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13 minutes ago, AAS said:

https://www.instagram.com/p/CCVrxV5hsYc/?igshid=iv3d04j6ej93

Interesting time to start a new division 

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From their press release:

A unique travel experience for vacationers
Early this year, the carrier acquired a fleet of Boeing 737-400s and began to transform them so they meet the company's high service and safety standards. Unlike many airlines, the aircraft used by OWG will be tracked in real time using a sophisticated communication system. In order to offer competitive rates, OWG has opted for the proven Boeing 737-400 aircraft (158 seats). The interior of each plane was refurbished with new, lighter and sturdier seats. All of this work represents an investment of several millions of dollars.

In addition to these technological innovations, the new brand is counting on the quality of its team to provide a travel experience that will exceed customer expectations. With respect to in-flight protection standards against COVID-19, the OWG crew will benefit from the expertise developed by Nolinor Aviation during the crisis, while they continued to serve certain northern destinations by applying the highest standards in terms of health and safety.

Here is what they publish re their fleet:

https://owg.com/en/our-fleet/

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8 minutes ago, neverminds said:

Are they even going to bother to tell us what their acronym stands for. Looked through all of their literature and couldn’t find it anywhere 

image.png.527f8a54d622fbb3984cb0d01dd4988d.pngimage.png.40af3d5b32e66a5d1747298f06582cda.png

 

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I hope they set aside some of the startup money for the Disney lawsuit.

Also, what is this magical system that allows the aircraft to be tracked in real time?  Whatever it is, sounds very useful.  I'm surprised more airlines aren't interested in knowing where their aircraft actually are in "real time".

  • Haha 3
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I actually like the livery, it's different.  I agree that it's not the best aircraft for the job, and in a high density seating even with the new lighter seats.  According to their site they are equipping LPV in them, quite the investment for the few times it may pay off.  https://owg.com/en/our-fleet/

It also took me some time to figure out what OWG meant, and wasn't until the following article I found out.  Not the best market/brand name IMO.  Their strategy is also based on the non package vacation travellers. 

Quote

The strategy is completely in contrast to the strategy that Transat was working to deploy before it was the subject of an offer to purchase from Air Canada, namely the construction of its own hotels. Transat saw this as the only way to improve its profit margin, which was almost nil in aviation.  "Transat's strategy, I never understood it," says Prud'Homme.


I dunno, there's a reason why TUI has hotels, and Transat is/was heading in that direction, both big long time players in the leisure travel.  Not a company who did a few contract charters for Sunwing and then decided to enter the market.  Would be best to cater to both the package and non package travellers, not just the I would guess smaller segment.  Wish them well in their new venture.

 

https://www.lapresse.ca/affaires/2020-07-07/un-nouveau-transporteur-aerien-quebecois-nait-en-pleine-crise.php

