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From the WDYTWGTH file....

So much for what Trump did wrong, now here is what Biden will / may do to bring things back to reality: Biden to use executive actions to roll back Trump policies on 1st day in office

Not long ago, Democrats considered executive orders to be nothing more than "a stunt".... remember? Stunt was the word of the day.... stunt, STUNT, STUNT, STUNT how many different ways was there to sa

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And in the NEWS....LOL


“ Secret service made an exception and let him drive himself!!!!" Naomi joked on her Instagram Story, since the president is rarely allowed to drive for security reasons, as per CNBC. "A little rusty but he still won (barely)," she added. “

“ Newsweek, which spent four years admonishing President Donald Trump's golf hobby, published an article that titled "Joe Biden, Playing as Luigi, Wins in Mario Kart Race Against Granddaughter at Camp David." Newsweek does not appear to have been taken over by satirical site The Babylon Bee.

The article, framing the game between Biden and his granddaughter at Camp David as a fun-loving President's Day activity, discussed Naomi Biden's Instagram video of Biden "competing against her on the Arcade GP DX machines, complete with chairs and steering wheels."

The story then details who played who in the rollicking video game line-up, saying that "Biden sat on the right as Luigi, and Naomi is Princess Peach on the left...Despite not being at the same gaming level as his granddaughter, the commander-in-chief came out victorious."

Newsweek seems to have thought it was super cute that Naomi said "'Secret service made an exception and let him drive himself!!!!' On her Instagram Story. 'A little rusty but he still won (barely).'"

Looks like Camp David has a really sweet set up.

 

https://www.newsweek.com/joe-biden-playing-luigi-wins-mario-kart-race-against-granddaughter-camp-david-1569439

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1 hour ago, Jaydee said:

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Texas blackouts fuel false claims about renewable energy (apnews.com)

With millions of Texas residents still without power amid frigid temperatures, conservative commentators have falsely claimed that wind turbines and solar energy were primarily to blame.

“We should never build another wind turbine in Texas,” read a Tuesday Facebook post from Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller. “The experiment failed big time.”

“This is a perfect example of the need for reliable energy sources like natural gas & coal,” tweeted U.S. Sen. Steve Daines, a Republican from Montana, on Tuesday.

In reality, failures in natural gas, coal and nuclear energy systems were responsible for nearly twice as many outages as frozen wind turbines and solar panels, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, which operates the state’s power grid, said in a press conference Tuesday.

Still a variety of misleading claims spread on social media around renewable energy, with wind turbines and the Green New Deal getting much of the attention.

A viral photo of a helicopter de-icing a wind turbine was shared with claims it showed a “chemical” solution being applied to one of the massive wind generators in Texas. The only problem? The photo was taken in Sweden years ago, not in the U.S. in 2021. The helicopter sprayed hot water onto the wind turbine, not chemicals.

Other social media users, including Republican U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado, puzzlingly labeled the Green New Deal as the culprit. Boebert tweeted on Monday that the proposal was “proven unsustainable as renewables are clearly unreliable.”

But the Green New Deal is irrelevant, as no version of it exists in Texas or nationwide, said Mark Jacobson, director of the Atmosphere/Energy Program and professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University.

“It’s really natural gas and coal and nuclear that are providing the bulk of the electricity and that’s the bulk of the cause of the blackouts,” Jacobson told The Associated Press.

ERCOT said Tuesday that of the 45,000 total megawatts of power that were offline statewide, about 30,000 consisted of thermal sources — gas, coal and nuclear plants — and 16,000 came from renewable sources.

On top of that, while Texas has ramped up wind energy in recent years, the state still relies on wind power for only about 25% of its total electricity, according to ERCOT data.

“It’s not like we were relying on it to ride us through this event,” Joshua Rhodes, a research associate at the Webber Energy Group at the University of Texas at Austin, told the AP. “Nor would it have been able to save us even if it were operating at 100% capacity right now. We just don’t have enough of it.”

The agency confirmed that wellhead freeze-offs and other issues curtailing supply in natural gas systems were primarily to blame for new outages on Tuesday, after severe winter weather caused failures across multiple fuel types in recent days.

