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Once Things Start back up

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Parking of aircraft will remain a problem and in particular at airports where currently unused runways etc have been used to park idle aircraft.  https://www.theglobeandmail.com/world/article-the-big-park-how-airlines-are-storing-their-unused-aircraft-in-a/

THE BIG PARK

An economy in lockdown requires far fewer planes and ships, forcing owners to figure out where to store them

MATTHEW MCCLEARNGRAPHICS BY JOHN SOPINSKI AND TIMOTHY MOOREPUBLISHED MAY 5, 2020

By bringing much of the global economy to a grinding halt, the COVID-19 crisis has sidelined countless vehicles – and not just the car in your neighbour’s driveway. Planes and ocean-going vessels have begun migrating from the world’s busiest airports and harbours to remote locations where the workhorses of the global economy go to rest, or die.

Having far fewer passengers and far less cargo to carry, airlines and shipowners are forced to decide where to store underutilized assets until the day they’re needed again.

That could be months, even years away. Or never.

Nowhere is the challenge more acute than in aviation. Reeling from travel bans, many airlines have grounded their entire fleets, while most others have cancelled the majority of flights. Collectively, they have dropped tens of millions of seats from their schedules every week, according to OAG, an aviation data firm.

Lately the pace has slowed. “Quite frankly, there isn’t much more international capacity that can be dropped around the globe,” senior analyst John Grant wrote in a recent commentary.

 
0427-nw-wo-airline-capacity_pdf-desktop.png?token=0

SINCE JANUARY AIRLINES WORLDWIDE

HAVE CANCELLED MOST SCHEDULED FLIGHTS

Scheduled seats, in millions

115

105

Base global

capacity

95

85

75

65

55

Adjusted

capacity

by week

45

35

25

Jan. 20

Feb. 3

March 2

April 6

April 27

 

Major hubs such as international airports in Chicago and Frankfurt have converted unused runways into airliner parking lots, and some airports have waived parking fees. But that’s likely not a long-term solution, and OAG has predicted the volume of fliers might not recover until 2022 or 2023.

Other options include moving planes to regional airports, maintenance hubs and dedicated storage facilities, where owners are scrambling to make more space for an expected surge in new arrivals.

“They go wherever it’s cheapest to park them,” said John McKenna, president of the Air Transport Association of Canada.

Some airlines publicly announced their plans. Lufthansa said it will “temporarily decommission” its entire fleet of 17 Airbus A340-600s at Teruel Airport in eastern Spain; it expects them to remain out of service for at least one year. Qantas said it grounded 150 planes, including nearly all of its wide-body aircraft.

Many more airlines are making such decisions unannounced. Air Canada and WestJet did not respond to inquiries about storage of their own fleets..

 

To determine what Canada’s largest airlines are doing, The Globe and Mail turned to Flightradar24, a global flight-tracking service based in Sweden. While it’s not always crystal clear whether planes have truly left service, by Flightradar24’s reckoning more than 300 of Air Canada’s and WestJet’s planes are already parked. Another 200 or so planes either remain in service or their status could not be determined.

“The majority of both Air Canada’s and WestJet’s fleets are still in Canada, at the airports you would expect them to be at,” said Ian Petchenik, a spokesman for Flightradar24. There were two dozen De Havilland Dash-8 turboprops parked in Vancouver. About 30 of WestJet’s Boeing 737s are stored at the airline’s home base in Calgary. At small airports such as Montreal’s Mirabel, the increase in parked aircraft is obvious in satellite imagery.

 

MirabelAirport_2019_lg.jpgMAY 4, 2019 MirabelAirport_2020_lg.jpgAPRIL 7, 2020Tap to view before and after

TAP TO VIEW BEFORE AND AFTER
Montréal-Mirabel International Airport in Mirabel, Que. on May 4, 2019 and April 7, 2020PLANET LABS

Craig Bradbrook, vice-president of aviation services at the Greater Toronto Airports Authority, said Toronto Pearson International Airport instituted a new parking plan after airlines indicated they might park upward of 100 aircraft there. The plan was to use all available aprons – the area of an airport where planes are parked, loaded, unloaded or refuelled – first, then move to unused runways. (The latter measure proved unnecessary – lately there have been about 40 aircraft parked at Pearson.)

