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Jaydee
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Sometime in the last month or so in one of these Covid threads I made the statement;

"The vaccinated are a greater threat to the unvaccinated than the unvaccinated are to the vaccinated". 

I received much negative blowback for that heretical statement.  Now I read, on the CBC no less, the very same thing:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-covid-19-anti-vaccine-man-changes-mind-1.6201220

"They said, 'Well, (if you're vaccinated) you might still carry COVID or delta, but it's not going to affect you the same way, and chances of you going to the hospital or death is extremely low,'" he said.

The brother-in-law then said he, being double-vaccinated, was more of a danger to Lerato (who was unvaccinated) than Lerato was to him.

"I said how? He said, 'Because I could be carrying delta or COVID but it won't affect me really because I'm vaccinated. So, if I give you a handshake or give you a hug and you're not vaccinated, you're going to get it.' It kind of woke me up."

So, should I expect the same level of outrage at this article or apologies from those who trounced me for saying it earlier?

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1 hour ago, Seeker said:

Sometime in the last month or so in one of these Covid threads I made the statement;

"The vaccinated are a greater threat to the unvaccinated than the unvaccinated are to the vaccinated". 

I received much negative blowback for that heretical statement.  Now I read, on the CBC no less, the very same thing:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-covid-19-anti-vaccine-man-changes-mind-1.6201220

"They said, 'Well, (if you're vaccinated) you might still carry COVID or delta, but it's not going to affect you the same way, and chances of you going to the hospital or death is extremely low,'" he said.

The brother-in-law then said he, being double-vaccinated, was more of a danger to Lerato (who was unvaccinated) than Lerato was to him.

"I said how? He said, 'Because I could be carrying delta or COVID but it won't affect me really because I'm vaccinated. So, if I give you a handshake or give you a hug and you're not vaccinated, you're going to get it.' It kind of woke me up."

So, should I expect the same level of outrage at this article or apologies from those who trounced me for saying it earlier?

Interesting, so the CBC is now a trusted news source?  ?  Based on one mans story, based on what relatives (in the Medical Field said)  ? ?   Hmmmm  no bashing intended just honest skepticism 

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11 hours ago, Kargokings said:

Interesting, so the CBC is now a trusted news source?  ?  Based on one mans story, based on what relatives (in the Medical Field said)  ? ?   Hmmmm  no bashing intended just honest skepticism 

CBC is not a trusted source.  It is however what most people seem to use as their daily goto.  The point is - what I expressed is now being published by a mainstream source.  I'd read the same thing, and came to the same conclusion, months ago and posted such here on the forums to much derision.  Was I wrong?  Is the CBC article wrong?  Somebody's got some 'splaining to do.

BTW, it's not just a "one man's story" situation.  Multiple sources come to the same conclusion; the vaccinated are a bigger threat to the unvaccinated than the other way 'round.  I'll not get into the whole argument  about who's clogging up the ICU beds or delaying surgeries which is a serious problem being caused by the unvaccinated.  On the simple question of which way the threat vector lies - it's clear (to me at least).

 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Kargokings said:

Good for you, it is also crystal clear to me ?

Nice.  Just vague enough that you can play it either way depending on how the thread goes.  You have learned well grasshopper.

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I found this on the internet concerning a group of doctors and others suing the "College of Physicians and Surgeons.

 

Ther is quite a bit of detail concerning the suit a and the effect and ineffectiveness of the vaccines. I'm not informed enough to either endorse it or reject it. I'd be interested in hearing comments.

https://www.jccf.ca/unethical-conduct-of-the-college-of-physicians-and-surgeons-council/

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2 hours ago, GDR said:

I found this on the internet concerning a group of doctors and others suing the "College of Physicians and Surgeons.

 

Ther is quite a bit of detail concerning the suit a and the effect and ineffectiveness of the vaccines. I'm not informed enough to either endorse it or reject it. I'd be interested in hearing comments.

https://www.jccf.ca/unethical-conduct-of-the-college-of-physicians-and-surgeons-council/

It is mainly about the order that restricted church gatherings, a order by the way that most church's abided by, there were however a couple of less than main stream church groups that went out of their way to defy  the restrictions which resulted closure of at least one of the church's and charges / gaol time for the minister. 

