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Determination No. A-2020-134

July 9, 2020
 

APPLICATION by Air Canada also carrying on business as Air Canada rouge and as Air Canada Cargo (applicant) pursuant to subsection 69(1) of the Canada Transportation Act, SC 1996, c 10 (CTA).

 
Case number: 
20-05563
 

The applicant has applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (Agency) for a licence to operate a scheduled international service, all‑cargo aircraft, in accordance with the Air Services Agreement between the Government of Canada and the Government of the Russian Federation, signed on December 18, 2000, as amended ( Agreement).

The Licensee is currently licensed to operate a scheduled international service, large aircraft, in accordance with the Agreement.

The Agency is satisfied that the applicant meets all the applicable requirements of subsection 69(1) of the CTA. The Agency also finds that the pertinent terms and conditions of the Agreement have been complied with.

Accordingly, the Agency issues the licence.

Pursuant to subsection 71(1) of the CTA, the licence is subject to the conditions prescribed by the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88‑58, and the following conditions:

  1. The Licensee is authorized to operate scheduled international services on the route set out in the Agreement.
  2. The scheduled international services are to be conducted in accordance with the Agreement and any applicable arrangements agreed to between Canada and the Russian Federation.
 

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Determination No. A-2020-135

July 9, 2020
 

APPLICATION by Air Canada also carrying on business as Air Canada rouge and as Air Canada Cargo (applicant) pursuant to subsection 69(1) of the Canada Transportation Act, SC 1996, c 10 (CTA).

 
Case number: 
20-05564
 

The applicant has applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (Agency) for a licence to operate a scheduled international service, all‑cargo aircraft, in accordance with the Agreement between the Government of Canada and the Government of the Republic of Venezuela on Air Transport, signed on June 26, 1990 ( Agreement).

The Licensee is currently licensed to operate a scheduled international service, large aircraft, in accordance with the Agreement.

The Agency is satisfied that the applicant meets all the applicable requirements of subsection 69(1) of the CTA. The Agency also finds that the pertinent terms and conditions of the Agreement have been complied with.

Accordingly, the Agency issues the licence.

Pursuant to subsection 71(1) of the CTA, the licence is subject to the conditions prescribed by the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88‑58, and the following conditions:

  1. The Licensee is authorized to operate scheduled international services on the route set out in the Agreement.
  2. The scheduled international services are to be conducted in accordance with the Agreement and any applicable arrangements agreed to between Canada and Venezuela.
 

Member(s)

J. Mark MacKeigan
 
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Determination No. A-2020-131

July 9, 2020
 

APPLICATION by Air Canada also carrying on business as Air Canada rouge and as Air Canada Cargo (applicant) pursuant to subsection 69(1) of the Canada Transportation Act, SC 1996, c 10 (CTA).

 
Case number: 
20-05560
 

The applicant has applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (Agency) for a licence to operate a scheduled international service, all‑cargo aircraft, in accordance with the Arrangement on Air Transport between the Government of Canada and the Government of Ecuador set out in an Agreed Minute signed on May 24, 2019 ( Arrangement).

The Licensee is currently licensed to operate a scheduled international service, large aircraft, in accordance with the Agreement.

The Agency is satisfied that the applicant meets all the applicable requirements of subsection 69(1) of the CTA. The Agency also finds that the pertinent terms and conditions of the Arrangement have been complied with.

Accordingly, the Agency issues the licence.

Pursuant to subsection 71(1) of the CTA, the licence is subject to the conditions prescribed by the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88‑58, and the following conditions:

  1. The Licensee is authorized to operate scheduled international services on the route set out in the Agreement.
  2. The scheduled international services are to be conducted in accordance with the Agreement and any applicable arrangements agreed to between Canada and Ecuador.
 

Member(s)

J. Mark MacKeigan

Determination No. A-2020-133

July 9, 2020
 

APPLICATION by Air Canada also carrying on business as Air Canada rouge and as Air Canada Cargo (applicant) pursuant to subsection 69(1) of the Canada Transportation Act, SC 1996, c 10 (CTA).

