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the following article focuses on Alberta but pertains to all Provinces, States and most non 3rd world countries. So called 3rd world countries are not facing resistance to the vaccinations , at this time, but rather a shortage of vaccines. 

As cases rise, vaccination wall of defence must be stronger

 

  • Calgary Herald
  • 27 Jul 2021
  • ROB BREAKENRIDGE “Afternoons with Rob Breakenridge” airs weekdays 12:30-3 p.m. on 770 CHQR rob.breakenridge@ corusent.com Twitter: @Robbreakenridge
img?regionKey=B9NIDwv2pfv0l2S5bjajDA%3d%3d  

After we've enjoyed the luxury of indifference for a few weeks, the daily COVID-19 case count is suddenly very relevant to Albertans once again.

It was a little disconcerting to how quickly we went from 40 or 50 cases a day to 173 at the end of last week (which the government initially tried to pass off as 98 new cases, in a somewhat underhanded data shell game). Now that the Delta variant appears to be dominant, further increases seem all but guaranteed.

To whatever extent we are in or on the cusp of a fourth wave, it is clear that vaccines have been a game-changer. Hospitalizations have continued to decline, which is very much in keeping with our understanding of the impact these vaccines continue to have.

But while we're not likely to see the sorts of hospitalization levels we saw in the second and third waves, if cases continue to rise, hospitalization levels will inevitably do so, as well.

This doesn't need to mean a return to restrictions. Vaccines remain our best line of defence, but that wall of protection isn't yet where it needs to be. Last week, we inched past the 75 per cent mark for first doses for eligible Albertans. We're at about 62 per cent of eligible Albertans fully vaccinated. These numbers have made a huge difference here, and many countries around the world would love to be anywhere close to those sorts of levels.

But in the Canadian context, we're lagging behind other provinces, most of which are around or above 80 per cent for first doses.

It would be unfair to lump all or even most of the blame on the provincial government.

The good news is that we have the vaccines we need.

Certainly, vaccines have been made widely available and the pro-vaccine message from the government is loud and consistent.

However, it would be fair to note that the ending of all provincial health restrictions, which was tied to a specific vaccination target, removed any built-in incentive to attain a higher rate. Hitting 70 per cent of Albertans with a first dose was an important milestone, but it was in no way the finish line.

We probably need to get to at least 80 per cent of eligible Albertans fully vaccinated to really contain the situation — probably more like 80 per cent of the total population.

A week ago, Health Minister Tyler Shandro announced that more vaccine initiatives would be coming. A couple of days later, we got an announcement about a government-business partnership to launch a new mobile vaccine clinic. That's certainly helpful and welcome, but probably not a total difference-maker. Let's hope the minister's tease was about more than just that.

The good news is that we have the vaccines we need. And it's possible that concern over the Delta variant or rising case numbers might be enough to spur some fence-sitters to finally take the jab.

The province, meanwhile, may need to at least open the door to options it has so far refused to put on the table.

The mask mandate was among the restrictions that fell by the wayside on July 1. But holding up a potential return of mask mandates if vaccine levels don't reach a certain point might be another powerful incentive.

There's also the option of requiring proof of vaccination in certain settings. The U.K., for example, has made proof of vaccination a requirement for nightclubs and other large venues. The Stampede's Nashville North gave us a bit of a glimpse into how this might work here.

Given that Albertans in their 20s represent a disproportionate number of new infections while also having the lowest rate of vaccination, this could be an effective way of controlling the former and encouraging the latter.

We've made tremendous strides in Alberta, but we need to set ourselves up for success into the fall and winter. As such, the vaccine push needs to be the top priority.

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Covid: Sydney extends lockdown as other Australian cities reopen

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29 minutes ago
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Sydney's lockdown has been extended by another month as Covid cases continue to rise.Australia's largest city has been under stay-at-home orders since late June due to an outbreak of the Delta variant.

More than 2,500 people have been infected in Sydney's worst outbreak this year.

New South Wales - of which Sydney is the capital - reported 177 new cases on Wednesday, the most in a day since March 2020.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian said it was not possible for the city to exit lockdown on Friday as had been planned.