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1 minute ago, Kargokings said:

It is mainly about the order that restricted church gatherings, a order by the way that most church's abided by, there were however a couple of less than main stream church groups that went out of their way to defy  the restrictions which resulted closure of at least one of the church's and charges / gaol time for the minister. 

This wasn't about the churches but about the restrictions put on doctors and other healthcare workers, and the lack of support from the "College of Physicians and Surgeons Council".

 

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1 hour ago, GDR said:

This wasn't about the churches but about the restrictions put on doctors and other healthcare workers, and the lack of support from the "College of Physicians and Surgeons Council".

 

You did ask for comments.  However my only comments will be those contained in the following news articles and of course that stated in the filed lawsuit. Since the courts are involved to otherwise comment would be foolish 

 (The filed lawsuit states that the Alberta government has violated the right to peaceful assembly, the right to travel, the right to conduct a business to earn a living, the right to visit family and friends, including having visitors in one’s own private residence, and the right to worship. 

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Sep. 28, 2021 — The lawyer representing Artur Pawlowski confirms her client was arrested at the airport on an outstanding criminal contempt of court charge.
 
Sep. 13, 2021 — A lawyer for Alberta Health Services says an Alberta pastor and his brother found guilty of contempt after deliberately violating COVID-19 ...

 

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Somewhat on topic.  

U.S. woman refused kidney transplant until she gets COVID-19 vaccine

By Patty Nieberg, Thomas Peipert and Colleen Slevin  The Associated Press
Posted October 8, 2021 8:39 am
Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 in Colorado Springs, Colo. Lutali recently found out her hospital wouldn't approve her kidney transplant surgery until she got the COVID-19 vaccine. Even though she has stage 5 kidney disease that puts her at risk of dying without a new kidney. AP Photo/Thomas Peipert

When a Colorado woman found out her hospital wouldn’t approve her kidney transplant surgery until she got the COVID-19 vaccine, she was left with a difficult decision pitting her health needs against her religious beliefs.

70c8fc80Leilani Lutali, a born-again Christian, went with her faith.

Even though she has stage 5 kidney disease that puts her at risk of dying without a new kidney, Lutali, 56, said she could not agree to be vaccinated because of the role that stem cells have played in the development of vaccines.

“As a Christian, I can’t support anything that has to do with abortion of babies, and the sanctity of life for me is precious,” she said.

 others

Double heart transplant recipient urges anti-vaxxers to think about others – Sep 6, 2021

UCHealth requires transplant recipients to be vaccinated because recipients are at significant risk of contracting COVID-19 as well as being hospitalized and dying from the virus, spokesman Dan Weaver said. Unvaccinated donors could also pass COVID-19 to the recipient even if they initially test negative for the disease, he said.

“Studies have found transplant patients who contract COVID-19 may have a mortality rate of 20% or higher,” he said.

It’s not clear how common this type of policy is.

The American Hospital Association, which represents nearly 5,000 hospitals, health care systems and networks in the United States, said it did not have data to share on the issue. But it said many transplant programs insist that patients get vaccinated for COVID-19 because of the weakened state of their immune system.

While any type of surgery may stress a patient’s immune system and leave them vulnerable to contracting COVID-19 later, organ transplants recipients are even more at risk because they have to take a powerful regime of drugs to suppress their immune system to keep their body from rejecting the new organ, which is seen by the body as a foreign object, Nancy Foster, AHA’s vice president for quality and patient safety policy said in a statement.

“Further, if patients were to wait to get their vaccine until after the surgery, it is unlikely that their immune system could mount the desired antibody reaction given that they are taking anti-rejection medications,” she said.

Transplant centers in Washington, Vermont, Massachusetts and Alabama have polices requiring that recipients be vaccinated, according to news reports.

Cleveland Clinic recently decided to require COVID-19 vaccinations for both transplant recipients and living donors, the organization said in a statement.

Some health care systems recommend or strongly encourage vaccination for transplants, including the Mayo Clinic and Sentara Healthcare, two of the nation’s largest. The University of Alabama Birmingham’s School of Medicine transplant program only recommends that living donors receive a vaccine, but it does not require it for the donation process.

The best time to get a COVID-19 vaccine is before an organ transplant. If time allows, patients should get their second dose of the available vaccines at least a couple of weeks prior to transplant “so that your body has a good immune response to the vaccine,” said Dr. Deepali Kumar, the American Society of Transplantation’s president-elect and an infectious disease physician.

