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“We will not tolerate gang violence in our city"

https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/warmington-hailstorm-of-bullets-fired-in-frightening-mississauga-ambush

Oh yes you will, and I'm starting to think you enjoy it because there is only one of two things that can be true here.... either you are a complete idiot, or you are enjoying the show so much you want it to continue.

The next phase starts when law abiding citizens, (who have nothing to do with gangs) begin carrying illegally out of desperation and fear simply looking to protect themselves from the mess you created. Here's a hint, THAT'S NOT GOOD!

 This gets worse fool.... not better. Get out and see the world, no other outcome is even remotely possible.

Want to stop this cycle? Then start tomorrow as follows:

- No bail for firearm offences and illegal gang activity of any type whatsoever. 

- Immediate reinstatement of TAVIS

- Immediate return to Carding (or stop and frisk) in high gang density areas

- immediate fitting of big boy pants (all city council members) to repel the screams of racism... your new talking point goes like this: "when old white women with blue hair join street gangs their butts get carded too, so get used to it."

After that, we can talk about what comes next and you can bet your idiot a$$ that the discussion will not revolve around defunding the police. 

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“We will not tolerate gang violence in our city" https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/warmington-hailstorm-of-bullets-fired-in-frightening-mississauga-ambush Oh yes you will, and I'm start

Took me a while to find it (not being in the military and all).  You're right - I expect this will be the new SOP. Reminds me of a scene from The Town - a cop in his patrol car happens to notice

Yeah, that's totally not a situation for the police - better call in the social workers.

Posted Images

Here's a taste of where y'all are headed.... make no mistake now, idiot politicians are getting people killed just as surely as if they pulled the trigger themselves. Democrats take note, this isn't how you get yourself elected. Those refugees you counted on to vote for you likely would feel safer back home now.

Judge for yourself, here is what she said as the shooting unfolded: 

Under no circumstances will I allow Donald Trump’s troops to come to Chicago and terrorize our residents.

Chicago's Lori Lightfoot tweets against Trump as bullets fly outside funeral home

The mayor's tweet came almost simultaneously as at least 14 people were reportedly shot outside a funeral home

 

 

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I guess he has decided enough is enough of course the Dems are against the surge.

Quote

Trump to send 'surge' of hundred of federal agents to cities

  • 22 July 2020
 
Federal agents in Portland 21 JulyImage copyrightREUTERS

US President Donald Trump is sending hundreds of federal law enforcement officers to cities he says are plagued by a "shocking explosion" of crime.

The Republican said Operation Legend would see a "surge" of agents deployed to Democratic-run Chicago, Albuquerque and Kansas City.

Federal officers are already in Portland, Oregon, where the mayor says they are making ongoing protests worse.

Mr Trump is adopting a law-and-order posture ahead of November's election.

US Attorney General William Barr, who joined Mr Trump at Wednesday's announcement, said they had sent about 200 federal agents to Kansas City, Missouri, would send a "comparable" number to Chicago, and about 35 others to Albuquerque, New Mexico.

There have been protests - sometimes descending into civil disorder - in scores of US cities since May, following the death of an unarmed black man, George Floyd, in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Meanwhile, gun violence has spiked in cities including New York City, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Chicago and Milwaukee.

On Tuesday night, federal agents fired tear gas, pepper balls and flashbangs at demonstrators in central Portland, which has seen 54 consecutive night of protests. 

 

The officers quickly used crowd-control munitions in an attempt to disperse hundreds of people gathered outside a federal court.

The agents have been accused of driving in unmarked vehicles around Oregon's biggest city while wearing military fatigues and arbitrarily arresting a handful of demonstrators.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot confirmed on Tuesday that federal agents would be deployed to her city to beef up local police.

"We welcome actual partnership, but we do not welcome dictatorship," Ms Lightfoot told a news conference, warning that the federal officers should not try the same tactics they have used in Portland.

Mr Trump often highlights Chicago's gun violence epidemic and he did so again on Wednesday.

"This rampage of violence shocks the conscience of our nation," he said.

In the latest incident in Chicago, at least 15 people were shot outside a funeral home in a suspected gang-related attack.

Federal officers were deployed to Kansas City following the death of a four-year-old boy, LeGend Taliferro, who was shot in the face while sleeping in his family home in June.

