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Coronavirus_2020.01.28


Jaydee
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The efficacy of anti-malarial drugs was never the issue for me… I have no idea (none, zero, not a clue) if it works on Covid 19 or not. But whether it does or doesn’t wasn't the point, it was the hysteria surrounding it that surprised me.

 Like others who have spent time in various foreign vacation paradises, I found the notion that a common anti-malarial had been suddenly deemed to be so dangerous astounding, it coloured my view and perceptions of much of the information that followed and I was also surprised by the play it got on CNN etc..

The other staggering part of this (for me) was the treatment of "at risk" elderly people in LTC facilities both here and in the US; the most outrageous example of that being in New York. You don’t need a medical degree to understand the basics of a threat assessment or situation estimate (EOTS). Any sane person can make predictions based on common sense and It seems my granddaughter has most politicians beat on that score.

Anyone who really wants to sink their teeth into such things should find a veteran with lots of medals and ask him/her if he has ever been injected with anything that was subsequently expunged from his medical records. Better yet, ask a retired medic. The press is curiously AWOL on that subject eh?

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It is interesting that so much has been said about Canada being a failure in that it is running behind in it's vaccination campaign.

The country that is closest to us in size and population has yet to start vaccinations.  They will start this week.

It isn't about rollout, it's about the manufacturers being caught not being able to produce.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-02-14/australia-to-get-first-shipment-pfizer-covid-vaccine-this-week/13153796

Australia's first shipment of Pfizer vaccine due to arrive this week, Health Minister Greg Hunt confirms

Australia's first shipment of the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine will touch down this week, with the Federal Government conceding distributing it across the country will not be a flawless exercise.

Key points:

  • The Health Minister said the doses were due to arrive sometime this week
  • He did not offer an exact date, saying he needed to be careful about details in a "highly competitive global world"
  • The Deputy Prime Minister said rolling out the vaccine was not going to be an easy task

Health Minister Greg Hunt confirmed the first batch of the Belgium-made Pfizer jab was "scheduled to land in Australia before the end of the week, if not earlier".

However, he remained tight lipped about the exact arrival date over fears that could put the product at jeopardy.

"Because this is the most precious of cargoes, we are being cautious with our details in a highly competitive global world," he told reporters in Canberra.

Once the vials reach Australian shores they will be examined by the Therapeutic Goods Administration.

But Mr Hunt said the government remained on track to begin giving the vaccine to vulnerable and priority groups before the end of February.

 
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Nice to know where the rest of the population fits in..you know....the ones who actually pay Canada bills. A 20 year old Indian comes before a 75 year old White man 

 

The memo then identifies the next priority for first-dose vaccinations, once all of those listed above have been addressed:

 

  • Adults aged 80 and older
  • Staff, caregivers, and residents in retirement homes and other congregate settings for seniors.
  • “High priority” health-care workers, including those involved in community care with a lower risk of exposure serving both special and general populations, as well as those involved in non-acute rehabilitation.
  • All Indigenous adults.  ( ?????????)
  • Adults receiving chronic home care

https://globalnews.ca/news/7640416/ontario-updates-covid-19-vaccine-priority-list/

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1 hour ago, deicer said:

It isn't about rollout, it's about the manufacturers being caught not being able to produce.

If it’s all about the manufactures....😂😂😂 please explain why other countries are not having Canada’s problems....you know....the ones with LEADERS....speaking of which...look who’s leading the pack...I guess Tru.....er...Joes been REALLLLLL busy the last month  to get these so quick 😂😂

Shssshhhhhhhh don’t tell Pelosi.

CBCD79C6-2C14-4BF0-9B58-3EC76362DD8F.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee
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In the above example, the U.S. and Britain are manufacturing vaccines in house.  Canada would be in the same position if it weren't for Mulroney and Harper selling manufacturing out.

As for Israel, they struck a deal with Pfizer to get the vaccine quicker in exchange for citizen data, thereby turning the country into a giant lab.

https://www.politico.eu/article/israel-coronavirus-vaccine-success-secret/

Reasons behind this roaring start are fast emerging: Netanyahu revealed on January 7 that Israel struck an agreement with Pfizer to exchange citizens' data for 10 million doses of the coronavirus vaccine, including a promise of shipments of 400,000-700,000 doses every week.

