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Jaydee
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On 8/13/2021 at 9:39 AM, A330PilotCanada said:

Good Morning Jaydee:

Thank you for bringing this one up. What is your take on this? Do the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few in these very unprecedented times? 

Undecided. 

I see both sides of the argument. Freedom is a slippery slope as history has taught us on many occasions. IMO Freedom is a RIGHT, not something you EARN  or give away to a Political whim.

Millions have died protecting that right. When Covid is finally under control and treated with yearly booster shots, will passports become null and void or will they keep them in place just in case? My guess is they will be permanent and every now and then Leftist leaning governments will chip away and add small things bit by bit.
 

I don’t trust ANYTHING Trudeau is involved with. 
 

According to my inside sources “FIFPA” probably won’t be an impediment to a Vaccine passport. That being said, laws are made by governments and can just as easily be changed by governments, ESPECIALLY if they are given a majority.

FYI…I am double vaccinated and glad of it….but do I want conditions attached to my freedom to travel? That’s another question entirely. The answer is a deafening NO.

Edited by Jaydee
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It would be refreshing to see other religions call out their own when merited.

When true believers become a danger to themselves and others

Fri Aug 13, 2021 - The Globe and Mail 
by Michael Coren

Quote

'Other forms of Christian anti-vaccine hysteria are drenched in “hidden agenda” fantasies, conspiracy theories about the state and secularism, and eschatological mania.' 

The devil, it’s said, has all the best tunes. Not sure if that’s necessarily true, but Beelzebub certainly has an exemplary public relations department. How else can we explain how appalling the Christian world often appears at times of crisis? That’s seldom been as bitingly obvious as during the COVID-19 pandemic, with resistance to vaccinations often led by conservative Christians.

The vast majority of churchgoers aren’t reactionary, and they’ve fully embraced lockdowns, physical distancing, and vaccinations, but that can’t obscure the reality of the situation. Read right-wing Christian media platforms and websites, listen to their radio broadcasts, look at who is protesting, and the paranoia and anger are palpable.

A poll this year by the U.S. Public Religion Research Institute found that a mere 45 per cent of white evangelicals said they would get vaccinated, the second-lowest acceptance rate of any religious affiliation, and the indications are that this number has remained fairly static. In Canada, the percentages seem to be higher, but the problem remains.

Last December, for example, then-Conservative MP Derek Sloan, an outspoken social conservative, sponsored a parliamentary e-petition claiming: “Bypassing proper safety protocols means COVID-19 vaccination is effectively human experimentation.” It received more than 41,000 signatures.

The opposition to vaccines is multifaceted. The most ideologically plausible, if still bizarre, objection comes from those convinced that embryonic stem cells have been used in the development and manufacture of vaccines, and in some cases that may be true. Yet even the Vatican has said it’s “morally acceptable” to receive a vaccination that has used cell lines derived from aborted fetuses, because of the “grave danger” of the pandemic.

But Pope Francis is not popular with Catholic conservatives, and they look to alternative leaders such as Cardinal Raymond Burke, who has said the virus “has been used by certain forces, inimical to families and to the freedom of nations, to advance their evil agenda. … These forces tell us that we are now the subjects of the so-called ‘Great Reset,’ the ‘new normal,’ which is dictated to us by their manipulation of citizens and nations through ignorance and fear.” This darling of the Catholic right, by the way, has just tested positive for COVID-19.

Other forms of Christian anti-vaccine hysteria are drenched in “hidden agenda” fantasies, conspiracy theories about the state and secularism, and eschatological mania. There is a global battle, it is said, between the remnant of authentic Christians, be they Catholic or evangelical, and the Godless forces of government, media and business. COVID-19, and the vaccine response to it, are all part of the plan to control and dominate. There are myriad references to Masonic plots and the illuminati, and sometimes – predictably – this dark lunacy bleeds over into antisemitism.

Not always though. One of the loudest resisters to vaccinations is a nun called Mother Miriam, a Jewish convert to Roman Catholicism, with a popular daily phone-in show in which she presents her “mission to bring hope to a world that has lost its way.” Part of that mission, apparently, is to argue that vaccines are “not only unethical and immoral, but have been proven to be very dangerous.”

