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Jaydee
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On 1/27/2020 at 1:47 PM, Jaydee said:

*** At this point it’s still unconfirmed***
Received this from a friend at Western.

“ Tons of chatter today that there is a confirmed Coronavirus case for a student at western “

then this....

https://www.google.ca/amp/s/lfpress.com/news/local-news/coronavirus-london-public-health-officials-bracing-for-high-likelihood-virus-will-be-found-here/amp

 

Just putting this out there. Curious as to what all healthy lifestyle living individuals with a mindful discerning approach to all risks, known and unknown have to contribute to the topic in this link? 
https://youtu.be/iY98nuD3Bco

 

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Your body, your choice only if your choice does not allow the virus to mutate and infect others.  Following is another example of "my body, my choice"  said without any thought to the downstream effects

Boeing workers stage protest over vaccine mandate

By Eric M. Johnson  1 hour ago

LikeComments|1

By Eric M. Johnson

© Reuters/LINDSEY WASSON Boeing employees protest vaccine mandate

EVERETT, Wash. (Reuters) - Waving signs like "coercion is not consent," and "stop the mandate," some 200 Boeing Co employees and others staged a protest on Friday over the planemaker's COVID-19 vaccine requirement for U.S. workers.

Boeing said on Tuesday it will require its 125,000 U.S. employees to be vaccinated by Dec. 8 under an executive order issued by President Joe Biden for federal contractors.

Biden and his team have struggled to vanquish the coronavirus pandemic because a large swath of the U.S. population continues to resist taking safe and widely available vaccines.

"It's my choice and it's my body," one avionics engineer said, his voice nearly drowned out by anti-Biden chants and trucks honking to show support along the busy street outside Boeing's factory in Everett, north of Seattle.

© Reuters/LINDSEY WASSON Boeing employees protest vaccine mandate

"It's an experimental drug given under a pseudo-emergency," he added.

Another worker, an assembly mechanic, said: "This is America. We don't just do what we're told because one person says to."

United Workers 'Overwhelmingly' Support Vaccine Mandate: CEO

A Boeing spokesperson did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Earlier this week, Boeing said employees must either show proof of vaccination or have an approved reasonable accommodation based on a disability or sincerely held religious belief by Dec. 8.

Major U.S. airlines including American Airlines have said they will also meet the deadline imposed on federal contractors, as has aircraft parts manufacturer Spirit AeroSystems.

"Now that he has issued the Executive Order, it is our responsibility to comply with that order," Spirit Chief Executive Officer Tom Gentile wrote in a memo to employees and seen by Reuters on Friday.

Spirit was calling back former employees as it prepares for what Gentile characterized as "one of the fastest increases in production rates in the history of our industry."

Several Boeing employees at the protest said they were applying for exemptions. One engineer said he might seek early retirement, rather than complying with the mandate. Another employee, a 20-year Boeing technical designer, said he would find a new job rather than take a COVID vaccine, and made untrue claims about the vaccine.

"The vaccine isn't safe, it isn't proven, and it's not effective," he said.

Boeing has said its mandate does not apply immediately to its sites in Texas, where Republican Governor Greg Abbott issued an executive order on Monday barring COVID-19 vaccine mandates by any entity, including private employers.

One Boeing mechanic - wearing a shirt with the words "practicing socialist distancing" - said the mandate reflected "tyrannical big-government and tyrannical big business."

"I'm against the mandate, and the vaccine is a personal choice," he said. 

(Reporting by Eric M. Johnson in Everett, Washington; Editing by Chris Ree

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Hard Hearted I guess but I find it impossible to sympathize.  We had / have the same type of  complaints here in the west and again, my response is "so sad, too bad" .

The reluctance is fueled by fear fed by ignorance, superstition and of course social media.  This is shared amongst a number of Canadian and is not limited by race, colour ,education ,social status or religion. 

Benefit to the majority needs to take first place.  