Under this agreement, Israel will provide details to Pfizer (as well as and the World Health Organization) about the age, gender and medical history of those receiving the jab as well as its side effects and efficacy. 

Pfizer clearly has much to gain by rolling out its vaccine in Israel, turning it into the global pilot for a rapid vaccination campaign — and the depth of results now available to Pfizer, especially if successful, can boost marketing worldwide.

Still, health authorities aren't answering direct questions about the exact number of doses Israel has secured or how much it paid for them, saying only that the country signed secret agreements with manufacturers as the vaccination campaign began.

 

Also unclear was the price it had paid for the Pfizer jab — until January 5, when officials disclosed off-the-record that Israel paid $30 per person. That's more than twice the amount listed by Belgium, for example, which accidentally revealed its vaccine price list when Belgium's secretary of state tweeted it. Then, on Monday night, an Israeli public broadcaster reported an even higher price, at $47 per person.

Netanyahu — who is hoping to get reelected in March — has also repeatedly brought up his close relationships with the chief executives of Pfizer and Moderna, suggesting his connections helped secure millions of doses. 

"I speak to them all the time," Netanyahu said. He added that Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla, a descendant of a Jewish family from Thessaloniki, is "a great friend" of Israel.

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46 minutes ago, deicer said:

In the above example, the U.S. and Britain are manufacturing vaccines in house.  Canada would be in the same position if it weren't for Mulroney and Harper selling manufacturing out.

 

Typical FALSE INFORMATION:

here is the real story:   GUNTER: Trudeau's blaming Harper on vaccines -- but it goes back to Chretien | Toronto Sun

Here’s where the little cogs in Liberal brains come in.

If they get us ready for the excuse that we no longer have the ability to make vaccine, then when Canadian voters start to see their American and British cousins rolling up their sleeves for shots long before any arrive here, the Liberals can insist we lost those jobs because Harper outsourced Canadian manufacturing.

And most Liberal voters will swallow that.

But the blame really goes back to the Liberals under Jean Chretien.

It was a major plank in the Liberals’ 1993 election platform to get rid of Mulroney-era patent protections for drugmakers.

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2 hours ago, Kargokings said:

Typical FALSE INFORMATION:

here is the real story:   GUNTER: Trudeau's blaming Harper on vaccines -- but it goes back to Chretien | Toronto Sun

Here’s where the little cogs in Liberal brains come in.

If they get us ready for the excuse that we no longer have the ability to make vaccine, then when Canadian voters start to see their American and British cousins rolling up their sleeves for shots long before any arrive here, the Liberals can insist we lost those jobs because Harper outsourced Canadian manufacturing.

And most Liberal voters will swallow that.

But the blame really goes back to the Liberals under Jean Chretien.

It was a major plank in the Liberals’ 1993 election platform to get rid of Mulroney-era patent protections for drugmakers.

Interesting that you consider that the real story.

It is outdated from November last year and the premise of not getting vaccines before other countries was wrong because we ended up getting the first doses in December.

As for the drug development cutbacks, the timeline stated includes the period that Harper made the most cuts.  

So it is just a tad disingenuous to put up an opinion piece from the Toronto Sun and use it as factual.

 

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4 hours ago, deicer said:

Interesting that you consider that the real story.

It is outdated from November last year and the premise of not getting vaccines before other countries was wrong because we ended up getting the first doses in December.

As for the drug development cutbacks, the timeline stated includes the period that Harper made the most cuts.  

So it is just a tad disingenuous to put up an opinion piece from the Toronto Sun and use it as factual.

 

and your factual piece came from?????

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IMPEACHABLE OFFENSE

 NY Assembly Pushes for ‘Impeachment Commission’ to Probe Andrew Cuomo

Republicans in the New York State Assembly announced Thursday they will push to form an impeachment commission to “gather facts and evidence” surrounding Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s handling of the coronavirus crisis and underreported COVID-19 nursing home deaths in the state.