COVID-19, runs the anti-vaccine narrative, is either a hoax or, if real, is nothing more than a mild flu. If the latter, it has been exploited by plotting governments and elites to close churches, remove freedom of religion and impose vaccines. Donald Trump, always eager to echo fundamentalist rhetoric, said while still U.S. president that some states had closed places of worship, while allowing “liquor stores and abortion clinics” to stay open.

The obsession with conspiracies isn’t confined to Christian conservatives, and is typical of any subgroup that sees its place under threat by a world it can’t accept or understand. The consequences, as we know only too well, can be fatal. In the Christian context, it’s tied in with polemics about Armageddon, the end times, and the notion that vaccines contain the “mark of the beast.” This nonsense is supposedly from the Book of Revelation, where the Antichrist is said to tempt Christians to mark their bodies. That’s a callow misreading of the deeply complex final book of the New Testament, as much poetry as allegory, and demanding a non-literal approach. Problem is, literalism is at the broken heart of the anti-vaccine theocrats.

Mingled together, it’s a toxic and anti-social mess, with the true believers more determined than ever. “Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing.” But that’s from the Gospel of Luke, and not to be trusted – he was a doctor.

Michael Coren is an author and ordained cleric in the Anglican Church of Canada.

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https://www.uab.edu/news/health/item/12143-three-things-to-know-about-the-long-term-side-effects-of-covid-vaccines

Three things to know about the long-term side effects of COVID vaccines

 
Written by: Matt Windsor
Media contact: Bob Shepard

 

Close-up, hands wearing blue PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) gloves are filling a syring with a dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease) vaccine on January 15, 2021.Many Americans say they want to “make sure the shot is safe” before getting vaccinated. That data is already in, and it is overwhelming.
(Photo by: Andrea Mabry)
In his nearly 30 years studying vaccines, Paul Goepfert, M.D., director of the Alabama Vaccine Research Clinic at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has never seen any vaccine as effective as the three COVID vaccines — from Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson — currently available in the United States. 

“A 90 percent decrease in risk of infections, and 94 percent effectiveness against hospitalization for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines is fantastic,” he said. 

But what makes vaccine experts such as Goepfert confident that COVID vaccines are safe in the long term? We have all seen billboards and TV infomercials from law firms seeking people harmed by diet drugs or acid-reflux medicines for class-action lawsuits. What makes Goepfert think that scientists would not discover previously unsuspected problems caused by COVID vaccines in the years ahead? 

There are several reasons, actually. Vaccines, given in one- or two-shot doses, are very different from medicines that people take every day, potentially for years. And decades of vaccine history — plus data from more than a billion people who have received COVID vaccines starting last December — provide powerful proof that there is little chance that any new dangers will emerge from COVID vaccines. 

The majority of Americans who have not been vaccinated — or who say they are hesitant about vaccinating their children — report that safety is their main concern. Nearly a quarter of respondents in Gallup surveys in March and April 2021 said they wanted to confirm the vaccine was safe before getting the shot. And 26 percent of respondents in a survey of parents with children ages 12-15 by the Kaiser Family Foundation in April 2021 said they wanted to “wait a while to see how the vaccine is working” before deciding to get their child vaccinated. 

UAB received its first doses of the Pfizer vaccine in mid-Dec., 2020.UAB received its first doses of the Pfizer vaccine in mid-Dec., 2020.
(Photo by: Steve Wood)
But Goepfert says we already know enough to be confident the COVID vaccines are safe. Here is why, starting with the way vaccines work and continuing through strong evidence from vaccine history and the even stronger evidence from the responses of people who have received COVID-19 vaccines worldwide over the past six months.

Vaccines are eliminated quickly

Unlike many medications, which are taken daily, vaccines are generally one-and-done. Medicines you take every day can cause side effects that reveal themselves over time, including long-term problems as levels of the drug build up in the body over months and years. 

“Vaccines are just designed to deliver a payload and then are quickly eliminated by the body,” Goepfert said. “This is particularly true of the mRNA vaccines. mRNA degrades incredibly rapidly. You wouldn’t expect any of these vaccines to have any long-term side effects. And in fact, this has never occurred with any vaccine.”

