Coronavirus_2020.01.28


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25 minutes ago, boestar said:

farmers maximize profits by selling local.

 

Only those who produce quota controlled products.  Dairy, eggs, poultry.  A lot of the rest have found profitable markets for their produce overseas.  Wheat, Beef, Pork, Wheat and Canola to name a few. 

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Cars line up at Dodger Stadium for COVID-19 testing on the Monday after Thanksgiving weekend in Los Angeles, California. Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday said a “drastic” new lockdown order might be necessary if coronavirus cases in the state continue to surge to their highest levels since the start of the pandemic.

BB62AD97-47DF-48EC-9FA1-8BA0F019EFA7.jpeg

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The current rate of positive tests in California is running at about 6%.

If that was the aerial view of a drive in church service, Gavin would hatching kittens right now, the ticket writers would be out in full force and deicer would have increased his posting count by one.   

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3 hours ago, boestar said:

sure but you normally don't buy those products at your local farmers market like you do fresh produce and dairy

 

Local farmers market?   Some real ones still exist but if you check the back areas you will find a lot of the fruits and other produce are not exactly local.  

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Malcolm....
 

ICUs in Alberta are drowning, say doctors. 'I've never had this happen in all my years of practice.'

Hospitals in Calgary are running out of space and there are also concerns about having enough staff—and enough oxygen—to treat patients

https://www.macleans.ca/society/health/icus-in-alberta-are-drowning-say-doctors-ive-never-had-this-happen-in-all-my-years-of-practice/

 

 

 

47F76708-3830-43A8-B08E-9FC9921C0B0A.jpeg

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12 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

Malcolm....
 

ICUs in Alberta are drowning, say doctors. 'I've never had this happen in all my years of practice.'

Hospitals in Calgary are running out of space and there are also concerns about having enough staff—and enough oxygen—to treat patients

https://www.macleans.ca/society/health/icus-in-alberta-are-drowning-say-doctors-ive-never-had-this-happen-in-all-my-years-of-practice/

 

 

 

47F76708-3830-43A8-B08E-9FC9921C0B0A.jpeg

Not sure why you are directing this to me as I live in Alberta and support any and all measures that will reduce our exposure.  Cheers old chap.

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1 minute ago, Malcolm said:

Not sure why you are directing this to me as I live in Alberta and support any and all measures that will reduce our exposure.  Cheers old chap.

Stay Safe 🙏🏻 ...was all that was intended since you do live in Alberta.

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3 hours ago, Malcolm said:

Local farmers market?   Some real ones still exist but if you check the back areas you will find a lot of the fruits and other produce are not exactly local.  

My local market Every Saturday morning from sprint until fall.  99% locally grown and produced.  Commercial products are not technically allowed.  Best produce out there.  A 5 minute walk from my house gets the best corn around.  Either harvested from the field out back or from other area farmers.  Small town Canada gotta love it.

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Sorry for the long post - there was no link...

 