She announced further curbs on movement - including a 10km (6.5 miles) limit on essential shopping.

Victoria and South Australia both came out of lockdowns on Wednesday, after containing smaller outbreaks.

Sydney's five million residents had enjoyed a fairly normal lifestyle this year until the outbreak happened.

For most of the pandemic, Australia has kept infections relatively low by closing its borders and ordering hotel quarantine for arrivals.

State governments have plunged cities into rapid lockdowns to curb outbreaks, using aggressive contact tracing.

There have been over a dozen snap lockdowns in the past year.

But experts warn that restrictions in Sydney could last until September or even later.

Authorities say they cannot re-open until the transmission rate is back to near zero.

At least one in three cases from the past week had been infectious in the community. Reasons included undertaking critical work and grocery shopping.

The highly policed lockdown has fuelled discontent among some in the community.

Several thousand people staged "freedom" protests in Sydney, Melbourne and other cities on the weekend.

It has also highlighted the nation's bungled vaccine program, which began in February.

Just 16% of Australia's adult population is vaccinated.

Critics have blamed the low rate on the federal government's failure to secure more supplies of the Pfizer vaccine.

They also attribute it to confidence in the AstraZeneca vaccine being undermined by mixed messaging about its rare blood clot risk.

The national regulator has recently updated its guidance to urge Sydney residents to get the AstraZeneca jab, of which Australia has a large supply.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison apologized for his government's handling of the rollout last week, following months of criticism.

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Canadians blame Liberals for failed pandemic border policy: government-commissioned survey

July 27, 2021
 

The government instituted COVID-19 travel bans too late and Canadians hold them responsible, according to a survey commissioned by the federal government.

In early 2021 the Department of Finance paid Quorus Consulting Group Inc. $59,775 for their findings, as reported by Blacklock’s Reporter

“In terms of what the federal government got wrong, many felt the government should have closed the borders sooner than it did,” the Department of Finance report read.

On January 11, 2020, the first COVID-19 death was announced in China. Taiwan, the United States and Australia all restricted travel from China within weeks. Meanwhile, on January 29, 2020, the Public Health Agency insisted it was safe for Canadians to travel to China and vice versa. Approximately 1,796 travellers arrived in Canada from Wuhan over that time.

Closing the border and banning international flights was initially frowned upon by the Liberal government out of concern for “discrimination” against Chinese-Canadians. Health Minister Patty Hajdu’s notes from a February 12, 2020 teleconference stated: “We remain concerned about social anxiety, misinformation and discrimination in the Chinese-Canadian community with the coronavirus.”

The lack of travel bans is just one example of how the Trudeau government bungled Canada’s COVID response.

As late as March 29, 2020, Health Minister Patty Hadju was claiming that “the risk of spread of [COVID-19] within Canada continues to remain low.” Hadju later went on to dismiss those skeptical of China’s COVID-19 statistics as “conspiracy theorists,” emphasizing the need to “work together as a globe.” 

When China confessed that its numbers were wrong, Hadju doubled down and refused to admit she had made a mistake by trusting the communist regime.

Despite China’s false data, the Trudeau government continued to trust the regime. While multiple countries were developing vaccines, the Canadian government chose to only pre-order doses from CanSino Biologics, a Chinese company under scrutiny by intelligence agencies.

Canada also faced shortages of face masks, forcing the government to buy at inflated prices on the open market. For some orders, the government was paying as much as $10 per unit. It was later revealed that the Public Health Agency of Canada destroyed 2 million N95 masks from the national stockpile in 2019. While the agency claims the masks expired, new masks were never ordered.

“[The COVID-19 pandemic] remains central to the lives of Canadians and plays a significant role in how they view the federal government and the role it should be playing in the short and medium-term,” the government report read.

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Sadly only time will tell if this move by Alberta will be positive or negative.

OTTAWA – Canada’s top doctors say Alberta’s decision to end isolation requirements for those who test positive for COVID-19, or who have been in close contact with someone who has, could have ripple effects across the country.

Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam is urging people to continue isolating, get tested for COVID-19, and inform their close contacts even if it is no longer mandated.


