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Out training the rapid loss of experience is harder than most people think. The MBA crew and RCAF career managers have been playing catch up for years. It's expensive, thirsty work, it always effects the tempo of operations and you always get an inferior product when forced to recruit en masse.... especially if the job is perceived as undesirable (due to pay, working conditions, length of training, etc). 

Taken together (and IMO) the entire defund police thing is about establishing a national/federal force to replace municipal forces. It's an important piece of the puzzle for enforcing social agenda and most countries who tread this road use their military.

The current trend toward sanctuary jurisdictions and the outright refusal of some departments to enforce unconstitutional laws must be seen (in liberal circles) as an obstacle to be overcome. 

While most people may be opposed in principal to defunding, I submit that they haven't taken the time to think it all through. If they had, they wold be more concerned than I perceive them to be and "opposed in principal" would become the understatement of the year.

 

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Alberta social studies curriculum adviser says Kamloops unmarked burial site no evidence of genocide

 

Chris Champion says unmarked graves of Indigenous children no comparison to the Holocaust

 
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Janet French · CBC News · Posted: Jun 17, 2021 7:16 PM MT | Last Updated: 12 hours ago
 
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Ground penetrating radar was used on the grounds at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to indicate that the remains of 215 children could be buried at the site. (Andrew Snucins/The Canadian Press)

WARNING: This story contains details some readers may find distressing.

A key government adviser for Alberta's new elementary social studies curriculum says people are overreacting to the discovery of what are believed to be the unmarked burial sites of children's remains adjacent to a former residential school in Kamloops, B.C.

 

"Almost the entire media and social media class in Canada, however, seized on Kamloops as evidence of 'Canada's Holocaust,' as if the children had been deliberately killed or that death was the norm rather than the very sad exception," Chris Champion wrote Thursday in the Dorchester Review, a history publication which he edits.

He says there is a "vast gulf" between the fate of children buried in Kamloops and the magnitude of other atrocities. He wrote that Indigenous people should not be "entitled to some unique aristocratic victim status."

Last year, the Alberta government paid Champion $15,400 for 38 days of work providing advice on the kindergarten to Grade 6 social studies curriculum. He previously worked for Premier Jason Kenney when Kenney was a federal Conservative cabinet minister.

Champion did not respond to a request for comment.

Parents, teachers, academics and Indigenous leaders and elders have panned the draft curriculum as racist, Eurocentric, age-inappropriate and unsupported by research about how children best learn.

The article follows recent Twitter posts by the Dorchester Review account depicting residential school students standing on a wooden structure and smiling.

"'They were put through hell' and yet they are having an absolute blast on that play structure. What gives?" reads one tweet from Wednesday. Another tweet claimed the mortality rate for children in residential school was lower than for the general population of young children in the early 1900s.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has identified about 4,100 children who died at residential schools, but says this is likely an underestimate due to poor records. The commission concluded children were abused, physically, emotionally and sexually, and that they died in intolerable numbers.

Observers say K-6 curriculum needs to be revisited

Nicole Sparrow, press secretary to Education Minister Adriana LaGrange, said in an email that Alberta Education denounces the Dorchester Review's tweets. She said Champion is not involved in the development of curriculum for Grades 7 to 12 and hasn't worked for the government since September 2020.

"The forcible removal of Indigenous children from their homes to residential schools is a dark, deplorable part of Canada's history — which is exactly why, for the first time, the new draft curriculum will teach students about residential schools, Truth and Reconciliation and ensure students learn First Nations, Métis and Inuit content in every single grade," she said.

The draft does not introduce the concept of residential schools until Grade 5, counter to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's calls to action to start in kindergarten.

 
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Kisha Supernant, director of the Prairie and Indigenous Archeology Institute at the University of Alberta, said she was horrified by recent tweets from the account of the Dorchester Review, which is edited by Chris Champion, one of the government's key advisers for a new social studies curriculum. (Submitted by Kisha Supernant)

Kisha Supernant, a University of Alberta archeology professor who works with Indigenous communities to uncover unmarked burial sites, says the government needs to revisit the curriculum with "more appropriate" advisers. One photo of smiling children does not negate thousands of survivors' stories, she said.

