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Friday Toe Tapper///Have a nice weekend  aef.mp4

Who knew??   Relic ... from the Beachcomers tv series (which ran for 18 seasons!!) was awarded the DFC.. Robert Clothier... https://www.bombercommandmuseum.ca/chronicles/robert-clot

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4 minutes ago, deicer said:

Raised on a cattle and horse farm...Maybe that is my problem ???ūü§®

But used with looters and rioters...I  really don't  care

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https://abcnews.go.com/Lifestyle/wireStory/72-year-scotch-whisky-fetches-54000-auction-75562062

72-year-old Scotch whisky fetches over $54,000 in auction

A 72-year-old bottle of Glen Grant single malt whisky from Scotland has fetched more than $54,000 in an auction in Hong Kong

HONG KONG -- A 72-year-old bottle of Glen Grant single malt whisky from Scotland fetched more than $54,000 in an auction in Hong Kong on Friday.

It is the first time that the 1948 Glen Grant whisky, by independent bottler Gordon & MacPhail, was offered in an auction. It is number 88 of 290 decanters bottled by the company and was auctioned off by Bonhams, fetching a price of 421,600 Hong Kong dollars ($54,300) including premium.

 

The bottle had a book estimate of 300,000 to 380,000 Hong Kong dollars ($38,000 to $49,000).

The whisky, the oldest from the Glen Grant distillery, is in a Dartington crystal decanter with an American black walnut presentation box.

Despite the economic uncertainty brought by the pandemic, interest in rare whiskies remains high. Compared to other investment commodities, collectable whisky has done well in the past 10 years with a four-fold increase in prices, said Christopher Pong, wine and whisky specialist at Bonhams.

Other whiskies featured in Friday’s auction included a 35-year-old Hibiki whisky from Japan in a Kutani ceramic decanter that sold for 372,000 Hong Kong dollars ($48,000).

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The Hottest  New  Topic You Should Use As A Conversation Starter At Your Next Cocktail Party.. (You're Welcome)

 

Why do wombats poop cubes? Scientists may finally have the answer

The common wombat (Vombatus ursinus), also known as the coarse-haired or bare-nosed wombat, poops cube-shaped feces.

The common wombat (Vombatus ursinus), also known as the coarse-haired or bare-nosed wombat, poops cube-shaped feces.

For years, party goers have been wondering why wombat poop is cube-shaped (yes, really). Now, they say they have got to the bottom of the mystery.

Bare-nosed wombats, or common wombats, can be found in the woodlands of hilly landscapes in south and southeastern Australia and in Tasmania.
The furry marsupials are renowned for producing distinctive, cuboid poop, which researchers believe they then disperse tactically in order to communicate with one another.
Now, scientists at the University of Tasmania have discovered more about the curious phenomenon.
 
 
It is believed that wombats place their cube-shaped poop in tactical areas to communicate with one another.
 
It is believed that wombats place their cube-shaped poop in tactical areas to communicate with one another.
 
Using laboratory testing and mathematical models, a team of researchers found there are two stiff and two flexible areas around the circumference of the wombat intestine. The intestine, at 33 feet long, is around 10 times the length of a wombat's body.
"This ability to form relatively uniform, clean cut faeces is unique in the animal kingdom," Scott Carver, a wildlife ecologist from the University of Tasmania, said in a statement.
"They place these faeces at prominent points in their home range, such as around a rock or a log, to communicate with each other. Our research found that these cubes are formed within the last 17 percent of the colon intestine," he said.
The researchers say the distinctive cube shape of wombat poop is caused as a result of the drying of the faeces in the colon, and muscular contractions, which form the uniform size and corners of the poop.
 
"Bare-nosed wombats are renowned for producing distinctive, cube-shaped poos. This ability to form relatively uniform, clean cut faeces is unique in the animal kingdom," Carver added.
In people, food travels through the gut in one or two days, but a wombat's digestive process can take up to four times as long, so the animal can extract all possible nutritional content from its food. The creatures also produce poop that is much drier than human feces -- because they are better at extracting water from the intestine.
Carver said the discovery that the cubes are created inside a soft tube reveals "an entirely new way of manufacturing cubes," which could have implications for manufacturing, clinical pathology and digestive health.
 
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A girl and her tractor.  What can I say, I like tractors.  She's got mad skills - if you don't have time for the whole thing watch from 4:30 where she drives in formation with the harvester doing live off-load.  Also from 13:55, backing up the farm trailer with pivoting front axle - impressive.  Definitely not your average city girl.

 

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27 minutes ago, seeker said:

A girl and her tractor.  What can I say, I like tractors.  She's got mad skills - if you don't have time for the whole thing watch from 4:30 where she drives in formation with the harvester doing live off-load.  Definitely not your average city girl.

 

Farm hands and the tractors sure have changed since I operated a case tractor and hay baler pulling a stone boat.   

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6 minutes ago, Kargokings said:

Farm hands and the tractors sure have changed since I operated a case tractor and hay baler pulling a stone boat.   

Ain't that the truth - spent a lot of time myself picking rocks and loading the stone boat, also stooking hay bales.

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36 minutes ago, seeker said:

Ain't that the truth - spent a lot of time myself picking rocks and loading the stone boat, also stooking hay bales.

I had a cub cadet.  