RELATED: People who test positive for COVID-19 should still isolate: PHAC


Alberta’s case levels have been rising and the delta variant is now dominant.

Vaccination rates have also begun to lag with around 75 per cent of eligible Albertans getting at least one dose of vaccine and 64 per cent fully immunized.


RELATED:


Tam says Alberta still has a long way to go to get enough people vaccinated to keep everyone safe.

Dr. Howard Njoo, Canada’s deputy chief public health officer, adds that if Alberta sees more infections among its unvaccinated populations that could spread throughout Canada as people travel.

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CDC study shows 74% of people infected in Massachusetts Covid outbreak were fully vaccinated

Delta, now in at least 132 countries and already the dominant form of the disease in the United States, is more transmissible than the common cold, the 1918 Spanish flu, smallpox, Ebola, MERS and SARS, according to the document. Only measles appears to spread faster than the variant.

The data published Friday was based on 469 cases of Covid associated with multiple summer events and large public gatherings held in July in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, which encompasses Cape Cod and is just outside Martha’s Vineyard. The events were held in Provincetown, according to NBC News. Approximately three-quarters, or 74%, of the cases occurred in fully vaccinated people who had completed a two-dose course of the mRNA vaccines or received a single shot of Johnson & Johnson’s.

Overall, 274 vaccinated patients with a breakthrough infection were symptomatic, according to the CDC. The most common side effects were cough, headache, sore throat, muscle pain and fever. Among five Covid patients who were hospitalized, four were fully vaccinated, according to the agency. No deaths were reported.

Testing identified the delta variant in 90% of specimens from 133 patients.

While numerous studies have shown that the vaccines don’t work as well against the delta variant as they did against other strains, health officials say they are still highly effective, especially in protecting against severe illness and death. Roughly 97% of new hospitalizations and 99.5% of deaths in the U.S. are among unvaccinated individuals, U.S. health officials repeated this week.


https://www.cnbc.com/2021/07/30/cdc-study-shows-74percent-of-people-infected-in-massachusetts-covid-outbreak-were-fully-vaccinated.html

 

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Protests re the new rules in Alberta but very limited in it's scale. Even the press can not hide that there are a few hundred demonstrating vs the normal screaming headline of Massive Protests.

Albertans hold second day of protests against changing COVID-19 measures | Watch News Videos Online (globalnews.ca)

Albertans hold second day of protests against changing COVID-19 measures

On Saturday, Albertans gathered to protest the government’s announcement that it will be making changes to COVID-19 testing, isolation and contact tracing requirements. As Michael King reports, those opposed said their main concern is for children who are not old enough to be vaccinated.

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Good Afternoon All:

As if we didn't have enough on the Delta VoC cue the potential Lambda VoC.

 

Explainer: What is the Lambda coronavirus variant? | Coronavirus pandemic News | Al Jazeera

 

Explainer: What is the Lambda coronavirus variant?

The Lambda variant has spread to 28 countries but it is not considered a variant of concern. Here’s what we know so far.

 

By Elizabeth Melimopoulos

27 Jul 2021

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, the virus that causes the disease, SARS-CoV-2, has mutated multiple times, with some strains being more infectious and deadlier than others.

Currently, the World Health Organization (WHO) has classified four of those mutations as variants of concern: Alpha, Beta, Gamma and Delta.

Four others – Eta, Iota, Kappa and Lambda – have been designated as variants of interest, and in recent weeks the rapid spread of the Lambda strain, first detected in Peru, has caught the attention of various experts.

Lambda is currently the dominant variant in the Andean nation, which has the highest per capita coronavirus death rate in the world, while it has also spread to at least 28 other countries including Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and the United Kingdom.

Here is what we know so far:

Where and when was it first detected?

The Lambda variant was first detected in Peru last December. It is a variation of the novel coronavirus that was first recorded in the country in August 2020.

The exact origins of the Lambda variant, which was previously known as the Andean strain, remain unclear, but scientists say it first emerged in South America.

Over the last three months, Lambda has grown to represent 80 percent of all cases in Peru, according to the country’s National Institute of Health.

