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Jaydee
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McMaster University did a study that could be useful...

https://brighterworld.mcmaster.ca/articles/antidepressant-fluvoxamine-can-save-covid-19-patients-mcmaster-led-research-shows/

Antidepressant fluvoxamine can save COVID-19 patients, McMaster-led research shows

An inexpensive oral antidepressant can save the lives of COVID-19 patients and cut hospital admissions by up to 30 per cent, says a study co-led by McMaster University. 

McMaster researcher Ed Mills and his team treated 738 randomly selected Brazilian COVID-19 patients with fluvoxamine, while another 733 received a placebo, between Jan. 20 and Aug. 6 of this year. 

Every patient receiving fluvoxamine during the trial is tracked for 28 days to determine their health outcomes and if they still need hospital treatment. 

Researchers found about a 30-per-cent reduction in events among those receiving fluvoxamine compared to those who did not.   

The fluvoxamine trial formed part of the larger TOGETHER Trial that started in May 2020, aiming to test potential COVID-19 treatments in a community setting. 

TOGETHER Trial scientists tested eight drugs, including hydroxychloroquine, metformin, kaletra and ivermectin, but only fluvoxamine had a positive effect on COVID-19.  

“Fluvoxamine is the only treatment that, if administered early, can prevent COVID-19 from becoming a life-threatening illness,” said Mills, co-principal investigator for the TOGETHER Trial and a professor of McMaster’s Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact. “It could be one of our most powerful weapons against the virus and its effectiveness is one of the most important discoveries we have made since the pandemic began.

“In addition, this cheap, easily-accessible pill is a massive boon to public health, both in Canada and internationally, allowing hospitals to avoid expensive and sometimes risky treatments.”  

Costing about $4 per 10-day course, fluvoxamine could be a game-changer for poorer countries with low vaccination rates and lacking access to more advanced COVID-19 therapies, Mills said. 

Fluvoxamine has been used since the 1990s and its safety profile is well-known. It was identified early in the pandemic for its potential to reduce cytokine storms — severe immune responses to COVID-19 that can cause potentially lethal organ damage.  

Joining McMaster’s scientists in the TOGETHER Trial were researchers from the CardResearch Cardiologia Assistencial e de Pesquisa LTDA in Brazil. 

The researchers will soon submit their findings to a medical journal for peer review. They have also submitted their research to the U.S.-based National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization. 

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https://video.foxnews.com/v/6290063857001#sp=show-clips

The point here is simple, it’s not the content (specifically) it’s the terminal guidance course correction.

Mainstream doctors and the mainstream media are now telling you exactly what tinfoil hat wearers have been saying, it’s obvious now and they can freely talk about this without getting fired or de-platformed. We are finally hearing the things that should have been the subject of polite and thoughtful debate a year (or more) ago.

Watch as democrats and liberals walk this back incrementally, you’re already seeing it happen on a number of fronts. Doctors can now openly discuss treatment options and off label applications like fluvoxamine. There’s a reason no one is ridiculing “wormy depressed horses” now too, they have come to see how silly they sounded.

Next up, the voters who demanded this madness will pivot (largely due to recovery impacts on them) and vilify the governments who gave them what they wanted for giving them what they wanted.

The game is over. Before long, your grandchildren will be asking you to proof read their essay about mass formation psychosis.

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Far Right and Hard Left join find common ground to vote no.

French parliament approves Macron’s COVID-19 vaccine pass plan

Officials hope the bill comes into force by January 15 as France faces a surge in infections.

A medical worker administers a dose of COVID-19 vaccine
The vaccine pass rules will apply to those aged above 16 [File: Sarah Meyssonnier/Reuters]
Published On 6 Jan 20226 Jan 2022
 

France’s parliament has approved President Emmanuel Macron’s plans for a COVID vaccine pass to help curb the spread of the Omicron variant after a tumultuous debate whipped up by Macron’s comments that he wanted to “p**s off” the unvaccinated.