The federal law enforcement operation is named after the boy, Mr Trump said. LeGend's mother joined the president at the announcement.

"No mother should ever have to cradle her dead child in her arms simply because politicians refused to do what is necessary to secure their neighbourhood and to secure their city," Mr Trump said.

 

Crime-fighting or electioneering?

Analysis by Tara McKelvey, Kansas City

Many people in Kansas City say the president's plan is not what this place needs. Kansas City leans Democratic, and many are opposed to the president's policies and object to his aggressive law-and-order mandate.

Traditionally crime-fighting programmes are popular during election campaigns, and critics of the president say this initiative is directed more at his conservative supporters in the rural heartland than those who live in Kansas City and other urban areas.

Mr Trump's critics say the initiative is not really an effort to fight urban crime, claiming it is simply a way to drum up enthusiasm among the president's base of supporters before the election.

 

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Democratic politicians, and in particular, the mayors of the "defund police" cities at the heart of this violent mess, need to be stripped of their tax payer funded security details.  

And if DNC strategists think that their breathtakingly hypocritical actions are serving the agenda of reflecting poorly on Trump, they had best take the weekend and review EOTS development and basic battle procedure because they are directly culpable in all of these deaths.

If I were advising on tactics, I'd suggest that the present course of action has become a metaphor for open warfare between the two parties and it's clearly getting people killed now. One side or the other is going to burn as a result of it and it's unlikely to be the side that favours law and order. Unless the polling indicates that voters want more violence, more shootings and more death, y'all best stop before this sticks to ya.... be assured it will stick to someone.

Now, cast your mind back 2 years when I was suggesting that doing the work and earning the win was the choice of champions. You could have fielded a strong moderate candidate and had a resume of good governance leading into the election. Right now you would be working toward easing the tensions, healing the divides and calling for unity and better times ahead. You could be smart enough to realize that every utterance that doesn't do this is a lost opportunity. And you could be tactically aware enough to realize that the notion of all of this ending on election night is a paradise of delusion that only a Demonrat could conjure.

 https://video.foxnews.com/v/6174172621001#sp=show-clips

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America is rapidly becoming the place where we used to send troops to prevent what is now happening in America.

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UN urges US to tamp down use of force by officers in Portland, warns of ‘human rights violations’

The UN's comments come as the Justice Department announced it would open an investigation into the conduct of federal officers in Portland and Washington

 
News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com.

The United Nations has urged the U.S. to stop using what critics say is excessive force on protesters and journalists during ongoing demonstrations in cities, including Portland, Ore.

 

MORE THAN  2,000 PORTLAND DEMONSTRATERS TAKE TO STREET FOR 57TH NIGHT IN A ROW, CLASH WITH FEDS

“There have been reports that peaceful protesters have been detained by unidentified police officers and that is a worry because it may place those detained outside the protection of the law and may give rise to arbitrary detention and other human rights violations,” Liz Throssell, a U.N. human rights spokeswoman, said at a news briefing in Geneva on Friday.

“The authorities should ensure that federal and local security forces deployed are properly and clearly identified and would use force only when necessary, proportionately and in accordance with international standards,” she said.

President Trump dispatched members of the Department of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection, Federal Protective Service and U.S. Marshals Service to both Portland and Washington, D.C., where peaceful demonstrations have turned violent, with ratcheted-up efforts to deface federal property and, in some cases, attack officers.

 

Demonstrators shield themselves from tear gas launched over a fence by federal officers during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse Friday, July 24, 2020, in Portland, Ore. 

Demonstrators shield themselves from tear gas launched over a fence by federal officers during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse Friday, July 24, 2020, in Portland, Ore.  (AP)

Police said crowds of people have thrown Molotov cocktails, lit fires in parks and in trash cans and released hundreds of gallons of water from fire hydrants during the nightly protests, which have been going on for nearly two months following the death of George Floyd in May.

Floyd, an unarmed Black man, died in police custody after a Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck for over eight minutes.

Federal agents have sparred with protesters and been accused of exercising excessive force tactics on wide swaths of demonstrators, impacting both violent rioters and law-abiding ralliers, most of whom are marching against police brutality and racial inequalities.