French article, in English

The gamble of launching an airline in the midst of the industry's worst crisis since its inception is audacious, but Nolinor says it has been working there for two years. Based in Mirabel, the company is known for serving Quebec's Far North, particularly for the benefit of mining companies. When Boeing's 737 MAX aircraft were grounded last spring, Sunwing called on it to operate certain flights.  "We realized that people appreciated our service and that it was not outside of what we were able to do," says its president, Marco Prud'Homme. It added to the project that we had already started with the idea of diversifying our income. » 
Good time
COVID-19 certainly presents a lot of challenges for air carriers, but it has created opportunities for Nolinor.  "It's going to make us all get to the same starting line," says Prud'Homme. I don't know when the industry will come back, everyone is in the dark, but it gives us the opportunity to be on the same level as the others. »  There are also concrete benefits. The crisis has freed up slots and boarding gates everywhere, including at Montreal-Trudeau Airport, where OWG plans to have access to regular gates.
A niche
OWG does not define itself as a low cost carrier, also known as low cost in the industry.  "One of the definitions I hate the most is low cost," says Prud'Homme. There is nothing that is cheap in aviation. If you edit your Excel file and tell yourself that no glitch is going to happen, it doesn't make sense. »  The company sees itself more as a "traditional" service, where you buy your ticket and expect a certain service," says Prud'Homme.  "When you look at how the airlines behaved with people who wanted a refund, I think there is room to attract sympathy. We do not intend to replace anyone, but to carve out a niche position. The reason we have come to the Charter of Passenger Rights is that, somewhere, the companies have taken passengers for granted. »  In particular, Nolinor intends to build on its experience to make OWG a one-time carrier.
Three planes
Nolinor announced in May the acquisition of three used Boeing 737-400 aircraft. They are the ones who will be destined for OWG. These are its three largest aircraft, which already held a dozen 737-200 and a 737-300.  According to the businessman, their acquisition could have been made at a third of the cost of a 737-800, a newer model, predecessor of the MAX and still widely used all over the world, at least before the crisis caused by COVID-19. Using next-generation seats, up to 50% lighter, OWG's aircraft will be able to carry as much as the 737-800, Prud'Homme argues, a significant advantage.  "It's a pretty conservative project, we're not jeopardizing our business," he says.  The new company has already filed its schedules and obtained the authorization of the airports concerned. Federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau officially approved its creation on Monday afternoon. However, the precise list of destinations served will not be communicated for another week or two.  "We have chosen a popular destination where you can take market share without becoming the number one public enemy of other carriers," says Prud'Homme.  The company, whose name is derived from the name "Off We Go" used during the development of the project, intends to focus only on the sale of airline tickets, not that of vacation packages.  "Before COVID, there was an interesting rise of people who were going to rent houses on site. I look at all the young people here who go on vacation, they are not interested in resorts. They want to leave with their backpacks, rent a house. And in the coming year, I'm not sure that it's the people 70 and over who are going to travel the most. »  The strategy is completely in contrast to the strategy that Transat was working to deploy before it was the subject of an offer to purchase from Air Canada, namely the construction of its own hotels. Transat saw this as the only way to improve its profit margin, which was almost nil in aviation.  "Transat's strategy, I never understood it," says Prud'Homme.

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Just now, seeker said:

I hope they set aside some of the startup money for the Disney lawsuit.

Also, what is this magical system that allows the aircraft to be tracked in real time?  Whatever it is, sounds very useful.  I'm surprised more airlines aren't interested in knowing where their aircraft actually are in "real time".

They make ADS sound like they pioneered it !!

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5 minutes ago, seeker said:

I hope they set aside some of the startup money for the Disney lawsuit.

Also, what is this magical system that allows the aircraft to be tracked in real time?  Whatever it is, sounds very useful.  I'm surprised more airlines aren't interested in knowing where their aircraft actually are in "real time".

ADS-B  Which is pretty much mandatory now

 

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10 hours ago, rudder said:

What is this fascination with truly awful paint jobs (see also Flair)?

I actually like this one. 

Flair's is on a whole other level of terrible god awful bad. 

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Determination No. A-2020-130

July 8, 2020
 

APPLICATION by Les Investissements Nolinor Inc. carrying on business as Nolinor Aviation et/and Nolinor and as OWG (applicant) pursuant to subsection 69(1) of the Canada Transportation Act, S.C., 1996, c. 10, as amended (CTA).

 
Case number: 
20-02538
 

The applicant has applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (Agency) for a licence to operate a scheduled international service, large aircraft, in accordance with the Arrangement between the Government of Canada and the Government of the Republic of Cuba set out in an agreed minute signed on May 8, 2015 ( Arrangement).

The Agency is satisfied that the applicant meets all the applicable requirements of subsection 69(1) of the CTA. The Agency also finds that the pertinent terms and conditions of the Arrangement have been complied with.

Accordingly, the Agency issues the licence.

Pursuant to subsection 71(1) of the CTA, the licence is subject to the conditions prescribed by the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88‑58, as amended, and the following conditions:

  1. The Licensee is authorized to operate a scheduled international service on the routes set out in the Arrangement.
  2. The scheduled international service is to be conducted in accordance with the Arrangement and any applicable arrangements agreed to between Canada and Cuba.
 