Macron told Le Parisien newspaper earlier this week that he wanted to make the lives of those refusing the COVID-19 vaccine so complicated by squeezing them out of public places that they would end up getting jabbed.

 

 

Macron’s coarse language barely three months before a presidential election was widely seen as politically calculated, tapping into an intensifying public frustration against the unvaccinated.

More than 90 percent of those above 12 have received at least two doses, government data shows. Health Minister Olivier Veran said a record number of people since October 1 received a first shot on Wednesday after Macron’s comments were published.

Legislators in the lower house passed draft legislation on Thursday including the vaccine pass shortly after 5am local time (04:00 GMT) after an all-night session by a margin of 214 to 93. Many of those who voted against the bill were from the far right or hard left.

The legislation will go to the Senate before a final vote in the National Assembly.

For months, people in France have had to show proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test to enter venues such as cinemas and cafes and use trains.

But with Delta and Omicron variant infections surging, the government decided to drop the test option in the new bill.

The vaccine pass rules will apply to those aged above 16, and not above 12 as the government had initially sought.

European countries are divided on how to coerce citizens into getting vaccinated.

Italy on Wednesday made COVID-19 vaccination mandatory for people from the age of 50, with teachers and public health workers already obliged to get the shot. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson slammed those who refuse vaccination, but said he would not force anyone to get a jab.

Prime Minister Jean Castex said countries that had moved towards compulsory vaccinations such as Italy and Austria had lower vaccination rates than France.

Castex also said France was ready to move towards a fourth COVID shot when the time was right.

On Wednesday, France registered a record of more than 332,000 new COVID-19 cases in the last 24 hours, and a further 246 COVID deaths in hospitals.

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U.S. Is Open as Canada Shuts Down. The Difference? Their Health Care Systems

  • U.S. free-market system has more surge capacity than Canada’s
  • Omicron exposes a trade-off of government-run health care

Thu Jan 6, 2022 - Bloomberg News
By Brian Platt and Kevin Orland

Quote

“America’s outcomes are almost inexplicable given the scientific and medical firepower of the USA,”

As omicron sweeps through North America, the U.S. and Canadian responses couldn’t be more different. U.S. states are largely open for business, while Canada’s biggest provinces are shutting down. 

The difference largely comes down to arithmetic: The U.S. health care system, which prioritizes free markets, provides more hospital beds per capita than the government-dominated Canadian system does.

“I’m not advocating for that American market-driven system,” said Bob Bell, a physician who ran Ontario’s health bureaucracy from 2014 to 2018 and oversaw Toronto’s University Health Network before that. “But I am saying that in Canada, we have restricted hospital capacity excessively.”

The consequences of that are being felt throughout the economy. In Ontario, restaurants, concert halls and gyms are closed while Quebec has a 10 p.m. curfew and banned in-person church services. British Columbia has suspended indoor weddings and funeral receptions.

The limits on hospital capacity include intensive care units. The U.S. has one staffed ICU bed per 4,100 people, based on data from thousands of hospitals reporting to the U.S. Health and Human Services Department. Ontario has one ICU bed for about every 6,000 residents, based on provincial government figures and the latest population estimates.

covidcrunch.jpg.0acc351bdb9353cea653406c26463aa7.jpg

Of course, hospital capacity is only one way to measure the success of a health system. Overall, Canadians have better access to health care, live longer than Americans and rarely go bankrupt because of medical bills. Canada’s mortality rate from Covid-19 is a third of the U.S. rate, a reflection of Canada’s more widespread use of health restrictions and its collectivist approach to health care.

Still, the pandemic has exposed one trade-off that Canada makes with its universal system: Its hospitals are less capable of handling a surge of patients. 

The situation is especially stark in Ontario. Nationally, Canada has less hospital capacity than the U.S. has, as a proportion of the population. But even among Canadian provinces, Ontario fares the worst. It had one intensive-care or acute-care bed for every 800 residents as of April 2019, the latest period for which data is available, according to the Canadian Institute for Health Information. During the same period, the average ratio in the rest of Canada was about one bed for every 570 residents. (The state of New York has about one inpatient hospital bed per 420 residents.) 

