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Drugs and vaccines aren't really the same thing, though. Also, the whole "rushed into production" argument isn't accurate. A ton of work went into developing a vaccine for the SARS-COV-1 virus. That stopped when the virus stopped spreading but the knowledge of the virus particle's structure and how it infects a person was kept. This gave them a big head start when building a vaccine for this iteration of a coronavirus.

Edited by J.O.
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On 12/3/2020 at 4:14 PM, J.O. said:

Drugs and vaccines aren't really the same thing, though. 

I see what you're saying I think, but vaccines are drugs.

They obviously differ in their makeup from chemical drugs, but as they are designed to achieve a response in the body they are a drug by general definitions and are classified so by the FDA and other regulators.

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I will give it some time (was it 28 days???) for the vaccine to truly be tested in the wild before I consider partaking.

True side effects cannot be known in such a short trial period.  especially for a vaccine using RNA to do the job.

 

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6 hours ago, j.k. said:

I see what you're saying I think, but vaccines are drugs.

Most drugs are designed to reduce symptoms such as pain, tremors etc. They usually do so by "deadening" something the body does naturally. This is why many drugs have side effects - they are doing something the body doesn't want to do naturally.

Vaccines are designed to cause the body to have an immune response to an unwanted infection without an actual infection - in a sense, getting the body to do more of what it already does.

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8 hours ago, J.O. said:

Most drugs are designed to reduce symptoms such as pain, tremors etc. They usually do so by "deadening" something the body does naturally. This is why many drugs have side effects - they are doing something the body doesn't want to do naturally.

Vaccines are designed to cause the body to have an immune response to an unwanted infection without an actual infection - in a sense, getting the body to do more of what it already does.

As I said, I see what you're trying to say, but your interpretation is narrow and incorrect. You are limiting your interpretation of drug to include only chemical drugs.

The Food and Drugs Act and its Regulations categorize vaccines as biologic drugs. Biologic drugs differ from chemical drugs because they come from living organisms, which means they are more variable than chemical drugs. Therefore, biologic drugs require more regulatory oversight than chemical drugs, as well as special expertise and procedures for their:

  • manufacture
  • control
  • regulation
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AELF FlightService Partners With Avianor on A330 Auxiliary Cargo Conversions

393ed6dd32d700df215bfa434e80.jpg

CHICAGO, Dec. 9, 2020 /CNW/ — AELF FlightService has partnered with Montreal-based Avianor for the conversion of its passenger A330-200s to auxiliary cargo configuration. An aircraft maintenance and cabin integration specialist, Avianor supplied the custom Supplemental Type Certificate (“STC”) conversion kit and parts support for the modifications, in which all passenger seats are removed from the cabin and netted cargo restraints installed.

The Avianor contract covers four of the AELF FlightService A330-200s. The first two aircraft, MSN 700 and MSN 472, have completed the embodiment of the Avianor STC, and each aircraft now has a cargo capacity of 230m3 of volume and 58T of payload. Two additional aircraft, MSN 466 and MSN 871, are currently undergoing the conversion.

With increased demand for urgent transport of medical supplies and personal protective equipment (PPE), the netted cargo capacity offered by AELF FlightService’s A330’s has particular value now. The grounding of a significant percentage of passenger flights globally that would normally transport freight in aircraft cargo holds has implications for the timely and efficient distribution of a wide variety of critical cargo, including vaccines for COVID-19.

“The embodiment of the Avianor STC on our aircraft was a strategic decision, enabling us to meet the current market environment and also maximize the flexibility of our fleet,” said Joe Cirillo, Chief Operating Officer. “After considering a number of other solutions, we are pleased to be working with Avianor to ensure we meet our customer’s changing needs.”

Earlier this year, Avianor acted quickly to develop the widebody STC in response to the unforeseen circumstances of the pandemic.

“When the industry was challenged by the COVID-19 crisis, Avianor rose to the occasion and adapted its business to meet the needs of the economy. Putting forward a reactive approach and innovative expertise, we broke barriers with our certified cargo conversion solution increasing air freight capacity and keeping aircraft operational. Trusted by world renowned operators with our customized solutions, we are extremely proud to work with AELF FlightService on their A330-200s and appreciate the confidence they place in our team,” added Matthieu Duhaime, President & COO, Avianor.

About Avianor (www.avianor.com)

Avianor has been a leader in MRO, cabin integration and interior completion of commercial and military aircraft for more than 25 years. Located at Montreal-Mirabel International Airport (YMX), comprised of 350 permanent and temporary employees, the company occupies 250,000 square feet of hangars, manufacturing and repair shops, warehouses and offices. DRAKKAR Aerospace & Ground Transportation became a majority shareholder of the company in 2019, thus continuing its growth and position of choice within the local, national and international aerospace industry.