Covid Vaccines for Canada- A Sad Story. Introduction I have been closely following the Covid vaccine issue in Canada and felt compelled to write about it. As President and CEO of GlaxoSmithKline Canada for 16 years, I was intimately involved in the production and distribution of the Canadian vaccine for the H1N1 pandemic in 2009. All of the vaccine for that pandemic was produced in the GSK vaccine factory in Quebec City. The campaign, although there were a few glitches, was a tremendous success. The vaccine was developed, rolled out and injected into millions of Canadians in just several months. I give great credit to the Chief Public Health Officer at that time, David Butler-Jones and the Deputy Minister of Health, Morris Rosenberg, for their leadership and collaboration during that pandemic. Millions of doses of Canada’s annual flu vaccine are also produced in the GSK facility in Quebec City. This despite comments by Mr. Trudeau and some of his Ministers that this facility was closed down during the Harper years. So why is Canada lagging the rest of the world in developing and rolling out a Covid vaccine? Why is Canada down the priority list of countries to receive supplies of vaccine? Why does Canada not have the capability to produce vaccine for Covid? The story is a long one. Many mistakes have been made and there has been a real lack of vision particularly by successive Liberal governments, including the current one. The mistakes of the past are now catching up with us. “The chickens have come home to roost.” Let me explain. Recognition of the Innovative Pharmaceutical Industry First I want to say how proud all of us who have worked in the Global Pharmaceutical industry should be. From the outset of this pandemic I believed that it would be our industry that would solve the Covid challenge. It looks like that is coming true with a number of innovative vaccines being developed, tested and approved in less than one year. It is truly a modern miracle of science and a real tribute to the innovative pharmaceutical industry and its people. We are changing the course of history, solving the pandemic and saving million of lives around the world. In many countries we have done that in collaboration and partnership with federal governments. The Canadian Pharmaceutical Industry The issues we are facing today in Canada with respect to having early access to a Covid vaccine have their roots in history which go back 50 years. In 1968 Pierre Trudeau and his government effectively eliminated pharmaceutical patents by implementing a regime of compulsory licensing. The objective was to lower pharmaceutical prices and encourage the establishment of a Canadian domestic industry. It was a massive failure. What it did do was lead to a number of multinational innovative companies immediately closing down their research centres in Canada. It also lead to the creation of a very powerful generic industry that does no innovative research and has now evolved into a commodity business competing globally on price. The generic industry oligopoly emerged with Apotex and Novopharm dominating the landscape. For over 3 decades, under very favourable market conditions for those companies, Canadians ended up paying the highest prices in the world for generic drugs. The owners, Barry Sherman and Leslie Dan went on to become two of the 10 richest individuals in the country. They also became two of the most powerful people in the country by hitching their wagons to the Liberal party of Canada. They were some of the biggest funders of Liberal candidates, MP’S and cabinet Ministers, particularly those in the Toronto area. That allowed them to dramatically influence pharmaceutical policy in Canada in their favour, particularly with respect to patent policy. Where is the domestic generic industry now when we desperately need innovative new medicines and vaccines to deal with Covid? Although the Mulroney and Harper Conservative governments supported the innovative industry by improving the patent (and data protection) landscape, Canada only partially recovered, and to this day does not have globally competitive patent protection for innovative medicines. This regime has led to many brand name pharmaceutical products losing their patent cover and market position early. So why would a company be motivated to invest in a country that does not adequately protect its innovation? Well they aren’t. The pharmaceutical policy environment in Canada for the innovative industry has been quite unfriendly on other fronts as well. Successive Liberal governments of Pierre Trudeau, Jean Chretien and Justin Trudeau have created an environment which has discouraged innovative pharmaceutical investment in research, development and manufacturing in Canada. They have consistently put the Canadian CEO’s of global companies in a weak position to attract investment to Canada from their global corporations. In addition to weaker patent protection compared with other Western countries, Health Canada continues to be one of the slowest regulatory agencies in approving new medications and vaccines. The pricing regime has deteriorated over the years with successive Liberal governments focused on ratcheting down the prices of innovative medicines. In fact, on January 1, 2021 the Trudeau government will enact new PMPRB ( Patented Medicines Pricing Review Board) regulations to drive prices down further. Not a good move during a pandemic when it is that industry that is ultimately going to save your bacon. It is already apparent that these pricing regulation changes will impact when and if new innovative treatments for cancer and other critical diseases will come to Canada. How many more lives will be lost due to a lack of early access to new medicines because Canada is only looking for the best price and doesn’t want to pay for new innovations. Are we going to continue to make the mistakes of the past? Unfortunately Health Ministers, Health bureaucrats and left leaning politicians only see medicines and vaccines as a cost to the health care system. They do not recognize the value those medicines bring to the system in reducing costs in other healthcare silos. Governments have also never recognized the value the industry brings to the innovative economy, despite the fact that Canada continues to lag the world in innovation, and is in real need of upping its game. The last global survey saw Canada slip down the innovation list even further. Pharmaceutical jobs are some of the most high value jobs in the economy. The few politicians who do recognize that value are always shouted down by the Health Ministry and those who just want a lower price. The bottom line is that despite numerous outreach efforts by the industry over the years, successive Liberal governments, including this one, have done little to nothing to create a favourable pharmaceutical policy environment. They have made no effort to work with the innovative industry to encourage a partnership which would deliver tremendous value to the healthcare system and the economy and give Canadians early access to new medicines and vaccines. So, not surprisingly, the industry has gone elsewhere to invest where that positive environment exists. Good examples are the U.S., the U.K. and Europe. It should also come as no surprise that the U.S., with its Operation Warp Speed, lead by the former head of Vaccines for GSK, and its contribution of billions of dollars, is at the head of the line for a Covid vaccine and will begin to