"Someone who thinks that that's quality scholarship shouldn't be writing a curriculum, because clearly, they don't understand," she said.

 
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Daniel Panneton is a program and education assistant at the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in Toronto. He teaches students and the public about the Holocaust, and says he sees parallels between Holocaust denial and people who minimize the harms of residential schools. (Submitted by Daniel Panneton)

Daniel Panneton, program and education assistant at Toronto's Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre, said he sees parallels between the Dorchester Review tweets and the rhetoric of Holocaust deniers.

"The fact that that person is potentially shaping the way that Canadian children are learning about their own history is very concerning, in that he may be impeding a much-needed conversation and reckoning," he said.

Opposition NDP education critic Sarah Hoffman says the tweets are further evidence the education minister should rescind the draft curriculum, and rework it with Indigenous experts.

"She is completely misreading where Canadians, where Albertans are on this issue, and how rightfully outraged we are," Hoffman said.

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I can no longer see the road back... madness has become normal and it's reflected in the fact that what used to be political affiliation has become a religion. Those who scoff at Christianity and belittle Christians should look up the definition.

I'll take selective outrage for $100 Alex:

Mob gathers in Portland after deadly officer-involved shooting; some throw items at officers

A suspect was hospitalized after being shot by an officer earlier

The department clarified on Twitter that the suspect was an "adult white male," citing "erroneous" information circulating on social media. No one else was injured in the incident. 

 

 

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Six things the media got wrong about the graves found near Residential Schools | True North (tnc.news)

Six things the media got wrong about the graves found near Residential Schools

By
 Candice Malcolm
 -
July 7, 2021Pinterest
 
 
 

When it comes to the coverage of graves identified near residential schools in three First Nations communities, the legacy media in Canada has done a tremendous disservice to all Canadians – especially First Nations. 

They have created a moral panic, and continue to fan the flames of racial division.

This panic came to a breaking point over the weekend, when prominent statues were knocked over and at least 25 churches in Western Canada were either vandalized or completely burnt down. 

To make matters worse, several prominent commentators, including politicians, journalists, professors, lawyers and activists, excused the behaviour of the mob, explained away and justified these riots, and in some cases, even cheered them on. 

“Burn it all down,” said the head of the BC Civil Liberties Association, once the country’s strongest voice for protecting the rule of law and civil liberties.

Likewise, the Chair of the Newfoundland Canadian Bar Association Branch said “Burn it all down”

Or how about this, from a radio host in St. John New Brunswick:

“Burn the churches down. Arrest any former staff that were actually there and any current staff that won’t provide documentation. Sell everything they own in Canada and give it to survivors. Dismantle it completely.”

Not to be outdone, NDP MP Niki Ashton cheered on the mob who toppled statues at the Manitoba legislature but calling it “decolonization” and saying there is “no pride in genocide.” 

Finally, Justin Trudeau’s top advisor and best friend Gerald Butts said that burning churches isn’t cool, but it “may be understandable.”

How did we get here as a country? 

Here are the six ways the legacy media in Canada got this story wrong. 

1. Unverified Reports 

It is standard practice in journalism to clarify whether or not an allegation has been proven, in court or otherwise. But when the Tk’emlups band issued a press release stating that they had used ground penetrating radar to locate 215 unmarked graves, the media accepted the story without question or any verification. 

The band said a report was forthcoming in mid-June – but no report has been released to date. No evidence of any sort has been put forth for public consideration. We don’t know who carried out the research, whether it was a company or a university, or how the technology was used. At this point, we have a few claims, and nothing else. 

This may be a minor point, but it’s an important distinction nonetheless. 