 
Case number: 
20-05562
 

The applicant has applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (Agency) for a licence to operate a scheduled international service, all‑cargo aircraft, in accordance with the Arrangement on air transport between the Government of Canada and the Government of the Republic of Singapore, set out in an agreed minute signed on December 7, 2016 ( Arrangement).

The Licensee is currently licensed to operate a scheduled international service, large aircraft, in accordance with the Arrangement.

The Agency is satisfied that the applicant meets all the applicable requirements of subsection 69(1) of the CTA. The Agency also finds that the pertinent terms and conditions of the Arrangement have been complied with.

Accordingly, the Agency issues the licence.

Pursuant to subsection 71(1) of the CTA, the licence is subject to the conditions prescribed by the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88‑58, and the following conditions:

  1. The Licensee is authorized to operate scheduled international services on the route set out in the Arrangement.
  2. The scheduled international services are to be conducted in accordance with the Arrangement and any applicable arrangements agreed to between Canada and Singapore.
 

Member(s)

J. Mark MacKeigan

Determination No. A-2020-132

July 9, 2020
 

APPLICATION by Air Canada also carrying on business as Air Canada rouge and as Air Canada Cargo (applicant) pursuant to subsection 69(1) of the Canada Transportation Act, SC 1996, c 10 (CTA).

 
Case number: 
20-05561
 

The applicant has applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (Agency) for a licence to operate a scheduled international service, all‑cargo aircraft, in accordance with the Arrangement on air transport between the Government of Canada and the Government of Grenada, set out in an agreed minute signed May 21, 2019 ( Arrangement).

The Licensee is currently licensed to operate a scheduled international service, large aircraft, in accordance with the Arrangement.

The Agency is satisfied that the applicant meets all the applicable requirements of subsection 69(1) of the CTA. The Agency also finds that the pertinent terms and conditions of the Arrangement have been complied with.

Accordingly, the Agency issues the licence.

Pursuant to subsection 71(1) of the CTA, the licence is subject to the conditions prescribed by the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88‑58, and the following conditions:

  1. The Licensee is authorized to operate scheduled international services on the route set out in the Arrangement.
  2. The scheduled international services are to be conducted in accordance with the Arrangement and any applicable arrangements agreed to between Canada and Grenada.
 

Member(s)

J. Mark MacKeigan
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  • 2 weeks later...

Air Canada Started Cargo Flights from Quito International Airport

Corporación Quiport S.A. Press Release ~ 21 July 2020

air_canada_cargo_quito.jpg
  • The flight arrived yesterday afternoon and left this morning with 50 tons of flowers bound for Montreal.

As part of the 60 years of bilateral relations between Ecuador and Canada, on Monday afternoon a brief act took place that formalized the start of Air Canada cargo operations at the Quito airport, with two weekly flights. The aircraft, an Airbus 330 C of the Canadian airline, departed this morning from the cargo terminal of the Quito airport with 50 tons of flowers for export to Montreal.

air canada cargo quito 2

In turn, through these cargo flights, medical supplies and electronic items from Canada will arrive in Ecuador, which are the main items of import by air from that country.

The event was attended by Daniel Legarda, Vice Minister of Industries and Production; Tyler Wordsworth, Charge d’Affaires of the Canadian Embassy; Caleb McLean, President of the Canadian Ecuadorian Chamber of Commerce; Patricia Aulestia, representative of Air Canada in Ecuador; Sandro Ruiz, Manager of the Metropolitan Public Airport Services Company; Felipe Ribadeneira, President of the Fedexpor Board; Alejandro Martinez, President of Expoflores; and Alex Moreno, Quiport Manager of Route.

The Vice Minister of Industries and Production, Daniel Legarda, pointed out that the new route “will open important perspectives to continue deepening bilateral relations with Canada, hopefully with the search for a trade agreement or an investment agreement, as well as to resume passenger flights and to further advance on the bilateral relationship with Canada and North America in general”.

The Canadian Embassy in Ecuador has been instrumental in the initiation of air cargo transportation through Air Canada. Tyler Wordsworth, Chargé d’Affaires of the Canadian Embassy explained that “on the sixtieth anniversary of diplomatic relations with Ecuador it is very important to have this Air Canada cargo flight that arrived after a successful season of passenger flights. Now, due to the pandemic, we can only arrive with cargo, but we are very pleased that Air Canada has sent this flight that will result in the strengthening of diplomatic relations between our countries”.