That leaves the province’s health care system in a precarious position whenever a new wave of Covid-19 arrives.

“The math isn’t on our side,” Ontario Premier Doug Ford said Monday as he announced new school and business closures this week to alleviate pressure on the province’s hospitals. The province has nearly 2,300 people hospitalized with Covid-19.

No Surge Capacity

On Wednesday, after Brampton Civic Hospital in the Toronto suburbs declared an emergency because of a shortage of beds and workers, Brampton’s mayor, Patrick Brown, tweeted: “We need a national conversation on inadequate health care capacity and staffing.”

The biggest bottleneck in the system is the staffing required by acute care, particularly in the emergency departments and intensive care units, Bell said. The personnel crunch becomes extreme during Covid waves when large numbers of staff are forced to isolate at home because of infection or exposure.

“We haven’t done an adequate job of developing capacity that will serve the needs of Ontarians,” Bell said. “There’s just no surge capacity available.”

Stephen Archer, head of the medicine department at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, about three hours east of Toronto, spent two decades working in hospitals in Minneapolis and Chicago. He said he believes strongly that the Canadian system is better and provides more equitable care.

Still, he called it “embarrassing” to see Toronto’s hospitals having to transfer virus patients to smaller hospitals around the province, as happened last year. The Kingston Health Sciences Center, where he works, took in more than 100 Covid patients from Toronto earlier in the pandemic, which was no surprise, Archer said, because Ontario’s hospitals get overwhelmed even by a busy flu season.

“I think a very fair criticism of the Canadian system and the Ontario system is we try to run our hospitals too close to capacity,” he said. “We couldn’t handle mild seasonal diseases like influenza, and therefore we were poorly positioned to handle Covid-19.”

divergingoutcomes.jpg.3000a976398bead6b2c2b95646785ccc.jpg

Beyond hospital capacity, Archer and Bell cited other reasons for the disparity in the way that the U.S. and Canada respond to new outbreaks. Canadians put more trust in their government to act for the larger collective good, and they won’t tolerate the level of death and severe disease that America has endured from Covid, they said. 

David Naylor, a physician and former University of Toronto president who led a federal review into Canada’s response to the 2003 SARS epidemic, said hospital capacity probably plays a bigger role in Canadian decision-making than in the U.S. because Canada’s universal system means “the welfare of the entire population is affected if health care capacity is destabilized.”

But he also argued that focusing only on hospital capacity could be misleading. “Both Canada and the U.S. have lower capacity than many European countries,” he wrote by email.

The major difference between the two countries’ responses to Covid outbreaks is cultural, Naylor argues. In Canada, more than the U.S., policy is guided by a “collectivist ethos” that tolerates prolonged shutdowns and other public health restrictions to keep hospitals from collapsing.

“America’s outcomes are almost inexplicable given the scientific and medical firepower of the USA,” Naylor said. “With regret, I’d have to say that America’s radical under-performance in protecting its citizens from viral disease and death is a symptom of a deeper-seated political malaise in their federation.”

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18 hours ago, Airband said:

We haven’t done an adequate job of developing capacity that will serve the needs of Ontarians,” Bell said. “There’s just no surge capacity available.”

Pretty cool.

For me (on a number of issues) the last few days have been a bit like watching a bear emerge from its winter den and shake off a long sleep. You don't get to see that very often.  It's been totally absent for the last two years... like no one seemed to notice, until now.

Allowing professional people to speak freely (and hopefully politely) is the only way to plot a rational course around the red stuff on our collective radar screens. 

I'm amazed it took this long but now it seems that the sleepers have awakened and there is new hope for good outcomes.

Better late than never I guess. Here's a little musical motivation for politicians and voters alike.... get er done:

 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Posted (edited)
42 minutes ago, deicer said:

 

This clip is really disturbing. Political theatre at best.
 