vaccinate its population by December. The Pandemic Management Failures of the Trudeau Government. Many want to praise the federal government for all the money they have shovelled out to Canadians during the pandemic. Many of the programs have been very beneficial and truly needed. It’s hard not to be a bit cynical though. It is well known that Liberal governments love to spend money and they love to say “their government” is making all this money available to Canadians. What they fail to say is that it is Canadian taxpayers, our children and grandchildren who are and will be paying for all this spending. And clearly they know that doing so will buy many votes for a long time. For example, why give money to well off seniors? Is it because they care or because it buys seniors’ votes? Governments of all stripes would have and could have done the same in terms of spending billions of dollars rolling out these programs under these circumstances. That is the easy part. That spending should not blind Canadians though to the fact that almost everything else regarding the pandemic has been poorly handled by our federal government. They defunded our pandemic early warning system (GPHIN) which was state of the art globally. It would have warned us early on about Covid. By killing it they were flying blind and couldn’t react soon enough to stop the arrival of the virus. We could have and should have closed the border sooner. Despite all the talk about documenting learnings from the SARS epidemic and the H1N1 pandemic, virtually none of the key learnings seem to have been documented and we have had to re-invent the wheel to a great degree. One of the learnings was to have a stockpile of PPEs and antivirals. I don’t know about antivirals but the current government threw the outdated stockpile of PPE’S in the dumpster in 2019 and did not restock. We then had to scramble to find sufficient new sources and quantities but quickly recognized we had outsourced most of that production to other countries, particularly China. Unfortunately Canada is also experiencing a record number of drug shortages, especially during Covid. Most of our medicines now come from other countries, such as China and India. Will we eventually have to wait in line for many of them as well as we have very little domestic manufacturing left? Do we have any secure sources of supply? During the H1N1 pandemic it was agreed by everyone that Canada should never have just one local supplier of pandemic vaccine. Great idea, but there was no follow up planning to ensure we had vaccine manufacturing capability or secure sources of supply for the next pandemic. And here we are, scrambling for early access to vaccine. Why is it that we can’t have more rapid tests available? The PCR testing is effective and accurate but it is slow and resource intensive. We just don’t have the capacity to do widespread PCR testing. So rapid tests would be very useful in some instances. They are not as accurate but if they were good enough for the NBA and NHL in allowing them to successfully run their seasons, they should be good enough for us. The federal government, in its desire to show Canadians they were doing something about vaccines threw millions of dollars at 3 or 4 Canadian organizations which had never produced a vaccine and had little hope of producing one in time for Covid. None of these will pay off in the near term, if at all. Medicago might be the best hope. One of the first vaccines that the government bet on was the CanSino Chinese vaccine in partnership with the National Research Council, who were supposed to manufacture it. With all of our issues with China why would anyone bet on a partnership for a life saving vaccine with them? It was a dramatic failure as China never delivered the materials for the clinical trial. It went nowhere. It would have been nice to have at least a couple of the new vaccines tested in Canadian clinical trials. Not one of them has been used in a major Canadian clinical trial. We need to ask ourselves why? Is it because of the poor relationship our government has with the key pharmaceutical companies? We now know that Canada should receive about 6 million doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines by the end of March. That means we can begin to vaccinate 3 million people. By that time the U.S. will have vaccinated 110 million people. The Canadian public should, and probably will be, outraged. It appears that many countries are well ahead of us with respect to vaccine access. Countries such as Spain, Mexico, Indonesia, India, Germany, the U.K., etc. As Terrence Corcoran suggests in his opinion piece on Saturday November 28 this is due to Canada’s slow-off-the-mark contact and negotiation with Global Pharmaceutical companies. Government dithered and naively tried to find a way to develop a vaccine in Canada. As a result of our poor positioning on the priority list, the government knows it has a real political problem which could lead to them losing the next election. So the political rhetoric is spinning out of control and Trudeau and his cabinet are out spinning and bending the truth. They are in panic mode and are blaming other countries, pharmaceutical companies, and the Conservatives for our poor position. Dominic Leblanc stated on Power Play on CTV this week that GSK had closed its manufacturing for vaccines during the Harper years which is blatantly false. They have also stated numerous times that Canada has no vaccine manufacturing capability because it left over the last few decades. That is also false. GSK and Sanofi manufacture multiple vaccines in Canadian plants. The NRC also has the ability to manufacture vaccines. Trudeau is now telling Canadians that the hope is that the majority of us should be be vaccinated by the end of September. A few minutes later the deputy public health officer stated that it will probably be the end of 2021 but that “September and the end of the year are in the same ballpark.” And what does “the majority” mean? 50 percent? We are fortunate that the National Vaccine Task Force, made up of prominent experienced research and industry experts made the recommendation to secure contracts with 7 different global pharmaceutical companies. This is one of the few bright spots of the pandemic planning. Why is it that most other Western countries have a detailed plan that they have communicated publicly describing how many doses they expect, how they will distribute them, and who will get them? Meanwhile, we have none of that? In fact, they just appointed someone to plan the rollout. The lack of transparency of the Liberal government is shocking. We clearly do not have a plan yet and we are supposed to obtain approval of the Pfizer vaccine by December. All this to say that much of the pandemic effort at the federal level, except spending money, deserves a failing grade. So one has to ask the question, “How many more people will die in this pandemic who shouldn’t have if the federal government had done a better job over the last year? How much better off would Canada now be if in 1968 the Pierre Trudeau government had had a vision to develop and nurture the innovative pharmaceutical and vaccine industry?” Every month we don’t have a vaccine more people will get sick and more will die. At the current rate that means approximately 2500-3000 deaths every month. Months matter. Days matter. Unfortunately ‘The chickens have come home to roost” and Canadians will pay the price. We reap what we sow. 