What’s involved in storing an aircraft – and the attendant costs – varies considerably depending on how long the plane is expected to remain out of service. The most expensive option is to keep it ready to fly at a moment’s notice.

Longer-term options must take into account that planes are designed to fly, not rest. Typical requirements include removing fluids and wrapping crucial components in protective casings, which can take several days to do and undo. Engines are covered, regular inspections conducted, cabins cleaned and doors checked to ensure they remain properly sealed.

Long-term storage facilities are like giant jigsaw puzzles; complexity increases as more aircraft arrive. “If you’ve got plenty of space, you can parallel park them,” said Jonathan McDonald, an aviation analyst at IBA. “When you’re running out of space, you can interlock park them – one facing in, one facing out." But that makes it challenging to disentangle planes when it’s time to re-enter service.

The longer an aircraft is parked, the more important it is to find a drier climate that won’t promote corrosion. Lufthansa recently selected Teruel Airport because it receives around 240 days of sunshine annually, and little rainfall – ideal conditions for preserving aircraft.

For similar reasons, in North America, arid southwestern U.S. states are home to long-term storage facilities as well as “boneyards” where retired aircraft go to die. Pinal Airpark, in Arizona, is such a facility. According to Flightradar24′s data, both Air Canada and WestJet have aircraft stored there. (Most are Boeing 737 Max, grounded as a result of the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines crashes involving that aircraft.) Such facilities are filling up as airlines take planes out of service.

 

PinalAirpark_2019_2_lg.jpgAPRIL 21, 2019 PinalAirpark_2020_2_lg.jpgAPRIL 21, 2020Tap to view before and after

TAP TO VIEW BEFORE AND AFTER
Pinal Airpark Airport in Red Rock, Arizona on April 21, 2019 and April 21, 2020PLANET LABS

The main reason such facilities are popular, Mr. Petchenik said, “is that there’s space, the parking is relatively inexpensive and you can park them all together in the dry desert air."

He said airlines usually prefer to store as many aircraft as possible in the same place. But at a time when thousands upon thousands of jets are parked around the world, “you’re running out of parking space in a lot of places,” he said. Parking location “is not determined by what you want, it’s determined by what you can do.

“The number of aircraft stored, and the uncertainty surrounding when they will be used again, is unprecedented.”

The shipping industry, meanwhile, faces a similar dilemma.The 2008-09 financial crisis touched off several years of turmoil. Shipping lines were forced to lay up huge numbers of vessels as they ran out of cash. By late 2009, reports surfaced of what the media dubbed “ghost fleets”: legions of oil tankers, bulk carriers and other large commercial vessels anchored for long periods.

So far this year, 2.2 million TEUs (20-foot equivalent units, a measure of container capacity) – about 10 per cent of the global total – have been idled. That’s equivalent to all of 2009. “Everything is happening much faster” than it did during the financial crisis, said Peter Sand, chief shipping analyst for BIMCO, a large global shipping association.

0427-nw-wo-global-shipping-desktop.png?token=0

COVID-19 IS PUSHING MANY CONTAINER SHIPS OUT OF SERVICE

Percentage of global shipping fleet tonnage idled

10%

8

6

4

2

0

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

March

April

2019

2020

JOHN SOPINSKI/THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: DREWRY

Hypothesizing that a recession prompted by COVID-19 might already be producing ghost fleets, The Globe turned to Cambridge, Ont.-based exactEarth Ltd., which collects data on global maritime vessel traffic from ship transponders using satellite-based automatic identification systems (AIS).