Vaccine side effects show up within weeks if at all

That is not to say that there have never been safety issues with vaccines. But in each instance, these have appeared soon after widespread use of the vaccine began. 

“The side effects that we see occur early on, and that’s it,” Goepfert said. “In virtually all cases, vaccine side effects are seen within the first two months after rollout.”

From side, Dr. Kierstin Kennedy, MD (Associate Professor, Hospitalist Service) is wearing blue scrubs and a fabric face mask while receiving the COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease) vaccination from a female healthcare worker wearing scrubs and a PPE face mask and gloves, December 2020.(Photo by: Steve Wood)The only vaccine program that might compare with the scale and speed of the COVID rollout is the original oral polio vaccine in the 1950s. When this vaccine was first introduced in the United States in 1955, it used a weakened form of the polio virus that in very rare cases — about one in 2.4 million recipients — became activated and caused paralysis. (Compare this with the 60,000 children infected with polio in the United States in 1952, and the more than 3,000 children who died from the disease in the United States that year.) Cases of vaccine-induced paralysis occurred between one and four weeks after vaccination. None of the COVID vaccines uses a weakened form of the SARS-CoV-2 virus — all train the body to recognize a piece of the virus known as the spike protein and generate antibodies that can attack the virus in case of a real infection.

In 1976, a vaccine against swine flu that was widely distributed in the United States was identified in rare cases (approximately one in 100,000) as a cause of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, in which the immune system attacks the nerves. Almost all of these cases occurred in the eight weeks after a person received the vaccine. But the flu itself also can cause Guillain-Barré Syndrome; in fact, the syndrome occurs 17 times more frequently after natural flu infection than after vaccination.

COVID vaccine experience over the past six months

“By the time the Pfizer and Moderna COVID vaccines were approved for emergency use in the United States in December 2020, we already knew the short-term side effects very well from the efficacy studies,” Goepfert said. “Pfizer and Moderna — and later Johnson & Johnson and then Novavax, which reported on its phase III trial results in June 2021 — all have enrolled 30,000-plus individuals, half of whom got the vaccine and half of whom got a placebo initially, after which all the placebo group got the vaccine.

From side, a Black female healthcare worker is wearing PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) face mask and gloves as she vaccinates a Black male at the UAB COVID-19 Vaccination Site at Parker High School.(Photo by: Steve Wood)The side effects seen in these studies, and again in the nationwide rollouts that began in December 2020, were tolerability issues, Goepfert says, mainly arm pain, fatigue and headache. These are very transient, and occur a day or two days after the vaccine. They then resolve quickly. 

As of June 12, 2021, more than 2.33 billion COVID vaccine doses have been administered worldwide, according to the New York Times vaccinations tracker

Goepfert says that, between December and June, we began to see the more-rare side effects that do not show up until millions of people have gotten the vaccine.  

About one in 100,000 people receiving the AstraZeneca COVID vaccine have experienced a clotting disorder known as thrombotic thrombocytopenia, including 79 cases among more than 20 million people receiving this vaccine in the United Kingdom, and 19 deaths. A smaller number of cases have occurred with Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine as well, Goepfert says. 

“The causes are still being worked out; but when this happens, it occurs from six days to two weeks after vaccination,” he said. “More recently, an even more rare side effect — myocarditis, or inflammation of the heart muscle — has been reported in people receiving Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines. That is about one in a million, or possibly higher rates in some populations; but again, all of these occur no more than a month after the vaccination.”

On July 12, 2021, the FDA announced that in rare cases (100 reports out of 12.8 million shots given in the United States), the J&J vaccine is associated with Guillan-Barré syndrome. The cases were mostly reported two weeks after injection and mostly in men age 50 and older.

Weighing the odds

Any risk is frightening, especially for a parent. But the rare side effects identified with COVID vaccines have to be weighed against the known, higher risks from contracting COVID, Goepfert says. It is not clear how COVID variants such as the highly infectious Delta mutation may affect patients. Early indications are that Delta infections bring more severe side effects than other forms of COVID, but that vaccines are still protective against Delta.

It is COVID infection, and the growing evidence of persistent symptoms from what has become known as “long COVID,” that are the most troubling unknown out there, Goepfert says. 