About AELF FlightService (http://www.AELF-FlightService.com)

AELF FlightService is a privately held commercial aircraft leasing company and, in conjunction with Maleth Aero AOC Limited, provides ACMI/Charter solutions with a fleet of passenger and auxiliary freight aircraft. The company has offices in Chicago, Miami, and Dublin. 

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https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/air-canada-operates-4-000th-all-cargo-flight-highlighting-expanding-role-of-its-cargo-division-885725462.html

 

Air Canada Operates 4,000th All-Cargo Flight, Highlighting Expanding Role of its Cargo Division 

  • Air Canada Cargo working with partners to prepare for COVID-19 vaccine transportation

MONTREAL, Dec. 16, 2020 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada said today that with the flight of AC 7227 from Toronto to Lima it has now operated 4,000 all-cargo flights since launching into the cargo-only-flight business in March of 2020. By successfully establishing a dedicated, cargo-only operation, Air Canada Cargo is well-positioned to play a key role in carrying COVID-19 vaccine shipments for Canadians and to capture future growth opportunities in the global air cargo market.

"Air Canada Cargo has emerged as an outstanding performer during the COVID-19 crisis and was a key player in transporting medical equipment including PPE to Canada early on. It is impressive that the Cargo team re-engineered its business model and network for cargo-only flights in March and has now successfully operated 4,000 such flights onboard both mainline widebody aircraft, as well as seven transformed widebody aircraft enabling cargo transport in the cabin. These initiatives have helped solidify our ability to meet heightened demand for air cargo capacity globally and have contributed to the growth of Air Canada's successful Cargo division at an unprecedented pace," said Lucie Guillemette, Executive Vice President and Chief Commercial Officer. "This ability to quickly pivot exemplifies Air Canada's commitment to innovate and seize opportunities."

The 4,000th flight from Toronto to Lima carried an assortment of freight from around the world including pharmaceuticals, water purifying equipment and vehicle parts. Since the start of the pandemic, Air Canada Cargo has transported a wide range of goods on its cargo-only flights, including PPE for frontline healthcare workers.

In anticipation of the requirement for air cargo capacity to ship and distribute COVID-19 vaccines in Canada and worldwide, Air Canada Cargo has been working with its freight forwarding customers specialized in handling pharmaceutical shipments. Air Canada Cargo's role will be to provide capacity for vaccine shipments through agreements with international freight forwarders, governments or international agencies on scheduled or on-demand, cargo-only flights. As part of these supply chain preparations, Air Canada Cargo has undergone an extensive operational readiness exercise to ensure training, procedures and facilities are updated and reflect current requirements and standards for transporting pharmaceuticals, including achieving IATA's CEIV Pharma certification in July 2020. 

Recently, Air Canada successfully concluded a collective agreement amendment with its pilots, represented by the Air Canada Pilots Association to enable Air Canada to competitively operate dedicated cargo aircraft. The airline is now finalizing plans to convert several of its owned Boeing 767-300ER aircraft to freighters to fully participate in global cargo commercial opportunities. 

 

 

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Air Canada signs up for converted freighters as it targets air cargo

From Air Cargo News – link to source story

By Damian Brett | 14 January 2021

Air-Canada-B787-8-tail-fin.jpg

Air Canada will sell two passenger Boeing 767s to be converted into freighters before leasing them back as it targets growth in air cargo.

The Montreal-headquartered company will sell two of its B767-300ER aircraft to ATSG-owned lessor Cargo Aircraft Management (CAM).

The first aircraft will be inducted for conversion in March 2021. Both are expected to be redelivered to Air Canada by the end of 2021.

This is the first sale-leaseback agreement between ATSG and Air Canada.

In November 2020, Air Canada announced its plan to use converted freighters to grow its cargo business in response to “evolving opportunities in the airfreight market”.

“Getting these two [Boeing] 767 freighters into our operation in 2021 is aligned with our announcement in November,” said Jason Berry, vice-president of cargo at Air Canada. “We are excited to be in a position to capture the market opportunities that currently present themselves. Delivering on our commitments is critically important to all of us at Air Canada.”

The aircraft will be converted by Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) of Tel Aviv, Israel.

“It is always a great feeling to gain a new lease customer and we are proud to be able to again support a great airline like Air Canada,” said Mike Berger, chief commercial officer of ATSG. “We are looking forward to delivering these airplanes and extending our special partnership with Air Canada.

“We continue to see growth outside of the US, and ATSG continues to enable great companies to take advantage of growing global e-commerce and mobile-commerce trends.”

Like most carriers, Air Canada has seen cargo become an increasingly important part of its business as a result of the Covid-19 outbreak as passenger demand droped and cargo revenues increased.

In the second quarter of last year, the airline saw cargo revenues exceed those of passenger revenues for the first time in its history.