“When we found it, it did not attract much attention,” said Pablo Tsukayama, a doctor in molecular microbiology at Cayetano Heredia University in Lima and one of the people who documented Lambda’s emergence.

“But we continued processing samples, and by March, it was in 50 percent of the samples in Lima. By April, it was in 80 percent of the samples in Peru,” Tsukayama told Al Jazeera. “That jump from one to 50 percent is an early indicator of a more transmissible variant,” he added.

According to Tsukayama, the Lambda strain did not initially cause alarm because new strains are common in places with high infection rates. Latin America and the Caribbean, while home to eight percent of the global population, account for 20 percent of the world’s COVID cases, according to a June 24 report by the US-based Congressional Research Service.

Where has it spread?

According to data from the Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAID), a platform onto which countries upload their COVID-19 viral sequences, the Lambda strain has already reached 28 countries.

That includes Brazil, Spain, the Netherlands, Aruba, Belgium, France, Portugal and the United States.

What are the strain’s characteristics?

Recent research on the Lambda strain has registered several mutations in its spike protein, the part of the virus that makes contact with human cells, binds to them, and then infects them.

The mutation observed in the spike protein might be the reason for its “increased transmissibility… and it could provide a reduction of protection by current vaccines”, according to a study released in July by a team from New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine and released on the medical website bioRxiv ahead of peer review.

According to virologist Ricardo Soto-Rifo of the University of Chile’s Institute of Biomedical Sciences, one of the mutations labelled as L452Q was similar to a mutation also shown in the Delta variant that is believed to have contributed to that strain’s high rate of infection.

But Soto-Rifo cautioned that the real effect of the mutations remains unclear.

“However we cannot tell yet what the real impact of these mutations are, since it’s a strain that has shown primarily in South America, and that puts us at a disadvantage, as we don’t have all the resources to execute the needed research,” he said.

Are vaccines effective against Lambda?

With a team of scientists, Soto-Rifo carried out preliminary studies – not yet peer-reviewed – assessing the effect of the Chinese-developed CoronaVac vaccine on the Lambda strain. The results showed that Lambda was able to neutralise the antibodies generated by the vaccine.

Soto-Rifo said part of the vaccine efficacy can be measured by the immunisation response, but also by the responses of T-cells, which stimulate antibody production and help combat the virus-infected cells.

“These results were expected,” Soto-Rifo said. “The virus has changed and that can make the vaccine not as efficient as it was with the original virus, but that doesn’t mean the vaccine doesn’t work any more.

“As a matter of fact, we also know that CoronaVac still has a good percentage of protection against the virus.”Play Video

Should we be concerned?

Not yet, said Dr Roselyn Lemus-Martin, who holds a PhD in molecular and cell biology from the University of Oxford and is based in the US.

“At the beginning, we were really concerned… We thought that due to its characteristics, Lambda could become more transmissible than Delta,” Lemus-Martin told Al Jazeera. “But right now, in the US, for example, we’ve seen that Delta keeps being the dominant strain, and what we’ve noticed is that Lambda is not spreading as quickly [in other areas].”

But Tsukayama at Cayetano Heredia University in Lima remains cautious. He said Peru’s research capacity to measure the effect of Lambda is limited, which makes it harder to evaluate the variant’s spread.

“Gamma showed up in Brazil and expanded throughout the region, and it’s already considered a variant of concern,” he said.

“Lambda shares many of the characteristics of Gamma, and it has also spread in other countries. What we don’t have yet is the same amount of evidence Brazilians did. In the region, Brazil leads in their research capacity.”

Where has it spread?

According to data from the Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAID), a platform onto which countries upload their COVID-19 viral sequences, the Lambda strain has already reached 28 countries.

That includes Brazil, Spain, the Netherlands, Aruba, Belgium, France, Portugal and the United States.

What are the strain’s characteristics?

Recent research on the Lambda strain has registered several mutations in its spike protein, the part of the virus that makes contact with human cells, binds to them, and then infects them.