“The long-term side effects of COVID infection are a major concern,” Goepfert said. “Up to 10 percent of people who have COVID experience side effects such as difficulty thinking, pain, tiredness, loss of taste and depression. We don’t know why that is, how long these symptoms will last or if there are effective ways to treat them. That is the most troubling unknown for me.” 

Even as cases, hospitalizations and deaths have declined significantly in Alabama since January, there are still nearly 250 new COVID cases diagnosed and nearly 10 deaths reported statewide per day as of mid-June 

“Many people worry that these vaccines were ‘rushed’ into use and still do not have full FDA approval — they are currently being distributed under Emergency Use Authorizations,” Goepfert said. “But because we have had so many people vaccinated, we actually have far more safety data than we have had for any other vaccine, and these COVID vaccines have an incredible safety track record. There should be confidence in that.”

“Many people worry that these vaccines were ‘rushed’ into use and still do not have full FDA approval — they are currently being distributed under Emergency Use Authorizations,” Goepfert said. “But because we have had so many people vaccinated, we actually have far more safety data than we have had for any other vaccine, and these COVID vaccines have an incredible safety track record. There should be confidence in that.”

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5 hours ago, Jaydee said:

Undecided. 

I see both sides of the argument. Freedom is a slippery slope as history has taught us on many occasions. IMO Freedom is a RIGHT, not something you EARN  or give away to a Political whim.

Millions have died protecting that right. When Covid is finally under control and treated with yearly booster shots, will passports become null and void or will they keep them in place just in case? My guess is they will be permanent and every now and then Leftist leaning governments will chip away and add small things bit by bit.
 

That being said, I don’t trust ANYTHING Trudeau is involved with. 
 

According to my inside sources “FIFPA” probably won’t be an impediment to a Vaccine passport. That being said, laws are made by governments and can just as easily be changed by governments, ESPECIALLY if they are given a majority.

FYI…I am double vaccinated and glad of it….but do I want conditions attached to my freedom to travel? That’s another question entirely. The answer is a deafening NO.

Good Afternoon Jaydee:

Thank you for your thoughts on this rather contentious subject. Some countries (New Zealand and others) are now raising the requirement for verifiable proof of vaccine status. Myself I view this as no more cumbersome then filling a Electronic Travel Authority ( a ETA is required by both Australia and New Zealand before you get on the airplane). Some countries have a yellow fever requirement which is verified by the Yellow Vaccine booklet. As Don Hudson can attest in our initial 3 week course we had to visit the health clinic for cholera, yellow fever, small pox and others all in one visit. That was a couple of days with sore arms. We and others had to do that so we could operate flights into countries that had the vaccine requirement.

But from today's news this is all academic as to travel by air and rail passengers as well as civil servants.

From your favourite "radical left wing media" the CBC

  

Federal government to require vaccinations for all federal public servants, air and train passengers | CBC News

 

Federal government to require vaccinations for all federal public servants, air and train passengers

We need to reach as many Canadians as we possibly can' — Transport Minister Omar Alghabra

 

John Paul Tasker · CBC News · Posted: Aug 13, 2021 12:28 PM ET | Last Updated: 1 hour ago

 

 

Transport Minister Omar Alghabra announced today that the federal government will soon require that all public servants be vaccinated — a mandate that he said will also be implemented by Crown corporations and other federally regulated businesses in the coming weeks.

While Canada's vaccination rate is among the highest in the world — 81 per cent of all eligible Canadians have had at least one dose — Alghabra said the country "must do better."

"We need to reach as many Canadians as we possibly can," he said.

After a blitz in April and May, the number of new first doses being administered daily has been stuck at well under 100,000 since mid-June.

There are still more than 5.7 million people over the age of 12 who have chosen to forgo a shot altogether, or to wait for a later date. The number of unvaccinated Canadians is roughly equivalent to everyone living in the Vancouver, Calgary and Edmonton metropolitan areas combined.

Starting as soon as next month, the vaccine will be made mandatory for federal employees and those working in some federally regulated industries (airlines and railways, among others) in an effort to boost stalled vaccination rates.