 

Assembly Republicans on Thursday said they would introduce a measure to form an impeachment commission, which they said would be tasked with “examining the state’s method of administration and conduct in all matters relating to nursing homes and long-term care facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

The resolution would set a 60-day deadline for the committee to conduct its work and submit findings and recommendations to the legislature.

The committee would be bipartisan and consist of eight members, with two appointees from each legislative leader, and have the same powers of a legislative committee, including the ability to subpoena witnesses and compel records, correspondence and documents related to the matter be produced. 

“The Cuomo Administration’s nursing home cover-up is one of the most alarming scandals we’ve seen in state government,” Assembly Minority Leader Will Barclay said in a statement. “Intentionally withholding critical information from the public, underreporting fatality numbers by 50 percent and the recent revelation they hid the truth to avoid a federal Department of Justice investigation are among the factors that raise the serious possibility of criminality.”

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/cuomo-nursing-home-scandal-ny-assembly-republicans-impeachment-commission

 

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Third wave this spring in Canada if provinces keep relaxing COVID-19 measures, Tam warns 

New federal forecasts project that COVID-19 variants could fuel a surge of 20,000 new cases per day by mid-March


 

OTTAWA — Canadian health officials on Friday said tough public measures should be maintained to prevent new variants of COVID-19 from triggering a third wave, just as some of the major provinces are relaxing restrictions.

Ontario, the most populous of the 10 provinces, is gradually allowing shuttered businesses to reopen and diluting limits on the size of public gatherings

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/third-wave-spring-canada-theresa-tam?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR1oWjMlt-iNgO4FZro58H7eDnPh1mv326UcrjSv7OhXv7yVTsMqh32GT9E#Echobox=1613753210

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Apparently, the industry experts and scientists which Trudeau relies on for advice, have taken umbrage to our pms statement that the panel recommended the Chinese vaccination:

Quote

Members of Canada’s COVID-19 Vaccine Task Force absolved themselves of blame on Thursday for the failure of the federal government to partner with a Chinese vaccine producer, telling MPs they didn’t recommend the initial deal, as the Liberals have suggested.

Instead, Ottawa’s decision to tie its early vaccine fortunes to a company whose candidate never reached Canada was an attempt to leverage the existing relationship between the National Research Council (NRC) and CanSino, which dated back to 2013. That year, CanSino was licensed a cell line by the NRC that it used to develop a vaccine against Ebola. CanSino used the same cell line to develop its COVID vaccine.

The NRC signed a deal with CanSino on May 6, 2020, to ship the company’s COVID vaccine candidate to Canada. The research arm of the Chinese military helped to conduct Phase 1 and 2 clinical trials. If the vaccine had been proven effective, the deal would have allowed Canada to produce it, one of the world’s most promising candidates at the time........

 

Responding to a question in the House from Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole on Dec. 8 about the deal, Trudeau said that, “every step of the way, we leaned on our experts, on the immunity task force, and on the vaccination task force, to make recommendations on what we should do to ensure a solid supply of potential vaccines to Canadians.”

In documents tabled in the House on Jan. 25, the NRC wrote that, “while the Vaccine Task Force had originally ranked the CanSino Biologics vaccine candidate among the most promising globally, their recommendation was subsequently revised, based on their analysis of additional clinical-trial data.”

 

 

 

https://ipolitics.ca/2021/02/18/covid-vaccine-task-force-washes-its-hands-of-failed-cansino-initial-deal/

 

If only we had a mechanism in government where the pm could be held accountable for his lies and deceptions.....insert sarcasm emoji.

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https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/some-travellers-walking-out-of-pearson-airport-or-take-a-fine-instead-of-paying-for-quarantine-hotel

The very first question any reasonable person would ask is how do we enforce this?

What do we do about people who can't afford it? 

If it's as important as we tell the masses it is, how do we justify not interdicting people who refuse?

WTF do we do about police forces who wilfully fail to enforce our good idea (that being the law)?

Buffoonery makes my head hurt. 

 

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51 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/some-travellers-walking-out-of-pearson-airport-or-take-a-fine-instead-of-paying-for-quarantine-hotel

The very first question any reasonable person would ask is how do we enforce this?