The direct benefit will be for the flower growing sector, since flower cargo represents 92% of total exports by air from Quito. Alejandro Martinez, President of Expoflores, was satisfied with the Air Canada operation. “Without a doubt, the direct flight from Quito to Canada is positive especially related to transport time, we are talking about reducing some 48 to 72 hours, which is positive”. He noted and stressed that “Canada is a highly exclusive market, a niche market for Ecuador… We certainly believe that this is going to help reactivate the Canadian market in an important way ”.

For his part, Andrew O’Brian, President and CEO of Quiport, the company in charge of the administration and operation of the Quito airport, explained that cargo operations during this health emergency have been key to keeping the export sector active and to receive medical supplies. “Air Canada’s decision to operate cargo flights in Quito is vital for the economic recovery and an indicator of the importance of cargo activities at our airport”, he concluded.

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Determination No. A-2020-142

July 23, 2020
 

APPLICATION by Cargolux Italia S.p.A. carrying on business as Cargolux Italia (applicant) pursuant to subsection 69(1) of the Canada Transportation Act, SC 1996, c 10 (CTA).

 
Case number: 
20-06338
 

The applicant has applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (Agency) for a licence to operate scheduled international services in accordance with the Agreement on Air Transport between Canada and the European Community and its Member States, signed on December 18, 2009 (Agreement).

The Agency is satisfied that the applicant meets all the applicable requirements of subsection 69(1) of the CTA. The Agency also finds that the pertinent terms and conditions of the Agreement have been complied with.

Accordingly, the Agency issues the licence.

Pursuant to subsection 71(1) of the CTA, the licence is subject to the conditions prescribed by the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88-58, and the following conditions:

  1. Subject to the availability of rights as set out in Annex 2 of the Agreement, the Licensee is authorized to operate scheduled international services on the route set out in the Agreement.
  2. The scheduled international services are to be conducted in accordance with the Agreement and any applicable arrangements agreed to between the European Community and its Member States and Canada.
 

Member(s)

J. Mark MacKeigan
 

Determination No. A-2020-141

July 23, 2020
 

APPLICATION by Cargolux Italia S.p.A. carrying on business as Cargolux Italia (applicant) pursuant to subsection 73(2) of the Canada Transportation Act, SC 1996, c 10 (CTA).

 
Case number: 
20-06337
 

The applicant has applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (Agency) for a licence to operate a non‑scheduled international service to transport traffic on a charter basis between Italy and Canada.

The Agency is satisfied that the applicant meets all the applicable requirements of subsection 73(2) of the CTA.

Accordingly, the Agency issues the licence.

Pursuant to subsection 74(1) of the CTA, the licence is subject to the conditions prescribed by the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88-58, and the following conditions:

  1. The Licensee is authorized to transport traffic on a charter basis between Italy and Canada.
  2. The Licensee is prohibited from carrying local traffic between points in Canada.
 

Member(s)

J. Mark MacKeigan
 
 
 
 
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  • 2 weeks later...

Cargojet Announces Strong Second Quarter Results


NEWS PROVIDED BY

Cargojet Inc. 

Aug 06, 2020, 07:15 ET

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MISSISSAUGA, ON, August 6, 2020 /CNW/ - Cargojet Inc. ("Cargojet" or the "Corporation") (TSX: CJT) announced today financial results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2020. Total Revenues for the quarter were $196.1 million compared to second quarter 2019 Revenues of $119.1 million. Gross Margin for the quarter was $90.7 million compared to second quarter 2019 Gross Margin of $26.6 million. Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDAR for the quarter were $91.1 million and $91.1 million compared to second quarter 2019 Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDAR of $37.5 million and $37.8 million respectively.