 

MAYORS OF PORTLAND, CHICAGO, ATLANTA, OTHER BIG CITIES DEMAND 'FEDERAL FORCES' WITHDRAW

 

Mary Hubert, part of a "wall of moms," holds a peace sign during a Black Lives Matter rally on Wednesday, July 22, 2020, in Portland, Ore. 

Mary Hubert, part of a "wall of moms," holds a peace sign during a Black Lives Matter rally on Wednesday, July 22, 2020, in Portland, Ore.  (AP)

A federal judge in Portland Thursday barred federal officers from dispersing, arresting, threatening to arrest or using force against journalists or legal observers and demanded that they immediately stop detaining protesters without probable cause. The judge also mandated over 100 federal officers to identify themselves and their agency before arresting anyone and to explain why an arrest is taking place.

The Department of Justice also announced a probe into the use of force by federal officers after Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler was tear-gassed by officers just a day before.

 

The U.N. has been accused of being an inconsistent voice on human rights. The U.S. left the U.N. Human Rights Council in 2018 over concerns about the membership of the controversial body – which includes countries with poor human rights such as Venezuela and Eritrea. The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, of which Throssell is a spokesperson, is a different body to the UNHRC.

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Portland officials send federal government cease-and-desist letter calling for removal of courthouse fencing

'The fencing and barriers in the right-of-way create a hazard for Portlanders by blocking the bike lane on SW Main,' the letter states

Federal agents make aggressive sweep through Portland on 57th straight night of unrest

Democrats continue to push back against President Trump's support of federal intervention; Corke reports from the White House.

Portland authorities are calling on the government to remove fencing around a federal courthouse amid ongoing protests or face legal action, according to a recently published official letter.

 

The “illegally” installed concrete and metal barriers “are both unpermitted and represent a hazard to the traveling public,” said a letter sent with a cease-and-desist order to a federal official Thursday. Among other things, they block a bike lane, according to the document, published online by Willamette Week.

 

Protesters throw flaming debris over a fence at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse on July 22, in Portland, Ore. Following a larger Black Lives Matter Rally, several hundred demonstrators faced off against federal officers at the courthouse. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Protesters throw flaming debris over a fence at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse on July 22, in Portland, Ore. Following a larger Black Lives Matter Rally, several hundred demonstrators faced off against federal officers at the courthouse. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

“Unidentified agents of the federal government have placed unpermitted fencing and jersey barriers in the city’s right-of-way outside of the Hatfield Federal Courthouse,” the letter states. “The fencing and barriers in the right-of-way create a hazard for Portlanders by blocking the bike lane on SW Main, which is the premiere bike facility into downtown Portland.”

MORE THAN 2,000 PORTLAND DEMONSTRATORS TAKE TO STREET FOR 57TH NIGHT IN A ROW, CLASH WITH FEDS

Failure to remove the fencing would violate city code and administrative rules, “and will be subject to fines and potential legal action,” said the letter.

 

Demonstrators tried to kick down a fence during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse July 23, in Portland, Ore. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Demonstrators tried to kick down a fence during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse July 23, in Portland, Ore. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

A spokesperson for the U.S. General Services Administration, which received the letter from Portland's transportation head and its chief deputy city attorney, did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request seeking comment.

The fencing was erected Wednesday to protect the courthouse in downtown Portland, according to Willamette Week. But it has since become a focus of protesters' attention after nearly two months of demonstrations, which at times have devolved into riots.

Since its installment, demonstrators have attempted to tear it down, throwing fireworks over the perimeter. In at least one instance, they lit a large fire between the barrier and the courthouse, according to social media and reports.

 
 

More than 2,000 people took to the streets Thursday night into Friday morning.

MAYORS OF PORTLAND, CHICAGO, ATLANTA, OTHER BIG CITIES DEMAND 'FEDERAL FORCES' WITHDRAW

The protests began in May after the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis while he was in police custody, and reportedly flared after President Trump sent federal agents despite the city’s opposition.

 

Trump defended the government’s decision to take action in Portland on Thursday night during an interview with Fox News’ Sean Hannity, saying, “We had to do it.”

 

“They're anarchists,” Trump said. “That's even, that's a level that people haven't seen, but they're anarchists."

According to Oregon Public Broadcasting, the fencing cost taxpayers more than $208,000.