ExactEarth divided the world into 260,000 cells (which at the equator measured 25 kilometres by 25 kilometres); it then counted the number of vessels in each cell on April 14 and compared that number with the same day a year earlier.

The vast majority of cells had no statistically significant differences. However, exactEarth identified three clusters of cells in China with significantly larger concentrations of vessels this year. The most noteworthy hotspot was in the waterways around Guangzhou, a major port and transportation hub. On April 14, 2019, there were approximately 350 cargo vessels and tankers in the inland waterways around the city. A year later, there were well over 1,100.

 

Guangzhou_2019_lg.jpgAPRIL 14, 2019 Guangzhou_2020_lg.jpgAPRIL 14, 2020Tap to view before and after

TAP TO VIEW BEFORE AND AFTER
Tankers and cargo vessels in Guangzhou, China on April 14, 2019 and April 14, 2020MATT MCCLEARN AND JOHN SOPINSKI/THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: EXACTEARTH, ESRI

Mr. Sand said that’s no ghost fleet. The additional ships reflect the fact that China’s economy has been effectively shut down for months because of the COVID-19 outbreak, slowing the flow of dry bulk cargo considerably. “These ships are simply waiting there to take the next cargo,” he said. “It’s a slowdown of business that shows up around the anchorages in the major exporting regions.”

 

But Mr. Sand said the industry ordered many more new vessels from shipyards than necessary during the last decade, such that capacity nearly doubled since the 2008-09 recession. With global demand plummeting now, owners have a strong incentive to begin laying up ships, which can save at least US$2,000 a day in operating costs per vessel. But to do that they must move away from major ports, where anchoring is pricey.

There are designated storage anchorages around the world, many of them in Asia. One of the most famous is Brunei Bay in the South China Sea, which is said to be safely out of the path of pirates and typhoons, and boasts favourable holding conditions and gentle currents. There are others in Scotland, Norway and Brazil.

“They empty the ship of many liquids in the engines, and they basically hibernate the ship, put on board a ghost crew or even only one watchman to patrol five or 10 ships, and seafarers go home,” Mr. Sand said. Dehumidifiers are installed to inhibit corrosion and underwater inspections can help monitor the hull’s condition.

Mr. Sand said he’ll watch the designated layup areas closely in the coming weeks. Some large bulk carriers have already anchored in Brunei Bay, although its waters are by no means packed. “We know from those who manage these areas that they have received increased interest in layup business,” he said. “The early indications are that owners are getting in touch with these layup sites to keep their options open.

“The shipping industry is a very optimistic one – people do things later rather than earlier, simply because they hope for a change,” he said. “But it is happening."

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

 
 
 

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Looks like quite a bit of room at Mirabel but Pinal Air Park is kinda crowded. 

"relatively inexpensive"....I wonder what the daily fee is in Arizona.??

Stored outside in the winter, up here, is not very desirable.

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22 hours ago, Kip Powick said:

Looks like quite a bit of room at Mirabel but Pinal Air Park is kinda crowded. 

"relatively inexpensive"....I wonder what the daily fee is in Arizona.??

Stored outside in the winter, up here, is not very desirable.

The storage cost is minimal but being in active storage increases the cost quite a bit. That pic of Pinal Park is less than a week old. I know that for certain. 

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In the article, above there are aerial pictures of various storage airports with pre and after photos showing the quantity of parked planes increasing. You'd get an opposite effect if you took an aerial shot of the AC headquarters parking lot in YUL. To give context the parking lot there is probably just a bit bigger than 2X a Walmart lot. It used to be full and now its seldom filled to 10% capacity...

 

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same goes for just about every aviation company parking lot. We are all working from home

 

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‘Opportunity for innovation’: What the future of air travel could look like

From BNN Bloomberg – link to story and VIDEO

Jon Mace, BNN Bloomberg | 8 May 2020

The Close Airlines critical to Canadian economy, but crown corporation a ‘dumb’ idea: Karl Moore. Karl Moore joins to discuss the implications of an airline bailout and what it might look like for smaller players.