Cargojet's domestic revenues benefited from a strong e-Commerce growth driven by the work-from-home economy that were partially offset by lower B2B volumes, as most non-essential businesses were closed in the early part of the Quarter. We have seen a rebound of B2B volumes late in the Quarter as economies started to re-open across the country. The e-Commerce growth continues to accelerate, in addition to large online retailers, thousands of small and medium sized businesses moved their sales to online channels resulting in strong growth in the B2C Business. As reported by Statistics Canada, in April e-Commerce sales as a percentage of total retail sales doubled to 14% compared to Q1 of 2020 and were up 120% in May compared to May 2019.

"Reduced global air cargo capacity, as a result of extremely reduced passenger flights, led to strong ACMI growth in International markets that we believe will continue for the short and medium term. We also realized strong ad-hoc international charter revenues operating during the period, providing capacity to bring PPE and other medical supplies back from Asia for various government agencies that may not be recurring," said Ajay Virmani, President & CEO.

"We firmly believe that the real strength of Cargojet is its 1,200 strong team members. As we faced the once-in-a-century challenge of operating our business in a global pandemic, it tested every aspect of our business but what really stood out was the unwavering commitment, hard work and devotion of each one of our team members who rose to the challenge. We remained laser focused on ensuring health and safety of our employees, our customers and the cargo we move. The special measures we put in place in late March have now become the new normal within our operations. These extraordinary measures not only allowed us to operate safely, they were instrumental in helping us exceed customer expectations with record on-time performance during these unprecedented times," commented Mr. Virmani.

"We are continuing to monitor the impact of COVID-19 but believe it will be several quarters before we fully understand its short and long-term implications. Cargojet continues to show resilience and operating leverage as it handles a significant surge in volumes. At the same time, we are continuing to use increased cash flows to pay down debt and we continue to make investments to ensure that we can participate in the growth opportunities being presenting to us," concluded Mr. Virmani.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Transport Canada Extends Approvals for De Havilland Canada Dash 8 Simplified Package Freighters

dehavilland-stacked-horizontal-lockup-bl

Dash 8 SPF conversions will continue to support airlift of freight in response to COVID-19

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TORONTO, Sept. 4, 2020 /CNW/ – De Havilland Aircraft of Canada Limited (“De Havilland Canada”) announced today that Transport Canada has confirmed the extension of approvals that permit the conversion of Dash 8 Series aircraft into Simplified Package Freighters (SPF) in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The approvals which now extend to July 31, 2021, will allow for continued flexibility in the transportation of goods in the framework of the COVID-19 pandemic.

loncap-332-simplified-package-freighter-v1.jpg

“There is an ongoing, fundamental need for the transport of humanitarian aid and cargo; air cargo services therefore continue to be vital for the economy, financial stability of aircraft operators, and for fighting COVID-19,” said Amod Kelkar, Vice President, Customer Services and Support, De Havilland Canada. “We are therefore delighted that Transport Canada has confirmed an extension to the approvals for our Dash 8 Series Simplified Package Freighters.

loncap-332-simplified-package-freighter-dash-100-200-v12.jpg

“Our teams have issued the revised Aircraft Flight Manual supplements to customers who bought this solution and we are working to convert the SPF modifications to permanent Service Bulletins based on the need and the regulatory allowances. Our goal is to stay in close contact with our customers to ensure that their requirements are met during this challenging time and we will provide more updates as we progress further,” added Mr. Kelkar.

De Havilland Canada’s Service Bulletins allow Dash 8-100/200, Dash 8-300 and Dash 8-400 aircraft to be quickly converted into Simplified Package Freighters by the removal of seats and seat track covers in the passenger cabins. The converted Dash 8-100/200, Dash 8-300 and Dash 8-400 aircraft provide total potential cargo capacities of up to 6,500 lb, up to 9,625 lb and up to 17,960 lb respectively.

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https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/will-cargo-bolster-passenger-airlines-recovery-in-africa/vi-BB18OPLw?ocid=msedgdhp

 

Will cargo bolster passenger airlines' recovery in Africa?

 
  •  
 
While passenger air travel has dipped during the pandemic, demands for cargo have soared across the continent. CNN's Eleni Giokos examines how Kenya Airways is pivoting to meet the market shift.
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  • 4 weeks later...