Last year, the carrier operated more than 4,000 cargo-only flights.

Meanwhile, the conversion market looks set to take off as carriers look to offload unwanted passenger aircraft and there is increased demand for freighters.

The airline also sent out an update today on how it had been preparing for handling Covid-19 vaccines.

As part of its preparation, Air Canada Cargo said it had finalised agreements with additional suppliers of active, passive and hybrid packages, as well as increased capabilities for pharma handling, by undergoing a thorough review of all stations in its network, including those managed by third parties.

“We are seeing shipments of vaccines and vaccine consumables being transported by Air Canada Cargo for distribution in Canada since December. These shipments are a result of close collaboration with our supply chain partners, and our operational readiness to expertly handle them,” said Vito Cerone, vice president, cargo sales and commercial strategy.

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1 hour ago, Malcolm said:

Air Canada signs up for converted freighters as it targets air cargo

From Air Cargo News – link to source story

By Damian Brett | 14 January 2021

Air-Canada-B787-8-tail-fin.jpg

Air Canada will sell two passenger Boeing 767s to be converted into freighters before leasing them back as it targets growth in air cargo.

The Montreal-headquartered company will sell two of its B767-300ER aircraft to ATSG-owned lessor Cargo Aircraft Management (CAM).

The first aircraft will be inducted for conversion in March 2021. Both are expected to be redelivered to Air Canada by the end of 2021.

This is the first sale-leaseback agreement between ATSG and Air Canada.

In November 2020, Air Canada announced its plan to use converted freighters to grow its cargo business in response to “evolving opportunities in the airfreight market”.

“Getting these two [Boeing] 767 freighters into our operation in 2021 is aligned with our announcement in November,” said Jason Berry, vice-president of cargo at Air Canada. “We are excited to be in a position to capture the market opportunities that currently present themselves. Delivering on our commitments is critically important to all of us at Air Canada.”

The aircraft will be converted by Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) of Tel Aviv, Israel.

“It is always a great feeling to gain a new lease customer and we are proud to be able to again support a great airline like Air Canada,” said Mike Berger, chief commercial officer of ATSG. “We are looking forward to delivering these airplanes and extending our special partnership with Air Canada.

“We continue to see growth outside of the US, and ATSG continues to enable great companies to take advantage of growing global e-commerce and mobile-commerce trends.”

Like most carriers, Air Canada has seen cargo become an increasingly important part of its business as a result of the Covid-19 outbreak as passenger demand droped and cargo revenues increased.

In the second quarter of last year, the airline saw cargo revenues exceed those of passenger revenues for the first time in its history.

Last year, the carrier operated more than 4,000 cargo-only flights.

Meanwhile, the conversion market looks set to take off as carriers look to offload unwanted passenger aircraft and there is increased demand for freighters.

The airline also sent out an update today on how it had been preparing for handling Covid-19 vaccines.

As part of its preparation, Air Canada Cargo said it had finalised agreements with additional suppliers of active, passive and hybrid packages, as well as increased capabilities for pharma handling, by undergoing a thorough review of all stations in its network, including those managed by third parties.

“We are seeing shipments of vaccines and vaccine consumables being transported by Air Canada Cargo for distribution in Canada since December. These shipments are a result of close collaboration with our supply chain partners, and our operational readiness to expertly handle them,” said Vito Cerone, vice president, cargo sales and commercial strategy.

"Will?"  Are they not already in process of conversion?

 

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4 minutes ago, boestar said:

"Will?"  Are they not already in process of conversion?

 

Not according to the article, perhaps the report is simply about the two that will be leased back rather than owned?

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2 minutes ago, boestar said:

I had heard that 2 767 were being converted in Europe before Christmas.  Perhaps it was just conjecture

 

In this forum a report I read was in Nov and the kicker there was that no conversion would happen until the AC Pilots agreed on the operation.  In Dec. Dagger posted an article saying that agreement had been reached.

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WEST ATLANTIC BOEING 737 SUFFERS HARD LANDING AT EXETER

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Yesterday a West Atlantic Boeing 737 suffered a hard landing incident at Exeter Airport, UK.

The 26 years-old 737-400 freighter, with registration G-JMCY and having just performed flight NPT-05L from the East Midlands, UK, suffered a very hard landing at Exeter airport, UK. The below images show that the aircraft sustained major damage, however the 2 crew on board were not injured.

west_atlantic_b734_g-jmcy_exeter_210119_

A post flight inspection found creases around the fuselage, to the extent that Royal Mail are currently unable to unload the mail that the plane was carrying

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The aircraft involved in this incident was initially delivered to Alaska Airlines in December 1994, from 2009 to 2014 it flew to Donavia and in 2015 it was converted for cargo freight.