The government says it also "expects" that other employers in federally regulated sectors — like banking, broadcasting and telecommunication — will require vaccination for their employees. "The government will work with these employers to ensure this result," the government said in a statement announcing the new mandate.

There are more than 300,000 federal public servants and tens of thousands more people are working in industries that fall under the federal labour code.

Alghabra said the government will work expeditiously with public service unions and employers to get the mandate in place "by the end of October" at the latest.

This is not a recommendation. Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc said that all public servants and some employees in federally regulated sectors must comply with the vaccine mandate or risk losing their jobs.

"This is a mandatory requirement to go to work in a federal workplace or work in the government of Canada," he said.

"Obviously, there will be certain individuals for medical reasons that will not be able to be vaccinated and the appropriate officials will work with them to ensure that the appropriate measures are in place."

Beyond the mandatory vaccination requirement for federal employees, Alghabra said, a similar mandate will be extended to "certain travellers."

Starting soon, all commercial air travellers and passengers on interprovincial trains and large marine vessels with overnight accommodations (such as cruise ships) will have to be vaccinated, Alghabra said. He said accommodations will be made for "those few who are unable to be vaccinated," such as testing and screening.

Vaccine requirements in the transportation sector will help protect the safety of employees, their families, passengers, their communities and all Canadians. And more broadly, it will hasten Canada's recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic," he said.

Asked when these measures for travellers would take effect, Alghabra said the government is developing "a measured and practical approach to requiring vaccines in these sectors as quickly as possible."

With a fourth wave of new infections poised to hit Canada in the coming weeks, experts say boosting vaccine coverage will protect the country's health care system from again being overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients.

To date, the vast majority of new infections have been among the unvaccinated, even though they make up an increasingly smaller segment of the population.

There have been a number of "breakthrough" cases among the fully vaccinated but early data suggest those with two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine are much less likely to require hospitalization or die from the virus.

Proponents of mandatory shots maintain it's the best way to develop herd immunity, protect the collective health of Canadians and rid the country of a very serious disease. Almost universal vaccine coverage has eradicated other diseases, such as polio and tetanus.

Critics, meanwhile, say that requiring vaccines is a heavy-handed approach that could lead to discrimination against the unvaccinated.

In a statement, a spokesperson for Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole said vaccines are "the most important tool in the fight against COVID-19" and the party encourages "every Canadian who is able to get one." 

But when asked about the federal mandate, the spokesperson said that "Conservatives support Canadians' right to determine their own health choices."

Before the new requirements were announced Friday, Conservative MP David Yurdiga, who represents Fort McMurray, Alta. in the Commons, said a government plan to make vaccination mandatory for federal bureaucrats was "another example of the Liberals using severe government overreach for political gain."

Yurdiga said forcing these workers to get a vaccine is a "tyrannical" idea that should give all Canadians pause.

"Canadians deserve the right to liberty, whether they choose to be vaccinated or not. Mandating the vaccine as a requirement to work would be the beginning of a slippery slope," Yurdiga said.

The MP said such a policy would punish Canadians for "what they choose to do with their bodies."

While there's certain to be resistance from some circles, at least one federal public service union said Friday it's open to the mandate.

Debi Daviau is president of the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada, which represents 60,000 bureaucrats across the country. She said in a media statement that the union "welcomes all efforts to increase vaccination coverage in Canada."

"That includes a vaccine policy in the federal government that makes vaccines more accessible to our members and accommodates legitimate reasons for which an employee may not be vaccinated."

Mark Porter, executive vice-president of people and culture at WestJet, said the airline would be "working diligently to implement the government's policy on mandatory vaccines for airline employees."

"Vaccinations are the most effective way to ensure the safety of our guests and employees, while curbing the spread of COVID-19," he said, promising to work with employees who may have questions about the new requirement.

Goldy Hyder, president and CEO of the Business Council of Canada, said requiring vaccines for some workers is "absolutely the right thing to do.

"These measures should be implemented as soon as possible" so that Canada can avoid further pandemic-related economic disruption, he said.

"We must do better if we hope to avert a significant fourth wave. Canadians and Canadian businesses cannot endure any more lockdowns."