 

 

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It seems that it is a situation much like Walkerton.  In Walkerton, they cut back inspections to save money and e-coli killed people.

In Texas, they cut back on winterizing and inspections to cut costs.

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/in-texas-s-black-swan-blackout-everything-went-wrong-at-once-1.1564500

In Texas's black-swan blackout, everything went wrong at once

The finger-pointing began immediately: It was the frozen wind turbines that foolishly replaced traditional sources. No, fossil fuels were at fault. No, Texas’s deregulated power market, unique in the country, had allowed companies to skimp on maintenance and upgrades.

As the hours ticked by and millions more were plunged into frozen darkness, a more sober reality emerged. The greatest forced blackout in U.S. history, as this event has almost certainly become, was the result of a systemic and multifaceted failure. There are no promises of when power will be restored and little likelihood that the episode won’t be repeated in a corner of the country hard hit by climate change.

Transmission towers and power lines lead to a substation after a snow storm on February 16, 2021 in Fort Worth, Texas.

“This feels like a technical design failure,” said Michael Webber, who founded the Webber Energy Group at the University of Texas at Austin and serves as chief science and technology officer at French utility Engie.

Power plants weren’t fully weatherized, wiping out generation capacity. The ones that were still standing struggled to get enough fuel, with shale wells experiencing so-called freeze-offs. Many wind turbines stopped spinning. Texas, with a grid notoriously isolated from the rest of the U.S., was unable to call on neighboring states for help.

 

Still, as the pressure dropped last week and frigid air descended from the north, some saw what was coming and felt like they were witnessing a train crash. They lay part of the blame on Ercot, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, which manages the flow of power to consumers and says the extreme nature of the weather made it hard to be ready.

“We were woefully unprepared for this kind of cold,” said Texas State Representative Ron Reynolds, whose own house is without power. “They got caught with their pants down and now millions of Texans have no power. This is a matter of life and death.”

Ercot officials couldn’t say when power would be restored. “I know it’s frustrating we can’t offer a time certain, but it’s a process we’re engaged in to get the grid back in balance,” Ercot chief executive officer Bill Magness said during a news conference Tuesday.

Adam Sinn, owner of Aspire Commodities LLC, a power and gas trader, was one of those wondering why so little was being done. He said that a week ago, when the seven-day outlook hit, Ercot’s own projections showed too little supply to meet soaring demand.

“We were looking at this week thinking, they are going to have to cut 10,000 megawatts of consumers,” he said. “I really think Ercot is to blame on this one.” He said there were spare megawatts that weren’t brought online. For example, Vistra Corp., a large generator, had 4,000 megawatts off line for maintenance in four plants that could have been turned on quickly, he said, citing data from Genscape Inc.

Sinn said either Ercot failed to order the megawatts back on or was told no, which should have generated publicity so residents could prepare.

Ercot and Genscape didn’t respond to requests for comment. Vistra declined to comment.

If Ercot knew what was in store, it wasn’t apparent in its messaging to Texans. Over the weekend, recommendations from its official Twitter account included closing the blinds and unplugging unused kitchen gadgets. “Laundry on Valentine’s Day?” it said in another post. “No.”

On Tuesday, Dan Woodfin, a senior director for Ercot, attributed the main factors to frozen instruments at natural gas, coal and nuclear plants. He and other Ercot officials said they believed generators had prepared better for such cold.

Ercot’s authority is somewhat limited. In 2011, the last time freezing weather caused rolling outages, it released best practices for power generators to follow, but it couldn’t require anything, said Adrian Shelley, Texas office director of Public Citizen, an advocacy group.

Federal energy regulators also issued a 357-page report that recommended generators winterize their equipment, including insulating pipes.

“The financial incentive isn’t there to harden that infrastructure,” he added. “From a generator perspective, the only incentive is to bring energy to market as cheaply as possible.”

Power prices spiked on several days to the price cap in Texas -- a staggering US$9,000 a megawatt-hour.

A 100-megawatt wind farm in the state that might have normally made almost US$40,000 over a two-day period in February could reap more than US$9.5 million on Monday and Tuesday alone, Nicholas Steckler, a power-markets analyst at BloombergNEF, said. On Monday, electricity sales likely totaled US$10 billion, according to Wood Mackenzie.