 
West-Atlantic-Boeing-737-Suffers-Hard-La

West Atlantic UK is a cargo airline with 15 aircraft (1 ATR 72, 6 737-300’s, 6 737-400’s and 1 7373-800) with an average age of 29 years. This airline along with Cygnus Air, Swiftair and West Air Sweden are all part of LUSAT AIR S.L.

Photos by: @breakingavnews

 
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  1. Quote

    both cargo and passenger

     

Determination No. A-2021-10

January 18, 2021
 

APPLICATION by Air Canada also carrying on business as Air Canada rouge and as Air Canada Cargo (Air Canada) to amend Condition No. 1 of Licence No. 110020 in order to operate a scheduled international service between Canada and Egypt using its own aircraft, pursuant to subsection 69(1) of the Canada Transportation Act, SC 1996, c 10 (CTA).

 
Case number: 
21-00371
 

On April 8, 2011, the Canadian Transportation Agency granted Air Canada the authorization, in Decision No. 108-A-2011, to operate its scheduled international service, large and all-cargo aircraft, through code sharing only, on licensed routes between Canada and Egypt in accordance with the Interim Arrangement between the Government of Canada and the Government of the Arab Republic of Egypt set out in an Agreed Minute signed on November 10, 2010 (Arrangement).

Air Canada now wishes to operate its scheduled international service with its own aircraft. The proposed start-up date is June 17, 2021.

Air Canada holds valid insurance and the Canadian Foreign Air Operator Certificate for the proposed operation.

Condition No. 1 of the licence No. 110020 now reads:

      The Licensee is authorized to operate a scheduled international service on the routes set out in the Arrangement.

 

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J. Mark MacKeigan
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Boeing Now Has Commitments For More Than 150 Converted 737s

As cargo demand rises globally, Boeing has successfully secured 150 commitments for its 737-800BCF (Boeing Converted Freighter). The news comes after lessor BBAM increased its orders by up to 12 more planes. Here’s why air freight demand is rising and how Boeing leads the race.

 

Link to story. Boeing Now Has Commitments For More Than 150 Converted 737s - Simple Flying

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  • 2 weeks later...

Determination No. A-2021-18

February 1, 2021
 

APPLICATION by Cargolux Airlines International, S.A. (Cargolux), on behalf of itself and Cargolux Italia S.p.A. carrying on business as Cargolux Italia (Cargolux Italia), pursuant to section 60 of the Canada Transportation Act, SC 1996, c 10 (CTA), and section 8.2 of the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88-58 (ATR).

 
Case number: 
21-00953
 

Cargolux, on behalf of itself and Cargolux Italia, has applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (Agency) for an approval to permit Cargolux to provide its scheduled international service and its non-scheduled international service between Canada and Luxembourg using aircraft with flight crew provided by Cargolux Italia, beginning on February 2, 2021, to December 31, 2021.

Cargolux has also requested an exemption from the application of subsection 8.2(2) of the ATR, which requires the filing of an application for an approval at least 15 days before the first planned flight. The Agency finds that compliance with subsection 8.2(2) of the ATR is impractical in this case. Accordingly, the Agency, pursuant to paragraph 80(1)(c) of the CTA, exempts Cargolux from the application of subsection 8.2(2) of the ATR.

Cargolux is licensed to operate a scheduled international service (all-cargo aircraft) in accordance with the Agreement on Air Transport between Canada and the European Community and its Member States, signed on December 18, 2009.

Cargolux is also licensed to operate a non-scheduled international service to transport traffic on a charter basis between Canada and Luxembourg.
The Agency has considered the application and the material in support and is satisfied that it meets the remaining requirements of section 8.2 of the ATR.

Accordingly, the Agency, pursuant to paragraph 60(1)(b) of the CTA and section 8.2 of the ATR, approves the use by Cargolux of aircraft with flight crew provided by Cargolux Italia, and the provision by Cargolux Italia of such aircraft and flight crew to Cargolux, to permit Cargolux to provide its scheduled international service and its non-scheduled international service on licensed routes between Canada and Luxembourg using aircraft and flight crew provided by Cargolux Italia, beginning on February 2, 2021, to December 31, 2021.

This approval is subject to the following conditions:

  1. Cargolux shall continue to hold the valid licence authorities.
  2. Commercial control of the flights shall be maintained by Cargolux. Cargolux Italia shall maintain operational control of the flights and shall receive payment based on the rental of aircraft and crew and not on the basis of the volume of traffic carried or other revenue-sharing formula.
  3. Cargolux and Cargolux Italia shall continue to comply with the insurance requirements set out in subsections 8.2(4), 8.2(5) and 8.2(6) of the ATR.
  4. Cargolux shall continue to comply with the public disclosure requirements set out in section 8.5 of the ATR.
  5. Cargolux and Cargolux Italia shall advise the Agency in advance of any changes to the information provided in support of the application.
 

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J. Mark MacKeigan
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