 

 

 

 

 

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https://www.cp24.com/world/vaccine-skeptic-u-s-talk-radio-host-dies-of-covid-19-at-age-61-1.5556750

Vaccine skeptic U.S. talk radio host dies of COVID-19 at age 61

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) -- A conservative talk radio host from Tennessee who had been a vaccine skeptic until he was hospitalized from COVID-19 has died. He was 61.

Nashville radio station SuperTalk 99.7 WTN confirmed Phil Valentine's death in a tweet Saturday.

Valentine had been a skeptic of coronavirus vaccines. But after he tested positive for COVID-19, and prior to his hospitalization, he told his listeners to consider, “If I get this COVID thing, do I have a chance of dying from it?” If so, he advised them to get vaccinated. He said he chose not to get vaccinated because he thought he probably wouldn't die.

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For those hesitant due short approval time for emergency use, and research work, this TedTalk might help understand the rapid development of the mRNA vaccine. I asked about this, thinking that it was "unexpected" and a "eureka" moment but no...

From last year when the mRNA vaccinces were becoming public knowledge:

Observation: "The Pfizer vaccine (now touted at 95% effective...), & Moderna news is unexpected and very good."

Response: "Yes, it is very good and wasn't unexpected. BioNTech and Sahin know what they are doing. Sahin won the German Cancer Prize last year for BioNTech's approach to anti-cancer drugs.", etc.

From the TED Talk site:

As COVID-19 spread, BioNTech cofounders Uğur Şahin and Özlem Türeci had one goal: to make a safe, effective vaccine faster than ever before. In this illuminating conversation with head of TED Chris Anderson, the immunologists (and married couple) share the fascinating story of how their decades of mRNA research powered the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine -- and forecast what this breakthrough science could mean for the future of vaccines and other immunotherapy treatments:

 

 

Edited by Don Hudson
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I watched an interview with a researcher who stated that the development time for the actual drug (The Science) is generally quite short.  It is the approval process and red tape that take the time.  Sometimes years after the trials and studies are concluded.  That process was waived this time around.  They are working on it but ret tape takes time

 

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Delta to impose $200 monthly surcharge for unvaccinated employees

Wed Aug 25, 2021 - The Financial Times
by Steff Chavez

Delta Airlines will begin charging unvaccinated employees enrolled in the company sponsored healthcare plan an additional $200 per month on November 1, chief executive Ed Bastian announced in a memo to employees.

“This surcharge will be necessary to address the financial risk the decision to not vaccinate is creating for our company,” he stated.

Delta is the first major US company to take such an action. It stopped short of a vaccine mandate, a step taken by United Airlines and Amtrak earlier this month.

Bastian noted that the average cost to Delta for an employee’s Covid-19-related hospitalisation is $40,000, and that all hospitalised employees in recent weeks were not fully vaccinated.

In addition, a mask mandate will go into effect immediately for unvaccinated employees, and, beginning on September 12, employees who are not fully vaccinated must submit to a weekly Covid-19 test.

Three quarters of Delta employees are vaccinated, though Bastian stressed the importance of getting “as close to 100 per cent as possible.”

Following the US Food and Drug Administration’s full approval of the BioNTech/Pfizer jab, “we can be confident that the Pfizer vaccine is safe and effective,” Bastian told employees. “The time for you to get vaccinated is now.”

He also indicated that the surcharge and other requirements came as a result of the fast-spreading Delta variant, which is now the dominant strain in the US.

“Over the past few weeks, the fight has changed with the rise of the B.1.617.2 variant,” the executive said, pointing to the recent increase in hospitalisations and deaths.

Bastian also said that beginning September 30, only fully vaccinated Delta employees experiencing a breakthrough infection will be eligible for Covid-19 pay protection.

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For those who think that it's almost over and large gatherings outdoors are OK...

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/sturgis-rally-2021-south-dakota-covid-19-cases-surge/

COVID-19 cases in South Dakota increase more than 450% since start of Sturgis Motorcycle Rally

BY CAITLIN O'KANE

UPDATED ON: AUGUST 27, 2021

 

South Dakota has seen a sharp increase in daily COVID-19 cases following the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in Meade County this month. Hundreds of thousands of bikers descended upon the area August 6-15, despite the Delta variant wreaking havoc on the U.S. 

