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Coronavirus_2020.01.28


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4 hours ago, deicer said:

Well, ivermectin didn't work in this case...

Well he's dead but maybe without the ivermectin he might have been more dead - we just can't tell from the information available.

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The Canadian Press

A 'rapidly escalating COVID-19 situation is developing in the Yukon,' top doctor says

WHITEHORSE — Yukon's top doctor says a "rapidly escalating COVID-19 situation" is threatening the territory's health-care system and residents must take steps to control the spread.

%7B© Provided by The Canadian Press

Acting chief medical officer of health, Dr. Catherine Elliott, says in a statement that Yukon is at a point in the pandemic it has not seen before. 

Elliott says Yukoners must "take immediate steps to break the cycle of widespread community transmission" that will likely continue over the coming days.

The Yukon government says it is considering new recommendations from Elliott, but for now, residents are urged to get vaccinated and follow existing guidelines.

The current recommendations, in effect until at least Nov. 30, include limiting social gatherings to 20 people indoors if everyone is fully vaccinated and to six people for gatherings where not everyone is fully vaccinated, though they're not requirements.

Elliott's warning came as Yukon reported 80 new cases of COVID-19 diagnosed over a three-day period between Friday and Monday, for a total of 169 active infections.

The territory says 132 of the overall active cases are in Whitehorse residents, 20 cases are in Carmarks and four are in Carcross, while Burwash Landing, Pelly Crossing and Teslin each have one resident with an active infection. 

Elliott has also declared a COVID-19 outbreak affecting the Grade 4/5 class at École Whitehorse Elementary School and says all other students should go to school.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 8, 2021. 

The Canadian Press

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Denmark ditched its Covid rules two months ago. Now it's joined other EU nations in mulling new restrictions

By Sheena McKenzie, CNN  1 hour ago 

Two months ago, Denmark was riding high. The European nation lifted all remaining domestic coronavirus restrictions as the government declared Covid-19 was no longer "an illness which is a critical threat to society."

 nightclubs and restaurants without showing a "Covid passport," used public transport without having to wear a mask and met in large numbers without restrictions.

The optimism of mid-September has been short-lived.

Denmark, like many countries across Europe, is now considering whether to reinstate restrictions as the continent battles a surge of Covid-19 cases that has pushed the region back into the epicenter of the pandemic.

Large swathes of Europe are battling to beat back surges of the Delta variant amid the relaxation of restrictions and stuttering vaccine rollouts in some countries, with the WHO warning half a million Europeans could die of Covid-19 in a potentially devastating winter.

In the space of a few months, Europe's Covid-19 fortunes have shifted dramatically. By the end of the summer, many countries had done away with tough restrictions after nations particularly in the west of the bloc charged ahead with vaccination programs and cases plummeted.

Now as other parts of the world reopen, Europe could again be facing a winter of renewed clampdowns.

Repeat restrictions

On Monday the Danish government proposed reintroducing a digital "corona pass" -- used as proof of vaccination or a negative Covid-19 test -- for entering bars and restaurants, as the country faces a third wave of infections, Reuters reported.

The measure will be subject to parliamentary approval. But it comes against the urgent new backdrop of steadily rising cases -- from a low of just over 200 daily infections in mid-September to around 2,300 in recent days.

Denmark is not alone. Austria this week banned unvaccinated people from restaurants and hotels amid a surge in cases. And Iceland reintroduced masks and social-distancing rules following a rise.

Elsewhere, Germany's incidence rate is breaking records on a daily basis. On Tuesday the country recorded its highest seven-day infection rate since the pandemic began, with 213.7 cases per 100,000 people, according to the country's Robert Koch Institute of infectious diseases (RKI).

In some eastern German states, like Saxony and Thuringia, the incident rate has been more than double that, at over 400.

And on Tuesday French President Emmanuel Macron was set to address the nation amid a surge in cases -- his first major TV speech since July when he announced mandatory vaccinations for all health workers.