2. What exactly was “discovered”?

There has been incredible confusion over what exactly was discovered, and media outlets have used tremendous liberty in describing what the bands have claimed. 

JJ McCullough has made this point on Twitter, showing all the various ways the media have described what was discovered. 

A LACK OF CLARITY AMONG REPORTERS REGARDING WHAT GROUND-PENETRATING RADAR DOES SEEMS TO HAVE LED TO A LOT OF INCONSISTENCY IN HOW THE KAMLOOPS RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL DISCOVERY HAS BEEN CHARACTERIZED. WHICH ONE DO YOU THINK IS THE MOST ACCURATE? (ADDED THE PRESS RELEASE FOR CONTEXT) PIC.TWITTER.COM/M25NLEUQY3

— J.J. McCullough (@JJ_McCullough) June 5, 2021

The first nation band leaders say they used ground penetrating radar. 

To be clear: nothing was “uncovered.” No “bodies” were found. There was no excavation, nothing was unearthed, nothing was removed, no identities were confirmed.

So anything you may have read saying these graves belong to children, including some specific claims about the ages of these children, is speculation at this point. 

Let me refer back to a National Post story that explains what ground penetrating radar actually does. They interviewed a professor of Anthropology who is also the director of the Institute of Prairie and Indigenous Archaeology. She said this of ground penetrating radar:

“It doesn’t actually see the bodies. It’s not like an X-ray.” 

“What it actually does is it looks for the shaft. When a grave is dug, there is a grave shaft dug and the body is placed in the grave, sometimes in a coffin, as in the Christian burial context. What the ground-penetrating radar can see is where that pit itself was dug, because the soil actually changes when you dig a grave. And occasionally, if it is a coffin, the radar can pick up the coffin sometimes as well.”

We’re talking about pretty rudimentary technology here, and a relatively imprecise process. The numbers are more or less a rough estimate. 

So why have media reports been so bold in asserting these numbers as facts? 

3. We don’t know whose graves were discovered

The Tk’emlups band claimed the graves belonged to children at the school. So when the second two bands (Cowessess and Lower Kootaney) came forth with their own claims, many in the media jumped to the conclusion that these too were the graves of children from residential schools. 

But that wasn’t the claim made by the bands. In fact, in both Cowessess and Lower Kootaney, the graves are believed to be in community cemeteries, belonging to both First Nations and the broader Canadian community. 

Tucked away at the very end of a report in the Globe and Mail on the findings at the Cowessess reserve in Saskatchewan, it said this: 

“It appears that not all of the graves contain children’s bodies, Lerat (who is one of the band leaders) said. He said the area was also used as a burial site by the rural municipality.

“We did have a family of non-Indigenous people show up today and notified us that some of those unmarked graves had their families in them – their loved ones,” Lerat said.”

So what we have here is an abandoned community cemetery, where people of different backgrounds were buried. 

That’s quite a leap from the original storyline that these graves belong to children who had died at a residential school. 

4. NOT mass graves

These are not mass graves. Several media outlets, both in Canada and international outlets like the BBC, Al Jazeera, the New York Times and the Washington Post have recklessly and erroneously labeled these findings as mass graves. 

HOW COME SO MANY MEDIA OUTLETS DESCRIBED THESE AS A "MASS GRAVES"? THE WORDS NEVER APPEARED IN THE ORIGINAL NEWS RELEASE FROM TK'EMLÚPS TE SECWÉPEMC EITHER. THE MEDIA JUST MADE IT UP. HTTPS://T.CO/3IQYW1AFPL

— Candice Malcolm (@CandiceMalcolm) June 4, 2021

I WONDER IF THE @TORONTOSTAR @BBCNEWS @NYTIMES @WASHINGTONPOST AND COUNTLESS OTHERS WILL BOTHER ISSUING CORRECTIONS OR UPDATING THEIR REPORTS WITH THE FACTS. PIC.TWITTER.COM/XTO471PYB3

— Candice Malcolm (@CandiceMalcolm) June 4, 2021

This is incredibly irresponsible. 