Determination No. A-2020-169

September 29, 2020
 

APPLICATION by Cargojet Airways Ltd. carrying on business as Cargojet Regional (applicant) pursuant to subsection 69(1) of the Canada Transportation Act, SC 1996, c 10 (CTA).

 
Case number: 
20-08560
 

The applicant has applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (Agency) for a licence to operate a scheduled international service, all‑cargo aircraft, in accordance with the Agreement between the Government of Canada and the Government of Japan on Air Services signed on January 12, 1955 ( Agreement).

The Agency is satisfied that the applicant meets all the applicable requirements of subsection 69(1) of the CTA. The Agency also finds that the pertinent terms and conditions of the Agreement have been complied with.

Accordingly, the Agency issues the licence.

Pursuant to subsection 71(1) of the CTA, the licence is subject to the conditions prescribed by the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88‑58 (ATR), and the following conditions:

  1. The Licensee is authorized to operate a scheduled international all‑cargo service on the route(s) set out in the Agreement.
  2. The scheduled international all­‑cargo service is to be conducted in accordance with the Agreement and any applicable arrangements agreed to between Canada and Japan.
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  • 4 weeks later...

Determination No. A-2020-179

October 22, 2020
 

APPLICATION by Türk Hava Yollari Anonim Ortakligi (Turkish Airlines Inc.) carrying on business as Turkish Airlines and Turkish Cargo (Turkish Airlines), on behalf of itself and ACT Havayollari A.S. (ACT Airlines Inc.) carrying on business as ACT Airlines (ACT Airlines), pursuant to section 60 of the Canada Transportation Act, SC 1996, c 10 (CTA), and section 8.2 of the Air Transportation Regulations, SOR/88-58 (ATR).

 
Case number: 
20-09399
 

Turkish Airlines, on behalf of itself and ACT Airlines, has applied to the Canadian Transportation Agency (Agency) for an approval to permit Turkish Airlines to provide its scheduled international service, all-cargo aircraft, between Turkey and Canada using two aircraft with flight crew provided by ACT Airlines, until September 11, 2021.

Turkish Airlines has also requested an exemption from the application of subsection 8.2(2) of the ATR, which requires the filing of an application for an approval at least 15 days before the first planned flight. The Agency finds that compliance with subsection 8.2(2) of the ATR is impractical in this case.

Accordingly, the Agency, pursuant to paragraph 80(1)(c) of the CTA, exempts Turkish Airlines from the application of subsection 8.2(2) of the ATR.

Turkish Airlines is licensed to operate a scheduled international service in accordance with the Arrangement between the Government of Canada and the Government of the Republic of Turkey on Air Transport set out in an Agreed Minute signed on February 7, 2020.

The Agency has considered the application and the material in support and is satisfied that it meets the remaining requirements of section 8.2 of the ATR.

Accordingly, the Agency, pursuant to paragraph 60(1)(b) of the CTA and section 8.2 of the ATR, approves the use by Turkish Airlines of two aircraft with flight crew provided by ACT Airlines, and the provision by ACT Airlines of such aircraft and flight crew to Turkish Airlines, to permit Turkish Airlines to provide its scheduled international service, all-cargo aircraft, on licensed routes between Turkey and Canada using two aircraft and flight crew provided by ACT Airlines, from the date of this Determination to September 11, 2021.

This approval is subject to the following conditions:

  1. Turkish Airlines shall continue to hold the valid licence authority.
  2. Commercial control of the flights shall be maintained by Turkish Airlines. ACT Airlines shall maintain operational control of the flights and shall receive payment based on the rental of aircraft and crew and not on the basis of the volume of traffic carried or other revenue-sharing formula.
  3. Turkish Airlines and ACT Airlines shall continue to comply with the insurance requirements set out in subsections 8.2(4), 8.2(5) and 8.2(6) of the ATR.
  4. Turkish Airlines shall continue to comply with the public disclosure requirements set out in section 8.5 of the ATR.
  5. 5. Turkish Airlines and ACT Airlines shall advise the Agency in advance of any changes to the information provided in support of the application.
 

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  • 3 weeks later...

 news from CargoJet who evidently doing quite well

Cargojet Declares Quarterly Dividend


NEWS PROVIDED BY

Cargojet Inc. 