While some pointed to wind power as a culprit, as of early Tuesday wind shutdowns accounted for 3.6 to 4.5 gigawatts -- or less than 13 per cent -- of the 30 to 35 gigawatts of total outages, Ercot’s Woodfin said. Gas produced 35 per cent of the power in January.

Others said Texas’s problems were wide-ranging.

“Everyone wants to blame someone, so they blame Ercot,” Webber said. “But if the gas can’t come out of the ground, is that Ercot’s fault? If we have sloppy building codes that don’t properly insulate homes, is that Ercot’s fault?”

He suggests a combination of upgrades and expansions nationally at a cost of trillions of dollars over decades. Roughly 10 per cent of that will need to take place in Texas. That’s a lot of money, which is why little was done the last time Texas saw a major test of its grid in the cold a decade ago.

Texas lacks the long-term planning processes that other parts of the country employ. In the east, grid operators run capacity markets that act like insurance policies. Generators are paid to guarantee that their supplies will be available on the most extreme hot and cold days. If they don’t show up, they face stiff penalties. Texas has instead left it up to prevailing prices and industry.

That deregulated and competitive nature of the markets stands to exacerbate massive price run-ups. More than 100 electric suppliers compete for customers who churn power companies like credit cards. They take big risks to attract new customers, offering incredibly low rates and allowing unlimited power use on weekends. But when the wholesale markets backfire, they bail on them.

The state also refuses to connect its grid with neighbors in part out of fear that the system will fall under federal oversight and regulation. But its politicians are coming to realize that independence has a down side.

Natural gas played an outsize role in the disaster. As early as last Thursday, Energy Transfer LP sent a warning to customers on its Transwestern natural gas pipeline: It was going to be cold, and if producers’ shipments were to deviate from their normally scheduled flows, they needed to let the operator know.

Maybe the North Dakota oil field could withstand frigid temperatures, but the infrastructure that connects the Permian Basin in West Texas and southeastern New Mexico is exposed to the elements. Drilling liquids freeze inside pipes, forcing wells and gas processing plants shut.

By Friday, temperatures had dropped to 24 degrees in Dallas. Texans were told to start conserving energy. Physical gas prices soared to more than US$500 in Oklahoma from less than US$4 at the start of the week. As of Tuesday, they had doubled to roughly US$1,000 per million British thermal units. Texas Governor Greg Abbott asked a major gas exporter to limit their intake.

All of this is to speak nothing of the human toll.

“It’s mentally draining, the constant thought of wondering, ‘When will the power come back on, how can I get us out of this situation?’” said Alton McCarver, a 30-year-old IT worker, who led his family into his Dodge Charger for hours at a time to blast the heater and charge phones. “It’s been an uphill battle to stay warm.”

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27 minutes ago, deicer said:

It appears Biden is trying to bring the U.S. up to speed with the rest of the world.

https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/127/text

Craziness.

Register every firearm in the country?

Undergo a psychological evaluation including interviews with spouse, former spouse and two family members??  Yeah, there's a good idea - let's get the former spouse to weigh in.

Database of all owners and their firearms available to the public????  Another brilliant idea - let's tell all the criminals exactly where all the firearms and valuables are in the country, can't see any problem with that!

Mandatory insurance - 'cause that's a benefit somehow.

Mandatory firearms training - to make everyone a better shot.  One of the things I count on if ever facing a criminal with a gun is that they usually miss what they are shooting at more than they hit it due to lack of discipline and training but we can fix that - just train everyone on proper effective shooting technique - brilliant.

Morons.

 

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1 hour ago, seeker said:

Craziness.

 

Mandatory firearms training - to make everyone a better shot.  One of the things I count on if ever facing a criminal with a gun is that they usually miss what they are shooting at more than they hit it due to lack of discipline and training but we can fix that - just train everyone on proper effective shooting technique - brilliant.

Morons.