All three chiefs themselves have explicitly stated these are not mass graves. 

"THIS NOT A MASS GRAVE SITE, THIS IS JUST UNMARKED GRAVES" – COWESSESS FIRST NATION CHIEF CADMUS DELORME, TELLING @EVANLSOLOMON ABOUT HOW HIS COMMUNITY FOUND 751 UNMARKED GRAVES BEHIND THE MARIEVAL INDIAN RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL #CDNPOLI HTTPS://T.CO/IQKI9TX9PU PIC.TWITTER.COM/EGPM2WI9Q3

— CTV Question Period (@ctvqp) June 27, 2021

"THIS IS NOT A MASS GRAVE. THESE ARE PRELIMINARY FINDINGS. WE WILL BE SHARING THE WRITTEN REPORT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE MONTH."

— Angela Sterritt (@AngelaSterritt) June 4, 2021

Why is this important? 

Mass graves are a hallmark of genocide. They conjure images of pure evil, the kind of evil that characterized collectivist governments in the 20th century.

Hitler, Stalin, Mao and Pol Pot. 

These were truly evil leaders who used mass graves to cover their atrocities and crimes against humanity. These leaders carried out mass murder, and the mass graves went hand in hand. 

The use of the term mass graves is wrong, and it is reckless. It conflates Canada’s policy of forced assimilation through mandatory universal education, with Nazi death camps. 

Let me be clear. Canada’s policy was wrong. It was misguided and in too many cases, those who were responsible for caring for children in this country let them down, and let all of us down. 

But that does not put Canada’s residential schools on any level of equivalence with Auschwitz and other Nazi concentration camps. 

It’s good to see that the Washington Post made a correction on their story. Others should follow. 

5. Cause of death

Many children who died at these schools died of natural causes. According to the Truth and Reconciliation Committee report in 2015, the number one cause of death was Tuberculosis. 

TRCC-1.png

You can argue that these children didn’t receive proper health care, or that some of their immune systems could’t handle living in close proximity to other children. 

But negligence resulting in accidental death is quite different from murder, which is what many in politics and the media have suggested. 

IT’S CALLED GENOCIDE, JOHN. WE BETTER GET USED TO THE WORD. HISTORIANS WILL BE USING IT WITH NO QUALIFICATIONS, EQUIVOCATIONS OR ASTERISKS. CANADA MUST OWN THESE CRIMES. CANADIANS NEED TO CALL IT BY ITS NAME. #GENOCIDE HTTPS://T.CO/RY4LBDZHTP

— Charles Adler (@charlesadler) June 24, 2021

Since this news came out, there has been a near universal assumption in the media that these graves are evidence of Canada’s Holocaust, as if the children had been deliberately killed.

Genocide requires intent. It requires a concerted and systematic effort to conduct mass murder and eliminate an entire race of people.

Canada’s residential schools, however misguided, had the intent of educating children, assimilating them into the broader Canadian population, and ultimately lifting them out of poverty. 

The policy was wrong, clearly. It was flawed and much harm resulted. 

But there are a few orders of magnitude that separate the misguided intent of Catholic priests, nuns and Canadian government officials versus those of Nazi firing squads and gas chambers. 

6. It’s possible these weren’t even unmarked graves. 

Wooden graves, which were and are still the norm in First Nations communities in Western Canada, erode and disintegrate over time. It’s possible these were once marked graves. 

This is the claim being made by the former chief in the Lower Kootenay region (the third band to have announced the finding of graves.)

This is from a Global News story (my emphasis added):

The detection of human remains in unmarked graves at the site of a former residential school in B.C. was not an unexpected discovery, according to the area’s former chief.

On Wednesday, it was confirmed that ground-penetrating radar found 182 unmarked graves in a cemetery at the site of the former Kootenay Residential School at St. Eugene Mission just outside Cranbrook, B.C.

