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https://aviationhumor.net/photos-inside-hindenburg-zeppelin

Rare Historical Photos Show The Inside Of The Hindenburg Zeppelin

 

In 1936, DELAG (German acronym for “German Airship Travel Corporation”) introduced the Hindenburg. It made 36 Atlantic crossings (North and South). The trips took about four days in each direction, and a one-way ticket was about $400, which is around $7,000 in today’s money.

Its interior design was done by Fritz August Breuhaus, who took part in designing Pullman coaches, ocean liners and so on.

The Hindenburg was three times longer and twice as tall as a Boeing 747

inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi

Dining Room

Hindenburg’s Dining Room was approximately 47 feet in length by 13 feet in width, and was filled with luxury goods such as paintings on silk wallpaper by Professor Otto Arpke.

inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection
inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection
inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection

Lounge

The Lounge, which is a must for luxury travels, was approximately 34 feet in length, and was also decorated with a mural by the same Professor Arpke. 

inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection
inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection

During the 1936 travel season, the Lounge even had a 356-pound piano, made of Duralumin and covered with yellow pigskin.

inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Archiv der Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH, Friedrichshafen

Writing Room

inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection

Passenger Cabins on Hindenburg

The Hindenburg was dubbed the ‘world’s first flying hotel.’ The passenger space was spread over two decks, known as ‘A Deck’ and ‘B Deck.’ It could accommodate 70 passengers.

inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection

The Smoking Room

The most surprising areas aboard a hydrogen airship was the smoking room.

inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection

The Bar

inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Archiv der Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH, Friedrichshafen

Control Car, Flight Instruments, and Flight Controls

inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection
inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection
inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection
inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection

Crew Areas and Keel

inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection
inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection
inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection
inside-hindenburg-zeppelin-luxury-interi Image credits: Airships.net collection
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Not a bad attempt, but pales in comparison to the Pythons' Australian wine review...

 

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Maybe Kip would like to get one to convert into a new residence?

https://www.messynessychic.com/2016/04/20/river-rockets-of-the-soviet-space-age/

River Rockets of the Soviet Space Age

 
APRIL 20, 2016
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hydrofoil

It looks like a prop from Star Wars doesn’t it? Trust the Soviets to have the coolest abandoned stuff lying around. During the cold war period and into the 1980s, this rusting behemoth was once part of a fleet of vessels which rose out of the water at high speed and were considered the heroes of the Russian riverways.

Lead image (c) Ratmir base

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The streamlined Soviet passenger boats used a hydrofoil technology that lifted the boat’s hull out of the water, decreasing drag and allowing it to travel at incredible speeds of up to 150 km/hr.

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via Dark Roasted Blend

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They were nicknamed Raketas (“Rockets”) and some models were even fitted with airplane turbine engines on each side.

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Soviet inventor Rostislav Alexeyev was considered the ‘father’ of modern hydrofoil and nearly 3,000 vessels were built for Russian and Ukranian waterways. Over the years, many different models were introduced with names inspired by the Soviet space age, like “Sputnik”, “Comet”,  “Meteor” and “Stormbringer”.

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But then came the economic collapse of the Soviet Union and production of the hydrofoils ceased. Vessels were decommissioned, sent to rust away in ship graveyards, like this one in a forest near the city of Perm ↓

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(c) Ratmir Base

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(c) Ratmir Base

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(c) Ratmir Base

Others found their way out of the Soviet Union as far as Vietnam, where the 1970s Voshkod hydrofoil boats are still in service, operating a daily route between the Cat Ba island and the city of Hai Phong.

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You can find others still gliding down rivers in Canada, Greece, Yugoslavia, Netherlands, Thailand and Turkey. Here’s one in China…

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For many Russians, the hydrofoils are a fond childhood memory from the golden age of Soviet innovation. One wealthy Russian even converted one into a luxury yacht…

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via Dark Roasted Blend

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This one found a less glamorous fate as a bar inside of what looks like a housing estate in Ukraine ↓

ukraine-kanev-city-meteor-bar

via Dark Roasted Blend

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I hope you enjoyed geeking out on these as much as I did. And since we’re on the topic of Soviet behemoths, check these out…

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Above: Ekranoplan “Alekseyev A-90 Orlyonok”/ Below: Proposed passenger & cargo shop from”TM” magazine, Russia, 1974

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  • 3 weeks later...

CFB Borden chronicles Canada’s military aviation history to dizzying heights

From Barrie Today – link to source story

From the CF-104 Starfighter to the CF-101 Voodoo and the CF-116 Freedom Fighter to the F-86 Sabre, Base Borden Military Museum takes people back in time

By: Ian McInroy | 2 September 2021

A CF-104 Starfighter intercepter is on display at CFB Borden. Ian McInroy for BarrieToday

A CF-104 Starfighter intercepter is on display at CFB Borden. Ian McInroy for BarrieToday

Soaring tributes to Canada’s aviation history can be seen at Canadian Forces Base Borden.

Mounted on pedestals to honour the men and women who flew them and serviced them, the aircraft from another century are a reminder of air battles and technologies of decades gone by.

Military aviation in CFB Borden, located about 20 minutes west of Barrie, goes back to early 1917 when it was called Camp Borden.