The mutation observed in the spike protein might be the reason for its “increased transmissibility… and it could provide a reduction of protection by current vaccines”, according to a study released in July by a team from New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine and released on the medical website bioRxiv ahead of peer review.

According to virologist Ricardo Soto-Rifo of the University of Chile’s Institute of Biomedical Sciences, one of the mutations labelled as L452Q was similar to a mutation also shown in the Delta variant that is believed to have contributed to that strain’s high rate of infection.

But Soto-Rifo cautioned that the real effect of the mutations remains unclear.

“However we cannot tell yet what the real impact of these mutations are, since it’s a strain that has shown primarily in South America, and that puts us at a disadvantage, as we don’t have all the resources to execute the needed research,” he said.

Are vaccines effective against Lambda?

With a team of scientists, Soto-Rifo carried out preliminary studies – not yet peer-reviewed – assessing the effect of the Chinese-developed CoronaVac vaccine on the Lambda strain. The results showed that Lambda was able to neutralise the antibodies generated by the vaccine.

Soto-Rifo said part of the vaccine efficacy can be measured by the immunisation response, but also by the responses of T-cells, which stimulate antibody production and help combat the virus-infected cells.

“These results were expected,” Soto-Rifo said. “The virus has changed and that can make the vaccine not as efficient as it was with the original virus, but that doesn’t mean the vaccine doesn’t work any more.

“As a matter of fact, we also know that CoronaVac still has a good percentage of protection against the virus.”Play Video

Should we be concerned?

Not yet, said Dr Roselyn Lemus-Martin, who holds a PhD in molecular and cell biology from the University of Oxford and is based in the US.

“At the beginning, we were really concerned… We thought that due to its characteristics, Lambda could become more transmissible than Delta,” Lemus-Martin told Al Jazeera. “But right now, in the US, for example, we’ve seen that Delta keeps being the dominant strain, and what we’ve noticed is that Lambda is not spreading as quickly [in other areas].”

But Tsukayama at Cayetano Heredia University in Lima remains cautious. He said Peru’s research capacity to measure the effect of Lambda is limited, which makes it harder to evaluate the variant’s spread.

“Gamma showed up in Brazil and expanded throughout the region, and it’s already considered a variant of concern,” he said.

“Lambda shares many of the characteristics of Gamma, and it has also spread in other countries. What we don’t have yet is the same amount of evidence Brazilians did. In the region, Brazil leads in their research capacity.”

What are the strain’s characteristics?

Recent research on the Lambda strain has registered several mutations in its spike protein, the part of the virus that makes contact with human cells, binds to them, and then infects them.

The mutation observed in the spike protein might be the reason for its “increased transmissibility… and it could provide a reduction of protection by current vaccines”, according to a study released in July by a team from New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine and released on the medical website bioRxiv ahead of peer review.

According to virologist Ricardo Soto-Rifo of the University of Chile’s Institute of Biomedical Sciences, one of the mutations labelled as L452Q was similar to a mutation also shown in the Delta variant that is believed to have contributed to that strain’s high rate of infection.

But Soto-Rifo cautioned that the real effect of the mutations remains unclear.

“However we cannot tell yet what the real impact of these mutations are, since it’s a strain that has shown primarily in South America, and that puts us at a disadvantage, as we don’t have all the resources to execute the needed research,” he said.

Are vaccines effective against Lambda?

With a team of scientists, Soto-Rifo carried out preliminary studies – not yet peer-reviewed – assessing the effect of the Chinese-developed CoronaVac vaccine on the Lambda strain. The results showed that Lambda was able to neutralise the antibodies generated by the vaccine.

Soto-Rifo said part of the vaccine efficacy can be measured by the immunisation response, but also by the responses of T-cells, which stimulate antibody production and help combat the virus-infected cells.

“These results were expected,” Soto-Rifo said. “The virus has changed and that can make the vaccine not as efficient as it was with the original virus, but that doesn’t mean the vaccine doesn’t work any more.

“As a matter of fact, we also know that CoronaVac still has a good percentage of protection against the virus.”

Should we be concerned?

Not yet, said Dr Roselyn Lemus-Martin, who holds a PhD in molecular and cell biology from the University of Oxford and is based in the US.

