebecois say).

Even if the English team beats India in cricket (which happens very rarely, huh!), none of the half a billion Indian fans whine that it is because the English “continue to benefit from colonialism,” despite our 200-year history of subjugation.

Yet Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart “continues to benefit from colonialism”? This is a man who came from a family that lost their home and went bankrupt, yet still managed to get a degree at Acadia University. He moved from Nova Scotia to British Columbia in 1989 with only $100 in his pocket and worked his way up to become an academic, a member of Parliament and then mayor of one of Canada’s largest cities. He appears to have done this through hard work and determination, not by exploiting colonialism or Canada’s Indigenous peoples.

Does he even know how he benefits from colonialism? And if so, why doesn’t he stop?

I was astonished when, a few years ago, a delightfully warm-hearted woman I’ve known since she was a teenager — and who immigrated to Canada in her 30s — started complaining about racism in Canada. It was especially perplexing given the fact that she stood for election and is currently an elected representative in a provincial government.

Think about this: she’s become a political and social leader in a country she moved to as an adult, had no ethnic connection to, did not belong to the majority religion and did not even have English as her first language growing up.

I’d like to underline that there is absolutely no chance — none whatsoever — that I could get elected in the legislature of the state where I live in India, because my family is originally from a different state.

Reflect on this: no one has any chance of getting elected (which is why no one in the past 20 years has) in my state if she’s from another state in the same country; yet this woman — who lived a majority of her life in India — thinks Canada is racist?

I’ve been increasingly worried that Canadian culture has become a petri dish for such thinking, ever since my sons started school there.

I checked the holiday calendar issued by the Peel District School Board in Ontario and noticed that a remarkable number of days were marked with esoteric religious holidays. The Ninth Day of Ridvan of the Baha’i faith is listed, as is Farvadegan of Zoroastrianism.

Since there are only about 100,000 adherents of Zoroastrianism in the world (of which 70,000 are in India) I’m unsure how many have found their way to Canada. But I can’t imagine there’s too many of them in Peel Region. Why do Canadians accept that a public school board in a secular country that’s 65 per cent Christian should be commemorating holidays of religions that hardly anyone in the country adheres to?

I didn’t plan on sending my sons to Canada for school, as I am very proud of the richness of the 2,000-year-old Indian civilization, including its languages, history, culture, literature and cuisine. But since that’s the way the dominoes of fate fell, I became keen in anticipation of what they would learn in Canada.

I’d hoped they would imbibe the rugged sportiness, the quiet sense of civic pride and social service, as well as the cheery optimism that Canadians were rightfully renowned for. All of which I’d seen and loved in Kevin Hawryluk, a Vancouver native who’d helped me kick-off one of my first startups.

In short, I was looking forward to my sons becoming more Canadian in Canada. But every week seems to bring a new episode in the unending TV series that should be called “Canada’s Got Stupid!” Now I worry that they are distanced from all that is wonderful in India, and instead are immersed in the worst of Canada.

National Post
GJ@Prototyze.com

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/gourav-jaswal-from-abroad-canada-looks-like-a-country-drowning-in-its-own-self-pitty

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21 hours ago, Kargokings said:

image.thumb.png.69cd108894b4eec3e97c3462a0175c33.png

Bloc Québécois fails to pass motion on Quebec nationhood, constitutional change

"before you start cheering, it was only a nay by one member, and only because of a procedural error"  

14 hrs ago

 

OTTAWA — The Bloc Québécois failed to unanimously pass a motion recognizing Quebec's right to unilaterally change the Constitution in line with proposed reforms to the province's language law.© Provided by The Canadian Press

Leader Yves-François Blanchet tabled a motion Wednesday in the House of Commons asking lawmakers to recognize that right, but confronted a single, critical "nay" from a lone member of Parliament.

Independent MP Jody Wilson-Raybould scuppered the unanimity required for a motion tabled without official notice.

In a Twitter post minutes later, she said political partisanship and "pandering" have led lawmakers "to abandon core legal norms" and debate on constitutional issues.

As a "proud (First Nations) woman I'm always ready 2 discuss Nationhood & language," she wrote, calling the parties' deference to the Bloc "dismaying."

Quote

 

Earlier on Wednesday, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said Quebec's proposed changes to the Constitution are purely "symbolic" and will not impact Canadians outside the province, calling the modifications "important" but uncontroversial.

In the House, Trudeau cited former Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper's motion in 2006 recognizing that Quebecers form a nation within a united Canada, "and that remains our position" — though more than a dozen Liberals voted against the motion 15 years ago.

 

 

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Justin is running out of voters to apologize to, today he issued a formal apology re how Italians in Canada were treated during WWII. 

He will now be looking for another group to apologize to and I suggest it make a formal (pay it forward) to all the Canadian Taxpayers for the debt they will assume and need to pay off.

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19 minutes ago, Kargokings said:

Justin is running out of voters to apologize to, today he issued a formal apology re how Italians in Canada were treated during WWII. 

He will now be looking for another group to apologize to and I suggest it make a formal (pay it forward) to all the Canadian Taxpayers for the debt they will assume and need to pay off.

Did he cry ??

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6 hours ago, Jaydee said:

Some pre-pandemic crying photo shoots,,,not sure how sloppy he looks while crying with that gawd awful beard.

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Thanks, that sure brings out a whole bunch of nationalistic pride.

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On 5/27/2021 at 1:06 PM, Kargokings said:

Justin is running out of voters to apologize to, today he issued a formal apology re how Italians in Canada were treated during WWII. 

He will now be looking for another group to apologize to and I suggest it make a formal (pay it forward) to all the Canadian Taxpayers for the debt they will assume and need to pay off.

 

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“ Justin Trudeau is the type of guy who sees racism at every turn, except apparently when he’s wearing blackface and looking in the mirror. The prime minister not only likes to falsely accuse others of racism, his government is spending big to make sure that civil servants aren’t racist.”

After we broke the story about some bizarre anti-racism training for civil servants two months ago, the Conservative opposition asked the Liberal government to explain all of this cost and what was behind it. 
 

 

We now have details on the costs, how many training sessions were held and how many people were trained.

I don’t think we got our money’s worth.

If you don’t recall, this is the training session that told senior civil servants to question everything, including the very name of our country. “Racism and colonialism foundational to this place we now call Canada,” reads the heading for one “fact” listed under “Myths and Facts.”

Canada — a colonial settler society — is a concept based on many myths, including European discovery and harmonious multiculturalism,” the civil servants were told.

One myth and fact they were not allowed to question is that only white people can be racist.

“Myth #1 Reverse racism exists, BIPOC can be racists towards white people,” the section is titled.

“While assumptions and stereotypes about white people do exist, this is considered racial prejudice, not racist,” participants are informed. “Thus, racial prejudice can indeed be directed at white people (e.g. ‘white people can’t dance’) but is not considered racism because of the systemic relationship to power.”

The civil servants were also told about the dangers of white supremacy, which is a very real problem, but the training system developed by the good folks at Global Affairs Canada has some odd ideas about what is and what isn’t white supremacy.

https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/lilley-taxpayers-ripped-off-for-weak-anti-racism-training

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