Nov 12, 2020, 09:07 ET

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MISSISSAUGA, ON, Nov. 12, 2020 /CNW/ - The Board of Directors of Cargojet Inc. has declared a cash dividend of $0.2340 per common voting share and variable voting share for the period from October 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020. The record date for determining shareholders of the Corporation entitled to receive payment of the dividend of the Corporation shall be December 21, 2020 and the payment date for such dividend shall be on or before January 5, 2021. These dividends will be eligible dividends within the meaning of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

Cargojet is Canada's leading provider of time sensitive premium overnight air cargo services and carries over 8,000,000 pounds of cargo weekly. Cargojet operates its network across North America each business night serving 15 major cities, and selected international destinations.  Cargojet owns a fleet of 28 aircraft.

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Quite a bit of buzz about an AirCanada Cargo Pilot TA on other forums, is this something that may happen in the near future, if so any idea re where or if AC will get pure freighters or does it only cover belly loads?

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4 hours ago, Malcolm said:

Quite a bit of buzz about an AirCanada Cargo Pilot TA on other forums, is this something that may happen in the near future, if so any idea re where or if AC will get pure freighters or does it only cover belly loads?

I believe the plan is to retrieve 4 or 5 767s from the desert, and convert them to full freighters. I'm sure others on this forum can supply more info.

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Take a look inside an Air Canada passenger plane that’s been converted to carry freight

https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/take-look-inside-air-canada-passenger-plane-s-been-converted-carry-freight

18 November 2020  • SOURCE:  1 NEWS


Air Canada captain Andrew Kawa is used to flying hundreds of people around the globe, but thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, he’s now moving freight in a converted passenger plane.

PLAY VIDEO – link to video


Kawa spoke to 1 NEWS at Auckland Airport, as he prepared to take a load of car parts, mail, produce and pets to Toronto.

The airline had largely cleared the passenger deck on the Boeing 777-300 of seats – leaving business class intact – to allow more room for cargo.

“It’s like a big dance hall with stuff in the middle,” Kawa said while on board his plane.

“It’s very different. This plane normally holds 450 people. Not more than a year ago I was flying this plane and it was jam packed. It’s a bit strange now.”

He said there is little different about flying cargo to passengers, other than he might take the “smoothest ride” when carrying humans.

“Freight doesn’t really care, unless you’re taking live animals. We’re trying to get the most direct and most efficient route, as opposed for looking for the smoothest ride possible for passengers.” 

Cargo on the passenger deck has to be spread around as the floor is only rated for around 20kg per square foot, while the underbelly cargo section can hold up to 120kg per square foot. 

Kawa said it is a “bit depressing” walking through empty terminals, flying planes with as few as 40 people on board, and having colleagues either laid off or sitting idle.  

With 32 years in the industry, and having got through SARS and 9/11, he said he is confident air travel will get back to what it once was again

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Awwwwww pooor guy...needs 3 take-offs and 3 landings within 90 days.....

Geeze...with the "Truckasausrex"  we used to do 6 take-offs and landings in ONE DAY and then do the same thing the next day.....and it sure was a lot more fun than what that Captain is doing, .however, his "take-home" was certainly more that us peons .

  ScreenShot001.jpg.f73afd5df5a44809c8947ed03ab5954a.jpg

Edited by Kip Powick
speling
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Just now, Kip Powick said:

Awwwwww        poor guy...needs 3 take-offs and 3 landings within 90 days.....

Geeze...with the "Truckasausrex"  we used to do 6 take-offs and landings in ONE DAY and then do the same thing the next day.....and it sure was a lot more fun than what that Captain is doing, .however, his "take-home" was certainly more that us peons .  ScreenShot001.jpg.f73afd5df5a44809c8947ed03ab5954a.jpg

 

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56 minutes ago, Kip Powick said:

Awwwwww        poor guy...needs 3 take-offs and 3 landings within 90 days.....

Geeze...with the "Truckasausrex"  we used to do 6 take-offs and landings in ONE DAY and then do the same thing the next day.....and it sure was a lot more fun than what that Captain is doing,

Wasn'[t his comment re the 90days talking about it being difficult to maintain a rating thus there has been an increase in simulator times so as to keep the surplus pilots type certified?   