I don’t like lockdown or school closures any more than the next guy, and while I understand the frustration everyone feels on this subject, we cannot ignore what a **bleep** show our hospitals are in right now. I know this for a FACT. It’s undeniable….regardless of your political stripe. As to the hows and whys and whose to blame…well that  could be another thread entirely, but it’s happening and the ramifications have to be dealt with. NOW, …What do you expect the government to do, just sit idly by and watch? Do nothing? Watch things deteriorate to the point of no return?? The Libs and NDP would like nothing better if that were to happen. Just imagine the story line then.

 

Could the past two years been handled differently…maybe yes, maybe no…depends whether or not your crystal ball was made in China.  
 

Sadly, on another front I just was informed of a 5 yr old girl, (close to a family member) dying because of Covid. Admitted one day, dead the next. Yes it’s probably an anomaly but it did happen.

Rant Over

 

Edited by Jaydee
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If you look at the videos this individual puts out, he doesn't do political theater, he does political and cultural parodies.

I won't speak for other provinces, however, in Ontario, our current government has been behind in every aspect of reacting to the pandemic since the get go.

In the first waves, Ford didn't have the testicular fortitude to do the right thing, and it wasn't until Peel Region started to shut things down, followed by Toronto, that he started to react.

He claimed to be doing the most for the people, but it was all with federal money, and when he cried out for more, he was exposed for hiding billions that he hadn't spent.

He talks out one side of his mouth about the 'heroes' our healthcare workers are, yet he won't repeal Bill 124 that basically keeps them as slave labour.

He shut down small business, yet rewarded his big business buddies by shovelling all the sales their way.

He was quick to open stadiums to enrichen MLSE, but it turns out it became one of the biggest spreaders of omicron.

He was slow to close the schools, even though the numbers showed there was massive spread of cases amongst students and staff, so his response was to stop reporting school infection numbers.

So unlike the conservatives on this board complaining about what the liberals might have done, these are all factual things that have happened and are happening.

Doug Ford, definitely not for the people.

Edited to add:

They claim that there isn't enough PCR tests to full test the public, however, if you are rich or a sports celebrity, there are plenty of tests.  Also, you can't get a public test, but there are plenty of private places that you can pay $300 dollars for a PCR test and get your results almost immediately.

All part of the agenda to destroy our public healthcare and bring in private healthcare that is more profitable.

Vote ABC!

https://www.blogto.com/city/2022/01/why-people-are-calling-ontario-government-repeal-bill-124/

Edited by deicer
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People need to put partisan thinking behind them and become political agnostics. 

Imagine if we all voted on policy. Good policy would rise like cream because people demanded it and show themselves ready to rewarded it. So, if the Liberal party I previously voted for ever manages to pull their heads out of their collective butts and stop being certifiably crazy, I would vote for them again.

Or, you can take the "anything but" tactic and prolong the agony. Frankly I hope you do... I know lots of people who vote liberal just because. They don't follow the issues, vote on policy or even seem to care what the issues are. You could have an entire election cycle with no policy discussion at all and they wouldn't even notice.

They need a bellyful of bad policy and they need to be hurt by it. Most of them didn't notice the covid nonsense and were too busy shouting "anti-vaxxer" and ridiculing depressed horses who needed deworming medication. Keep watching, they will notice the tax measures needed to pay for it all because none of them were ever willing to pay for what they thought they might maybe have wanted in the first place.

If you like the current trajectory, then stay the course. You won't get better policy development until you demand it, and if you don't demand it, then the current situation is well deserved and will prove long lasting.

Wait until all the little dribs and drabs of covid information coalesce. I want to see if they get madder about that or about the taxes. I'm betting it's the latter. 

 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Posted (edited)

And there it is…The resident dicktater will force vaccinations on the nation…I don’t believe for one second the Health Minister would say this on his own accord….Trudeau may have just set in motion his own Alamo. 🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻

“ I see it coming': Mandatory vaccinations on the horizon, federal health minister says”

Asked about mandatory vaccination, he said in French, “I personally think we will get there at some point.”