Airlines critical to Canadian economy, but crown corporation a ‘dumb’ idea: Karl Moore

The spread of COVID-19 has crippled the global airline industry, as government-implemented travel restrictions are showing no signs of letting up. For those still taking domestic flights, the on-board experience is a lot different than it was pre-pandemic, but what will it look like when the world recovers and borders open back up?

Temperature checks, mandatory face masks and physical distancing are being introduced on a temporary basis at Air Canada, but some think increased sanitary measures will be the new norm.

“Just as 9/11 caused massive changes in the screening of our customers, I think COVID-19 will also lead to lasting changes as to how a customer is screened in an airport,” said Samuel Elfassy, VP of safety at Air Canada, in a telephone interview with BNN Bloomberg. “At one point we were looking for the physical safety of our customers, now we’re looking for the bio-safety of our customers.”

Canada’s largest air carrier unveiled a new initiative called Cleancare+ on Monday, along with its latest financial results. The program includes new cleaning protocols for aircraft, but most noticeable to passengers will be mandatory temperature checks before flights, as well as a guarantee that it will not sell the seat beside you.

Specifics like where a temperature check would take place are still being finalized, but Air Canada says the policy will start May 15, and remain in place until at least June 30.

WestJet has also introduced seat distancing and changes to inflight services, and according to a statement on the company’s website, decisions on next steps will always be made with the health, safety and mental well-being of guests and staff.

Karl Moore, professor of business strategy at McGill University and an expert in the airline industry, thinks a return to normal will depend on the development of a vaccine.

“I think they’ll be in place for a couple years,” Moore said by phone of increased sanitary measures. “Being on a plane for 12 hours going to Asia with someone in the middle seat beside you would make most consumers nervous, and I think it will for a while.”

It’s not just air carriers that are under pressure, plane manufacturers like Airbus SE and Boeing Co. have also seen business slow down significantly, but Moore figures they are busy innovating to come up with ways to make passengers feel safe again. That could include new cabin layouts, or even new technologies for disinfecting, as well as detecting illness.

“This creates incredible opportunity for innovation,” Elfassy said when asked if Air Canada is considering any new cabin layouts or on-board features.

“The post-pandemic world will include screening technologies that detect vital signs and provide a better understanding of what an individual’s health looks like, and whether or not that person should be flying.”

Air Canada did not confirm any permanent changes to its fleet, but did indicate it is working with third parties to develop new onboard technology that would help prevent the spread of the virus.

Aside from increased screening and the promotion of physical distancing, Moore thinks the big change for the aviation industry post-pandemic will be consolidation.

“I think the next few years are going to be really tough,” said Moore, who figures if flights are back up to 90-per-cent capacity in two years, carriers would be elated.

“There are going to be some airlines that go bankrupt, and they’re going to need lots of government support to stick around,” Moore added, noting he doesn’t expect any of Canada’s airlines to shutter. “I think we will see some big names fold in the U.S. and Europe.”

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Foreign holiday season likely to be cancelled, says minister

  • 1 hour ago
  •  

Many British people are unlikely to be able to take foreign holidays this summer because of coronavirus, Health Secretary Matt Hancock has said.

He told ITV's This Morning it's "likely to be the case" there won't be a normal summer holiday season.

The government is opening up parts of the economy, and Ryanair is planning to start services in July.

But Mr Hancock said the traditional big-break holiday season is unlikely.

Social distancing will have to be maintained for some time, he said. "The conclusion from that is it is unlikely that big, lavish international holidays are going to be possible for this summer."

Mr Hancock's comments came as many airlines detailed plans to restart flights.

Ryanair boss Michael O'Leary, who last month said that leaving the middle seat free to help social distancing was "idiotic", said he planned to sell as many seats as possible this summer.