The United Kingdom has also been battling a stubborn streak of new infections, months after "Freedom Day" celebrations at the end of July marked the removal of almost all Covid-19 restrictions.

Though unlike its European neighbors, the UK has no plans to reinstate restrictions any time soon, including mandatory mask wearing.

Vaccine roll on and on

Denmark's rise in case comes after a successful vaccine rollout, with 88.3% of its adult population fully vaccinated, according to the European Center for Disease Control (ECDC).

On Monday, Health Minister Magnus Heunicke tried to put Denmark's fortunes in the wider context of Europe's ongoing battle with Covid-19.

"Several European countries are now in the middle of their fourth wave of corona," Heunicke said during a televised briefing, Reuters reported. "In Denmark we are heading into our third corona wave."

The European Union as a whole has been a world leader on inoculations, with 75% of adults fully vaccinated, according to the ECDC. But the rollout has been extremely unequal across the bloc; on the eastern side, Romania and Bulgaria have fully vaccinated only 40% and 27% of their adults, respectively.

Now countries are increasingly turning their attention to booster shots in an effort to halt the virus' spread over the winter months, and the prospect of unpopular restrictions over the Christmas period.

Germany and Austria have offered booster shots for everyone six months after receiving their second shot. France has begun administering booster shots to its over-65s, those with underlying health conditions and carers. The United Kingdom, meanwhile has already administered more than 10 million top-up jabs, Prime Minister Boris Johnson tweeted this week.

 

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I'm not a huge fan of Fox news, largely due to its rather inflammatory style,  but I look in on it periodically. Here is a report from them comparing California and Florida.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/masked-california-covid-rate-twice-florida

Here is an paragraph from the report. Why aren't other jurisdictions doing this. Why aren't we. It does seem to me that our governments are pushing the vaccines they have already paid for that there are ignoring methods of treatment that can save lives. Also, they downplay the role of natural immunity.

"Gov. DeSantis is proud of Florida’s success with launching monoclonal antibody treatment sites throughout the state, which made a huge impact on lowering hospitalizations and saving lives. Early treatment – getting the monoclonal antibodies as soon as possible after testing positive or experiencing symptoms – cuts the risk of hospitalization by 70% or more," Pushaw added.

 

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While it is an effective treatment, many of the side effects are the same as getting vaccinated.  So why not avoid the hassle of getting the IV in the first place?

https://www.houstonmethodist.org/blog/articles/2021/jan/what-is-monoclonal-antibody-therapy-and-who-is-eligible-to-receive-it/

How is monoclonal antibody therapy administered?

Dr. Huang: Monoclonal antibody therapy is given through intravenous (IV) infusion. These infusions are given in one of our outpatient infusion centers and require about an hour to administer, followed by an hour of observation and monitoring.

One possible side effect of monoclonal antibody therapy is an allergic reaction. These reactions typically only occur during infusion or soon after, and your care team will closely monitor for any signs of an allergic reaction. However, because an infusion reaction can also be delayed, contact your doctor immediately if you notice any of the following signs of an allergic reaction:

  • Fever and/or chills
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Shortness of breath
  • Low blood pressure
  • Wheezing
  • Swelling of lips, face or throat
  • Muscle aches
  • Hives or itchiness
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1 hour ago, GDR said:

I'm not a huge fan of Fox news, largely due to its rather inflammatory style,  but I look in on it periodically. Here is a report from them comparing California and Florida.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/masked-california-covid-rate-twice-florida

Here is an paragraph from the report. Why aren't other jurisdictions doing this. Why aren't we. It does seem to me that our governments are pushing the vaccines they have already paid for that there are ignoring methods of treatment that can save lives. Also, they downplay the role of natural immunity.

"Gov. DeSantis is proud of Florida’s success with launching monoclonal antibody treatment sites throughout the state, which made a huge impact on lowering hospitalizations and saving lives. Early treatment – getting the monoclonal antibodies as soon as possible after testing positive or experiencing symptoms – cuts the risk of hospitalization by 70% or more," Pushaw added.