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Farm hands and the tractors sure have changed since I operated a case tractor and hay baler pulling a stone boat.   

 

Wow !!! You had a tractor !!

Horses are what we used for cutting the fields

Horse drawn side mower. There were little triangle blades between those spikes and they moved back and forth to gut the hay and naturally they got dull. The entire blade arm was slid out of the arm and all the blades were hand sharpened with a hand file, when required.

ScreenShot010.jpg.68dba8973da32bb0b81d066fd1a15dae.jpg

 

Then when it was dry we used this type of horse drawn rake. You drove the horse and when the rake was full you pulled the trip lever to raise the rake and start over.

ScreenShot012.jpg.9ba76b6eacf80683afea77ae1d3f7879.jpg

The "hay" was raked into windrows and then each windrow was later divided into miniature hays stacks to further dry and eventually all the little stacks were thrown on horse drawn wagon and off loaded into a hand built  big haystack

 

Foe the real youngn's, this  is a small stone boat. Rocks in the fields were pried out of the ground and put on the horse drawn stone boat and dumped in an area where they would not be a nuisance to any field machines. The stone boat could be used in winter to take hay out over the snow and given to grazing cattle and horses.

ScreenShot013.jpg.f5b0e2d6ae73d17bbf6bdc59ee6d513c.jpg

And "yes" I am that damned old and used all that equipment. I did not like dirt farming but it did¬† teach me one thing...'hard manual labour¬†won't kill you'.ūüėČ

Have a nice weekend

 

 

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Kip Powick said:

Farm hands and the tractors sure have changed since I operated a case tractor and hay baler pulling a stone boat.   

 

Wow !!! You had a tractor !!

Horses are what we used for cutting the fields

Horse drawn side mower. There were little triangle blades between those spikes and they moved back and forth to gut the hay and naturally they got dull. The entire blade arm was slid out of the arm and all the blades were hand sharpened with a hand file, when required.

ScreenShot010.jpg.68dba8973da32bb0b81d066fd1a15dae.jpg

 

Then when it was dry we used this type of horse drawn rake. You drove the horse and when the rake was full you pulled the trip lever to raise the rake and start over.

ScreenShot012.jpg.9ba76b6eacf80683afea77ae1d3f7879.jpg

The "hay" was raked into windrows and then each windrow was later divided into miniature hays stacks to further dry and eventually all the little stacks were thrown on horse drawn wagon and off loaded into a hand built  big haystack

 

Foe the real youngn's, this  is a small stone boat. Rocks in the fields were pried out of the ground and put on the horse drawn stone boat and dumped in an area where they would not be a nuisance to any field machines. The stone boat could be used in winter to take hay out over the snow and given to grazing cattle and horses.

ScreenShot013.jpg.f5b0e2d6ae73d17bbf6bdc59ee6d513c.jpg

And "yes" I am that damned old and used all that equipment. I did not like dirt farming but it did¬† teach me one thing...'hard manual labour¬†won't kill you'.ūüėČ

Have a nice weekend

 

 

 

 

 

Not many farmed in the 60s still using horses.  What breed?   

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Not many farmed in the 60s still using horses.  What breed?   

 

I believe the work horses were either Barb or Canadian and we had one Quarter horse. The Quarter horse was mine and was used for herding cattle.

All the other horses were riding horses. 

No Photos of the "work" horses but here are a few of my favourite riding horses

CHIEF was a "buckskin" and could go all day in the mountains.....All our ride horses  were "rein drop stop"

chief.jpg.57441c32fb53af9cc051a6b5699f4981.jpg

 

 

PAINT was purchased from Native Canadians  on the west side of Lake Okanagen, He was a Wall Eyed  APPALOOSA and one of the most sure footed horses I ever rode...he could go down a 60 degree shale embankment and never loose his footing. His biggest problem was he was easily "spooked" if you notice on the right side of his saddle there is a Green "quirt" hanging  from the saddle horn. If a butterfly popped up in front of him he would go crazy so one solid wack on his butt with the quirt would bring him back to reality. SHORTY was very placid, easily handled by "green-horns".

1412341990_paintandshorty.jpg.78c2496885972a72d7e8ca94cd99e1df.jpg

My brother came home for a short holiday (RCN) and we went back up to "The Cliff" He was on PRINCE  who was a sturdy well mannered horse 

1455931381_twoandme.jpg.4695c0fb4cfd1f98f612b81c0c0919e4.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

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All this farm talk! When I hear "stone boat", I'm expecting Dash-3 stories :eek:

Cheers - IFG¬†ūüćļ

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My quarter horse was an ex barrel racer and could turn on a dime. Well trained to knee or neck rein and ground tie. She could not stand a bit so we had a well padded "hack a more" that she liked. When friends came out from the city, they always asked if they could ride her, despite my briefing re how well she turned, they were quite often left sitting on thin air as she turned faster than they anticipated. Excellent horse with children who could climb  all over her but with adults she expected you knew what you were doing so as soon as your foot hit the stirrup, she was moving. If you **bleep** her off, she would either leave you hanging when she jumped a ditch or take you off under the nearest tree branch.... When it was time to bring our bull (purebred horned Herford) in, I would ride her up close to him and tell her to take him home. From that moment on, she was on automatic and I had nothing to do except to praise her efforts as we got closer to the barn area.  

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