 

Re the training, we already have that in Canada:

http://www.firearmsandhunterscourse.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/CFSC3.jpg

Canadian Firearm Safety Course (CFSC) – $190

 
 
 

FIREARMS SAFETY TRAINING

The Firearms Act requires that individuals wishing to acquire non-restricted firearms must take the Canadian Firearms Safety Course (CFSC) and pass the tests.

Individuals who wish to acquire restricted firearms must also take the Canadian Restricted Firearms Safety Course (CRFSC) and pass the tests.

CANADIAN FIREARMS SAFETY COURSES (CFSC)

The Canadian Firearms Safety Course (CFSC) was developed in partnership with the provinces and territories, national organizations with an ongoing interest in firearms safety, and many firearms and hunter education course instructors from across Canada. This course was developed to meet the mandatory requirements set out in subparagraph 106(2)(c)(i) of the Criminal Code of Canada and came into effect January 1, 1994.

As a result of the Firearms Act, the firearms safety training that is provided to firearms owners and users required modification. The revised CFSC, which was implemented on February 1, 1999, reflects the new legislation and focuses primarily on non-restricted firearms (rifles and shotguns). The legislation stipulates that individuals wishing to acquire non-restricted firearms must take the CFSC and pass the tests.

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42 minutes ago, Kargokings said:

Re the training, we already have that in Canada:

 

I'm well aware as I have taken it.  It's a one day course which actually ends up being about 4 hours long (with the exam after lunch) with no live fire component.

The Canadian course is all about safe storage, transportation and the regulations.  It's valid (although you could learn the material in about 15 minutes of self-study) but it doesn't teach anyone "how" to shoot.  The proposed American course seems to be about actually teaching people how to shoot - is that really what you want to do?  I could see it if the problem they were trying to address was accidental shootings but that's not it.

The whole plan is to make the process to own a firearm so complicated and expensive that most people won't bother, not much different from the Canadian plan in that sense.

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53 minutes ago, seeker said:

It's valid (although you could learn the material in about 15 minutes of self-study) but it doesn't teach anyone "how" to shoot.

Much like the Ontario boating license. You have a license, you are legal, supposedly safe....but don’t know how to untie a boat, let alone start the engine. Government bureaucracy is downright pitiful most days.

Edited by Jaydee
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The number of first time gun owners in the US is simply off the charts now and there's a reason for it. This entire effort is breathtakingly liberal, they can never ask themselves "what could possibly go wrong with my great plan?"

The bulk of the new/first time gun owners were the very people who would (or likely would) have previously supported such a bill. Think about that for just a moment..... a large percentage of these folks would never have previously considered gun ownership.... so what changed their minds? 

Well, it's exactly like we predicted right here on the forum.... defunding the police, failing to condemn seven months of violent riots/property destruction and Democratic funding of bail for the rioters might have had something to do with it. Nervous people in the US buy guns and stock up on ammo. The current North American ammunition shortage is like nothing I've ever seen before. 

We could have an entire thread on this very subject but IMO, by their own efforts, Democrats have trashed their own bill. If you knew in advance that you wanted it to fail.... this is exactly how you would go about ensuring it. There is no other option, these guys are either brilliant or dumb as fence posts.

I could mention the cost of all this and we could plot cost vs efficacy and then discuss the futility of registration in the absence of ballistic fingerprinting but it will never get to that point anyway. As always, I stand in awe. 

 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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25 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

The number of first time gun owners in the US is simply off the charts now and there's a reason for it. This entire effort is breathtakingly liberal, they can never ask themselves "what could possibly go wrong with my great plan?"

 

 


the real problem was caused by Trump and all of his wild supporters....   

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2 hours ago, Kargokings said:

the real problem was caused by Trump and all of his wild supporters....   

The gun buying madness and hoarding of ammunition started with the riots and defunding movement. It's now a bit like sourcing toilet paper and yeast was last year.... don't take my word for it, ask anyone who shoots a lot and buys ammunition in bulk, it's getting hard to source.  

This has been ongoing now for months and regardless of who gets blamed, it stands as problematic for any type of meaningful gun control efforts. 

So, assuming you are right and it was Trump supporters doing the rioting and burning, I would still maintain that the majority of new buyers in the last 8-9 months would not have purchased a gun in the absence of rioting, looting, and defunding calls. Keep in mind that none of this is a surprise it was predicted and it turned out to be a bit more extreme than expected.

