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To listen to sockboy and his idea of government .... we have your backs, from day one, clear and transparent, budgets will balance themselves, respect for parliament, blah blah blah ...... the Canadia

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4 minutes ago, Kargokings said:

Showing solidarity or maybe just because there where other people with our PM as the video in the following article shows.

Let’s remember who we are talking about here. This is the FLAKE Canada has entrusted for their safety 

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50 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

Let’s remember who we are talking about here. This is the FLAKE Canada has entrusted for their safety 

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You are avoiding my reply, what you posted was Fake News re why would he be wearing a mask. Nothing to do with anything else he did or didnot do. I hope to see him gone after the next election but as there are no serious opponents and as long as he is giving out $$$$$$$$ , I suspect we will see him stay around for a number of more years.  

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COVID guidance has always been a 6’ separation. He has gone massless for almost a year in his sermons from the cottage.  His aides could easily have separated themselves far enough away from their master for this meeting.

I would bet $$$, closed door meetings in his private office out of the public eye are held at a comfortable distance, without masks,

IMO, Trudeau  wearing a mask for this meeting was purely a PC photo op for the cameras. 

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1 hour ago, Jaydee said:

COVID guidance has always been a 6’ separation. He has gone massless for almost a year in his sermons from the cottage.  His aides could easily have separated themselves far enough away from their master for this meeting.

I would bet $$$, closed door meetings in his private office out of the public eye are held at a comfortable distance, without masks,

IMO, Trudeau  wearing a mask for this meeting was purely a PC photo op for the cameras. 

So I guess you say the same about the POTUS and his associates....  Lots of room for separation..  Re private meetings, here are the rules for the House of Commons.... 

Use of masks and extension of preventative measures at the House of Commons (ourcommons.ca)

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Trust is earned': New defence chief vowed to get tough on sexual misconduct, hours later he stepped down 

Chief Admiral Art McDonald sent a message Wednesday to all Canadian Forces personnel to come forward and speak up about alleged misconduct.

https://nationalpost.com/news/national/defence-watch/hours-before-stepping-down-from-top-military-job-defence-chief-vowed-to-get-tough-on-sexual-misconduct/wcm/4dffbd4a-794b-4a88-aa3d-0f07c8aa7a92?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR10d_r2P0LQadRrcWVRiEBXOizT-ovQij4FmFT-4eN2pnhGowUdyppIc_I#Echobox=1614303774

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And this **bleep** show continues.. If the Liberals didn't do a political hatchet job on Mark Norman he would have stepped up when Vance stepped down. Now Trudeau's pick is under investigation. Every Canadian institution under this Liberal "Government" has been soured. The Attorney Generals office, the GG, Military Command and our House of Commons.”

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Trudeau's Canada: Low achievement, high self-esteem 

Philip Cross: We feel very good about ourselves — but for no apparent reason

Tristin Hopper’s weekend article in the National Post asked why Canada can’t get things done anymore, from procuring vaccines to renovating 24 Sussex Drive. Malaise about Canada’s performance is entirely justified as our pampered public sector fails to deliver and few Canadian brands dominate in the global marketplace.

Canada’s image was not always so dim. As the resource boom started in 2003, The Economist featured a cover story about “Cool Canada,” featuring a moose wearing hipster shades. With oil and gas prices soaring, Prime Minister Stephen Harper trumpeted Canada as an “energy superpower.” Our technology sector hit a home run with the Blackberry cellphone. The Great Financial Crisis further boosted our international stature, showcasing the world’s soundest banking system. Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney parlayed this into becoming the first foreign-born head of the Bank of England. It seemed Canada understood banking better than anyone else.

With Trump gone, Canada becomes easy to ignore

 

Even our public sector seemed admirable by international standards. The 2009 Obamacare debate in the U.S. was filled with envious references to our health-care system, while obtaining a university education here required much less student debt. The World Bank touted “the Canadian Pension Model” to the world. By 2012, the National Post’s Joe O’Connor could write that “Canada got its swagger.” Justin Trudeau’s election in 2015 briefly made him a global hero to progressives before images of blackface, accusations of scandal, and a failure to deliver results dulled his allure. The boast that “the world needs more Canada” reached peak popularity with our 150th anniversary in 2017, although for many outside Canada it really meant “the world wants less Trump.” With Trump gone, Canada becomes easy to ignore.