According to a translation on CBC, he added, “I see it coming personally. Not now. I don’t think we are there yet. But I think discussions need to be had about mandatory vaccinations because we have to get rid of Covid 19.”

Duclos told a press conference that any decision would be in the hands of provincial governments, but he said the unvaccinated were creating a sizeable burden on others.

https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/health-minister-believes-mandatory-vaccinations-coming-to-canada

Edited by Jaydee
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2 hours ago, Jaydee said:

And there it is…The resident dicktater will force vaccinations on the nation…I don’t believe for one second the Health Minister would say this on his own accord….Trudeau may have just set in motion his own Alamo. 🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻

“ I see it coming': Mandatory vaccinations on the horizon, federal health minister says”

Asked about mandatory vaccination, he said in French, “I personally think we will get there at some point.”

According to a translation on CBC, he added, “I see it coming personally. Not now. I don’t think we are there yet. But I think discussions need to be had about mandatory vaccinations because we have to get rid of Covid 19.”

Duclos told a press conference that any decision would be in the hands of provincial governments, but he said the unvaccinated were creating a sizeable burden on others.

https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/health-minister-believes-mandatory-vaccinations-coming-to-canada

If this what it takes to beat the virus into submission, I would have no problem with the concept but I do question the enforcement / penalties for those who do not obey the mandate.  

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In New York 71.8% of the population is fully vaccinated.
Montana has 54% of the population is fully vaccinated.

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/map-covid-19-vaccination-tracker-across-u-s-n1252085

New York has a 7 day average of 3,587.1 cases per million – the second worst in the country.
Montana has a 7 day average of 534.1 cases per million – the second best in the country

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/covid-19-in-the-u-s-how-do-canada-s-provinces-rank-against-american-states-1.5051033

Edited by GDR
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There's lots more of this on the way. In the mean time though, if you are even slightly surprised by the initial indications, I say it's because you either haven't been paying attention or you've been too busy berating and ridiculing others. If 3 years ago I had suggested prioritizing medical treatment and triage based on race, I can well imagine what some of you would have said:

https://www.foxnews.com/health/almost-half-reported-ny-covid-19-hospitalizations-not-due-covid-19

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4 hours ago, GDR said:

In New York 71.8% of the population is fully vaccinated.
Montana has 54% of the population is fully vaccinated.

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/map-covid-19-vaccination-tracker-across-u-s-n1252085

New York has a 7 day average of 3,587.1 cases per million – the second worst in the country.
Montana has a 7 day average of 534.1 cases per million – the second best in the country

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/covid-19-in-the-u-s-how-do-canada-s-provinces-rank-against-american-states-1.5051033

Here’s an excellent wrap up of where we are and where we are going. Best video I have watched to date.

 

https://www.instagram.com/tv/CYZlDPZOYY3/?utm_medium=copy_link

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Kargokings said:

If this what it takes to beat the virus into submission, I would have no problem with the concept but I do question the enforcement / penalties for those who do not obey the mandate.  

I would tend to agree, but enforcement could become a political nightmare. How many people will fight back…literally…when push comes to shove. For the first time I am GLAD Trudeau won. He will have to face the fall out over the implementation consequences.
 

The old saying of “The **bleep** has hit the fan, but the splash has been contained” won’t hold water in 2022…especially out West where cojones are still in ample supply. I predict Ontario and the Maritimes will fold like a cheap suit. Quebec not so much..but oh my…out West…If he becomes heavy handed in his approach, we could very well see the separation of Canada. They have been looking for an excuse..this could push them over the edge In my opinion.

Here is a sampling of replies on Instagram. There were over 750  comments similar to this in less than 12 hours in varying degrees of **bleep**-off-ness.

229582FC-0880-4999-829D-B19E8BDBFF65.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee
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32 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

I would tend to agree, but enforcement could become a political nightmare

I hope they go ahead with this too but for different reasons.