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Airlines are scrambling to prepare ultra-cold shipping and storage facilities to transport COVID-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna, whose doses, which require deep freezing, are likely to be among the first to be distributed.

A recent survey by an air cargo association and a drug shippers’ group found only 15 per cent of industry participants felt ready to transport goods near the -70 C required by the Pfizer vaccine, while around 60 per cent could meet Moderna’s less stringent -20 C requirement.

READ MORE: Canada’s coronavirus vaccine rollout — who will get it first?

Typically, airlines use containers with cooling materials such as dry ice to transport pharmaceutical products, but some don’t have temperature controls, making products susceptible to unforeseen events such as flight delays.

Airlines are now considering options ranging from a large plug-in freezer that can cost about as much as a small car to a multi-layered canister that uses liquid nitrogen to ship vaccines requiring a deep freeze.

The potential demand for such high-end packaging has helped shares of cold container specialists such as Cryoport and Germany-based va-Q-tec more than double in recent months.

“With direct contracts with five temperature-controlled container manufacturers, Korean Air has secured sufficient quantities of containers. For now, we are in the process of signing contracts with other container manufacturers,” a Korean Air spokesperson said.

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1 hour ago, Kip Powick said:

Just heard on TV that one, or perhaps it is the two companies are attempting to modify the vaccine so that it could be shipped at room temp....Hope that works.

?

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8 minutes ago, J.O. said:

The other day I read that the Pfizer vaccine currently requires specialized refrigerated transport, probably using something like liquid nitrogen tanks. The Astra Zeneca vaccine only requires standard refrigeration. 

Moderna vaccine is OK at room temp.

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42 minutes ago, AIP said:

Moderna vaccine is OK at room temp.

Only after it has been activated.

Quote

Another steep challenge: distributing doses that must be kept very cold. Both the Moderna and Pfizer shots are frozen but at different temperatures.

"the Moderna vaccine can be kept in a conventional freezer at -20C for up to 6 months and that once thawed the vaccine can be kept for up to 30 days at standard refrigerator temperatures of 2 to 8C."

So it does appear that transportation would need to keep the vaccine from the factory to it's final destination at -20C so as to prevent thawing.

Pfizer's shots require long-term storage at ultra-cold temperatures, while Moderna says regular freezer temperatures will suffice for its vaccine.

 

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2 hours ago, J.O. said:

he other day I read that the Pfizer vaccine currently requires specialized refrigerated transport, probably using something like liquid nitrogen tanks.

Appears Pfizer will ship using dry ice (sublimates 5-10/lb per 24hrs), haven't seen anything re augmentation for long distance travel over extended time period.

vaccineship.jpg

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1 hour ago, Airband said:

Appears Pfizer will ship using dry ice (sublimates 5-10/lb per 24hrs), haven't seen anything re augmentation for long distance travel over extended time period.

The problem will of course be what else is in the cargo hold (C02 sensitive) AVI etc. so perhaps the solution will lie, at least in Canada, with all cargo or even executive jets to move the vaccine.  The rub with Pfizer will come at the destination which would need to have the extreme freezer units if the product will not be used immediately or at least close to time of arrival.  Not all of our hamlets do have access to plentiful quantiles of dry ice. Oh well I guess there are lots of very fine (hopefully not politicians) working on this.  ?

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3 hours ago, Malcolm said:

The problem will of course be what else is in the cargo hold (C02 sensitive) AVI etc. so perhaps the solution will lie, at least in Canada, with all cargo or even executive jets to move the vaccine.  The rub with Pfizer will come at the destination which would need to have the extreme freezer units if the product will not be used immediately or at least close to time of arrival.  Not all of our hamlets do have access to plentiful quantiles of dry ice. Oh well I guess there are lots of very fine (hopefully not politicians) working on this.  ?

AVI traffic is pretty limited right now. AC's 787 fleet can take approx 1000kg of dry ice per acft and the 777 can take 1500kg. With the use of Enviro-containers they will be able to handle large amounts. As long as the temp requirements are accurate. Good time to invest in Cold Chain technologies.

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