 

Of course when you take the following into account.........

Coronavirus infection by race: What's behind the health disparities? - Mayo Clinic

COVID-19 hospitalization rates among non-Hispanic Black people and Hispanic or Latino people were both about 4.7 times the rate of non-Hispanic white people.

Hispanic population of the United States in 2019, by state(in 1,000s)image.png.872846858d102902842e59335c37ace2.png

 

 

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1 hour ago, deicer said:

While it is an effective treatment, many of the side effects are the same as getting vaccinated.  So why not avoid the hassle of getting the IV in the first place?

 

It turns out that you can get the vaccine and still get Covid. So, vaccinated or not why can't we have access to the monoclonal treatment as it reduces severity, death and hospitalisation. I wasn't saying it should be a replacement for the vaccine, but it should be there as a back-up as it is in Florida. Florida has the lowest rate of any state and is lower than many Canadian provinces including BC.

Also it seems now, although it has been denied all along, that having contracted the virus, even if it is asymptomatic, provides immunity. The way Florida seems to be doing well at this is a combination of vaccines, monoclonal and now natural or herd immunity.

Why isn't this an option in Canada. Personally I wonder if our politicians have stockpiled and pushed the vaccine so hard as the only way of dealing with Covid they now can't be seen to looking at anything else. 

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27 minutes ago, Kargokings said:

Of course when you take the following into account.........

Coronavirus infection by race: What's behind the health disparities? - Mayo Clinic

COVID-19 hospitalization rates among non-Hispanic Black people and Hispanic or Latino people were both about 4.7 times the rate of non-Hispanic white people.

Hispanic population of the United States in 2019, by state(in 1,000s)image.png.872846858d102902842e59335c37ace2.png

 

 

That hardly shows the whole picture. Your chart just showed the number of Hispanic citizens. That group all includes the Hispanic African Americans.

The non-Hispanic African American population breaks down like this.

California  -  2.2 million
Florida          3.2 million
Texas      -    3.5 million

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_and_territories_by_African-American_population

Also, the numbers also have to take into account the populations involved.

California  -  39.5  million
Texas       -   28.9  million
Florida    -    21.4   million

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/covid-19-in-the-u-s-how-do-canada-s-provinces-rank-against-american-states-1.5051033

In the end both Florida and Texas without all the mandates are doing better than California, with the mandates.

 

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45 minutes ago, GDR said:

It turns out that you can get the vaccine and still get Covid. So, vaccinated or not why can't we have access to the monoclonal treatment as it reduces severity, death and hospitalisation. I wasn't saying it should be a replacement for the vaccine, but it should be there as a back-up as it is in Florida. Florida has the lowest rate of any state and is lower than many Canadian provinces including BC.

Also it seems now, although it has been denied all along, that having contracted the virus, even if it is asymptomatic, provides immunity. The way Florida seems to be doing well at this is a combination of vaccines, monoclonal and now natural or herd immunity.

Why isn't this an option in Canada. Personally I wonder if our politicians have stockpiled and pushed the vaccine so hard as the only way of dealing with Covid they now can't be seen to looking at anything else. 

The other big issue with regards to vaccine vs. monoclonal antibodies is the cost.  

Average cost of a vaccination is $20 whereas treatment with antibodies is $1250-$2100.

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/monoclonal-antibody-treatment-for-covid-19-effectiveness-cost-and-more#How-much-does-monoclonal-antibody-treatment-cost?

With the effectiveness of the vaccines, coupled with the much lower cost, as well as the similar side effects with antibody treatment, I would agree that having antibody treatment is a good 'back-up' to vaccinations if you get sick.

What I don't agree with is that it should be used as a backup plan by someone who choses to be unvaccinated.