Massive pain is required to cure this and the sooner we collectively hurt and hurt badly the sooner we will have a 2 generation REINIT. Ya got my vote...

 

 

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5 hours ago, GDR said:

In New York 71.8% of the population is fully vaccinated.
Montana has 54% of the population is fully vaccinated.

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/map-covid-19-vaccination-tracker-across-u-s-n1252085

New York has a 7 day average of 3,587.1 cases per million – the second worst in the country.
Montana has a 7 day average of 534.1 cases per million – the second best in the country

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/covid-19-in-the-u-s-how-do-canada-s-provinces-rank-against-american-states-1.5051033

I would think that these two statistics explain the difference between Montana and New York the best.

https://www.opendatanetwork.com/entity/0400000US30/Montana/geographic.population.density?year=2018

The last measured population density for Montana was 7 in 2018. Montana experienced an average growth rate of 0.99% from our first statistic recorded in 2009. If past trends continue, we forecast the population density to be 7 by 2023.

Population Density is computed by dividing the total population by Land Area Per Square Mile.

https://www1.nyc.gov/site/planning/planning-level/nyc-population/population-facts.page

  • New York has the highest population density of any major city in the United States, with over 27,000 people per square mile.
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3 hours ago, deicer said:

I would think that these two statistics explain the difference between Montana and New York the best.

https://www.opendatanetwork.com/entity/0400000US30/Montana/geographic.population.density?year=2018

The last measured population density for Montana was 7 in 2018. Montana experienced an average growth rate of 0.99% from our first statistic recorded in 2009. If past trends continue, we forecast the population density to be 7 by 2023.

Population Density is computed by dividing the total population by Land Area Per Square Mile.

https://www1.nyc.gov/site/planning/planning-level/nyc-population/population-facts.page

  • New York has the highest population density of any major city in the United States, with over 27,000 people per square mile.

 

Yes, that is all true but I'd suggest that would be largely counter-balanced by the fact that New York state has pretty rigid restrictions such as wearing masks etc, whereas Montana is pretty much wide open and leaves it up to its citizens. Also, as was the point. New York has roughly a 50% higher rate of vaccination as Montana.

Also I can see your point if the New York rate was 2 or 3 times as high, even if the vaccines were doing anything to stop the spread, but it is nearly 7 times as high. 

The number of cases of all variants is growing at an incredible rate but the death rate is dropping.

https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20211229/omicron-cases-soar-deaths-on-decline-white-house

It seems to me as someone with zero knowledge of vaccines that we can draw conclusions from all published data.

1/ There are now 2 variants left, Delta and Omnicron. Omnicron is far more transmissible but far less lethal.

2/Omnicron is pushing out the Delta variant and hopefully providing immunisation to those infected by it.

3/The vaccines, masks etc are not slowing the spread of this variant.

I know that Omnicron is not the flu but its effect is pretty much the same as a highly infectious form of the flu.

Then we look at those facts and we have to start questioning our governing authorities. Here is a statement from our federal health minister.

"“What we see now is that our health care system in Canada is fragile. Our people are tired and the only way as we know through COVID–19, be it this variant or any future variant, is through vaccination,” he said."

We know that vaccines are not the only way of controlling Covid. There are now approved treatments for the disease and of course he is completely ignoring any suggestion that herd or natural immunity will eventually control this virus.

The problem now is overcrowded hospitals and lack of staff to care for the situation. I just don't see anyway out of that except to whether the storm, use the antidotes that are available and we'll get through this.

IMHO at this point the damage that is being done to the mental health of Canadians and the financial state of the country by the mandates, will have a far more long reaching effect on the country.

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Good work Health Canada!

https://nationalpost.com/health/new-covid-drug-canada-is-spending-up-to-450m-on-may-be-ineffective-some-experts-warn

Canada was impressed enough that earlier this month it bought 500,000 courses of the yet-to-be-approved medicine from Merck at a cost that could be as high as $450 million. 