The airline is planning to operate nearly 1,000 flights a day from July, up from 30 today. It said face coverings being worn by all crew and passengers and cashless on-board transactions would help keep passengers safe as well as a new system for toilet breaks.Promote health. Save lives. Serve the vulnerable. Visit who.int

Passengers will have to ask crew to use the toilet to stop queues forming.

Meanwhile, EasyJet has told the BBC that it does not have a date for restarting flights, but is keeping the situation under review.Image copyrightGETTY IMAGES

The announcement came despite government plans to introduce a 14-day quarantine for international travellers to prevent a second spike in the virus, infuriating airlines which planned to resume flying in the coming months.

Willie Walsh, boss of rival firm IAG, which owns British Airways, criticised the move, warning it would force him to review his plans to ramp up flights in the summer.

"There's nothing positive in anything I heard the prime minister say [on Sunday]," he told MPs.

Virgin Atlantic also released its summer schedule for 2021 on Tuesday, promising more flights to Tel Aviv as well as routes linking Florida with Manchester, Glasgow, London Heathrow and Belfast after it pulled out of Gatwick.I

John and Irene Hays, owners of travel company Hays Travel, which took over Thomas Cook's shops last year, said the news has not dampened people's enthusiasm to get away.

Mr Hay told BBC Radio 5 Live: "There is a real desire to go on holiday. People have been locked down, and in terms of new bookings we're getting strong demand."

Talking about trips which were booked earlier in the year, Mrs Hays added: "Many people are not cancelling, they are just deferring their holiday or in some cases holding on to a credit note for now."

Mr Hays also thought that having to self-isolate at home for 14 days after returning from abroad may not stop people travelling.

"If people in the UK are already in lockdown, they might be happy to spend another fortnight at home. Some people might say go to Spain or somewhere, have a nice holiday and then come back and continue their lockdown," he said.

Mr Hancock's comments echo those from Transport Secretary Grant Shapps last month who warned people not to book summer holidays - domestic and overseas - until social distancing rules are relaxed. "I won't be booking a summer holiday at this point," he told the BBC on 17 April.

Airlines, and the travel industry generally, have been among the biggest financial losers of the international lockdown.

Aircraft fleets have been grounded and thousands of job cuts announced, with British Airways shedding 12,000 jobs and Virgin 3,000 jobs.

 

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My foreign holiday plans are cancelled for this summer as well... and after that, there's still lots of places in Canada that I want to see...

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14 minutes ago, conehead said:

My foreign holiday plans are cancelled for this summer as well... and after that, there's still lots of places in Canada that I want to see...


That might also pose problems .  Let's keep our fingers crossed. A lot will depend on how soon / if Ontario and Quebec get under control as if that does not happen, border crossing restrictions will likely increase.

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From Ryanair boss Michael O'Leary,

"...Passengers will have to ask crew to use the toilet to stop queues forming...."

If there was any shred of the old jet set glamour left in this business it just flew out the outflow valve right there. 

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44 minutes ago, Marshall said:


That might also pose problems .  Let's keep our fingers crossed. A lot will depend on how soon / if Ontario and Quebec get under control as if that does not happen, border crossing restrictions will likely increase.

I know... I'm thinking long after this summer. Maybe 2021 summer. I want a vaccine first.

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1 hour ago, Specs said:

From Ryanair boss Michael O'Leary,

"...Passengers will have to ask crew to use the toilet to stop queues forming...."

If there was any shred of the old jet set glamour left in this business it just flew out the outflow valve right there. 

If he stays true to form, it won't be long before he also demands your credit card for the privilege.

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14 minutes ago, J.O. said:

If he stays true to form, it won't be long before he also demands your credit card for the privilege.

Hasn't he tried that before?

 

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8 minutes ago, conehead said:

Hasn't he tried that before?

 

It was in the rumour mill but I don't think it was ever "tried".

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