“At the beginning, we were really concerned… We thought that due to its characteristics, Lambda could become more transmissible than Delta,” Lemus-Martin told Al Jazeera. “But right now, in the US, for example, we’ve seen that Delta keeps being the dominant strain, and what we’ve noticed is that Lambda is not spreading as quickly [in other areas].”

But Tsukayama at Cayetano Heredia University in Lima remains cautious. He said Peru’s research capacity to measure the effect of Lambda is limited, which makes it harder to evaluate the variant’s spread.

“Gamma showed up in Brazil and expanded throughout the region, and it’s already considered a variant of concern,” he said.

“Lambda shares many of the characteristics of Gamma, and it has also spread in other countries. What we don’t have yet is the same amount of evidence Brazilians did. In the region, Brazil leads in their research capacity.”

 

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Quebec records over 500 new COVID-19 cases since Friday as daily cases continue to rise

Quebec is reporting 501 COVID-19 cases over the last three days as the daily tallies continue to climb above the 100 mark.70c8fc80

No new virus-related deaths have been reported. Of the 501 new cases, 154 were reported on Monday and the other 347 were from the Saturday and Sunday.

Health officials say 53 per cent of all new daily infections are in the 20 to 39 age bracket.

Quebec’s COVID-19 death toll stands at 11,241 since the start of the pandemic.

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Good Afternoon All:

With apologies to the Mods this video was F^%#*&@* hard to watch and so easily preventable....

Man's last text: 'I should have gotten the damn vaccine'
Jessica DuPreez talks with John Berman about her 39- year-old fiancé who died from Covid-19. She discusses why they didn't get vaccinated, and how she thinks the shot could have saved the father of her kids.

Read in CNN: https://apple.news/AV0vdf3sqQYa1Obtk8i7xRQ

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1 hour ago, Kargokings said:

Unvaccinated?   Take Care

image.thumb.png.f4f788f73828a5c8dc60e79e5a60f1ea.png

Good Afternoon KK:

If I may add to your article from Reuters Canada and the video inside the hyperlink has an excellent presentation by Dr Fauci.

Delta spreads 'like wildfire' as doctors study whether it makes patients sicker | Reuters

 

Delta spreads 'like wildfire' as doctors study whether it makes patients sicker

By Deena Beasley

5 MIN READ

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - With a new wave of COVID-19 infections fueled by the Delta variant striking countries worldwide, disease experts are scrambling to learn whether the latest version of coronavirus is making people - mainly the unvaccinated - sicker than before.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned that Delta, first identified in India and now dominant worldwide, is “likely more severe” than earlier versions of the virus, according to an internal report made public on Friday.

The agency cited research in Canada, Singapore and Scotland showing that people infected with the Delta variant were more likely to be hospitalized than patients earlier in the pandemic.

In interviews with Reuters, disease experts said the three papers suggest a greater risk from the variant, but the study populations are limited and the findings have not yet been reviewed by outside experts. Doctors treating patients infected with Delta described a more rapid onset of COVID-19 symptoms, and in many regions an overall increase serious cases.

But the experts said more work is needed to compare outcomes among larger numbers of individuals in epidemiologic studies to sort out whether one variant causes more severe disease than another.

“It’s difficult to pin down increase in severity and population bias,” said Lawrence Young, a virologist at the UK’s Warwick Medical School.

In addition, it is likely that the extraordinary rate of Delta transmission is also contributing to a greater number of severe cases arriving at hospitals, the experts said.

Delta is as contagious as chickenpox and far more contagious than the common cold or flu, according to the CDC report.

Shane Crotty, a virologist at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology in San Diego, said the clearest indication that the variant may cause more severe disease comes from the Scotland study, which found that Delta roughly doubled the risk of hospitalization compared to an earlier version.

The majority of hospitalizations and deaths from coronavirus in the United States are occurring in people who have not been vaccinated. But there is evidence that the shots are less effective in people with compromised immune systems, including the elderly.

For vaccinated, otherwise healthy individuals, the odds are that if they contract COVID-19 they will only experience asymptomatic or mild disease, said Dr. Gregory Poland, infectious disease expert at the Mayo Clinic.