Many major religious denominations have no objections to the COVID-19 vaccines. But the rollout has prompted heated debates because of the longtime role that cell lines derived from fetal tissue have played, directly or indirectly, in the research and development of various vaccines and medicines – including common over-the-counter medications like Tylenol.

Roman Catholic leaders in New Orleans and St. Louis went so far as to call Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 shot “morally compromised.” J&J has stressed that there is no fetal tissue in its vaccine.

Moreover, the Vatican’s doctrine office has said it is “morally acceptable” for Catholics to receive COVID-19 vaccines that are based on research that used cells derived from aborted fetuses. Pope Francis himself has said it would be “suicide” not to get the shot, and he has been fully vaccinated with the Pfizer formula.

Ethical considerations should take both individual and societal perspectives into account, Dr. Kumar said.

It’s really what’s best for the patient at this time and from a societal perspective as well,” she said. “The more patients that get vaccinated, you know, we have better outcomes.”

To Lutali, a recruiter for tech companies, it seems like her hospital was so insistent on saving her from COVID-19 that is is willing to let her possibly die by blocking her transplant surgery.

Lutali, who does not belong to a denomination, said she does not live in fear of dying because of her belief in the afterlife. She is searching for another hospital, possibly in Texas or Florida, where she could get a transplant without being vaccinated.

“I have hope that something will come along that is something I can live with in terms of my choices,” she said.

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Saturday, October 09, 2021

 

Good morning! Here's our second look at the week, with a round-up of health and medical science news. If you haven’t subscribed yet, you can do that by clicking here.

 
 
 
 

New data suggests Canada's 'gamble' on delaying, mixing and matching COVID-19 vaccines paid off

 

New research from B.C. and Quebec shows the decision to vaccinate more Canadians sooner by delaying second shots by up to four months saved lives and led to strong vaccine effectiveness against all circulating strains of the virus. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

 

New data suggests Canada's 'gamble' on delaying, mixing and matching COVID-19 vaccines paid off
 

Early data suggests strong protection against delta, no evidence for boosters in the general population yet


Adam Miller

 

New Canadian data suggests the bold strategy to delay and mix second doses of COVID-19 vaccines led to strong protection from infection, hospitalization and death — even against the highly contagious delta variant — that could provide lessons for the world.

Preliminary data from researchers at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) and the Quebec National Institute of Public Health (INSPQ) show the decision to vaccinate more Canadians sooner by delaying second shots by up to four months saved lives.

The researchers excluded long-term care residents from the data, who are generally at increased risk of hospitalization and death from COVID-19, in order to get a better sense of vaccine effectiveness in the general population — and the results were exceptional. 

The analysis of close to 250,000 people in B.C. from May 30 to Sept. 11 found two doses of any of the three available COVID-19 vaccines in Canada were close to 95 per cent effective against hospitalization — regardless of the approved vaccination combination

That means for every 100 unvaccinated people severely ill in Canadian hospitals, 95 of them could have been prevented by receiving two doses of either the AstraZeneca-Oxford, Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, or some combination of the three.

 

Dr. Danuta Skowronski with the B.C. Centre for Disease Control laid the groundwork for the decision to hold back second doses and says the early vaccine effectiveness data are extremely encouraging. (Harman/CBC)

Dr. Danuta Skowronski, a vaccine effectiveness expert and epidemiology lead at the BCCDC whose research laid the groundwork for the decision to hold back second doses based on the "fundamental principles of vaccinology," says the early data is extremely encouraging. 

"We were very pleased to see during the period when the delta variant was not just circulating, but predominating, that we had such high protection nonetheless against both infection and hospitalization," the lead researcher on the analysis told CBC News. 

"Protection was even stronger when the interval between the first and the second doses was more than six weeks apart."

In fact, the research showed that protection against COVID-19 infection from two doses of the Pfizer vaccine rose dramatically when the first and second shots were spread out — from 82 per cent after three or four weeks, to 93 per cent after four months. 

"For those who received the AstraZeneca vaccine as their first dose, their protection against any infection was lower than for mRNA vaccine recipients, but they had comparable protection against hospitalization and that's the main goal," she said.

"But for those who received a first dose of AstraZeneca and a second dose as an mRNA vaccine, their protection was as good as those who had received two mRNA vaccines. So that's also a really important finding from this analysis."