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2 hours ago, boestar said:

My local market Every Saturday morning from sprint until fall.  99% locally grown and produced.  Commercial products are not technically allowed.  Best produce out there.  A 5 minute walk from my house gets the best corn around.  Either harvested from the field out back or from other area farmers.  Small town Canada gotta love it.

Of course there is the other 8 months of the year. 😀

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22 hours ago, mo32a said:

Sorry for the long post - there was no link...

 

Covid Vaccines for Canada- A Sad Story. Introduction I have been closely following the Covid vaccine issue in Canada and felt compelled to write about it. As President and CEO of GlaxoSmithKline Canada for 16 years, I was intimately involved in the production and distribution of the Canadian vaccine for the H1N1 pandemic in 2009. All of the vaccine for that pandemic was produced in the GSK vaccine factory in Quebec City. The campaign, although there were a few glitches, was a tremendous success. The vaccine was developed, rolled out and injected into millions of Canadians in just several months. I give great credit to the Chief Public Health Officer at that time, David Butler-Jones and the Deputy Minister of Health, Morris Rosenberg, for their leadership and collaboration during that pandemic. Millions of doses of Canada’s annual flu vaccine are also produced in the GSK facility in Quebec City. This despite comments by Mr. Trudeau and some of his Ministers that this facility was closed down during the Harper years. So why is Canada lagging the rest of the world in developing and rolling out a Covid vaccine? Why is Canada down the priority list of countries to receive supplies of vaccine? Why does Canada not have the capability to produce vaccine for Covid? The story is a long one. Many mistakes have been made and there has been a real lack of vision particularly by successive Liberal governments, including the current one. The mistakes of the past are now catching up with us. “The chickens have come home to roost.” Let me explain. Recognition of the Innovative Pharmaceutical Industry First I want to say how proud all of us who have worked in the Global Pharmaceutical industry should be. From the outset of this pandemic I believed that it would be our industry that would solve the Covid challenge. It looks like that is coming true with a number of innovative vaccines being developed, tested and approved in less than one year. It is truly a modern miracle of science and a real tribute to the innovative pharmaceutical industry and its people. We are changing the course of history, solving the pandemic and saving million of lives around the world. In many countries we have done that in collaboration and partnership with federal governments. The Canadian Pharmaceutical Industry The issues we are facing today in Canada with respect to having early access to a Covid vaccine have their roots in history which go back 50 years. In 1968 Pierre Trudeau and his government effectively eliminated pharmaceutical patents by implementing a regime of compulsory licensing. The objective was to lower pharmaceutical prices and encourage the establishment of a Canadian domestic industry. It was a massive failure. What it did do was lead to a number of multinational innovative companies immediately closing down their research centres in Canada. It also lead to the creation of a very powerful generic industry that does no innovative research and has now evolved into a commodity business competing globally on price. The generic industry oligopoly emerged with Apotex and Novopharm dominating the landscape. For over 3 decades, under very favourable market conditions for those companies, Canadians ended up paying the highest prices in the world for generic drugs. The owners, Barry Sherman and Leslie Dan went on to become two of the 10 richest individuals in the country. They also became two of the most powerful people in the country by hitching their wagons to the Liberal party of Canada. They were some of the biggest funders of Liberal candidates, MP’S and cabinet Ministers, particularly those in the Toronto area. That allowed them to dramatically influence pharmaceutical policy in Canada in their favour, particularly with respect to patent policy. Where is the domestic generic industry now when we desperately need innovative new medicines and vaccines to deal with Covid? Although the Mulroney and Harper Conservative governments supported the innovative industry by improving the patent (and data protection) landscape, Canada only partially recovered, and to this day does not have globally competitive patent protection for innovative medicines. This regime has led to many brand name pharmaceutical products losing their patent cover and market position early. So why would a company be motivated to invest in a country that does not adequately protect its innovation? Well they aren’t. The pharmaceutical policy environment in Canada for the innovative industry has been quite unfriendly on other fronts as well. Successive Liberal governments of Pierre Trudeau, Jean Chretien and Justin Trudeau have created an environment which has discouraged innovative pharmaceutical investment in research, development and manufacturing in