Canada’s public sector is clearly underperforming these days. Our vaunted health-care system is inoculating Canadians slower than some Third World countries. The insolvency of Laurentian University highlights a vulnerability in the funding model developed by many universities, which rely heavily on high fees for foreign students who are now staying home because of the pandemic. The Canadian Pension Model turned out to be based on unrealistic assumptions about rates of return as interest rates plunged.

Even more worrisome is that Canada is good at starting companies but not at nurturing them to global stature. Global leadership in key industries has disappeared. Canada claims just one of the Financial Times’ 100 leading global firms: Shopify. Smaller countries like Denmark, Sweden, Spain, and South Korea all have at least two companies on this list.

Nor have we been able to build on our strengths in banking, energy, or technology. Attempts to capitalize on our reputation by creating an institute for banking stability in Toronto came to nothing. Canada’s major contribution to global finance today is to serve “as an ATM and safe deposit box for money laundering” from China, according to Jonathan Manthorpe’s The Claws of the Panda. Our assumed technological prowess in everything from artificial intelligence to aerospace has not produced a successor on a global scale to Nortel or Blackberry. Canada’s superpower status in energy is undermined, as Tristan Hopper noted, by an inability to build pipelines or new hydro dams.

In sum, Canada has the same problem as many of our children: high self-esteem without high levels of achievement. We feel very good about ourselves — but for no apparent reason.

Before becoming Governor of the Bank of Canada, Tiff Macklem co-authored an op-ed arguing that more companies should embrace “Brand Canada.” He questioned why business people shrink from the concept of brands for countries while embracing brands wholeheartedly in the corporate world. Canadian firms evidently do not share Macklem’s confidence in “Brand Canada.” All our major banks have stripped any homeland reference from their names, replacing Canada, Toronto, Montreal and Nova Scotia with meaningless initials. This seemed misplaced during the financial crisis but turns out to have been prescient as the glow has faded from Canada’s image.

Macklem easily could have asked why companies should adopt Brand Canada when Canada does not embrace them? In his 2017 book Canadian Failures, Alex Benay, previously Chief Information Officer of Canada, wrote that “the United States’ identity is as much defined by Ford and Apple as it is by Abraham Lincoln and Mark Twain.” But rather than treating our companies as national symbols, Canadians are more inclined to identify with public programs like Medicare. We seem embarrassed by resource industries such as the oilsands, when they should be seen as symbols of Canadian innovation and technical know-how.

Ignoring commercial success has long-term consequences. Michael Bliss, Canada’s leading business historian, said “the one prescription for the eventual failure of the Canadian experiment in nationality would be to create an ever-widening gap in standards of living between the two North American democracies.” Nations need to figure out which parts of their identities function well and don’t need changing and which parts are no longer working and do need changing. In today’s Canada, a lot is not working well and needs changing, starting with an expensive yet oftentimes inept public sector and a widespread indifference to the importance of private sector efficiency and innovation.

Britain in the late 1970s showed that countries can pull themselves out of a prolonged tailspin. Unless Canada makes an equivalent turnaround in its current slide into mediocrity, others will soon be labelling us with the tag often applied to Brazil: “the country of the future — and always will be.” Potential is not enough. If you want to be a player on the global stage, at some point you have to prove your worth by actually delivering results.

Philip Cross is a senior fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute.

https://financialpost.com/opinion/trudeaus-canada-low-achievement-high-self-esteem

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WASHINGTON POST ARTICLE ABOUT VACCINATIONS IN CANADA

 