That’s when a series of temporary — they turned out to be not-so-temporary and some are still standing  hangars and aviation facilities were built to support the training of aviators for the Royal Flying Corps, according to Canadian Military History by author Bruce Forsyth.

“After the Great War, Camp Borden became the central point around which military aviation would develop in Canada,” he states in the book. “In 1919, an Imperial Gift of over 100 surplus war aircraft found their way to Canada, most of them going to Borden to provide the nucleus of a national air force.”

Following the creation of the Canadian Air Force in 1920, Camp Borden was once again selected as the main training centre for aviation.

“During the ’20s, the camp saw the birth of the Royal Canadian Air Force and the graduation of the first RCAF pilots in 1924,” Forsyth states in his book. 

Now, military aircraft from the second half of the 20th century can be seen up close and personal.

2021-09-01-im-borden-planesi.jpg

A CF-5 (officially designated as the CF-116 Freedom Fighter) can be seen at CFB Borden. Ian McInroy for BarrieToday

An aviation milestone for this country, the CF-100 was the first all-Canadian jet fighter and the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) bought 639 of them from Avio Ltd., located in Malton, Ont. It was introduced in 1953, had a range of 1,850 kilometres, carried machine-guns and rockets, and excelled in its primary role for air defence.

The Canadair T-33 Red Knight, a Canadian-built version of the Lockheed T-33, was Training Command’s solo display aircraft from 1958 to 1967. It was powered by a Rolls-Royce Nene 10 turbojet and had a top speed of about 500 knots. This particular T-33 was once in front of the 441 (Huronia) Wing, RCAF Association building on Highway 90 west of Tiffin Street.

It’s a familiar bird in a different colour. The Canadair CT-114 Tutor, of Snowbirds fame, entered service in 1964. The version on display at CFB Borden is in the 1963 paint scheme honouring 50 years of service between 1963 and 2013.

The Bell CH-136 Kiowa was tactically deployed as a light observation helicopter between 1971 and 1982, performing duties such as artillery and fighter fire spotting.

Designed by Grumman and built under licence by deHavilland in Canada, the multi-role Tracker flew with the Royal Canadian Navy aboard the carrier HMCS Bonaventure. The Tracker had the capability to search out and destroy submarines with torpedoes or depth charges.

A Canadair CF-104 Starfighter can be seen near Hangar Road at CFB Borden. Referred to as the ‘Missile with a man in it’, the CF-104 (single-seat version) was built in Canada under license by Canadair in Cartierville, Que., and was envisioned as a high-speed, high-altitude interceptor. It had a maximum speed of Mach 2, or 2,330 kilometres per hour.

The McDonnell Douglas CF-101 Voodoo, which entered service in the RCAF in 1961, was a supersonic, all-weather fighter-interceptor powered by two Pratt and Whitney gas turbine engines with afterburners. It had a maximum speed of 1,930 kilometres per hour. The Voodoos were replaced by the CF-18 Hornet in the 1980s.

Arcing across a field not far from the base’s airstrip is the Canadair F-86 Sabre, the premier swept-wing fighter interceptor of the 1950s (think Korean War). It first flew for the RCAF in 1950. Over the next 20 years, Sabres accumulated more than 925,000 flying hours. The famous Golden Hawks aerobatic squad flew Mark 5 Sabres.

The Canadair CF-5 — officially designated as the CF-116 Freedom Fighter  was the company’s licence-built version of the American Northrup F-5 Freedom Fighter aircraft. The CF-5, which began service in 1968, was upgraded periodically throughout its career and Canadian Forces retired it in 1995.

Sitting just outside the Base Borden Military Museum is the Sikorsky CH-124 Sea King maritime helicopter. Its compact design boasts a fold-up rotor and tail to allow it to lift off from destroyers and frigates to locate and destroy submarines. And its amphibious hull enabled it to conduct an emergency water landing.

Borden Military Museum

THE MUSEUM IS CLOSED TEMPORARILY FOR RENOVATIONS


Camp Borden was officialy open on July 11, 1916 by the Minister of Militia and Defence Major General Sir Sam Hughes, KCB, MP. In the 1930's the Base became the headquarters of the first armoured school, headed by the then Major F.F. Worthington. Other schools were soon added to the base making it the most important training Base in Canada. 
Over one half of the soliders who served in the Canadian Army overseas during WWI and WWII received some training here. Camp Borden is the birth place of Canada's Air Force and location of the first purpose build aircraft hangar (a National Historic Site).

 

Both Army and Air Training continued at Camp Borden after WWII and in 1966 the Army and Air Force establishments integrated and Camp Borden become Canadian Forces Base Borden under one Commander. Today, CFB Borden is the only tri-serve Base, training Army, Air Force and Navy Personnel in a multitude of Officer and Non-Commissioned occupations.

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On 9/5/2021 at 11:32 AM, Skeptic said:

From the CF-104 Starfighter to the CF-101 Voodoo and the CF-116 Freedom Fighter to the F-86 Sabre, Base Borden Military Museum takes people back in time

I wonder how long it will be before we have more airframes in museums around the country, than we have aircraft that are operational in the airforce? Trenton, for example.

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