On August 4, the date closest to the start of the rally for which data was available, the state reported 657 active cases. On August 25, the state reported 3,655 active cases. That's a 456% increase of active cases from before the start of the rally to two weeks after, according to the state's department of health.

As of August 24, about two weeks from the start of the event, South Dakota saw a weekly positivity rate of 38.8%. The week leading up to the rally — July 30 to August 6 — the state's weekly positivity rate was much lower, at 10.38%, the department of health data shows. The week before that, July 23-30, the positivity rate was just 6.10%.

The rate of daily cases increased 486% from August 6, when 80 new cases were reported, to August 23, when 469 cases were reported. 

Meade County, where Sturgis is located, saw a 34.2% weekly positivity rate last week, according to the state department of health. 

About 61% of the state's population over age 12 have been administered at least one dose of vaccine, and 55% are fully vaccinated, the department's data shows. In Meade County, 7,984 people have been vaccinated. With a population of 28,332, that's about 28% of the county vaccinated.

Vaccines are proven safe and effective. Despite this, the Delta variant is still rapidly spreading, and hospitals report the majority of their COVID-19 cases are in unvaccinated patients.

 

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Entire world is short-staffed': Food prices to climb as labour shortage crushes food industry 

Whether it's fruit pickers, slaughterhouse workers, truckers, warehouse operators, chefs or waiters, the global food ecosystem is buckling due to a shortage of staff

Across the world, a dearth of workers is shaking up food supply chains.

In Vietnam, the army is assisting with the rice harvest. In the United Kingdom, farmers are dumping milk because there are no truckers to collect it. Brazil’s robusta coffee beans took 120 days to reap this year, rather than the usual 90. And American meatpackers are trying to lure new employees with Apple Watches while fast-food chains raise the prices of burgers and burritos.

Whether it’s fruit pickers, slaughterhouse workers, truckers, warehouse operators, chefs or waiters, the global food ecosystem is buckling due to a shortage of staff. Supplies are getting hit and some employers are forced to raise wages at a double-digit pace. That’s threatening to push food prices — already heated by soaring commodities and freight costs — even higher. Prices in August were up 33 per cent from the same month last year, according to an index compiled by the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization.

The coronavirus pandemic has helped spark a labour shortfall for many parts of the economy. But the impact is particularly stark in food and agriculture, which are among the world’s least-automated industries. Food security is a sensitive issue in many parts of the world and thin margins mean rising costs generally pass through to buyers, according to Boston Consulting Group.

 

Almost certainly there is disruption,” said Decker Walker, BCG’s agribusiness expert in Chicago. Effects vary among locations and products, he said, but “the general theme seems to be: The roles with the least desirable working conditions are actually the ones that we have the most pain with.”

There are signs the labour shortfall is curbing supplies. In the United States, wholesale distributors like Sysco Corp. and United Natural Foods Inc. are reporting production delays and slowdowns for items ranging from bacon and cheese to coconut water and spices. In the U.K., some stores are running low on staples like bread and chicken, while McDonald’s Corp. ran out of milkshakes in August.

I have been in this business since the '80s, but I have never seen a situation like this

MICHELE FERRANDINO, FARMER

“We have family-wage, great jobs that have been open, that we’ve been recruiting really hard for and have had trouble filling,” said Patrick Criteser, chief executive officer of Tillamook County Creamery Association.

The Oregon-based dairy co-operative recently ran so short of workers that a board member had to skip an operational meeting to help out in the fields. “With the inflation we’re seeing in the business and the inflation that we’re seeing at the farm level, it’s going to translate to the shelf.”

Shortages are hitting farms, processors and restaurants alike. Malaysia, the world’s No. 2 palm oil producer, has lost about 30 per cent of potential output of the edible oil used in everything from chocolate to margarine. Shrimp production in southern Vietnam — one of the world’s top exporters — has dropped by 60 per cent to 70 per cent from before the pandemic. And a fifth of tomato production in the south of Italy has been lost this year, due to the scorching heat and transport paralysis, according to the farmers’ association CIA.