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Riot gear is now called anti-protest gear.... and anti-protest gear is banned:

Seattle police chief: New limits on anti-protest gear will mean 'adjusted' law enforcement

‘Simply put, the legislation gives officers NO ability to safely intercede ... in the midst of a large, violent crowd,' the chief says

 

 

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43 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

Riot gear is now called anti-protest gear.... and anti-protest gear is banned:

That's a huge error - should have called it should have called it anti-Covid gear....then it would be mandatory.

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If you live in Toronto, then black gangs matter. 

To solve the problem you first have to identify it. Then you move aggressively to to stop the violence. Then you move aggressively to correct the social issues that lead to it. Just because it's simple doesn't mean it's easy or cheap though.... in fact,  be assured that it's neither. I see that it's getting worse too, when would y'all like to get started on this?  BTW, It might be a good idea to stop protesting in (large numbers) during a global pandemic too; whatcha think?

Any grade 6 class (virtually anywhere) in an open discussion session would arrive at more sensible courses of action than Toronto City Council seems capable of. Just pose some of these scenarios to your grandchildren and see what they suggest.... ask them if they think abolishing the police is a wise strategy.

It's almost like it's deliberate. I spent a lot of time patrolling Canada's east coast fishing zones... I can tell you that the cod disaster was no surprise to anyone who did this regularly or to anyone who had eyes to see what was happening, there could be no other outcome.

Creating a perfect storm in the form of a regulatory environment and failing to take action when it's clearly warranted is akin to standing on the golf course during a thunderstorm with a golf club in each hand raised in anger and protest against the gathering storm, it just doesn't make a lot of sense to me and the outcome is predictable. Why is there such an appetite for this?

https://www.680news.com/2020/07/25/police-release-images-of-suspects-wanted-in-brazen-shooting-carjacking-in-mississauga/

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The crime that WH linked is pretty aggressive, even for Toronto standards, to the point it made the national news. It was not the usual gang retaliation drive by. This was a gang who did a series of armed robberies and resisted arrest. After being fired upon by an individual and an attempt ram the police cruisers, the police recovered a hand gun with a 31 round magazine!!

Gun crimes are an everyday event in Toronto and are not just in Jane and Finch anymore.

 

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Toronto police investigate derogatory messages left around subway station

Police search for suspect after hate-motivated messages left at Finch West station

Wouldn't it be great if they put this much effort into finding your stolen ATV or even pretended to care when your car got vandalized? How many cops are investigating little notes dropped around the subway station? And don't think for a second that I'm condoning the action here, but Toronto has some higher priorities it needs to get on with.

Defunding and/or abolishing police doesn't hurt me a bit. You might think I'm worried about myself here.... I'm not. It's a bit like the effect that transgender athletes had on female sports and university scholarships though. I feel badly for them and wonder what will become of female sports as a result. In short, it hurts other people and I think (OK actually I know) it's short sighted but comes with lots of inertia that's difficult to stuff back in the box. I'd like to know why others don't share that concern. Since pay and benefits is the biggest budget you know (or ought to know) what's going to get cut and you can guess what's going to happen to the already abysmal rural response times.

So really,  I'm concerned about your sister who lives alone and your elderly  parents because targeted home invasions are becoming more and more common in rural areas. Response times are getting slower and slower. If you think all this is just dandy, why aren't you as concerned about them as I am?

My only question for liberals is: do you really want what you seem to be asking for? Exactly the same question I had for female athletes I'm acquainted with.

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Unless we know what was on the cardboard how can we have an opinion?  You'll pardon me for withholding judgement based on the MSM's assessment that the messages were hate-motivated and/or derogatory.  Perhaps they were but the CBC has told me lots of stuff that turned out to be completely false;

- they told me about a 12 year old girl who was chased and had her hijab cut - completely false

- they told me about racist messages left on some dude's car - turned out he did it himself

 - they told me about a NASCAR noose left for whats-his-name - completely false

- they told me about some second-rate TV star and another noose - did it himself

Those are just off the top of my head, with some research I could find another hundred.  Here, I'll save you the effort of typing it into google: http://www.fakehatecrimes.org/

...and a video:

 

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Sadly the masses don't catch onto the numerous false flag events, created by individuals or organized groups.  Don't expect the media to properly report on it, because, hey, 'hate' is a headline grabber and the current meta to further far left agenda.  When there's nothing to protest and riot about, make something up or make it happen.