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1 hour ago, deicer said:

The other big issue with regards to vaccine vs. monoclonal antibodies is the cost.  

Average cost of a vaccination is $20 whereas treatment with antibodies is $1250-$2100.

 

 

What I don't agree with is that it should be used as a backup plan by someone who choses to be unvaccinated.

How much is the cost of several days in the hospital compared to 1200.00 to 2150.00?

That would leave two choices with those who are concerned about long term and short term side effects and remain unvaccinated. Either they wind up in hospital at great expense or you send them home to get sicker and maybe die. Which is it?

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1 hour ago, GDR said:

How much is the cost of several days in the hospital compared to 1200.00 to 2150.00?

That would leave two choices with those who are concerned about long term and short term side effects and remain unvaccinated. Either they wind up in hospital at great expense or you send them home to get sicker and maybe die. Which is it?

So don't get vaccinated, get sick, get antibodies that have the same side effects and risks as the vaccine at a hundred times the cost?

Doesn't make sense.

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26 minutes ago, deicer said:

So don't get vaccinated, get sick, get antibodies that have the same side effects and risks as the vaccine at a hundred times the cost?

Doesn't make sense.

I am not suggesting that we not get vaccinated, (I have 2 shots) but I am saying that I find the idea that we don't treat the unvaccinated deplorable. 

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2 hours ago, deicer said:

So don't get vaccinated, get sick, get antibodies that have the same side effects and risks as the vaccine at a hundred times the cost?

Doesn't make sense.

Another thought. How do you feel about treating a smoker for emphysema? By your thinking they shouldn't be treated either. They have been told a million times not to smoke.

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15 hours ago, Seeker said:

More on Ivermectin

Good video thanks.

He reminds me of a high school teacher I had…. the ability to synthesize and demystify complex processes with simple analogies is a rare gift.

This entire Ivermectin debate was something of a turning point for me personally. It’s when I realized the main stream media was deliberately and knowingly spreading the very misinformation they de-platformed others for. By constantly referring to it as “horse dewormer” they lost a massive amount of credibility while simultaneously gaining a frightening amount of acolytes.

The mantle of silliness surrounding this, which I would define as unwillingness, not inability to discuss the issue in a rational manner is astounding. You can see it right here on the forum, there are numerous posts and memes parroting the “horse dewormer” talking point. Most of them gleefully ridiculing anyone willing to consider the off label efficacy of a cheap and readily available drug that just happens to be on the WHO list of essential medications.

But going a step further, the issue of efficacy here isn’t the point, at least for me. The real point is that almost universally, the most vocal folks I’ve encountered with “attitude” are entirely unable to discuss the issue at a high school biology level. That’s pretty alarming…or should be.

How did so many people become so dismissive and so opinionated about something they knew so little about? I would attribute it to the power of propaganda and that never leads to a good place. People should be questioning everything.... and they clearly aren't.

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So much for the vaccine :Sob:

 

The surge in Sudbury comes despite a full vaccination rate of 87 per cent, which is above the provincial average.” 
 

There were 61 new cases in the Sudbury region reported Tuesday, compared with 55 in the much more populous Toronto health unit.”

 

https://www.thestar.com/politics/provincial/2021/11/09/ontario-will-stay-the-course-with-current-covid-19-restrictions-despite-surge-in-new-cases-christine-elliott-says.html?fbclid=IwAR0SsJ-IqnCZyGVcqYfIAKZok9xUTyXkzJLrFB0ER-8xXzga_zScvgHmtuU

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14 hours ago, GDR said:

I find the idea that we don't treat the unvaccinated deplorable. 

Me too, yet it seems to be gaining more traction than I ever would have imagined.

People (especially fat people) should be very careful that they don't sway others (dare I say like me) to the same opinion for the same reason. In other words, they should be very careful what they wish for.