A new analysis by British scientists argues the main finding in Merck’s phase 3 trial — a modest 30-per-cent reduction in hospitalizations among patients given the pills relatively early on — was actually not statistically significant. The fact the second half of that trial found better outcomes for patients getting a placebo is also raising questions.

What’s more, animal studies cited by the FDA – contested by Merck – suggest the drug might increase the risk of birth defects if taken by pregnant women.

Meanwhile, two Indian trials of generic versions of Molnupiravir were stopped because they found no benefit for patients.

“Spending money on a drug that at best is only minorly effective is an inappropriate use of Canadian taxpayers’ money,” said Ed Mills, a part-time McMaster University professor who is heading one of the world’s largest COVID treatment studies .

“The story here is that a major pharma took advantage of the pressure of the pandemic to pressure governments around the world to buy their drug when the trial was lousy.”

 

Hmmm, no wonder why people distrust big pharma.  What chance is there that a clause was written into the contract voiding it if the drug turned out to be useless and/or harmful?

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But despite the vocal protests, opposition to the new measures is not widespread and recent polling suggests the vast majority of people back the vaccine pass.

 

 

Covid: Thousands protest in France against proposed new vaccine pass

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Protesters in the French capital, ParisIMAGE SOURCE,GETTY IMAGES
Image caption,
About 18,000 people attended the protest in the capital Paris

French authorities say more than 105,000 people have taken part in protests across the country against the introduction of a new coronavirus pass.

Covid: Thousands protest in France against proposed new vaccine pass - BBC News

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Exactly how I see it too:

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/rex-murphy-last-years-hope-fades-into-perpetual-covid-nightmare

BTW, how do y'all plan to force people to get vaccinated? Seriously now, how do you see that playing out, Internment camps, injection squads, what exactly is your plan?

Don't ignore the question, if you want it tell me how you propose to enforce it. In some parts of the world that kind of stuff is called Tuesday morning and the only Canadians you'll see are wearing blue helmets. Before you post the staff answer, run it by a refugee.... I urgently recommend caution, see what they have to say about it.

This vaccine has to be the only medical treatment in history whose utter failure is blamed on those who didn’t take it. 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Here we go again...

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-01-08/cyprus-finds-covid-19-infections-that-combine-delta-and-omicron?sref=ctSjKj2N

Cyprus Finds Covid-19 Infections That Combine Delta and Omicron

A strain of Covid-19 that combines delta and omicron was found in Cyprus, according to Leondios Kostrikis, professor of biological sciences at the University of Cyprus and head of the Laboratory of Biotechnology and Molecular Virology. 

“There are currently omicron and delta co-infections and we found this strain that is a combination of these two,” Kostrikis said in an interview with Sigma TV Friday. The discovery was named “deltacron” due to the identification of omicron-like genetic signatures within the delta genomes, he said.

Kostrikis and his team have identified 25 such cases and the statistical analysis shows that the relative frequency of the combined infection is higher among patients hospitalized due to Covid-19 as compared to non-hospitalized patients. The sequences of the 25 deltacron cases were sent to GISAID, the international database that tracks changes in the virus, on Jan. 7. 

“We will see in the future if this strain is more pathological or more contagious or if it will prevail” over delta and omicron, he said. But his personal view is that this strain will also be displaced by the highly contagious omicron variant.

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Mother charged after son found in trunk at COVID test site

A Houston mother was charged after authorities allege she placed her 13-year-old son in the trunk of her car to isolate him after he tested positive for COVID-19, then took him to a drive-thru testing site

By JUAN A. LOZANO Associated Press
7 January 2022, 16:44
 2 min read

HOUSTON -- A Houston mother was charged after authorities allege she placed her 13-year-old son in the trunk of her car in an attempt to isolate him after he had tested positive for COVID-19 and then took him to a drive-thru testing site.