Vaccine passports doing more harm than good for some West Indian businesses in Toronto (msn.com)

Typical 'vaccine hesitant' person is a 42-year-old Ontario woman who votes Liberal: Abacus polling

Bruce Anderson: Compared to the vaccinated, the vaccine hesitant don’t have a lot of trust in government. They also try to avoid prescriptions, dislike putting anything unnatural in their bodies and say they are reluctant to take any vaccines. Most worry that COVID-19 vaccines haven’t really been tested for a long time.

Typical 'vaccine hesitant' person is a 42-year-old Ontario woman who votes Liberal: Abacus polling - Macleans.ca

Growing number of Canadian hospitals to require visitors to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination for entry

COVID-19: Hospitals requiring proof of vaccination | CTV News

 

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Fully Vaccinated - anti-vaxxer crowd will surely show respect and not mention it...

Former U.S. secretary of state Colin Powell dies of complications from COVID-19

Mon Oct 18, 2021 - CBC News

Colin Powell, a former U.S. secretary of state and Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman, died of complications from COVID-19 on Monday, according to his Facebook page. He was 84.

In the post, his family said Powell had been fully vaccinated and was receiving care at Walter Reed National Medical Center in Bethesda, Md.

In a long military career that included service in the Vietnam War, Powell rose to public prominence by serving as national security adviser under President Ronald Reagan beginning in 1987, two years later becoming the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. In the latter role he oversaw the U.S. invasion of Panama and later the U.S. invasion of Kuwait to oust the Iraqi army in 1991.

Powell, who resisted calls to run for president himself later that decade, would go on to be nominated by president George W. Bush to serve as secretary of state in 2001. Powell was the first African American to serve as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and secretary of state.

Bush called him a "great public servant" in a statement mourning his death.

"He was such a favourite of presidents that he earned the Presidential Medal of Freedom — twice," said Bush.

Powell famously represented the administration at the United Nations, arguing that U.S. intelligence had confirmed Iraq's possession of weapons of mass destruction, which was ultimately proven to be incorrect.

During his term as secretary of state he underwent surgery to treat prostate cancer.

Supported Democrats
He was later estranged from the Republican Party, endorsing Democrats Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden in their presidential campaigns.

Powell called president Donald Trump's foreign policy a "shambles" and criticized his personal character.

"He lies about things, and he gets away with it because people will not hold him accountable," he said in a 2020 interview.

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CANADA'S GREAT DIVIDE

Distrust grows over vaccine status

  • Calgary Herald
  • 18 Oct 2021
  • GEOFFREY MORGAN
img?regionKey=WdBOrjmlFA%2fljQvSFBSg%2fg%3d%3dPETER J THOMPSON / NATIONAL POST Canadians are increasingly divided over vaccination status, according to a poll that shows most vaccinated people do not trust the unvaccinated.

Canadians are increasingly divided over COVID-19 vaccination status, according to a new poll that shows most vaccinated people do not trust their unvaccinated friends and neighbours and believe they are lying about medical exemptions.

“There's a lot of distrust with regards to the motivation of those people that are refusing to get vaccinated and out there protesting and claiming it's a rights issue,” said Jack Jedwab, president and CEO of the Association of Canadian Studies and Metropolis Canada (ACS), who shared the findings of an Acs-leger poll exclusively with the National Post.

The poll found that nearly seven in 10 respondents, 69 per cent, said they do not trust people that are unvaccinated. British Columbians were the most likely, at 82 per cent of respondents, to say they did not trust unvaccinated people, followed by Ontario, where 73 per cent of respondents said they did not trust people that were unvaccinated.

Respondents in Alberta and Quebec were most likely to say they trusted unvaccinated people, at 54 per cent and 37 per cent, respectively.

“There is a problem of cohesion. We're not on the same page. As the percentage of people who are unvaccinated diminished, I think the tension increased rather than decreased,” Jedwab said, noting that vaccine hesitancy was higher, closer to 40 per cent across the population, earlier in the pandemic.

Now, over 76 per cent of Canada's population has received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 71 per cent of the population, 27 million people, are fully vaccinated, according to Statistics Canada. Among the eligible population, people 12 years old and up, 81 per cent of the country is fully vaccinated.