While the work is still being finalized and has not yet been submitted as a pre-print or undergone peer review, the researchers felt it's important to get their early data out now to inform the public and policymakers here and abroad about the positive results. 

"The mix-and-match schedules are protecting well, and my preference would be that those countries who don't recognize that get to see our data as soon as possible," she said, adding that the findings were sent to U.S. officials for review with regard to international travel policies

"My hope is that when they see the evidence that they will change those policies, which are frankly inconsistent with the science." 
 

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Quebec data backs up findings from B.C.


In Quebec, thousands of kilometres away and with a different population, demographic makeup and early vaccine rollout approach — the results of a twin study that will be published alongside the B.C. data were astonishingly similar. 

Of the 181 people who died from COVID-19 from May 30 to Sept. 11 in Quebec, just three were fully vaccinated. Researchers say that corresponds to a vaccine effectiveness against death upwards of 97 per cent based on a population analysis of nearly 1.3 million people. 

Similar to the B.C. data, the Quebec research also showed more than 92 per cent protection from hospitalizations — with Pfizer, Moderna or AstraZeneca vaccines — against all circulating coronavirus variants of concern in Canada at that time, including delta.

"The takeaway is whatever vaccine people had, if they got two doses they should consider that they are very well protected against severe COVID-19," said Dr. Gaston De Serres, an epidemiologist at the INSPQ. "That's the main message."

The analysis found Pfizer and Moderna vaccines were 90 per cent effective at preventing COVID-19 infections — either asymptomatic, symptomatic, or those needing hospital care — a protection rate equal to those with an AstraZeneca and mRNA vaccine combination.

For people who received two doses of AstraZeneca, the research suggests a slightly lower level of protection from infection — but one that is still remarkably high at 82 per cent. 
 

 

The research showed that protection against COVID-19 infection from two doses of the Pfizer vaccine rose dramatically when the first and second shots were spread out. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press)

De Serres says the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) and the Quebec Immunization Committee (CIQ) are looking at whether additional doses may be needed for that group, but says it's "not as pressing" given the strong protection from hospitalization. 

"For the time being, just stay put. If there is a recommendation for you to get an additional RNA dose you'll know in time," De Serres said. "But feel that what you've got is still a very good regimen to protect you against what we fear most — which is severe COVID-19."
 

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The NACI recommendation in March to delay second doses of all three COVID-19 vaccines by up to four months was not without controversy at the time, and no doubt led to confusion among many Canadians about whether they were adequately protected. 

Canada's Chief Science Adviser Mona Nemer said in early March that the strategy amounted to a "population level experiment," while at the same time health officials tried to reassure the public that the approach was safe and effective. 

Deepta Bhattacharya, an immunologist at the University of Arizona who was not involved in the study, says the results are "very encouraging" and provide evidence of "improved real world protection" from delaying second doses.

But he admits even he was initially skeptical. 

"I was uneasy about it in large part because I just wasn't sure how well the protection would hold up in the interim," he said. "Obviously it turned out well … but it was risky, and that gamble paid off."

Bhattacharya says the Canadian data now provides real world evidence that vaccinated people produce more antibodies if their second shot is delayed, and the quality of those antibodies may actually improve — which could explain the better protection against delta. 

"What I'm really wondering now going forward is whether the recommendations are going to fundamentally change as to when we should get that second shot," he said, referring to other countries around the world. "I wish I'd gotten mine later now in retrospect." 
 

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Keeping 'eye on the prize' means avoiding hospitalization


The data also has implications on whether average Canadians need booster shots, particularly given that emerging real world data in other countries like the U.S., Israel and Qatar show evidence of waning immunity that has prompted the rollout of third doses.

But experts caution that while countries reporting diminished vaccine effectiveness against COVID-19 infection may be making headlines, the more important factor is that the studies largely show the vaccines have prolonged protection against severe COVID-19 — meaning hospitalization and death.

"We really should keep our eyes on the prize, which is preserving healthcare system capacity and preventing unnecessary suffering," said Skowronski. "We're not going to prevent every case of COVID-19. Our goal was never to prevent the sniffles. Our goal was to prevent serious outcomes." 