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Even a blind monkey can see where all of this is headed:

https://www.foxnews.com/us/pinal-county-sheriff-citizens-posse-program-allows-residents-to-be-deputized

Meanwhile Democrats, the wilfully blind and outright liars insist that crime is down:

July was deadliest month in Chicago history, police superintendent says

Figures reveal 440 homicides in 2020, compared to 44 in 2019

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  • 4 weeks later...
Anon wrote: "Yes... let’s all join in the hatred of all police for the sins of a few. Let’s defund one of the most important public institutions in our countries history. Let’s have all badges removed and allow people to tend to their own safety and security. But before you do so, let me tell you about the badge and the thousands of good men and women it represents.
The Badge:
This badge ran towards certain death as the Towers collapsed on 9-11.
This badge ran into the line of fire to save the people in the Pulse Night Club.
This badge sheltered thousands as bullets rained down from the Mandalay Hotel in Las Vegas.
This badge protected a BLM rally that left five officers dead in Dallas.
This badge ran into the Sandy Hook School to stop a school shooter.
This badge killed the Oregon District mass shooter in seconds.
This badge has done CPR on your drowned child.
This badge has fist fought the wife beater who left his spouse in a coma.
This badge has run into burning buildings to save the occupants.
This badge has been shot for simply existing.
This badge has waded through flood waters to rescue the elderly trapped on the roof.
This badge has intentionally crashed into the wrong way driver to protect innocent motorists.
This badge has helped find the lost child so his mother would stop crying hysterically.
This badge has helped the injured dog off the road and rushed it to the vet.
This badge has escorted the elderly woman across the street because she couldn't see well and was afraid to cross.
This badge has bought food for hungry kids because they had been abandoned.
This badge has been soaked in blood and tears.
This badge has been covered by a mourning band to honor those who have sacrificed everything in service.
You may hate me because I wear it. But, I wear it with pride. Despite your hate and your anger, I will await the next call for help. And, I will come running without hesitation. Just like the thousands of men and women across this great nation.
This badge. ~Unknown
Every Cop, Cop Friend, Cop Relative, and Law Enforcement Supporter, should copy & paste this !!!
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Exploiting a Woman’s Deadly Fall to Smear Toronto’s Police

"A few years ago, when I did ride-alongs with Toronto-area police officers, I saw how much of their job involves dealing with mental-health and addiction issues. Most of the incidents these officers responded to were rooted in troubled households, and the protagonists typically were well-known to the arriving officers: an autistic adult son whose outbursts overwhelmed aging parents, a wife fearful of an alcoholic husband, an agitated elderly man who’d become convinced his neighbours were spying on him through his devices. Most of these incidents required therapists as much as (or more than) police officers. But since the threat of violence hovered over all of them, at least in theory, it was the police who got the call. As I wrote at the time, the officers mostly played the role of social workers with a badge."

"The stereotype of police as violent, poorly trained hotheads is sometimes borne out on YouTube, which now functions as a highlight reel for every bad apple wearing a uniform. But the reality—at least in Canada, where I live—is that new officers are typically post-secondary graduates who spend a lot of their time in training sessions. In 2016, I sat in on one such session at a police headquarters facility west of Toronto, where officers attend seminars conducted by experts from within the community, and then go through elaborate small-group role-playing scenarios led by a trained corps of actors who specialize in mimicking various crisis states. As I reported in a magazine article, the facility features a mock-up house with different rooms, so officers can perform their exercises in realistic domestic environments. When each role-playing scenario was completed, the officers were critiqued and interviewed in front of the entire group. Then the actor herself would give her impressions about how the officers’ behaviour made her feel."

When it comes to complicated domestic disputes, sometimes there is no substitute for manpower.

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I thought the entire article deserved to be posted, 

Exploiting a Woman’s Deadly Fall to Smear Toronto’s Police

written by Jonathan Kay
49957262878_2a6f4f9469_6k.jpg

A few years ago, when I did ride-alongs with Toronto-area police officers, I saw how much of their job involves dealing with mental-health and addiction issues. Most of the incidents these officers responded to were rooted in troubled households, and the protagonists typically were well-known to the arriving officers: an autistic adult son whose outbursts overwhelmed aging parents, a wife fearful of an alcoholic husband, an agitated elderly man who’d become convinced his neighbours were spying on him through his devices. Most of these incidents required therapists as much as (or more than) police officers. But since the threat of violence hovered over all of them, at least in theory, it was the police who got the call. As I wrote at the time, the officers mostly played the role of social workers with a badge.