“As that group (of unvaccinated people) became smaller, I think the tension began ratcheting up and the mistrust has really escalated,” Jedwab said, adding

Jedwab said he believes the deepening divisions pose a challenge for government outreach as health authorities across the country try to convince an increasingly entrenched minority to get a COVID-19 shot. At the same time, vaccine hesitancy poses an additional problem for governments implementing vaccine mandates for their workers.

The federal government has given an end-of-october deadline for public servants to get vaccinated, show proof of a legitimate exemption for vaccination or risk disciplinary action.

Provincial governments have also proposed vaccine mandates and, in Quebec's case, have had to extend the deadlines for implementing those mandates or risk potential impacts in the labour pool.

“I think this is a very critical issue going forward because we're trying to figure out what's underlying the concerns or rationale for people who resist getting vaccinated,” Jedwab said, noting that divisions between vaccinated and unvaccinated people are deepening.

The Acs-leger poll, conducted between Oct. 8 and Oct. 10 of 1,541 Canadians, also found that seven in 10 respondents, 74 per cent, believe there are legitimate medical exemptions to getting vaccinated, but most people could not pinpoint exactly what constituted a medical exemption.

Over 48 per cent of respondents believed that an allergy to vaccine ingredients provided a legitimate medical exemption to getting a COVID-19 vaccine, 10 per cent believed a chronic health problem was a legitimate medical excuse and roughly nine per cent believed a compromised immune system allowed for a medical exemption.

In fact, the list of legitimate medical exemptions in most Canadian provinces is quite small, and exemptions are granted on a very narrow set of requirements.

In Ontario, Canada's most populous province, exemptions are granted for pre-existing conditions if a person has either a “severe allergic reaction or anaphylaxis to a component of a COVID-19 vaccine” or “myocarditis to initiating a MRNA COVID-19 vaccine series.”

People with a history of capillary leak syndrome, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia or arterial thrombosis can also get an exemption to taking the Astrazeneca vaccine.

Allergies also require specific proof of a reaction, including a note from an allergist in many provinces.

In Alberta, which has the second lowest vaccination rate in the country after Saskatchewan, anyone who had an anaphylactic reaction to a first does of a COVID-19 and “has been assessed by an allergist/immunologist, and future doses of any COVID-19 vaccine are contraindicated,” may be eligible for an exemption.

image.png.7f51517269d2bcd77cf541ffa75ae41d.png

The province does not give COVID-19 vaccination exemptions on religious or philosophical grounds.

Notably, the Acs-leger poll found that eight in 10 Canadians, 79 per cent of respondents, don't believe there are legitimate religious exemptions for not getting vaccinated.

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6 hours ago, Kargokings said:

Canadians are increasingly divided over COVID-19 vaccination status, according to a new poll that shows most vaccinated people do not trust their unvaccinated friends and neighbours and believe they are lying about medical exemptions.

I wonder why they didn't ask the unvaccinated their opinion of their vaccinated friends and neighbours?  I think that would make a more interesting article.  ?

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Just enough time for a quick  Pop quiz:

Grade 13 biology suggests that mass vaccination efforts undertaken during the course of an active pandemic (with a highly mutable virus) is likely to result in which of the following:

a. Deicer posting disparaging comments about Donald Trump

b. A surge in Toronto shootings

c. A massive increase in illegal migrants and reinstatement of the “remain in Mexico” EO

d. Virus mutations and waning vaccine efficacy

Edited by Wolfhunter
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54 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

Just enough time for a quick  Pop quiz:

Grade 13 biology suggests that mass vaccination efforts undertaken during the course of an active pandemic (with a highly mutable virus) is likely to result in which of the following:

a. Deicer posting disparaging comments about Donald Trump

b. A surge in Toronto shootings

c. A massive increase in illegal migrants and reinstatement of the “remain in Mexico” EO

d. Virus mutations and waning vaccine efficacy

Oh!  I know! I know!  Pick me! Pick me!  It’s “D”.  

