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Some good news - the world's most coveted aircraft right now is the A220

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And specifically, the A220-300, most of which are made in Canada.

Right now, the 150 passenger plane makes a whole lot more sense than the 180-190 seat narrow bodies, and will for a couple of years.

AC to be best of my knowledge will take its deliveries on schedule

Air Baltic is in talks with Airbus to get more A222-300s sooner than the delivery schedule it has which runs through 2025.

https://twitter.com/justinbachman/status/1252591687576227841

Jet Blue says it intends to take its A220-300s on schedule starting later this year.

 

 

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The Canadian made C series of aircraft were always known to be a game changer by those who could perceive potential, just like the Q400, welcome world!

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13 hours ago, MD2 said:

The Canadian made C series of aircraft were always known to be a game changer by those who could perceive potential, just like the Q400, welcome world!

Too bad Bombardier screwed it all up having to sell everything and/or give it away!

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On 4/21/2020 at 6:52 PM, Tango Foxtrot said:

Now all they have to do is start making them again 🙂👍

Beginning of May

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On 4/22/2020 at 9:04 AM, Falken said:

Too bad Bombardier screwed it all up having to sell everything and/or give it away!

Too bad for Bombardier shareholders, but the jobs making the planes didn't move, and those are good skilled jobs for the most part. Subcontractors also kept making parts and subsystems. Airbus also has more clout in the marketplace, which is also good for the long-term. And the current crisis enhances the possibility of a stretch variant - the mythical -500.

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dagger, I haven't had a detailed look at the aircraft or read all threads covering the A220 so perhaps the question is covered in earlier posts about the C-series and the A220 post-Airbus' takeover. The question regards the additional value of CCQ & reduced training footprints for those carriers that have other Airbus types. Does CCQ apply to the A220 for those crews trained on the A320/A321, (either active or had been 320-trained at one time), or does the aircraft require a new type-rating/training etc.?

 

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A220 type rating covers -100 and -300

There's no way there is some CCQ for the A320 and A220...they are totally different birds, FBW systems are totally different, so I'd say there is no training benefit between those two types

A220 type rating

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22 hours ago, dagger said:

Too bad for Bombardier shareholders, but the jobs making the planes didn't move, and those are good skilled jobs for the most part. Subcontractors also kept making parts and subsystems. Airbus also has more clout in the marketplace, which is also good for the long-term. And the current crisis enhances the possibility of a stretch variant - the mythical -500.

I agree- too bad for the shareholders , but not for the ones that screwed it up!

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On 4/22/2020 at 7:04 AM, Falken said:

Too bad Bombardier screwed it all up having to sell everything and/or give it away!

It's better this way.

Airbus has unlimited growth potential in Quebec. Something they don't have anywhere else they're operating.

YMX has all the space in the world and Quebec has an established aerospace workforce which is something Falabama* doesn't have.

* Not pejorative, that's what they call it.

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On 4/22/2020 at 9:04 AM, Falken said:

Too bad Bombardier screwed it all up having to sell everything and/or give it away!

Indeed, another Avro Arrow it seems. All that effort, ingenuity, and time to benefit Airbus, not Bombardier, its workers, shareholders, and Canada in general for all its support.

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22 minutes ago, MD2 said:

Indeed, another Avro Arrow it seems. All that effort, ingenuity, and time to benefit Airbus, not Bombardier, its workers, shareholders, and Canada in general for all its support.

Indeed, but the arrow ended up at the bottom of one of there Great Lakes. This one lives on, giving support to the entire domestic aerospace sector. And that means a lot of jobs, tax revenue, etc.

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True, some consolation I suppose, but disappointing that it's not presented to the world by a Canadian company that originally designed this game-changing aircraft.

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I don't get the gloom, Airbus is destined to be the dominant aircraft maker of this century and they're here. Bombardier would have been a distant third no matter how successful they and the C Series were.

When Airbus is balancing resources between France, Germany and Quebec there will always be a compelling case for Quebec.

This is not a setback, this is a transformative economic event for Quebec and Canada.