The stereotype of police as violent, poorly trained hotheads is sometimes borne out on YouTube, which now functions as a highlight reel for every bad apple wearing a uniform. But the reality—at least in Canada, where I live—is that new officers are typically post-secondary graduates who spend a lot of their time in training sessions. In 2016, I sat in on one such session at a police headquarters facility west of Toronto, where officers attend seminars conducted by experts from within the community, and then go through elaborate small-group role-playing scenarios led by a trained corps of actors who specialize in mimicking various crisis states. As I reported in a magazine article, the facility features a mock-up house with different rooms, so officers can perform their exercises in realistic domestic environments. When each role-playing scenario was completed, the officers were critiqued and interviewed in front of the entire group. Then the actor herself would give her impressions about how the officers’ behaviour made her feel.

I thought about all this following the real-life case of Regis Korchinski-Paquet, the 29-year-old black woman who fell to her death from a Toronto apartment balcony in May while seeking to evade police officers. During one role-playing session I observed four years ago, an actor seeking to evade officers under similar circumstances ran into a bathroom and locked the door. For five minutes, the officers awkwardly tried to coax her out, meeting with eventual success. In the analysis segment that followed, the supervising officer explained that it once was common practice for officers in such situations to simply bash open the door. But this kind of technique fell out of fashion years ago, since it led to unnecessary trauma and risk (for the officers as much as the bathroom occupant).

Some of the other acted exercises I observed included a paranoid schizophrenic crouching under a kitchen table, babbling fearfully as officers tried to soothe him, and a homeless woman who threatened to hurt herself with a knife if officers approached. While holding them at bay from her perch on a living-room sofa, the actress recited a backstory: She had nothing to live for because child services had taken away her kid, her only reason for hope. When she finally put away the knife, the officers walked forward to escort her away—at which point the supervisor ended the exercise and admonished them: “Yes, she put away that knife,” he said. “But how do you know that’s the only weapon she’s got? When you focus on the object, you forget about the person.”

There was also a memorable exercise involving a male actor who was threatening to jump from a window—which presents another grim point of analogy to the Korchinski-Paquet case. It is a mark of this man’s acting skill that, years after I watched his morbid star turn, I still remember the details of his narrative: He was a musician, suffering from depression, who was stuck pursuing a dead-end part-time position with a local orchestra.

Critically, he wasn’t the only actor who was part of this particular exercise. An older woman played the role of his mother, who was screaming non-stop as the officers arrived. Two pairs of officers did the exercise in succession, and their approaches were very different. The first pair—two men who’d recently joined the force—both approached the man and took turns imploring him to step down from the window. But they could barely make themselves heard over the screaming of the actor playing the mother role. Then came the second pair of officers, middle-aged women who’d apparently worked together on the beat. One of the women spoke to the man, while the other officer gently guided the mother off into another room. This was correct practice, the instructor said: You can’t make any progress if you’re just going to become bystanders to an ongoing drama. In many cases, you need to separate the family members before you can help them.

It’s the same principle I saw (and wrote about) when I observed two veteran officers show up at the (very real) home of a young couple who’d been fighting. The man, plainly troubled in all sorts of ways, had punched a hole in the wall, and the woman was frightened. One of the first things that happened upon our arrival was that the female officer—Constable Jaime Peach, who still serves on the Peel Police—took the man downstairs and interviewed him in the lobby. The other officer, Winston Fullinfaw (who was promoted to staff sergeant around the time I rode with him), interviewed the woman and learned about her complicated family situation. Had there been more adults in the household, it’s possible that more officers would have been dispatched: When it comes to complicated domestic disputes, sometimes there is no substitute for manpower. A beleaguered lone officer sometimes may become more prone to violence, since he is more likely to lose control of a situation and feel threatened.

This is something we should think about amid claims that society would be more peaceful if we simply got rid of the police, or starved it of funding. We should also think about how such police forces would respond to funding cuts. Training programs would be one of the first things to face the chopping block. Would that make anyone safer?