Still, the B.C. and Quebec data showed "no signs" of waning immunity in the general population four months after the second mRNA dose and strong protection against infection of more than 80 to 90 per cent maintained. The analysis doesn't go beyond five months, but the researchers will continue monitoring vaccine effectiveness.

"We should be reassured that our vaccine effectiveness from this calculation, from what I've seen, will be robust with its protection," said Alyson Kelvin, an assistant professor at Dalhousie University and virologist at the Canadian Center for Vaccinology and the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization in Saskatoon who was not involved in the research.

"We must continue to have public health measures in place as well as expect at some point we might need a booster, but data like this will inform when we do and right now it's suggesting that we don't need it yet — but we have to keep vigilant." 

Skowronski says that while she supports giving long-term care residents and immunocompromised people third doses of COVID-19 vaccines to increase their protection based on emerging data, including from Canada, there isn't enough evidence yet for average Canadians. 

Until then, she says Canadians should feel well protected against severe outcomes from COVID-19 in the delta-driven fourth wave if they're fully vaccinated with any of the approved vaccine combinations in Canada. 

"We're going to have to learn to live with SARS-CoV-2, including in it's very many future iterations," she said. 

"But so long as we can prevent severe outcomes and maintain healthcare system capacity, we can come to a kind of a mutual understanding with this virus." 

 
 

Health officials in many parts of the country, along with infectious disease experts, recommend small gatherings for Thanksgiving dinner this year, outdoors where possible, and say it's important to check local public health guidelines on COVID-19. (Julie Van Rosendaal/CBC)

Pandemic early warning system has issued only a handful of alerts since start of 2020
 

Former PHAC director says system isn't working 'as is intended to function'

 

The country's pandemic early warning system has issued only a handful of alerts — most of them unrelated to deadly variants of COVID-19 — since facing intense public scrutiny and criticism from Canada's auditor general, new federal documents show.

Records obtained by CBC News under access to information reveal that between January 2020 and May 2021, the Global Public Health Intelligence Network (GPHIN) delivered only five infectious disease alerts to its nearly 900 subscribers worldwide.

The early warning system had stopped issuing bulletins and was largely silent throughout 2020 — just prior to and during the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic — but resumed in the fall of last year following widespread criticism.

It had been muzzled the year before by a series of internal decisions at the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). The agency wanted the surveillance system — which scours the internet for signs of infectious disease outbreaks — to focus more on domestic health concerns.

Of the five bulletins that were issued, only one of them — sent on Nov. 4, 2020 — signaled concern about a possible coronavirus variant that reportedly had appeared on a mink farm in Denmark and may have made the leap from animals to humans.

The other alerts involved an outbreak of H5N1 bird flu in Russia, a tick-borne viral infection in China and reports of an unknown disease in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

In contrast, ProMED — an internet surveillance program belonging to the International Society for Infectious Diseases (ISID) — has issued dozens of alerts over the same period of time. Some of those ProMED alerts have been about highly transmissible and lethal coronavirus variants.

It was ProMED, not GPHIN, that first alerted the Canadian military's intelligence branch to the initial outbreak of COVID-19 in December 2019, federal documents show.

Read more from CBC News' Murray Brewster on the shortcomings of Canada's early pandemic warning system.

 
 
 
 

Elsewhere from CBC:

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New COVID-19 cases on a downward trend for first time in months | CBC Politics

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Field visits by phone, locked-up PPE flagged by nursing home staff in 1st wave, documents show | CBC Investigates

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Urgent government action needed to tackle COVID-19 health-care crisis, medical leaders warn | CBC News

Cross-Canada health news:

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Doctor warns that 200 surgeries a day are being cancelled in Saskatchewan | CBC Saskatchewan

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Field visits by phone, locked-up PPE flagged by nursing home staff in 1st wave, documents show | CBC Ottawa

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Alberta reported more COVID-19 cases in September than any month prior, data shows | CBC Edmonton

 
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White Coat, Black Art

Dr. Brian Goldman takes listeners through the swinging doors of hospitals and doctors' offices, behind the curtain where the gurney lies.

 
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After eight years on disability, Kim Hawes credits her recovery from unexplained medical symptoms — and ability to go solo camping — with a unique kind of talk therapy that's gaining notoriety for helping long-suffering patients whose mysterious ailments leave physicians scratching their heads. (Submitted by Kim Hawes)


Off work for 8 years, woman says she got her life back with unique kind of talk therapy


Studies show intensive treatment helps some patients with unexplained symptoms

 

After eight years on long-term disability, Kim Hawes had nearly given up hope she'd ever be well enough to return to her job at the Nova Scotia Department of Justice.