The remains were found when remedial work was being performed in the area to replace the fence at the cemetery last year.

Sophie Pierre, former chief of the St Mary’s Indian Band and a survivor of the school itself, told Global News that while the news of the unmarked graves had a painful impact on her and surrounding communities, they had always known the graves were there.

“There’s no discovery, we knew it was there, it’s a graveyard,” Pierre said. “The fact there are graves inside a graveyard shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone.”

According to Pierre, wooden crosses that originally marked the gravesites had been burned or deteriorated over the years.  Using a wooden marker at a gravesite remains a practice that continues to this day in many Indigenous communities across Canada.

So when we’re talking about so-called unmarked graves, at least in the context of the Lower Kootenay Band, what we are more likely talking about is abandoned graves at an existing cemetery. 

Abandoned graves where people of different backgrounds — not just children from residential schools — were buried.

What an amazing leap to go from an uncared for community cemetery to mass graves, mass murder and genocide.

Mark Twain once said to never let the truth get in the way of a good story. Well for journalists, they might say never let the facts get in the way of a good narrative. 

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I fail to see how these are attempts to "explain away" what happened.  Information that gives context is important.  It's not explaining away but rather putting what happened into a coherent context.  Did bad things happen at residential schools?  Undoutedly.  Was the overall net effect negative?  Sounds like it.  Was it 100% negative?  Well, no, there have been people who attended residential schools who speak positively about the experience.  Was it 90% bad and 10% good?  95% bad and 5% good?  75% bad and 25% good?  I sure don't know but I do know that condeming it as 100% evil is wrong and does no one any good.

I believe that the residential school plan was well intentioned.  Poorly planned, poorly managed and poor oversight but well intentioned from an 1890s POV.  Of course that doesn't absolve anyone involved bu to say that the residential school plan was concieved to commit genocide, as is being pushed in the MSM, is wrong.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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21 minutes ago, seeker said:

I fail to see how these are attempts to "explain away" what happened.  Information that gives context is important.  It's not explaining away but rather putting what happened into a coherent context.  Did bad things happen at residential schools?  Undoutedly.  Was the overall net effect negative?  Sounds like it.  Was it 100% negative?  Well, no, there have been people who attended residential schools who speak positively about the experience.  Was it 90% bad and 10% good?  95% bad and 5% good?  75% bad and 25% good?  I sure don't know but I do know that condeming it as 100% evil is wrong and does no one any good.

I believe that the residential school plan was well intentioned.  Poorly planned, poorly managed and poor oversight but well intentioned from an 1890s POV.  Of course that doesn't absolve anyone involved bu to say that the residential school plan was concieved to commit genocide, as is being pushed in the MSM, is wrong.

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I agree, what was thought to be a good idea went wrong but mostly in the delivery by those who ran the residential schools........ and of course the polititions who, as recently as the 60s - 70s kept them going.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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To say that the residential school plan was well intentioned is to fail to see what the end result should have been.

As I posted elsewhere, when you look at the background of those who came up with the plan, and trace it back to the imperialism that was forced on the world by those of the same belief.  

Plain and simple, it was designed to get rid of the indigenous and their culture.  If that isn't genocide, what is.

Further to this, here is a simple explanation of why we are having this discussion.

https://youtu.be/v4UOsPoPMjA

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2 hours ago, deicer said:

To say that the residential school plan was well intentioned is to fail to see what the end result should have been.

As I posted elsewhere, when you look at the background of those who came up with the plan, and trace it back to the imperialism that was forced on the world by those of the same belief.  

Plain and simple, it was designed to get rid of the indigenous and their culture.  If that isn't genocide, what is.

 

Definition and debate

The term genocide was coined in 1943 by the Jewish-Polish lawyer Raphael Lemkin, who combined the Greek word "genos" (race or tribe) with the Latin word "cide" (to kill).