“But they can pass it on to family members and others who may not be so lucky,” Poland said. “We have to be vaccinated and masked or we will, for the fourth time now, endure another surge and out of that will come worse variants.”

‘FULL-ON FLAMES’

The rate of severe illness, especially in regions where vaccination rates are low, is again straining healthcare workers on the front lines of the pandemic.

“This is like a wildfire, this is not a smoldering campfire. It is full-on flames right now,” said Dr. Michelle Barron, senior medical director of infection prevention and control at Colorado’s UCHealth.

Research from China suggesting that the Delta variant replicates much faster and generates 1,000 times more virus in the body compared to the original strain highlights the biggest danger of this new wave, Barron said.

“It is hard to tell if they are more sick because of the Delta variant or if they would have been more sick anyway,” she said.

Other doctors said patients infected with Delta appear to become ill more quickly, and in some cases with more severe symptoms, than those they treated earlier in the pandemic.

“We are seeing more patients requiring oxygen sooner,” said Dr. Benjamin Barlow, chief medical officer at American Family Care, a 28-state chain of urgent care clinics.

At his clinic in Birmingham, Alabama, Barlow said that around 20% of patients are testing positive for COVID-19, compared with 2-3% a few weeks ago. Patients are assessed at that time for potential hospital admission and oxygen support.

David Montefiori, director of the Laboratory for AIDS Vaccine Research and Development at Duke University Medical Center, said the Delta variant is more infectious and leads to faster onset of illness - particularly for the unvaccinated.

“Frankly there’s a severity that comes from this variant that is a little more severe,” Montefiori said on a webcast last week. “It’s not just easier to transmit, it makes you sicker.”

Reporting by Deena Beasley in Los Angeles, Josephine Mason in London and Julie Steenhuysen in Chicago; Editing by Michele Gershberg and Daniel Wallis

 

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I know we are all getting tired of the Covid thing, but I recently came across a public health sign that illustrates how silly/extreme the precautions are being taken.

I was visiting a public access site along the St. Lawrence River for scuba divers. The local health authority had a large sign board indicating the protocols to be followed for access to the water…..socially distancing, of course, to maintain 2 metres from your dive buddy…(I assume this still applies underwater 😆) no sharing of regulators and other equipment, but the kicker was in suiting up: NO SPITTING IN THE MASK WAS ALLOWED! (For non divers….spitting in the mask is an old school trick to stop the lenses fogging up underwater) Only commercial anti fog solutions were allowed!
Think about the logic in this…..no spitting in your own mask before you dive into open water! 
Who thinks this s#$t up?? And worse yet, they are in governing our lives!

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8 minutes ago, st27 said:


Think about the logic in this…..no spitting in your own mask before you dive into open water! 
 

You don't want to be giving yourself the Covid!  Also, no studies done to determine how long the virus can live in open water - it might be FOREVER!

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Contrary to what the media pushes……

 

Typical 'vaccine hesitant' person is a 42-year-old Ontario woman who votes Liberal: Abacus polling

Bruce Anderson: Compared to the vaccinated, the vaccine hesitant don’t have a lot of trust in government. They also try to avoid prescriptions, dislike putting anything unnatural in their bodies and say they are reluctant to take any vaccines. Most worry that COVID-19 vaccines haven’t really been tested for a long time.

Still, based on the attitudes of the hesitant, there’s a good chance we will hit 90 percent of adults fully vaccinated — and possibly even a point or two higher than that.

The hesitant are not conspiracy theorists. They aren’t angry at the world. They don’t think COVID-19 is a hoax. They aren’t radicals of the left or the right — 61 percent of them say they are on the centre of the spectrum. Two thirds have post-secondary education. They might be timid, but they’re not stupid.