On May 27th, the last day of Korchinski-Paquet’s life, a half-dozen Toronto Police Service officers and an EMS worker responded to a call from her family members, who’d told a 911 operator that there was a fight in their 24th-storey apartment. Because Ontario’s independent Special Investigations Unit (SIU) now has released its report on Korchinski-Paquet’s death, based on camera footage and numerous interviews, we know what happened next. As the Toronto Sun accurately reported back in early June, Korchinski-Paquet asked to take a bathroom break before accompanying the officers downtown for mental-health treatment. She then barricaded a door, went onto her balcony, and slipped while trying to step onto another balcony, falling 24 floors to her death. Initial reports from family—which suggested that officers had murdered the woman by deliberately pushing her off the balcony—were completely false.

To state the obvious, the death of Korchinski-Paquet is a tragedy. And it would have compounded the tragedy to learn that her death was a racist act of homicide. One might therefore imagine that it would provide Torontonians with at least some meager solace to learn that their police force had acquitted itself without fault, and in a way that reflected the progressive, non-violent methods that are taught in training programs. But in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd and the riots that followed, it has become a common claim among progressive media and politicians that Canada is every bit as racist as the United States. And in the absence of actual recent Canadian scenes of horror on par with the killing of Floyd, the case of Korchinski-Paquet has been cited as a substitute.

The Toronto Star, which never misses a chance to hustle racism claims to its readers, has run features with titles such as “Regis Korchinski-Paquet’s death and anti-Black violence in policing,” informing us “how systemic racism and anti-Black violence continues to play a huge role in Canada.” In a Star op-ed published in early June, opinion writer Noa Mendelsohn Aviv explicitly rejected the proposition that “in order to comment on Regis’s death, we must wait for the result of the Special Investigation Unit’s investigation because we do not yet have the facts and need to ascertain the truth.” (Even when this week’s report came out, the Star could not bear to abandon its anti-police posture, and so now is impugning the credibility of the SIU.) A Maclean’s writer described Korchinski-Paquet’s death as evidence that “Black lives” are “expendable.” The SIU investigation shows nothing of the kind, even if I doubt we will see any retractions.

 

Perhaps the most appalling response—because it comes from someone who purports to be seeking the job of Canadian prime minister—was from Jagmeet Singh, leader of Canada’s progressive New Democratic Party (NDP). On August 26th, after the SIU released its report, Singh blithely claimed that Regis Korchinski-Paquet “died because of police intervention. She needed help and her life was taken instead. The SIU’s decision brings no justice to the family and it won’t prevent this from happening again.” Singh offered no theory as to why the SIU report was wrong, but simply delivered a flat-out blood libel against the officers who’d tried to help Korchinski-Paquet on May 27th (and who are likely traumatized by what happened, as any normal person would be). To repeat: This isn’t some college activist or aggrieved family member. It is the leader of a national Canadian political party who holds the balance of power in Canada’s minority Parliament.

Singh is in some ways a special case, because his NDP, having strayed so far from the unionized blue-collar base on which it was founded, now has been reduced to little more than a social-media outpost catering to college hashtaggers. For weeks, in 2017, he spouted conspiracist nonsense about the 1985 bombing of Air India Flight 182, the worst terrorist attack in Canadian history. More recently, he casually denounced the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as a gang of bigots, and then was ejected from Parliament when he accused a fellow Parliamentarian of being racist because he didn’t go along with Singh’s slur. But though comprising an extreme example, Singh is hardly alone. Indeed, the presumption that all police are, by their nature, contaminated by racist malignancy, has become a casually recited starting point in debates about crime and policing.

In regard to the actual goal of reforming police methods—which is the thing that Singh and everyone else pretends to care about—it’s worth taking stock of the damage wrought by this irresponsible approach. About three Torontonians die every year during encounters with police, this in a city of three million people. That’s less than one-third the average annual tally for Minneapolis, a city that is one-seventh the size of Toronto. One might think that a 20-plus-fold difference in per-capita police-involved deaths might be seen as statistically significant, and be reasonably attributed to the massive investments in training and professionalism that I have personally witnessed in Canadian constabularies. If best practices in Toronto spread to American cities, lives truly could be saved. But instead, progressives such as Singh are far more interested in polluting Twitter with lazy lies and protest applause lines that erase any distinction between policing methods.