After witnessing the horrors of the Holocaust, in which every member of his family except his brother was killed, Dr Lemkin campaigned to have genocide recognised as a crime under international law.

His efforts gave way to the adoption of the United Nations Genocide Convention in December 1948, which came into effect in January 1951.

 

Article Two of the convention defines genocide as "any of the following acts committed with the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial or religious group, as such":

  • Killing members of the group
  • Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group
  • Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part
  • Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group
  • Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group

The convention also imposes a general duty on states that are signatories to "prevent and to punish" genocide.

Since its adoption, the UN treaty has come under criticism from different sides, mostly by people frustrated with the difficulty of applying it to specific cases. Some have argued that the definition is too narrow; others that it is devalued by overuse.

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Once again, the manipulation is used to incite fear and violence...

https://www.cnn.com/2021/07/08/politics/critical-race-theory-panic-race-deconstructed-newsletter/index.html

The engineered conservative panic over critical race theory, explained

Spare a thought for critical race theory. It wasn't always a conservative bogeyman.
Especially over the past several months, Republican leaders have distorted CRT -- an academic frame that scholars such as Kimberlé Crenshaw have been using in graduate-level courses for decades to interrogate how the legal system entrenches racism -- into a catchall to describe things they don't like.
In this bastardized telling, CRT is whatever Republicans want it to be; it comes in many guises. "Black Lives Matter" is one name for CRT. "Social justice" is another. "Identity," yet another. "Reparations." "Ally-ship." "Diversity."
 
 
But to linger on what CRT is, or isn't, is to miss the more pressing concern: Why have Republicans latched onto a decades-old academic term?
" 'Strung together, the phrase "critical race theory" connotes hostile, academic, divisive, race-obsessed, poisonous, elitist, anti-American,' " explained Christopher F. Rufo, one of the conservative activists who -- with the help of Fox News, a network that's become its own language -- engineered the panic over CRT.
 
Because so many Americans don't know what CRT is, it's the perfect tool for scaring White conservative voters with made-up problems -- for mobilizing them against the racial awakening of the past year.
 

The backlash to CRT echoes the 1960s

The panic over CRT is hardly the first time that the US has seen such ethnonationalist fearmongering.
In a recent Twitter thread, Pomona College politics professor Omar Wasow argued that one way to understand the anxiety over CRT is as "a reactionary counter-mobilization."
Wasow, who was previously at Princeton University and whose research focuses largely on protest movements, said that he was struck by how the present-day backlash to CRT echoes the dynamics of the 1960s.
"What we saw in some cases in the '60s was that, as the civil rights movement was able to capture the moral high ground in a national conversation on race, that knocked pro-segregation forces on their heels," he told CNN. "There was a period of trying to regroup and find an issue to mobilize around when, nationally, being pro-segregation became highly stigmatized."
Republicans sought to reframe the world. For instance, they heeded the cruel logic of "law and order," a dog whistle used against the civil rights protests of the era. This maneuvering was part of what University of Arkansas political science professors Angie Maxwell and Todd Shields call the "Long Southern Strategy," a series of decisions on race, religion and feminism that Republicans made starting in the '60s to court White conservative voters in the South.
In the year since the murder of George Floyd and the renewed demands for racial justice, Republicans have once again detected a need to reposition themselves, to turn a cultural shift into a sense of crisis that they can use to their advantage. (Republicans are doing something similar in their war against transgender students, as The Atlantic's Adam Serwer keenly pointed out.)
"We saw Donald Trump try to run on 'law and order' and lose. It didn't seem to have the same punch that it did in the '60s, when Nixon invoked 'law and order' and won the White House. So, there's been this process of searching for a new issue," Wasow said. "There was a period when leading Republicans were complaining about 'cancel culture,' how Dr. Seuss was supposedly being canceled. But it never seemed to stick. So, I think that we're seeing this kind of elite process of trying to find an issue to mobilize around for the 2022, and maybe even 2024, elections. And CRT is one that's really hit a nerve."
Conservative media outlets also play a role in anti-CRT mobilization, broadcasting an invented problem to their millions of viewers.
"Instead of debating CRT's merit, right-wing talkers have simply sought to demonize it," CNN's Oliver Darcy wrote for the Reliable Sources newsletter. This conscious obsession with CRT has helped it leap "from the TV screen into state legislatures and local communities."
 