Anyone who calls that triage is either wilfully ignoring the medical context of “urgency” or invoking an old school concept of separation based on “quality.” The latter (IMO) runs totally opposite to liberal values and is about as far from woke as one can get…in fact, it borders on a crime against humanity. I would urge people to consider the ramifications of that notion vis a vis other hot button current event items.

Even a dumb gruntI can offer numerous historical examples of separation based on perceived “quality of the individual” but as you might imagine, all of them are as viscerally offensive as I find this to be.

Fat people should be asking Santa for a treadmill about now.   

 

 

 

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12 hours ago, GDR said:

Another thought. How do you feel about treating a smoker for emphysema? By your thinking they shouldn't be treated either. They have been told a million times not to smoke.

I'm not saying they don't get treated, however, I do believe in 'Triage'.

Assess all the patients, and if there are still resources available, then treat the unvaccinated and the smokers.  

Just don't give them the same priority.

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4 hours ago, Jaydee said:

So much for the vaccine :Sob:

 

The surge in Sudbury comes despite a full vaccination rate of 87 per cent, which is above the provincial average.” 
 

There were 61 new cases in the Sudbury region reported Tuesday, compared with 55 in the much more populous Toronto health unit.”

 

https://www.thestar.com/politics/provincial/2021/11/09/ontario-will-stay-the-course-with-current-covid-19-restrictions-despite-surge-in-new-cases-christine-elliott-says.html?fbclid=IwAR0SsJ-IqnCZyGVcqYfIAKZok9xUTyXkzJLrFB0ER-8xXzga_zScvgHmtuU

Read the following quote from the article you posted: Not sure how you can blame the vaccine and not the unvaccinated:

The area has by far the highest rate of active cases in the province, with “widespread” transmission particularly in the 18 to 39 age group. which has lower vaccination rates. That has prompted the health unit to request people work from home as much as possible and limit outings to essential activities only.

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Our government is so blind to anything other than the vaccines. Has it anything to do with the fact that they have stock piled so much of it?

https://globalnews.ca/news/8218172/canada-regeneron-monoclonal-antibody-covid-treatment/

Why isn't this available for us and why aren't we using as an additional weapon in addition to the vaccines.

 

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Things appear to be getting out of hand in parts of the EU. Here is the latest country to step back.  Covid: Austrians heading towards lockdown for unvaccinated - BBC News

 

 

Covid: Austrians heading towards lockdown for unvaccinated

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Austria recorded almost 12,000 new cases on Thursday, the highest so far

Austrians are days away from a first lockdown for anyone not fully vaccinated, after record infections were reported across the country.

Upper Austria province will impose restrictions from Monday if it gets the go-ahead from the federal government. Salzburg faces similar measures.

Chancellor Alexander Schallenberg said a national lockdown for the unvaccinated was "probably inevitable".

Two-thirds of people should not suffer because others were hesitant, he said.

Upper Austria, which borders Germany and the Czech Republic and has a population of 1.5 million, has the country's highest level of infection and the lowest vaccination rate.

Nationally, a record 11,975 Covid-19 infections were recorded in the past 24 hours and Austria's coronavirus commission has warned of a threat that "must be taken seriously".

line

What lockdown for unvaccinated will mean

Analysis box by Bethany Bell, Vienna correspondent

Austria has already banned the unvaccinated from going to restaurants, cinemas, ski lifts and hairdressers, but things are about to get even tougher in Upper Austria.

The province is introducing a lockdown for the unvaccinated.

The chancellor says this means that people who have not been vaccinated won't be able to leave home, unless it is for essential reasons like going to work, buying food or exercise.

Critics say the lockdown will be very hard to enforce.

If infections continue to rise, the authorities say lockdowns for the unvaccinated could be introduced in other areas. The far-right opposition Freedom Party has been campaigning on a platform of vaccine scepticism, a message that has found favour with many Austrians.

line

Austria's seven-day incidence rate is far higher than in neighbouring Germany, where Health Minister Jens Spahn recently warned of a pandemic of the unvaccinated.