What do we do about people who can't afford it? 

If it's as important as we tell the masses it is, how do we justify not interdicting people who refuse?

WTF do we do about police forces who wilfully fail to enforce our good idea (that being the law)?

Buffoonery makes my head hurt. 

 

 The total farce of this hotel quarantine BS is it only applies to Air travellers. Typical Ottawa...let’s decimate the Canadian aviation industry as much as possible attitude, while the Americans benefit like gang busters.

People are now changing flights to fly to Buffalo, Seattle etc, grabbing a cab to go across the border. They are having someone leave their car in advance in a parking lot close to the border.  They then simply drive home. They still have to quarantine but do it at home. No $3000 PP hotel bill.

Typical Canadian response:

"Common sense says, well, let's do the path of least resistance, right? If I can save 4,000 bucks, why wouldn't I do it?" he said, estimating the total hotel bill for two people”

Ottawa’s response

” In an email statement sent by his office, Blair also said that the government has implemented effective measures for both land and air travellers. 

"If people are not prepared to go through that rigour of keeping themselves and their communities safe, then I'd urge them to stay where they are, just to avoid all non-essential travel," he said. 

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/canada-land-border-hotel-quarantine-government-travel-1.5917382

 

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33 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

The total farce of this hotel quarantine BS is it only applies to Air travellers.

To me, simple tactics/timing suggests that this was instituted to discourage March break travel and suffers from the typical (liberal) lack of anticipating the consequences, legalities, public workarounds, costs and enforcement issues. Or perhaps, since JT isn't a dummy, it's possible they simply wanted to erect a fence as a moderate deterrent with no expectation of actually pursuing the what ifs. 

At first blush, the most obvious questions are left unanswered and appear unanticipated. Perhaps they don't consider that venue too important.... in which case they are simply liars. Given the choice between idiots and manipulative liars, it's most likely the latter IMO and this will die quickly after March Break regardless of the Covid situation. 

Either way, I consider it a blessing that most of these people never walk into a Recruiting Centre. 

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South Africa suspends use of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine after it fails to clearly stop virus variant.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021/02/south-africa-suspends-use-astrazenecas-covid-19-vaccine-after-it-fails-clearly-stop


*********************************
https://www.businessinsider.com/angela-merkel-wont-take-astrazeneca-covid-19-vaccine-2021-2

1842DC47-6DDA-4D0E-B9DD-084CA1848EC5.jpeg

35B0BF5F-79E0-4E0A-8F32-8DA79D562FDF.jpeg

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45 minutes ago, seeker said:

Ask yourself - which government do you have more confidence in to do the right thing; South Africa or Canada?

Yup, me too.

 

 

Germany turns it down because it isn’t effective in people over 70, South Africa because it isn’t effective against new variants... YET because Trudeau has his political ass in a bind because of his incompetence and says it’s OK for Canadians !!! 😡😡😡😡

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3 hours ago, Jaydee said:

Germany turns it down because it isn’t effective in people over 70, South Africa because it isn’t effective against new variants... YET because Trudeau has his political ass in a bind because of his incompetence and says it’s OK for Canadians !!! 😡😡😡😡

And now for the rest of the story;

There’s no ‘best’ vaccine, expert says as Canada OKs AstraZeneca shots

There’s no ‘best’ vaccine, expert says as Canada OKs AstraZeneca shots - National | Globalnews.ca

Vaccines from Moderna, Pfizer-BioNTech and AstraZeneca-Oxford have now been approved in Canada.  While Canadians may not get a choice about which COVID-19 vaccine to take, all three offer protection against severe illness, according to experts. “All of these vaccines are good,” Dr. Bradly Wouters, executive vice-president of science and research at the University Health Network told Global News Friday.

Read more: What are the differences between Canada’s approved COVID-19 vaccines? Here’s what we know

Available data shows all these three vaccines have the "ability to impact hospitalization" and offer "protection against severe illness," he said.

Which vaccine is the best?

There's no "best vaccine" option.

Whichever vaccine is available first, "it's going to protect you," Wouters said.