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Bombardier could never have marketed the aircraft the way that Airbus can, and could never scaled up production on the basis that Airbus can. And Bombardier could never have afforded to examine a larger version than the -300. Airbus has that ability if they so choose.

Bombardier demonstrated that innovation resides in Canada. But it was a deeply flawed parent company undertaking a massive capital intensive venture. Too bad the terms of sale could not have been more favourable in sustaining the Canadian identity of the product. At least the success of the platform will provide a significant Canadian employment base. 

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Also It is Airbus Canada.  So we still get to be a footnote

 

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It does not matter where the aircraft company is from.

I was on an aircraft selection gig down south with Bombardier and ATR competing.

The only Canadian in the room was me.

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6 hours ago, boestar said:

Also It is Airbus Canada.  So we still get to be a footnote

 

Do you think there is a soul in France railing against Airbus and saying they should have stuck with Sud and the Caravelle?

We got a seat at the table and we paid a lot less for ours than the French and Germans did.

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Why the new Airbus A220 is popular with airlines during the coronavirus pandemic

News from the Points Guy UK – link to story

Best-OF-AC-FF_Dec112019-1-scaled.jpg?res

Edward Russell ~ 14 May 2020

There are winners and losers of every crisis in the aviation industry. The coronavirus pandemic has already forced some airlines, like Virgin Australia, into restructuring. It’s also grounded many large aircraft like the Airbus A380, but an emerging winner may be a Canadian jet that recently got a new lease on life and is now proving its worth.

That jet is the Airbus A220, formerly the Bombardier CSeries. The plane benefits from its small size and low operating costs coupled with operating capabilities that rival larger planes like the Airbus A320 and Boeing 737. These are proving assets to airlines looking to slash expenses while maintaining a minimal flight schedule through the COVID-19 crisis.

“When we come out of the other side of this we continue to be excited about the A220s and the benefit that can bring to JetBlue”, JetBlue chief financial officer Steve Priest told analysts and investors on 7 May. “The economics of this aircraft are spectacular”.

The coronavirus crisis has prompted something of a reckoning at airlines. For years fleet planners pushed for larger and more efficient narrow-body models that could fly, for example, transcontinental routes in the U.S. with a full load of passengers. Airbus and Boeing delivered hundreds of their largest narrow-body models, the Airbus A321 and 737-900ER respectively, to airlines across the world.

Then the spread of COVID-19 and fear of the virus halted most air travel in just a few months. Globally, the number of flights was down 81% year-over-year on 5 May, according to flight-data firm Cirium. In a slight positive note, the number of flights was up 19% compared to the week before.

More than half of the global A220 fleet was tracked flying during the week ending 4 May, the data shows. This is a higher percentage than for either the A320 family, 737 family or Embraer E-Jet family.

“Airlines want jets that offer equivalent range and equal or better economics than bigger models, but fewer seats”, Teal Group analyst Richard Aboulafia told TPG. “The A220 is one of the very few products that bring this to the table”.

The A220-300 can fly as far as the A320, about 3,855 miles, but more efficiently and with fewer passengers. The A220 is lighter than the legacy Airbus narrow-body and benefits from the latest generation of engines.

Those advantages play out in the decisions airlines are making during the pandemic.

For example, Delta Air Lines is parking all 62 of its A320s but still flying its 31 A220-100s. The Atlanta-based carrier fits 109 seats on the latter jets compared to 157 seats on the former. In addition, the smallest A220s can fly nearly 100 miles further than the A320s.

(Photo by Zach Griff / The Points Guy) Onboard a Swiss A220-300. (Photo by Zach Griff / The Points Guy)

More A220s may also be good for passengers. The aircraft are quieter than most larger jets and, in many cases, offer a better onboard experience than comparably sized planes. In the U.S., Delta has even installed seat-back inflight entertainment where most other carriers — excluding JetBlue — have removed systems from their planes.

Even in Europe, where first class often means a blocked adjacent seat, the A220 is a comfortable option for travellers.