I have been in this business since the ’80s, but I have never seen a situation like this,” said Michele Ferrandino, a farmer in Foggia. “Tomatoes are very perishable goods. There were not enough trucks to transport the crop to the processing plants, in those crucial days” of the harvest, he said.

Cancelled or delayed deliveries have also forced British dairy farmers like Mike King in South Gloucestershire, England, to dump milk while stores run short. King estimates he has lost some 20,000 litres (5,283 gallons), and says some farmers have resorted to milking their cattle less frequently due to staffing shortfalls.

Even as restaurants and other businesses reopen in the U.S. and parts of Europe — boosting demand for goods such as meat and bottled drinks — the Delta variant is spreading in places like Southeast Asia, curbing primary production. Other, longer-established pandemic effects are still causing problems too: COVID-19 outbreaks continue to crop up in meat- and fish-processing plants, forcing temporary closures, and border restrictions in countries from the U.K. to Thailand are limiting the supply of migrant workers.

 

In some places, the scramble for staff is compounded by local issues, such as difficult and dangerous farmwork conditions caused by a record U.S. heatwave, or the disruption of Brexit.

As a result, employers face another hurdle: Workers have plenty of options.

The current economy is creating “choice where choices may not have existed in the past,” said BCG’s Walker. When “the entire world is short-staffed,” filling less desirable jobs gets more difficult, he said.

Employment in the food supply chain can certainly be tough. Whether it’s backbreaking strawberry picking, insecure slaughterhouse work or the fast-paced, high-pressure environment of a restaurant kitchen, many jobs are physically taxing, short term, poorly paid — or a combination of all three.

With more jobs available, Australian workers who might previously have settled for positions at meat processing plants in sparsely populated areas can opt for work in busier towns instead. Many of the European Union citizens who might typically travel to the U.K. to work on farms, in haulage or serving coffees are choosing to stay in their home countries or on the continent. American labourers who have struggled with sweltering heat in the fields may choose the cool interiors of a store instead.

Jon DeVaney, president of the Washington State Tree Fruit Association, acknowledges that work such as fruit picking is demanding.

Continued 

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What year were the concussion protocols implemented?

Former NHL star Theo Fleury's COVID-19 vaccine passport comments a 'stain on his legacy': Brandon University

BU, which gave Fleury honorary doctorate in 2015, denounces 'espousing of conspiracy theories'

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Fleury, 53, has also touted ivermectin, an anti-parasitic medicine commonly used for livestock, as an alternative COVID-19 treatment, and lambasted the mainstream media as liars for an "absolute all out disinformation campaign" over use of the medication.

'Fleury tweeted that vaccine passports would be used by pedophiles to track children.'

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I sure get a kick out of this:

Fleury, 53, has also touted ivermectin, an anti-parasitic medicine commonly used for livestock, as an alternative COVID-19 treatment, and lambasted the mainstream media as liars for an "absolute all out disinformation campaign" over use of the medication.

Yes, it is commonly used for livestock.  It is also commonly used for humans and has been for 40 years.  Whether you believe it's effective for Covid or not the constant media labeling of it as "de-worming medicine for horses" or "anti-parasitic medicine for livestock" without acknowledging that has been, and is, completely acceptable for human use (when prescribed and dosed by a doctor, of course) is dishonest.

To be clear, I am not encouraging or suggesting it as a Covid treatment.  I merely saying that the drug itself has human approval.

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1 hour ago, Seeker said:

I sure get a kick out of this:

Fleury, 53, has also touted ivermectin, an anti-parasitic medicine commonly used for livestock, as an alternative COVID-19 treatment, and lambasted the mainstream media as liars for an "absolute all out disinformation campaign" over use of the medication.

Yes, it is commonly used for livestock.  It is also commonly used for humans and has been for 40 years.  Whether you believe it's effective for Covid or not the constant media labeling of it as "de-worming medicine for horses" or "anti-parasitic medicine for livestock" without acknowledging that has been, and is, completely acceptable for human use (when prescribed and dosed by a doctor, of course) is dishonest.

To be clear, I am not encouraging or suggesting it as a Covid treatment.  I merely saying that the drug itself has human approval.

quite right.   

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image.png.70f9eb3b850f46099776d9e0c9ddda54.png

 

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