Member(s)

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For the life of me I can not fathom why they would use the 737-400, there are literally hundreds of used 737NG's and A320's out there that are close to free.

There is also a very limited amount of time left that Boeing will support the 737 classic series.

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 "When you look at how the airlines behaved with people who wanted a refund, I think there is room to attract sympathy. We do not intend to replace anyone, but to carve out a niche position. The reason we have come to the Charter of Passenger Rights is that, somewhere, the companies have taken passengers for granted. » 

 

"Transat's strategy, I never understood it," says Prud'Homme.

 

Pretty arrogant statements from the guy whose company was found potentially violating the rules of the federal subsidy...

 

https://www.journaldemontreal.com/2020/05/14/une-entreprise-a-tente-de-profiter-des-failles-de-la-pcu

Edited by Gumbi
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55 minutes ago, Gumbi said:

 "When you look at how the airlines behaved with people who wanted a refund, I think there is room to attract sympathy. We do not intend to replace anyone, but to carve out a niche position. The reason we have come to the Charter of Passenger Rights is that, somewhere, the companies have taken passengers for granted. » 

 

"Transat's strategy, I never understood it," says Prud'Homme.

 

Pretty arrogant statements from the guy whose company was found potentially violating the rules of the federal subsidy...

 

https://www.journaldemontreal.com/2020/05/14/une-entreprise-a-tente-de-profiter-des-failles-de-la-pcu

I must admit to be surprised that anyone in our "now" would not be wishing the new airline every success.  Does anyone know if they already have pilots, cabin staff etc or will be hiring more?  They appear to offer some serious benefits for their staff.https://nolinor.com/en/career/

 I wonder how the following program has gone:

Become a pilot through Nolinor Aviation!

Nolinor Aviation is launching a free pilot training program for its current and future employees, a first in Québec.

How do you become a commercial pilot?

 

Mirabel, February 20, 2018 – In response to a serious lack of pilots in the aviation industry, Nolinor Aviation is launching “Become a Pilot”—a commercial pilot training program for its current and future employees, a first in Québec. Nolinor employees who want to become a pilot and who have the right skills can take a commercial pilot training program. Program costs—which can run upwards of $75,000—will be fully covered by the company.

The air transportation industry is currently facing a worldwide shortage of qualified pilots in the coming years. Given the strong increase in air traffic and the introduction of new regulations on flight hours worked, this situation may become more pressing over the next few years. Several airlines have already planned to recruit 20-35% more pilots to meet their needs.

 

Nolinor-Aviation-Jacques-PrudHomme.jpg

“Thanks to this new initiative, people who have dreamed of being a pilot but, for a variety of reasons—particularly financial reasons—never pursued their dream, finally see that it is within reach. This program will help us add to the availability of well-trained pilots, to counter the problem we are seeing across Québec and Canada.”

Jacques Prud’Homme, President of Nolinor Aviation

 

The “Become a Pilot” program will be available to all employees that have worked for the company for at least one year, who want to invest in their future and who have the potential to become a commercial pilot, regardless of their current position. Each year, candidates will be chosen using a thorough selection process to identify employees with the desire and predispositions to become a pilot. The company has already tested this concept and can confirm that chosen candidates had a better overall understanding of the occupation and of the daily operations of an airline carrier.

 

“We foresee that this pioneering program will also help recruit candidates who are passionate about aviation, for a variety of internal posts. The company currently has nearly 265 employees and we regularly hire pilots as well as cabin crew members, mechanics and flight dispatchers.”

Marjorie Lafrance, Human Resources Manager at Nolinor Aviation

 

“CAMAQ (Sectorial committee on aerospace labour in Québec) welcomes and fully supports this innovative initiative that provides a golden opportunity to those who cannot afford professional training, which can cost upwards of $75,000. With the introduction of the “Become a Pilot” program, Nolinor offers a new solution to the need for pilots and reaffirms its position as a leader in the Québec aerospace industry,” explains Nathalie Paré, executive director of CAMAQ.

Apply today

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