If you think back to the toilet paper madness you won't be far off. There isn't a real shortage, you just can't get it. Calls for gun control result in more demand. Most Canadians don't realize that JT has sold more guns than any salesman could ever hope to. 

This is dated, it's getting worse. People will point fingers but frankly, that's irrelevant now.... the situation is what it is.

https://www.petersenshunting.com/editorial/whats-behind-the-ammunition-shortage/387187

Edited by Wolfhunter
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11 hours ago, Kargokings said:


the real problem was caused by Trump and all of his wild supporters....   

Trump was elected in 2018.......Obama was President from 2009 - 2017

This article is from 2012 

 

 

There Are 15,000 More Gun Stores In America Than Grocery Stores

In case you are worried that guns haven't sufficiently permeated American culture, here are some startling facts compiled by Jack Date, Pierre Thomas and Jason Ryan of ABC News.

 

  • There are ~14,869 more gun stores in America than grocery stores. Specifically, there are 51,438 gun retailers and 36,536 grocery stores.
  • There are almost as many gun dealers in America as gas stations. There are a total of 129,817 gun dealers in the country, which include retail stores (51,438), "collectors" (61,562), pawn shops (7,356), and importers and manufacturers. Meanwhile, there are 143,849 gas stations.
  • There are more than twice as many gun stores in America as McDonalds restaurants. There are only 14,098 McDonalds.
  • American gun companies made 5.5 million new guns in 2010 and 95% of them were sold to Americans.
  • These ~5 million guns weren't nearly enough to satisfy American demand for guns in 2010, so an additional 3.3 million guns were imported.
  • There were 16.5 million background checks for gun purchases in 2010. You can get a gun unless you have a criminal record or are evidently insane.
  • 47,856 people were murdered in the U.S. with guns from 2006-2010. This was more than twice as many people as those killed by all other methods combined.

https://www.businessinsider.com/more-gun-stores-in-america-than-grocery-stores-2012-12

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Worth reviewing I think because the first step is resolving to sin no more. You only earn the win by doing the work:

There are three things I dislike about liberals:

- their unwillingness to pay for what they want;

- Their inability to look around corners and anticipate problems; and 

- the long term effects of their "good ideas" producing a backlash that's more oppressive than the original "oppression" their good idea was supposed to fix.

 

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1 hour ago, Wolfhunter said:

Worth reviewing I think because the first step is resolving to sin no more. You only earn the win by doing the work:

There are three things I dislike about liberals:

- their unwillingness to pay for what they want;

- Their inability to look around corners and anticipate problems; and 

- the long term effects of their "good ideas" producing a backlash that's more oppressive than the original "oppression" their good idea was supposed to fix.

 

So why do you argue a point when the rest of the world shows that it works?

 

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4 hours ago, st27 said:

Not so easy, is it Joe??  Fulfilling demands from the lefties would tally up to  $650 billilon:

No it's not easy, but that doesn't mean the idea has no merit. It takes me back to the the three items on my list (above) though.

First off, how to pay for it. Please articulate where that $650 billion is to come from and how much it will add to the income tax rate this year. If there is a general consensus to proceed then cool, everyone can do their part. But if the only reply is that the wealthy 1% are going to pay for it then I have another question.... how's that working out for ya?

Next, lets look around the corner and anticipate potential sore points with it. Off the top of my head I'll suggest that the people who worked two jobs all through university are going to be a bit put out by their tax dollars rescuing those who didn't pay their university bills. So what about them? Democrats owe it to themselves to consider it because it will alienate as many as it pleases.

Finally, what are the possible long term effects here? I'm of the opinion that if you are smart enough to go to university you should be smart enough to pay for it. If getting a degree is the accomplishment of the masses then it will be of less value. Do we want a situation where a degree becomes the equivalent of grade 12. Don't laugh that off either, it's a valid question and has real potential consequences in the labour market. 

By way of example, the RCAF once accepted pilot candidates with grade 12 under a program called OCTP. Now to even be considered, you need a 4 year degree and be bilingual. The training system is horribly backlogged due to other poor decisions and so most pilots are pushing 28 before they start their first OTU. I was half way through my second tour at that point.