Previously, Hawes had been a healthy mom of three until an incident at work in 1993.

"I had an exposure to some chemicals, off-gassing from some furniture, and I ended up collapsed and had to be carried out of the building," she told White Coat, Black Art host Dr. Brian Goldman.

That fainting episode set off a series of anxiety and panic attacks. 

"I lost 22 pounds in a month. I couldn't eat. I couldn't sleep. I was sometimes in the fetal position, just crying because I couldn't cope. I was unable to care for my children." 

From there, Hawes joined the ranks of somatoform patients — those who present with clinically significant but unexplained symptoms over a long period of time, baffling the physicians who try to diagnose them. Sometimes these patients are referred to as having "functional disorders."

The quest for answers is costly to patients, health systems and insurance programs that often wind up paying long-term disability benefits. 
 

White Coat Black Art with Dr. Brian Goldman
Oct. 9 & 10 on CBC Radio One

 
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The Dose

The Dose is a weekly look at the health news that matters to you.

 
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An experimental pill-based COVID-19 treatment called molnupiravir, which is being developed by Merck & Co. and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics, is seen in this undated handout photo. ( Merck & Co Inc/Reuters)


What we know about Merck's experimental pill to treat COVID-19
 

Infectious disease specialists have 'cautious optimism,' but say vaccines most effective way to reduce risk


The first experimental pill to fight the virus that causes COVID-19 is on the way, according to pharmaceutical giant Merck & Co. But Canadian experts caution that vaccination is still the best way to prevent severe outcomes from the disease.

At this point, Merck has only put out a news release about molnupiravir, not the full results of the drug's trial, so infectious disease experts still have many questions.

Nonetheless, Dr. Lynora Saxinger, an infectious diseases specialist at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, said the drug does offer hope.

If it proves as effective as Merck says, it could reduce hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19 and help ease strain on health-care systems, she said.

"It definitely would make a difference," she told Dr. Brian Goldman, host of The Dose. "[But] you're never going to get the incremental benefit that you get from vaccination. So I think this is relevant to places where there's low vaccination for whatever reasons."

Listen to The Dose for free on CBC Listen or on your favourite podcast app — including Apple Podcasts and Google Podcasts.

 
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Oct 09, 2021.   

Complete article Northwest Territories COVID-19 case rate highest in Canada | CTV News

TORONTO -- The Northwest Territories is grappling with an explosion of COVID-19 cases, as its residents prepare to gather with family and loved ones for Thanksgiving.

As of Friday, the territory is reporting 452 active cases, the most that it's ever had since the start of the pandemic. According to CTVNews.ca's tracker, N.W.T is seeing an average of 43.1 new cases per day based on the late seven days.

That works out to 960 new cases per million residents – an infection rate that is higher than any other jurisdiction in Canada. It's also higher than every U.S. state other than Alaska.

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11 hours ago, Kargokings said:

and the scientists say.

COVID-19: Alberta Health Services says advisory group notes problems with ivermectin studies

Interesting.  The linked article contains this:

Alberta Health Services says its scientific advisory group has updated its review into using ivermectin to treat COVID-19, warning that existing studies have problems and the available evidence doesn’t deem it safe.

Notice:  "Alberta Health Services says its scientific advisory group has updated its review".  The headline simply says "advisory group" but not "it's" advisory group.  The rest of the article reads almost exactly like the BBC clip in my post just above.  I would be very surprised if AHS has done the "review" it claims.  I think it's much more likely that they are simply using the BBC group's output.

You have to love this part too:

The province’s health delivery agency says in a series of tweets that studies to date into using ivermectin, which is primarily used to treat cases of worms in livestock.  Yeah, maybe in Alberta it's primarily used for livestock but there have been 3.7 billion of doses of human ivermectin given around the world and a Nobel prize awarded for it's discovery and use - in humans!

Does, it work as a Covid treatment?  I sure don't know but it annoys me that it's constantly portrayed in the media as some dangerous veterinary drug and that the idea of a human taking it is ridiculous.