“The 2-3 configuration, large and modern bathrooms, big windows and modern touches combine to make for a pleasant flying experience”, wrote TPG’s Zach Griff after two A220 flights on Swiss last summer.

Zurich-based Swiss operates 29 A220-100s and -300s. Many of the planes remain in the air, with the A220 operating 83% of the airline’s flights in May, according to Cirium schedules.

Related: Why I’m a fan of Delta’s Airbus A220

Demand for new A220s continues apace. Air Canada maintains plans to take its full allotment of the jet this year, with 14 A220-300 deliveries still pending. The move comes as the Montreal-based carrier retires its 14 E190s and 65 more Airbus A319 and Boeing 767 jets due to the crisis.

In the U.S., New York-based JetBlue plans to take its first of 70 A220-300s by year-end, Priest said this week. The airline has accelerated A220 deliveries even as it postponed the arrival of 22 new A321neos to beyond 2022 amid broad efforts to cut expenses. The airline will configure its A220s with between 130 and 140 seats compared to 200 seats on its A321neos.

And in Europe, Latvia-based Air Baltic plans to emerge from the crisis as an all-A220 operator after retiring its last 737-300s and ATR turboprops. The airline operated 22 A220-300s and had orders for 28 more at the end of April, according to Airbus orders and deliveries data.

AMSTERDAM SCHIPHOL AIRPORT, HAARLEMMERMEER, NOORD-HOLLAND, NETHERLANDS - 2018/06/30: Bombardier and Airbus combined forces resulting in re-naming the CS-series aircraft into Airbus A220 series. (Photo by C. Van Grinsven/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images) An Air Baltic A220 departs Amsterdam Schiphol. (Photo by C. Van Grinsven/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

The jury remains out on whether the coronavirus will prove a pivotal moment for the A220. Airbus had just 529 outstanding firm orders for the aircraft — compared to 6,156 for its A320neo family — at the end of April. And the planemaker has not received any new A220 commitments since the crisis began.

Airbus continues to produce four A220s a month even as it has slowed rates for other passenger jets. However, plans to increase production are indefinitely postponed.

“As preferred as it may be to acquire aircraft to match the need of the network, with coronavirus, the airlines are no longer afforded this luxury”, wrote The Air Current managing director of analysis Courtney Miller in a piece on 7 May. Existing commitments for the A220, as well as the E-Jet-E2, are likely to be delivered and utilized. But new orders from cash-starved airlines are unlikely, he said.

With global aviation bumping along the bottom, there’s been a renewed focused on small jets. But are they really the future of flying? @miller22 explains the case against the Airbus A220 and Embraer E2. The case against the Airbus A220 and Embraer E2Coronavirus brings challenges for both Airbus’s A220 and Embraer’s E2 in adoption of the small narrow-body. TAC Analysis makes the case against their adoption.

Jon Ostrower

Take American Airlines, for example. The messaging of its plans to retire or park five aircraft types from its mainline fleet — including its smallest, the 99-seat E190 — focuses on simplifying its fleet, not adding new optimally-sized models like the A220. In fact, the carrier is even spending money to reduce fleet complexity, moving forward with work adding seats to some A321s and 737-800s. The effort, part of American’s “Project Oasis” updates, comes with the expectation of operational savings after the coronavirus subsides.

But fleet simplification, as American and others are undertaking in a big way, does not necessarily mean orders for new types will dry up completely. Boeing CEO David Calhoun made just such a point during the planemaker’s first quarter earnings call on 29 April.

“This is that moment where rationalization efforts get big”, he said. “And believe it or not, in some cases, it even requires that maybe new aeroplanes [be] ordered”.

Featured image courtesy of Airbus.

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Articles like just add to the proof that Canada should be on the forefront of aviation Engineering.  If it wasn't for government involvement and poorly run private (or public for that matter) companies we would be at the top of the heap.  

It is really sad to see all of the great work that Canada has done being passed off to others and we do not reap the benefits.

What Canada needs is an aerospace company that can rise to the challenge and keep politics out of it while properly managing the business.  Great things could be done.

  

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