 

On Thursday, Germany recorded more than 50,000 daily infections for the first time. Germany's 67.3% vaccination rate is higher than in Austria, but not by much.

Unvaccinated people will in effect be barred from restaurants, hotels, cinemas and theatres in the state of Brandenburg from Monday, by a "2G" rule limiting access to people who have been vaccinated or have recovered from Covid.

 

Coronavirusdata in detail

 
 
Scroll table to see more data

*Deaths per 100,000 people

Filter:                 The world                 Africa                 North America                 Latin America & Caribbean                 Asia                 Europe                 Middle East                 Oceania             
Country Deaths Death rate* Total Cases
New Cases
 
0
 
 
 
 
 
10
100
1k
10k
 
**
Russia 242,241 167.8 8,651,561
JAN 2020
NOV 2021
UK 141,805 212.2 9,301,909  
Italy 132,391 219.6 4,808,047  
France 117,893 175.8 7,217,484  
Germany 96,563 116.2 4,792,465  
Spain 87,504 185.9 5,025,639  
Poland 77,757 204.8 3,104,220  
Ukraine 77,130 173.8 3,232,035  
Turkey 72,127 86.5 8,233,649  
Romania 50,755 262.2 1,706,882  
Hungary 31,184 319.2 892,164  
Czech Republic 31,053 291.0 1,819,158  
Belgium 26,131 227.5 1,414,463  
Bulgaria 25,074 359.4 632,762  
Netherlands 18,561 107.1 2,201,010  
Portugal 18,203 177.3 1,097,557  
Greece 16,295 152.1 784,904  
Sweden 15,057 146.4 1,177,094  
Slovakia 13,229 242.6 518,635  
Bosnia and Herzegovina 11,717 355.0 257,401  
Austria 11,502 129.6 883,887  
Switzerland 11,274 131.5 887,446  
Georgia 10,509 282.5 755,046  
Serbia 10,405 149.8 1,183,025  
Croatia 9,500 233.6 501,327  
Moldova 8,099 304.7 345,964  
Azerbaijan 7,269 72.5 547,281  
North Macedonia 7,232 347.1 206,077  
Armenia 6,700 226.5 321,243  
Lithuania 6,135 220.1 428,541  
Ireland 5,492 111.1 469,386  
Slovenia 4,830 231.3 355,979  
Belarus 4,745 50.1 613,927  
Latvia 3,499 182.9 231,824  
Kosovo 2,978 166.0 160,872  
Albania 2,955 103.5 189,125  
Denmark 2,738 47.1 402,561  
Montenegro 2,148 345.3 148,579  
Estonia 1,610 121.4 205,096  
Finland 1,188 21.5 162,476  
Norway 922 17.2 216,855  
Luxembourg 849 137.0 82,842  
Cyprus 577 48.1 125,413  
Malta 462 91.9 37,904  
Andorra 130 168.5 15,618  
Channel Islands 103 59.8 13,684  
Gibraltar 98 290.8 6,153  
San Marino 92 271.7 5,588  
Liechtenstein 61 160.4 3,728  
Isle of Man 60 70.9 9,970  
Monaco 36 92.4 3,436  
Iceland 34 9.4 14,255  
Faroe Islands 5 10.3 2,615  
Vatican 0 0.0 27  
 
Show more

This information is regularly updated but may not reflect the latest totals for each country.

** The past data for new cases is a three day rolling average. Due to revisions in the number of cases, an average cannot be calculated for this date.

Source: Johns Hopkins University and national public health agencies

Figures last updated: 8 November 2021, 09:22 GMT

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The Netherlands is also facing a surge in cases, with a record 16,364 announced on Thursday in the past 24 hours and a rise in hospital admissions.

The Dutch Outbreak Management Team is said to have recommended a two-week partial lockdown across the country, cancelling public events and shutting cinemas and theatres.

However, a decision will only be made by the caretaker government on Friday and may stop short of the measures proposed.

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