Almost half of them (46 percent) live in Ontario and well over half of them (59 percent) are women. A quarter were born outside Canada. Their average age is 42 and the plurality are between 30 and 44 years old. If they were voting in a federal election today, 35 percent would vote Liberal, 25 percent Conservative, 17 percent NDP, 9 percent Green — pretty similar to overall voting intentions for the entire population.

https://www.macleans.ca/society/typical-vaccine-hesitant-person-is-a-42-year-old-ontario-woman-who-votes-liberal-abacus-polling/?fbclid=IwAR1e0v4In6yO28GYabIc9Zt5KFYpcg7v_Xgsb7DUI2HZX8sFaWJ9aOvLMEE

085E7052-F1DD-40CD-846B-B5B7B513D986.jpeg

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Good Evening All:

Apologies for the "Left Wing Bias source"😱 but finally a move towards a Vaccine Certificate for International Travel AKA Vaccine Passport.

Ottawa promises vaccine passport for international travel this fall | CBC News

 

Ottawa promises vaccine passport for international travel this fall

Government working with other countries to recognize vaccination credentials

Catharine Tunney · CBC News · Posted: Aug 11, 2021 4:33 PM ET | Last Updated: August 11

The federal government says it plans to create proof-of-vaccination documentation for international travel by early fall.

Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino said this afternoon that Ottawa is working with the provinces — which hold the data on vaccinations — to develop consistent credentials. The minister said the government is also working with other countries to recognize the credentials issued in Canada.

The federal certification would include data on the type of vaccines received, dates and location.

"For Canadians who decide to travel, using a proof of vaccination will provide foreign border officials with the vaccination history needed to assess whether a traveller meets their public health requirements and provide a trusted and verifiable credential for when they return home," says a government release.

Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc said the government expects the credentials to be digital but will also make it available for those without access to a device.

The federal announcement comes in the middle of a fierce debate as some provinces talk about introducing domestic proof of vaccination.

In Quebec, beginning in September, anyone wanting to visit non-essential businesses like bars, restaurants, gyms and festivals will need to present a scannable QR code through a smartphone app to prove they've been fully vaccinated against COVID-19. 

Manitoba has been issuing proof-of-immunization cards to residents who are two weeks past their second shot.

Nova Scotia Liberal Leader Iain Rankin has promised that a re-elected Liberal government would bring in a proposed ScotiaPass for fully vaccinated residents and that businesses and other organizations would be able to use the system to limit access to their services.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, meanwhile, continues to insist his province will not introduce proof-of-vaccination documentation.

"We've been very clear from the beginning that we will not facilitate or accept vaccine passports," Kenney told reporters last month.

"I believe they would in principle contravene the Health Information Act and also possibly the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act."

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12 hours ago, A330PilotCanada said:

also possibly the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

 

A question of privacy

In May, Canada's federal, provincial and territorial privacy commissioners issued a joint statement warning that while vaccine passports "may offer substantial public benefit, it is an encroachment on civil liberties that should be taken only after careful consideration."

According to Ontario's former privacy commissioner, Ann Cavoukian, now executive director of the Global Privacy and Security by Design Centre, Canadians shouldn't be expected to surrender their personal privacy for the sake of public health.

"You don't throw out privacy because there's a health-related concern now," Cavoukian said. "It can never be one versus the other."

Cavoukian is concerned about what could happen to people's private health data under a vaccine passport system, and she worries that once it's surrendered, it will already be too late.”

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/vaccine-passports-privacy-1.5972943

 

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1 hour ago, Jaydee said:

 

A question of privacy

In May, Canada's federal, provincial and territorial privacy commissioners issued a joint statement warning that while vaccine passports "may offer substantial public benefit, it is an encroachment on civil liberties that should be taken only after careful consideration."

According to Ontario's former privacy commissioner, Ann Cavoukian, now executive director of the Global Privacy and Security by Design Centre, Canadians shouldn't be expected to surrender their personal privacy for the sake of public health.

"You don't throw out privacy because there's a health-related concern now," Cavoukian said. "It can never be one versus the other."

Cavoukian is concerned about what could happen to people's private health data under a vaccine passport system, and she worries that once it's surrendered, it will already be too late.”

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/vaccine-passports-privacy-1.5972943

 

Good Morning Jaydee:

Thank you for bringing this one up. What is your take on this? Do the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few in these very unprecedented times? 

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