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seeker

A wild ride.

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A website I visit had this short clip:

 

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After some research I eventually found the aircraft to be a Dornier DO-24 and found this longer video of the landing:

 

Dornier_Do_24_ATT_vl_2.jpg

Edited by seeker

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13 hours ago, Innuendo said:

Short landing technique ??? But then I suppose you still need enough distance to get out again.

along with a very strong structure and  hull.  

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My first thought was that it was unintentional.  I have lots of time on tail-draggers and on floats and understand both the issue of groundloops and water "landings".  You can see how it happened - the pilot touches down at too high a speed and the forward part of the hull creates a turning moment far ahead of the C of G.  For the nautically-inclined, it's similar the bow-steering effect when a boat is trimmed too far forward. The same thing could happen on a regular float aircraft although usually (IMO) the floats will dig in enough to cartwheel the aircraft rather than just spin it around.  In a normal landing the the contact point between the hull and water would be well back from where it is - closer to, or even behind, the C of G.  Although it's a different type you can see what I mean here;

 

 

However, upon a slow-motion review it appears to have been intentional - to counteract the left rotation the pilot would have applied right rudder but the video, and screenshots I captured below, clearly show left rudder.  Either intentional, which would be incredibly stupid, or exceptionally poor flying skills.

 

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Screen Shot 2020-03-04 at 07.31.17.png

Screen Shot 2020-03-04 at 07.31.37.png

Edited by seeker

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Here you go....................

 

This massive three-engine Dornier Do 24 is a frequent visitor to the Scalaria Air Challenge in Austria. This year's participation was not without incident as the aircraft makes a high speed waterloop while landing on the brilliant waters of the Austrian Wolfgang Lake in the Salzkammergut valley.

The aircraft was attempting to land after a recent downpour that left debris floating in the water. An unidentified object struck the hull as the pilot attempted to go around, dipping the left side of the aircraft and ultimately performing the crazy donut seen above. No injuries were reported, but the aircraft did receive a fair amount of damage and flooding. It was pulled ashore and repairs have been started.

 

 

 
 
Play Video
 
 

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30 minutes ago, ILB said:

Damage from deadhead (tree) can be seen in video I posted above.

There's almost as much damage to my eyes from that dude in the Speedo!

  • Haha 1

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On 3/4/2020 at 9:12 AM, Kip Powick said:

Here you go....................

 

This massive three-engine Dornier Do 24 is a frequent visitor to the Scalaria Air Challenge in Austria. This year's participation was not without incident as the aircraft makes a high speed waterloop while landing on the brilliant waters of the Austrian Wolfgang Lake in the Salzkammergut valley.

The aircraft was attempting to land after a recent downpour that left debris floating in the water. An unidentified object struck the hull as the pilot attempted to go around, dipping the left side of the aircraft and ultimately performing the crazy donut seen above. No injuries were reported, but the aircraft did receive a fair amount of damage and flooding. It was pulled ashore and repairs have been started.

 
Pl

I've watched the video posted by ILB and looked at the pics.  Have to say that I'm skeptical about this explanation. 

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The explanation appears logical. In the longer video Seeker posted (accident begins at :40 secs) after the object is hit and raises the hull, there is a splash behind the aircraft as the object resurfaces. 

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Nope, disagree.

The rotation of the aircraft was caused by the incorrect landing attitude, the bow-steering effect and full left rudder throughout.  There is no way that hitting an object on, essentially, the centreline of the hull could induce it to spin at such a violent rate.

Don't believe me?  Try this thought experiment - imagine a boat of the same mass, moving at the same speed hitting an object - would you expect it to violently spin or to bounce up and over with a small amount of deflection?  Furthermore a boat with it's smaller moment of mass and lack of empennage has much less resistance to a rotational force input than an aircraft.

Hitting an object could not cause the aircraft to spin in such a manner.  It's possible that the pilot could have stomped on the left rudder to avoid the object but he did not state he was doing this in his report.  One other point is that this incident/accident happened during an airshow landing competition.  As someone said in the Youtube comments it has a "Hold my beer and watch this" feel to it - I agree.  

Look at the pictures below.  Note that the damage, conveniently, starts exactly at the seam between the nose gear door and the solid structure and stops cleanly at the first rib and is not nearly big enough to explain spinning the aircraft as we see - there should be a six foot gouge down the side.  

My opinion;   The pilot wanted to show off for the crowd and planned a dynamic water-loop/short field landing demo however the manoeuver was initiated at too high a speed and with the aircraft at the wrong attitude.  The damage to the forward hull was due to massive hydrodynamic overpressure exceeding the design strength.  There was no object in the water - this is a story for the insurance company.

(HST, I see the splash you are referring to however no object is seen - looks to me like the crest of several waves interacting with each other)

 

Screen Shot 2020-03-06 at 07.12.46.png

Screen Shot 2020-03-06 at 07.11.07.png

Screen Shot 2020-03-06 at 07.10.52.png

Edited by seeker

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(HST, I see the splash you are referring to however no object is seen - looks to me like the crest of several waves interacting with each other

I think left rudder was applied to miss the object in the water. The theory of interacting waves (similar to a speedboat doing tight circles on a lake) just doesn’t “hold water” in my opinion. Sorry couldn’t resist 😉

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