Canada. They have consistently put the Canadian CEO’s of global companies in a weak position to attract investment to Canada from their global corporations. In addition to weaker patent protection compared with other Western countries, Health Canada continues to be one of the slowest regulatory agencies in approving new medications and vaccines. The pricing regime has deteriorated over the years with successive Liberal governments focused on ratcheting down the prices of innovative medicines. In fact, on January 1, 2021 the Trudeau government will enact new PMPRB ( Patented Medicines Pricing Review Board) regulations to drive prices down further. Not a good move during a pandemic when it is that industry that is ultimately going to save your bacon. It is already apparent that these pricing regulation changes will impact when and if new innovative treatments for cancer and other critical diseases will come to Canada. How many more lives will be lost due to a lack of early access to new medicines because Canada is only looking for the best price and doesn’t want to pay for new innovations. Are we going to continue to make the mistakes of the past? Unfortunately Health Ministers, Health bureaucrats and left leaning politicians only see medicines and vaccines as a cost to the health care system. They do not recognize the value those medicines bring to the system in reducing costs in other healthcare silos. Governments have also never recognized the value the industry brings to the innovative economy, despite the fact that Canada continues to lag the world in innovation, and is in real need of upping its game. The last global survey saw Canada slip down the innovation list even further. Pharmaceutical jobs are some of the most high value jobs in the economy. The few politicians who do recognize that value are always shouted down by the Health Ministry and those who just want a lower price. The bottom line is that despite numerous outreach efforts by the industry over the years, successive Liberal governments, including this one, have done little to nothing to create a favourable pharmaceutical policy environment. They have made no effort to work with the innovative industry to encourage a partnership which would deliver tremendous value to the healthcare system and the economy and give Canadians early access to new medicines and vaccines. So, not surprisingly, the industry has gone elsewhere to invest where that positive environment exists. Good examples are the U.S., the U.K. and Europe. It should also come as no surprise that the U.S., with its Operation Warp Speed, lead by the former head of Vaccines for GSK, and its contribution of billions of dollars, is at the head of the line for a Covid vaccine and will begin to vaccinate its population by December. The Pandemic Management Failures of the Trudeau Government. Many want to praise the federal government for all the money they have shovelled out to Canadians during the pandemic. Many of the programs have been very beneficial and truly needed. It’s hard not to be a bit cynical though. It is well known that Liberal governments love to spend money and they love to say “their government” is making all this money available to Canadians. What they fail to say is that it is Canadian taxpayers, our children and grandchildren who are and will be paying for all this spending. And clearly they know that doing so will buy many votes for a long time. For example, why give money to well off seniors? Is it because they care or because it buys seniors’ votes? Governments of all stripes would have and could have done the same in terms of spending billions of dollars rolling out these programs under these circumstances. That is the easy part. That spending should not blind Canadians though to the fact that almost everything else regarding the pandemic has been poorly handled by our federal government. They defunded our pandemic early warning system (GPHIN) which was state of the art globally. It would have warned us early on about Covid. By killing it they were flying blind and couldn’t react soon enough to stop the arrival of the virus. We could have and should have closed the border sooner. Despite all the talk about documenting learnings from the SARS epidemic and the H1N1 pandemic, virtually none of the key learnings seem to have been documented and we have had to re-invent the wheel to a great degree. One of the learnings was to have a stockpile of PPEs and antivirals. I don’t know about antivirals but the current government threw the outdated stockpile of PPE’S in the dumpster in 2019 and did not restock. We then had to scramble to find sufficient new sources and quantities but quickly recognized we had outsourced most of that production to other countries, particularly China. Unfortunately Canada is also experiencing a record number of drug shortages, especially during Covid. Most of our medicines now come from other countries, such as China and India. Will we eventually have to wait in line for many of them as well as we have very little domestic manufacturing left? Do we have any secure sources of supply? During the H1N1 pandemic it was agreed by everyone that Canada should never have just one local supplier of pandemic vaccine. Great idea, but there was no follow up planning to ensure we had vaccine manufacturing capability or secure