Parts of the world are already facing which-is-best challenges. Astrazeneca's vaccine for instance, was cleared for use in Britain and Europe after data suggested that it was about 70 per cent effective.

Italy's government recently decided to reserve Pfizer and Moderna shots for the elderly and designate the Astrazeneca vaccine for younger, at-risk workers, sparking protests.

“Right now, it’s not vaccine against vaccine, it’s vaccine against virus,” Dr. Nirav Shah, director of the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, recently told The Associated Press.

Wouters reiterated a similar notion.

"In a pandemic, you need fast results," he noted and the "priority is to ensure everyone gets vaccinated" and not "debate over which vaccine is better."

"Each trial involves different people in different places," he said, and while many may be making comparisons between vaccines from the results of different Phase 3 trials, "such comparisons are misleading," he said.

After Pfizer and Moderna, AstraZeneca is the third shot officially authorized in the country.

 

The two doses of the Pfizer and Moderna shots were found to be about 95 per cent effective against the virus as compared to the AstraZeneca shots that stand at 62 per cent in preventing symptomatic cases.

However, Wouters said they will all work "as effectively as possible as long as combined with mask-wearing, handwashing and social distancing."

"We must continue to follow public health guidelines, being cautious until positive cases, hospitalizations and deaths are significantly reduced nationwide," he said.

Following Canada's approval of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine Friday, Procurement Minister Anita Anand cautioned against deliberation over “the sort of good or bad” vaccines.

 

 

“If there is a vaccine and it's been authorized by Health Canada, it means that it's met standards,” Anand said during a press conference Friday.

AstraZeneca shots may not seem equal to its opponents at first glance but "these vaccines do have a use,” she said.

“We have real-world evidence from Scotland and the U.K. for people that have been dosed that have been over 80, and that has shown a significant drop in hospitalizations, to the tune of 84 per cent,” she said.

“The idea is to have a suite of vaccines that are available. I think Canada is hungry for vaccines, we're putting more on the buffet table to be used."

Standards of efficacy

Speaking of the “standards of effectiveness,” Anand said vaccines “should meet at least 50 per cent.”

“If we compare that to the influenza viruses that we authorize every year, if you look back, for example, just to last year, the effectiveness of the flu vaccine against the most common strain was about 64 per cent, across to the next common strain was about 54 per cent,” she said.

As more information becomes available from real-world use, “the efficacy” of the AstraZeneca vaccine might prove to “be much higher,” Anand added.

Read more: Canada approves AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine

Considering all the five vaccines that are currently under review, including the Novavax and Johnson & Johnson shots, Anand emphasized that nobody has died so far from “adverse effects” of these vaccines.

"If you look across all the clinical trials of the tens of thousands of people that were involved, the number of cases of people that died from COVID-19 that got vaccine was zero. The number of people that were hospitalized because their COVID-19 disease was so severe was zero. The number of people that died because of an adverse event or an effect of the vaccine was zero,” she said.

The idea is “to prevent” serious illness, hospitalizations and “of course prevent death,” Anand said.

Storage and distribution

Compared to the other vaccines, the AstraZeneca shot is also easier to administer.

The vaccine can be stored, transported and handled at normal refrigerated conditions (2 to 8 C/36 to 46 F) for at least six months and administered within existing health-care settings.

The Moderna and Pfizer options, meanwhile, must be stored at subzero temperatures until they’re ready to be used, at -4 F and -94 F, respectively.

This is "something we need to take into account," Dr. Howard Njoo, Canada’s deputy chief public health officer, said during a press conference Friday.

He said the onboarding of the AstraZeneca vaccine is "another tool in our toolbox."

"Following the approval of Health Canada, the efficacy stands at 62 per cent, but we have to look at the entire profile of each vaccine because this vaccine is easier to administer than Pfizer and Moderna, so this is something we need to take into account," he said.

-- With files from The Associated Press

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On 2/27/2021 at 2:48 PM, Kargokings said:

AstraZeneca shots may not seem equal to its opponents at first glance but "these vaccines do have a use,” she said.

I am left wondering which vaccine she will get?

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