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1 hour ago, Wolfhunter said:

Just enough time for a quick  Pop quiz:

Grade 13 biology suggests that mass vaccination efforts undertaken during the course of an active pandemic (with a highly mutable virus) is likely to result in which of the following:

a. Deicer posting disparaging comments about Donald Trump

b. A surge in Toronto shootings

c. A massive increase in illegal migrants and reinstatement of the “remain in Mexico” EO

d. Virus mutations and waning vaccine efficacy

Welcome back Sir !!

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Florida’s per capital Covid rate is now the second lowest in the US

 

Remember the dog days of summer, when there was near consensus in the media that Florida was led by a madman whose reckless Covid policies represented a grave threat to the nation? Those hyperbolic claims have been quietly shelved, now that the number of new Covid cases in Florida has plummeted from 151,748 for the week ending August 20 to 19,519 as of October 8, according to the Florida Department of Health’s weekly Covid situation report.

According to the New York Times Covid Tracker, Florida now has the second-lowest per capita Covid rate of any state: 12 per 100,000, behind only Hawaii, with nine per 100,000 as of October 18. Florida’s vaccination rate (59 percent fully vaccinated) is now above the national average (57 percent.) I live in Pinellas County (St. Petersburg), which currently has a per capita Covid infection rate that’s lower than every county in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and other blue states.

As media elites waxed indignant over Florida’s alleged Covid sins this summer, many couldn’t hide their see-we-told-you-so delight when the Delta plague hit our shores. The Left eviscerated Governor Ron DeSantis for his opposition to mask and vaccine mandates. Joy Behar of ABC’s The View called him a “homicidal sociopath” and a “dangerous criminal.” Jennifer Rubin, the Washington Post’s “conservative” columnist, wrote that DeSantis’s conduct revealed a “breathtaking disdain for the well-being of his state.” Charles Blow of the New York Times wrote: “Yes, Florida, DeSantis is allowing you to choose death so that he can have a greater political life.” Writing for CNN, Columbia University economics professor Jeffrey Sachs declared that “Governors Ron DeSantis of Florida and Greg Abbott of Texas have, through their policies, been effectively leading their citizens toward death.”

MSNBC host Joy Reid called DeSantis “Dr. Death” and “the grim reaper of the South,” who was “rolling out the red carpet for the virus,” and “rooting for the virus.” She asked one guest to explain what she characterized as DeSantis’s strategy of “killing children in (his) own state and letting children die of Covid.” MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinski called Florida’s governor “the DeSantis variant” and proclaimed him the new leader of a cult. “Almost all of these hospitalizations (and) deaths (in Florida) would have, and could have, been avoided if misguided Americans had not followed the crazed teachings of a growing death cult,” she said.

Salon picked up on the death cult theme in a piece roasting DeSantis with the headline, “The GOP’s death cult comes for the children.” The author, Sophia Tesfaye, claimed that DeSantis’s goal was to make public schools in the state “so unsafe and inhospitable that parents are forced to push their children into private schools.” The Daily Beast got in on the act with a plea headlined, “It’s Time to Put the Right-Wing Zombie Death Cult on Trial.” The author, Wajahat Ali, fantasized about putting DeSantis and other Republican governors on trial for “helping to actively kill people and harm children with their pro-death policies.”

While some liberals feared us Floridians as an unwashed horde of invading barbarians, others laughed at our misfortune. In an early September monologue, ABC’s late-night host Jimmy Kimmel said, “Of the 54,000 Americans who died from Covid since the start of the summer, almost one of five died in Florida, which, my God, all those orphaned ferrets, it’s a shame.” Kimmel faced no sanction from ABC because mocking dead Floridians is apparently still considered good sport on the coasts. Earlier in the summer, he had called Florida “America’s North Korea.” He and others fail to understand that since the start of the pandemic, Florida has, for many, become synonymous with freedom, representing a way of life and a state of mind as much as a physical place. The media deliberately mischaracterize DeSantis and others in the “disease-spreading, right-wing zombie death cult” that supports him as anti-mask and anti-vax, when in fact, we just want to be left alone.