Information about the death of Korchinski-Paquet may be found on the website of Ontario’s SIU. And if there are lessons to be gleaned about how to better respond to potentially violent family crises, our leaders should implement them. But so far, police critics seem far more interested in exploiting this poor woman’s death to advance their own ideological bona fides and defame innocent police officers than with preventing future tragedies.

 

Jonathan Kay is Canadian Editor of Quillette. He tweets at @jonkay.

Correction: The original version of this article erroneously indicated that the average number of Torontonians who die annually in police-involved actions is about one. In fact, it is closer to three. The text has been corrected accordingly. 

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3 teens arrested in violent crime spree in Minneapolis

The suspects were between 14 and 15 years old By Vandana Rambaran | Fox News

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Three teens -- between 14 and 15 years old -- were arrested and charged with multiple felonies in connection with a string of robberies and a carjacking that happened in broad daylight, police in Minneapolis said.

Authorities made the arrests after viewing surveillance that showed a group of six teenagers in hoodies and masks robbing a woman who owned a gift store called 14 Hill, near E. 48th Street and Chicago Avenue, in broad daylight Tuesday, FOX9 reported.

CLEVELAND POLICE OFFICER SHOT, KILLED; 3 SUSPECTS REPORTEDLY ARRESTED

The incident is believed to be the fourth by the same group in the Lake Nokomis area.

Chad Stamps, the store owner's husband, told the local news outlet that the suspects "pushed her down and then they opened up the cash register and took the cash and ran out of there."

 

When the woman tried to flee to a next-door business, the suspects followed her, punching another business owner in the face, and making off with the woman's purse and her car.

The Third Precinct region where Tuesday's robberies took place saw four other carjackings by midafternoon on Wednesday.

Frustrated business owners say they worry that the offenders could return.

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Al Sharpton: Defunding police is something ‘a latte liberal' may like, but ‘proper policing’ is necessary

'On the ground it is certainly feeling more violent, feeling more unsafe in unsafe communities,' he said

MSNBC’s Al Sharpton said Tuesday that defunding the NYPD is something “a latte liberal' may support, but “people living on the ground need proper policing.”

 

“Morning Joe” namesake Joe Scarborough asked Sharpton about the crime in his native New York City, which has seen a surge in shootings during the coronavirus pandemic.

NYC CRIME SPREE KNOCKS ON THE DOORSTEPS OF AMERICA’S ULTRA-RICH 

“We’ve always heard about the tale of two cities. On the side of the city that I come from, which is Blacker and poorer, we’ve seen more in terms of gun usage. I got a lot of attention when I did the eulogy for George Floyd’s funeral, but I also, a month later, preached a 1-year-old kid’s funeral in Brooklyn who was killed by a stray bullet,” Sharpton said.

 

“Six people were shot over Labor Day weekend at a festivity in Brooklyn, so I would say statistically we’re not much higher than where we were, but on the ground it is certainly feeling more violent, feeling more unsafe in unsafe communities,” Sharpton added.

 

AOC SAYS PROPOSED $1B BUDGET CUT TO NYPD ISN'T ENOUGH: 'DEFUNDING POLICE MEANS DEFUNDING POLICE’

Scarborough then brought up the “defund the police” movement – which demonstrators have been calling for across the country, since the death of George Floyd in police custody in late May – noting that some feel it would largely impact minorities and people in already unsafe neighborhoods.

“We need to re-imagine how we do policing, but ... to take all policing off is something a latte liberal may go for as they sit around the Hamptons discussing this as an academic problem. But people living on the ground need proper policing,” Sharpton said.

Demonstrators calling to “defund the police” want taxpayer funds diverted from policing systems to support initiatives that focus on community and youth programs. Activists say the move would help prevent racial injustices by providing opportunities for underprivileged communities.

 

New York City lawmakers voted in July on budget changes that shifted $1 billion from the New York Police Department to programs that assist in youth and community development, a number that fell short of what many protesters in the city have demanded.

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The City Council said in a statement that the city's 2021 budget will include $837 million in cuts and transfers to the New York Police Department (NYPD) expense budget, which removes $1 billion from the NYPD’s spending when combined with associated costs.

The amount was far less than what some protesters demanded. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., said earlier that $1.5 billion in cuts would not be enough.

 

Fox News’ Caitlin McFall contributed to this report.  

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