So now candidates are older, they have wives, kids, mortgages etc... more pressures than I ever had to be sure. The failure rate is higher and everyone is surprised. If you want that then fine.... but for fu&%$ sake stop being surprised. Go back to rule number one.... it has a cost.

Edited by Wolfhunter
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https://www.foxnews.com/politics/new-york-ron-kim-cuomo-nursing-home-scandal-impeachable-offense

I'm now wondering how deep all of this runs because I doubt it all falls in Cuomo's lap.

We all watched this play out, I'm thinking they didn't want to give Trump the slightest bit of credit for the any of the other available options (other than LTC facilities). There was no way they would accept the cruise ship or field hospital (MASH) option as it would have required a thank you note to Trump.

Had any of Cuomo's shenanigans become mainstream prior to the election it might have materially effected the outcome. If it was clear all along to a dumb grunt, it surely had to be a known quantity in the DNC War Room. That makes it, and all the current machinations, orders of magnitude worse. 

The current outrage and demands for action (coming from democrats) rings hollow to me and leaves me wondering where all of these horrified buffoons were at the time.  

This might be of interest to some as well. I went looking for some of the add ons contained in the omnibus bill and wasn't smart enough to be able to find it. Although a separate issue, finding it should be easy and the media should just list out some of the items so people can decide whether they support the expense or not..... why is that so difficult?

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/house-conservatives-playbook-fight-back-democrats-covid-bill

Edited by Wolfhunter
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On 2/17/2021 at 6:18 PM, seeker said:

I'm well aware as I have taken it.  It's a one day course which actually ends up being about 4 hours long (with the exam after lunch) with no live fire component.

The Canadian course is all about safe storage, transportation and the regulations.  It's valid (although you could learn the material in about 15 minutes of self-study) but it doesn't teach anyone "how" to shoot.  The proposed American course seems to be about actually teaching people how to shoot - is that really what you want to do?  I could see it if the problem they were trying to address was accidental shootings but that's not it.

The whole plan is to make the process to own a firearm so complicated and expensive that most people won't bother, not much different from the Canadian plan in that sense.

Training one day ,  2 for restricted.

Wife and EXES have to sign off on it.

References have to be contacted to "vouch for your sanity" 

Full background check carried out prior to issuance of RPAL

Daily review of any criminal infractions after issuance of RPAL.

All handguns have to be registered, optional for long guns.

So how is the new US bill any different?

oh yeah a public registry, yeah thats kind of dumb

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.Biden ticking off all the boxes to look good.

” Biden's nomination for Assistant Health Secretary Rachel Levine, who is a gender non-conforming biological male who identifies as transgender.... The hearing on her nomination is set for Thursday.“

B0FBC06D-5A69-4725-9E9A-9FAA33DE886A.jpeg

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https://video.foxnews.com/v/6235090147001#sp=show-clips

If you wish, jump ahead to 10:30…. I can just imagine this sort of thing being discussed in Rome.

Over the years here (on the forum) we have, or perhaps I have, suggested that immigration policy belongs to the people and that demographic concentrations need to be considered in the light of long term population models.

Calling that racist is easy in the short term but few (including the Romans) take a long term view of it. What will be the effect of Muslim immigration to Germany and Europe in 50 years time.... I say it will be huge. I’m not suggesting that’s either good or bad BTW, only that it is worthy of considering.

The US is playing with big numbers now and the snowball is gathering speed as the weight of it increases. As I listen to both politicians and voters, it seems more and more apparent that the magnitude of the issue and the attendant costs (political, demographic, financial etc) are far more challenging than they think and I don’t believe they are willing to pay.

The effort required to achieve Paris Accord targets is easier than this IMO (a bit like losing weight) but we can all see where that’s headed. Open Borders and universal health, dental, tuition (etc etc) is simply unachievable for people who can’t lose 20 pounds or fill pot holes but the impact on society will be profound.

Unintended consequences are always worthy of sober consideration.... a major liberal failing, as is their long standing unwillingness to pay the bills.

Edited by Wolfhunter
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