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Hospitals fear fallout from vax mandates

Labour shortages could hamstring sector

  • Calgary Herald
  • 12 Oct 2021
  • MOIRA WARBURTON

VANCOUVER • Hospitals and long-term care homes are bracing for staff shortages and layoffs, as deadlines for vaccine mandates loom across the country, with unions pushing federal and provincial governments to soften hard-line stances.

A shortage of workers would strain the already overburdened workforce dealing with nearly two years of the pandemic.

Devon Greyson, assistant professor of public health at the University of British Columbia, said officials are steering into uncharted waters with mass vaccine mandates, and it's not clear how workers will respond.

“A shortage of workers can mean people's health and well-being. It's scary,” Greyson said.

However, he added, “we're in an ethical situation where it's also scary not to ensure that all health workers are vaccinated. So it's a bit of a Catch-22.”

Quebec and British Columbia have made it mandatory for health-care workers and nursing staff to be vaccinated to continue working in their respective fields.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also unveiled one of the strictest vaccine mandates in the world last week, saying unvaccinated federal employees will be sent on unpaid leave and making COVID-19 shots mandatory for air, train and ship passengers.

Ontario has not followed Quebec's lead, but many hospitals have implemented their own hardline policies.

Layoffs have already started to hit, with one hospital in Windsor, Ont., last week dumping 57 employees, half of them reportedly nurses and representing 2.5 per cent of staff, after its vaccine mandate came into effect.

The Toronto hospital network, which is reporting a 97 per cent vaccination rate, has given employees until Oct. 22 to get vaccinated or lose their jobs.

A long-term care home in Toronto put 36 per cent of its staff on unpaid leave after they refused to get vaccinated. Since going on leave, spokeswoman Maria Antia said 32 of the 111 affected workers have reported getting at least one vaccine dose.

British Columbia will place staff at its long-term care and assisted living sector on unpaid administrative leave if they fail to get at least one shot by Monday.

Some 97 per cent of longterm care staff in Vancouver and the surrounding areas have at least one dose as of Oct. 6, the province said. But northern B.C. has only 89 per cent of staff with at least one dose, although the data was still being updated.

The province recently changed the deadline, giving more time for people to receive their second vaccine dose. “It is because we know we have a very limited health-care resource,” Dr. Bonnie Henry, the province's medical officer, said.

Quebec is offering $15,000 bonuses to help attract and retain about 4,300 full-time nurses. Some 25,000 healthcare workers who are yet not fully vaccinated ahead of an Oct. 15 deadline risk suspension without pay, said Christian Dubé, the province's health minister.

On Monday Dubé applauded the province's nurses regulator for threatening to suspend the licence of any nurse who doesn't get the shot. The Ordre des infirmieres et infirmiers du Quebec gave nurses until Friday.

“I have a hard time understanding how there are nurses, with scientific training, who refuse to get vaccinated,” the order's president, Luc Mathieu, said in an interview with The Canadian Press on Monday.

More than 4,000 of the order's members had not been properly vaccinated and the status of 5,716 others remained to be verified, according to Mathieu.

“Starting Wednesday, we will reach to them to make a last verification on their vaccination status and if they are not adequately vaccinated, they will be suspended,” Mathieu said.

The head of the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario said the health staff shortage is “a crisis of mega proportions” that's largely unrelated to vaccine resistance. But Doris Grinspun argued that the impact of vaccine mandates could be mitigated if the province applied the policy across the entire health system.

“People need to work,” Grinspun said. “How many will leave if it's across the whole system? Where are they going to go?”

The Public Service Alliance of Canada, which represents 215,000 federal workers, said while the union supports the government's vaccination stance, its members who do not get inoculated should not be punished.

“Especially when remote work options are available that do not jeopardize the health and safety of co-workers,” said Chris Aylward, PSAC president.

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Apparently aspirin works effectively in reducing COVID effects. This makes sense as there was a report out that said that blood thinners were effective.

https://www.jpost.com/health-and-wellness/aspirin-lowers-risk-of-covid-new-findings-support-preliminary-israeli-trial-681127

 

Here is a report from the NIH on blood thinners and COVID.

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/full-dose-blood-thinners-reduce-need-organ-support-moderately-ill-covid-19-patients-not-critically-ill-patients#:~:text=A large clinical trial

Edited by GDR
Added link for NIH report.
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