The outrage over CRT is also about White identity politics

It makes sense to situate the controversy around CRT not only within the history of race and racism in the US but also within the larger arc of demographic change.
One crucial dimension of this change: the country's ballooning racial diversity and its effect on White identity politics, which Duke University political science professor Ashley Jardina describes as White Americans' increasingly active identification with their racial group.
"Various studies find that when White people are exposed to information about social change -- demographic change, in particular -- they express more politically conservative views," Wasow told CNN. "So, there's a larger conversation happening right now about whether the US is going to be a multiracial democracy -- in which there's no dominant group -- or hold onto what has historically been a kind of ethno-racial majority, a White Christian-dominant majority."
It's no exaggeration to say that the assault on the US Capitol on January 6 -- when insurrectionists waving Confederate flags and pledging their allegiance to Trump tried to overturn the 2020 presidential election -- was a deadly manifestation of a White nationalist vision.
Wasow added that such dueling visions are at the core of the contest between Trump and his ilk on the one hand and figures such as Barack Obama and Joe Biden on the other.
In publicly advocating for the birther conspiracy theory about a decade ago, Trump wasn't merely slandering one of his political opponents. He was attempting to delegitimize the multiracial coalition that installed Obama in the White House.
This battle over a country in transition continues today.
"I think that the panic over CRT can be seen as part of this underlying anxiety about the status of White Americans in a changing country. That fear is sharper in moments like the aftermath of a protest movement calling for things like reforming policing and thinking harder about race in schools and hiring," Wasow said.
These demands unsettle the status quo. Anti-CRT mobilization, then, is really a means of reaffirming the perceived legitimacy of the status quo.
But let's give Crenshaw the final word on the controversy. After all, she's one of the pioneers of CRT.
"Critical race theory is not anti-patriotic," she told CNN's Jason Carroll. "In fact, it is more patriotic than those who are opposed to it -- because we believe in the 13th and the 14th and the 15th Amendments. We believe in the promises of equality. And we know we can't get there if we can't confront and talk honestly about inequality."
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Sorry, anything that starts with "CNN says" isn't even worth reading.  At best it's Pablum, at worst it's outright lies and disinformation.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Good Lord, I bet hurricanes are caused by white supremacists and colonial expansion too.  If not them it must be Trump.

It's coming up to that time of year again and just look at the names, they're never called Mohamed or Tanisha, Kashima, or Kenisha.... it's racist and part of a white supremacist plot. CNN needs to call out these meteorologists as the racist, colonial, white supremacists that they are. We can start by renaming Hurricane Katrina.

It's equally clear that reducing pilot / AME salaries and regulating strict equity hiring protocols will alleviate personnel shortages.

Save yourself, always remember to sign in. 

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47 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

Good Lord, I bet hurricanes are caused by white supremacists and colonial expansion too.  If not them it must be Trump.

It's coming up to that time of year again and just look at the names, they're never called Mohamed or Tanisha, Kashima, or Kenisha.... it's racist and part of a white supremacist plot. CNN needs to call out these meteorologists as the racist, colonial, white supremacists that they are. We can start by renaming Hurricane Katrina.

Save yourself, always remember to sign in. 

It seems this one could be blamed on religion...... 
Elsa Origin and Meaning

The name Elsa is a girl's name of German origin meaning "pledged to God".

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Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, Kargokings said:

It seems this one could be blamed on religion...... 

Impeccable logic... and since the name Katrina means "pure", clearly those caught in her trail of destruction didn't measure up eh?

Maybe a little religion would have saved them.

Edited by Wolfhunter
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