People who have spent much of the last couple years living in fear resent Floridians’ freedom and are waiting for things to go badly here, as they did this summer. But the summer surge in Florida and across the South was predictable for mundane reasons. When the heat and humidity spikes, people retreat into air conditioning, where it’s easier to spread the virus. But as the temperatures have dipped in recent weeks, infection rates have plummeted across the South.

Meantime, the states whose Covid infection rates are now heading in the wrong direction are almost all in cooler-weather states run by Democrats, like Michigan, Minnesota, Colorado, Pennsylvania, and New Mexico. Don’t expect the media to highlight this or question if the leaders of those states made bad policy choices.

The truth always finds a way to slip out, though. Florida’s second-quarter tourism arrivals were up 223 percent year over year, and the number of domestic visitors was up 6 percent over the record figures posted in 2019. (International arrivals were down substantially due to travel restrictions.) I’ve had several visitors from cold-weather states like New York, New Jersey, and Illinois, who expected to be stepping over bodies in the streets in my hometown of St. Petersburg but were pleasantly surprised by how normal life is here. At a time when the Left is having an authoritarian moment—pushing vaccine and mask mandates, demanding crackdowns on conservative speech, intimidating parents who criticize school boards, and branding anyone who disagrees with them bigoted or worse—Florida feels like a bastion of liberty.

https://www.city-journal.org/florida-covid-cases-plummet?wallit_nosession=1

 

Edited by Jaydee
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Here is the CTV site which has Florida with essentially the same rate of infection as BC with only Hawaii and Louisiana better in the states.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/covid-19-in-the-u-s-how-do-canada-s-provinces-rank-against-american-states-1.5051033

Nearly all restrictions were removed in Louisiana last May.

https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/coronavirus/article_a5f18fac-bd95-11eb-8f0f-1392ff2be87e.html

Louisiana has 46.8% of its population fully vaccinated and Florida 58.9% and with very few restrictions being imposed and have significantly fewer cases than states where there are much more in the way of restrictions.

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/01/28/960901166/how-is-the-covid-19-vaccination-campaign-going-in-your-state

BC has 74.4% fully vaccinated and Canada is at 72.8% with numerous restrictions.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/coronavirus-vaccination-tracker-how-many-people-in-canada-have-received-shots-1.5247509

It does beg the question that has this shut down of our society with all the economic and social hardship it has caused been worth it.

I'd suggest that the appropriate response would have been to encourage people to get the vaccines and keep the economy going.  I weighed the pros and cons of getting the vaccine and I concluded with reservations that I was better off to get them. However, our governments concluded that it would discount the wisdom of its citizens to make the best choice for themselves, and then proceeded to bring in policies that forced people to have themselves injected with something that many just didn't want in their bodies, and in many cases forfeit their jobs and a myriad of other freedoms if they didn't comply.

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Here is today's chart from CTV with the number of cases per million in all states and provinces.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/covid-19-in-the-u-s-how-do-canada-s-provinces-rank-against-american-states-1.5051033

Today that we can see that Louisiana with a rate of vaccinated people approximately 28% lower than BC and has been relatively wide open for months and has a lower number of cases than BC which has been largely locked down for months.

 

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2 hours ago, GDR said:

Here is today's chart from CTV with the number of cases per million in all states and provinces.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/covid-19-in-the-u-s-how-do-canada-s-provinces-rank-against-american-states-1.5051033

Today that we can see that Louisiana with a rate of vaccinated people approximately 28% lower than BC and has been relatively wide open for months and has a lower number of cases than BC which has been largely locked down for months.

 

This is what I saw on the link you provided.

image.png.2f73598ea3c2ebea58be0c3e22d46d12.png

 

from the Lousisiana Department of Health

image.thumb.png.ccb0b7986554b920b4d0ba3a7807e8d3.png

And numbers from BC

image.png.10beac816bd8360ae3574c45844517fe.png

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