 
This is from The Washington Post, not a Canadian Newspaper…Feb 5th
 
According to the Bloomberg vaccine tracker, at the time of writing, Canada is hovering around 38th place in terms of vaccine doses administered per 100 people, having issued just over 1 million shots to a country of more than 37 million.
"There is no handy anthropological cliche that can be used to wave this failure away. Canadians are not being vaccinated in low numbers because they’re somehow too egalitarian or polite to take their shots until everyone is guaranteed one. Nor, for that matter, can one cite any evidence suggesting the country is teeming with anti-vaccine advocates or some other widespread movement of resistance. No, Canadians sit in 38th place simply because their government has not obtained enough vials of serum to inject them with.
By now, there has been ample documentation as to why this is, and the roads lead back to specific and flawed decisions made by the Trudeau government at critical moments. An ambitious early deal with Chinese vaccine producer CanSino fell through when the Chinese government vetoed the shipment, likely for political reasons that were hardly impossible to anticipate given the gloomy state of Canada-China relations. The government likewise negotiated slowly and poorly with Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, accepting an excessively pessimistic premise that large quantities of vaccine would neither be ready nor deliverable before April, leaving Ottawa startled when injection season wound up kicking off in December. In what seems destined to be yet another iconic Trudeau moment of halo-slipping, his government has been blasted for dipping into a vaccine stockpile intended for the developing world to supplement the deficient supply it obtained on its own.
Some of the reactions to all of this have been classically Canadian. There has long been a fantasy that Canada could be some sort of self-sustaining autarky if only its leaders were more patriotic. Recent rhetoric has accordingly claimed the country’s embarrassing vaccine rollout just proves Canada needs its own domestic vaccine industry, in the way previous generations were told Canada needs its own airplane or car industry, or should spend more time building oil refineries and lumberyards. Trudeau himself has partially conceded to this crowd, approvinga deal earlier this month that will see the Novavax vaccine produced at a yet-to-be-built facility in Montreal (though it’s possibly too late to matter).
But looking around the world, there’s really no indication that impressive vaccination rates correlate with this sort of muscular economic nationalism. Places like Chile and Israel simply seem to have inked earlier, better deals with the international pharma giants than Canada, with national governments that prioritized gaining access to adequate quantities of vaccines sooner, rather than gigantic amounts later. Many smaller nations of the European Union, similarly, are clearly benefiting from a supranational vaccine regime in which they have less sovereignty, rather than more — overall challenges notwithstanding.
 
Instead, it seems the most relevant variable is just that a lot of these other countries don’t have Trudeau in charge.
 
As the denouement of this pandemic (hopefully) continues to unfold, Canadians unsatisfied with the speed of their escape will have a clear target for their outrage.
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28 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

 

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The profoundly disturbing thing here is that liberal voters simply don't see that, or maybe they don't remember it, or maybe they think it was manufactured.

But when liberal politicians tell them that the conservatives plan to legalize automatic weapons and pass concealed carry and high capacity mag legislation, they all believe it. The inability to differentiate between what's real and what's not coupled with unresolved election reform issues is actually getting people hurt now.

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Once again, the liberal mantra......if you tell it to people enough times, they will believe it......and sadly there is no mechanism to challenge these claims, and people are dumb enough to believe it!
 

Another Trudeau doofus...disgusting that he can outright lie, mislead canadians and maintain his office 

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53 minutes ago, st27 said:

and sadly there is no mechanism to challenge these claims, and people are dumb enough to believe it!

I'm not sure that people actually want to think about it.

JT is smart enough to know that and he plays to it with a studied effort of actions that have no effect and lies about his political opponent's intentions should they be elected. The disinformation is neatly packaged, presented as factual and disseminated by a cooperative media. Those actions simply couldn't survive in a world where factual information was widely available and people spent a few moments considering cause and effect. 

Most folks who don't understand the laws are surprised at the regulations currently in place. You can then go the current situation in Toronto vs the new bans. If you can keep their attention long enough (a challenge in and of itself), they always revert to one of two default positions: "at least JT is trying to do something about it" or, "no one needs a gun."

Should you point out a few things that they clearly don't need the response is "don't be silly." So I'm left with the notion that they're not "dumb," they simply can't be bothered to think about it. Two days after JT promised to crack down on gun crime he introduced legislation to reduce sentences for serious gun crimes. These relaxations even apply to weapons trafficking and smuggling by people with previous weapons convictions.

Press play and see what Scarlet has to say about that....

 

 

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Trudeau shot down again. After acting like a school girl with a crush last week in his PR event with Biden.....we get this..

 

Biden spokesperson rules out helping Canada, Mexico with vaccine supply before all Americans are inoculated

During a White House press briefing today, Jen Psaki was asked if Biden was considering sharing part of the U.S. COVID-19 vaccine supply with allies. "No," she replied.

"The president has made clear that he is focused on ensuring that vaccines are accessible to every American. That is our focus," she added.

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/biden-vaccine-help-canada-mexico-1.5932176

 

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What kind of moron would you have to be to "share" critical supplies with anyone before meeting the needs of every one of your country's citizens first?

(Yes, I know).

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Came across this article ..... I wonder if John Robson would like to re think his opinion now, after sockboys 5 years destroying the country, and deficit spending that is bankrupting the country.....for the points raised,Harper doesn’t look so bad now, does he???

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/john-robson-i-cant-vote-for-the-harper-conservatives-i-just-cant

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