The 41-year-old is charged with endangering a child. Authorities allege her son was found on Monday in her car’s trunk at a testing site for the Cypress-Fairbanks school district in northwest Houston. The woman is a teacher with the district, which said in a statement that the child was not harmed.

https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/mother-charged-son-found-trunk-covid-test-site-82142183

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PM wants to take a stab at it?

But mandatory vaccinations an affront to charter and Canadian ideals

  • Calgary Sun
  • 9 Jan 2022
  • BRIAN LILLEY blilley@postmedia.com @brianlilley
img?regionKey=J5yf2gNL0MMYcInoXNiQyA%3d%3d  

Since the beginning of the pandemic, Canada's Charter of Rights and Freedoms has gone from a beloved document to an afterthought.

Governments of all stripes and at all levels have ignored the guarantees in the charter in favour of measures to defeat COVID-19. Most Canadians have welcomed and embraced the measures.

Now we appear to be ready to do that again, with the Trudeau Liberals pushing for provinces to embrace mandatory vaccination policies, not for some specific jobs or activities but for the entire population.

“I see it coming personally,” federal Health Minister Jean-yves Duclos said Friday. “Not now. I don't think we are there yet.”

It would be difficult for the federal government to impose such a mandate, so Duclos said the federal government wants the provinces and territories to do it.

“This is a conversation which I believe provinces and territories, in support with the federal government, will want to have over the next weeks and months,” he said.

Translation: We want the provinces to do our dirty work for us. We want the provinces to trample the charter guarantees of freedom of conscience and religion and the right to life, liberty and security of the person.

That's what a mandatory vaccination policy would do.

I may be triple vaxxed and encourage everyone to get their shots, but I don't want to live in a country where governments can force any medical intervention on a citizen as a condition of living. Most mandates so far have been limited to certain jobs or activities, a fact that would likely help them survive a Charter challenge.

This idea though goes beyond saying a doctor or nurse treating vulnerable people must be vaccinated. It goes beyond restricting movement. It goes well beyond school vaccination requirements, which allow parents to opt out. This would fly in the face of what we have said we believe in as a country and make a mockery of the charter that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Liberals wrap themselves in at every turn.

Fines rather than forcible inoculation would be the likely way to do this. It's what some European countries are doing. Greece is imposing a monthly fine of about $144 on people over 60 not vaccinated, while Austria is looking at a fine equivalent to $5,000 for those over 50 without a shot.

Some provinces are already saying no.

“Alberta's legislature removed the power of mandatory vaccination from the Public Health Act last year and will not revisit that decision, period,” Alberta Premier Jason Kenney said Friday.

Saskatchewan's Scott

Moe also rejected the idea.

“While we strongly encourage everyone to get vaccinated to protect yourself and others from serious illness, in Saskatchewan this is a personal choice, not one imposed on you by the government,” Moe said.

At this point, neither Ontario's Doug Ford nor Quebec's Francois Legault have commented on the Duclos statement.

This idea goes against what Trudeau himself said many times just a few months ago when he promised vaccines for anyone who wants one but denied any mandates were coming.

“We're not a country that makes vaccination mandatory,” Trudeau said during an appearance on the Brandon Gonez Show in May, citing people who may object for health or religious reasons during that interview.

That of course was before his government did polling that showed he could gain an advantage by politicizing this issue, channelling the anger of vaccinated Canadians against the unvaccinated. That's what he did during the last federal election and that's what his government is doing once again.

Trudeau is trying to use anger and emotions rather than facts, science and data to drive his agenda.

The truth is about 90% of all adults in Canada are vaccinated. It's higher for older age groups most at risk and vaccine uptake among younger age groups less at risk continues to grow. There is also the fact that the hospital crush happening right now is mostly vaccinated patients showing up sick and vaccinated staff calling in sick.

Engaging in a draconian measure, such as mandatory vaccinations for a small group of people, would be politically dangerous and practically difficult.

If Canadians believe in the charter we supposedly hold dear, we should all reject this idea.

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