sources of supply for the next pandemic. And here we are, scrambling for early access to vaccine. Why is it that we can’t have more rapid tests available? The PCR testing is effective and accurate but it is slow and resource intensive. We just don’t have the capacity to do widespread PCR testing. So rapid tests would be very useful in some instances. They are not as accurate but if they were good enough for the NBA and NHL in allowing them to successfully run their seasons, they should be good enough for us. The federal government, in its desire to show Canadians they were doing something about vaccines threw millions of dollars at 3 or 4 Canadian organizations which had never produced a vaccine and had little hope of producing one in time for Covid. None of these will pay off in the near term, if at all. Medicago might be the best hope. One of the first vaccines that the government bet on was the CanSino Chinese vaccine in partnership with the National Research Council, who were supposed to manufacture it. With all of our issues with China why would anyone bet on a partnership for a life saving vaccine with them? It was a dramatic failure as China never delivered the materials for the clinical trial. It went nowhere. It would have been nice to have at least a couple of the new vaccines tested in Canadian clinical trials. Not one of them has been used in a major Canadian clinical trial. We need to ask ourselves why? Is it because of the poor relationship our government has with the key pharmaceutical companies? We now know that Canada should receive about 6 million doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines by the end of March. That means we can begin to vaccinate 3 million people. By that time the U.S. will have vaccinated 110 million people. The Canadian public should, and probably will be, outraged. It appears that many countries are well ahead of us with respect to vaccine access. Countries such as Spain, Mexico, Indonesia, India, Germany, the U.K., etc. As Terrence Corcoran suggests in his opinion piece on Saturday November 28 this is due to Canada’s slow-off-the-mark contact and negotiation with Global Pharmaceutical companies. Government dithered and naively tried to find a way to develop a vaccine in Canada. As a result of our poor positioning on the priority list, the government knows it has a real political problem which could lead to them losing the next election. So the political rhetoric is spinning out of control and Trudeau and his cabinet are out spinning and bending the truth. They are in panic mode and are blaming other countries, pharmaceutical companies, and the Conservatives for our poor position. Dominic Leblanc stated on Power Play on CTV this week that GSK had closed its manufacturing for vaccines during the Harper years which is blatantly false. They have also stated numerous times that Canada has no vaccine manufacturing capability because it left over the last few decades. That is also false. GSK and Sanofi manufacture multiple vaccines in Canadian plants. The NRC also has the ability to manufacture vaccines. Trudeau is now telling Canadians that the hope is that the majority of us should be be vaccinated by the end of September. A few minutes later the deputy public health officer stated that it will probably be the end of 2021 but that “September and the end of the year are in the same ballpark.” And what does “the majority” mean? 50 percent? We are fortunate that the National Vaccine Task Force, made up of prominent experienced research and industry experts made the recommendation to secure contracts with 7 different global pharmaceutical companies. This is one of the few bright spots of the pandemic planning. Why is it that most other Western countries have a detailed plan that they have communicated publicly describing how many doses they expect, how they will distribute them, and who will get them? Meanwhile, we have none of that? In fact, they just appointed someone to plan the rollout. The lack of transparency of the Liberal government is shocking. We clearly do not have a plan yet and we are supposed to obtain approval of the Pfizer vaccine by December. All this to say that much of the pandemic effort at the federal level, except spending money, deserves a failing grade. So one has to ask the question, “How many more people will die in this pandemic who shouldn’t have if the federal government had done a better job over the last year? How much better off would Canada now be if in 1968 the Pierre Trudeau government had had a vision to develop and nurture the innovative pharmaceutical and vaccine industry?” Every month we don’t have a vaccine more people will get sick and more will die. At the current rate that means approximately 2500-3000 deaths every month. Months matter. Days matter. Unfortunately ‘The chickens have come home to roost” and Canadians will pay the price. We reap what we sow. 

Interesting read.

However, all governments are to blame, and nothing moves forward for the citizens of our country.  Question is, who did more damage.

Sorry for another long post.

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/monitor/october-2008-prescription-trouble

October 2008: Prescription for Trouble

Government’s links to Big Pharma threat to public health
AUTHOR(S): 
OCTOBER 1, 2008

Does anyone remember that the Conservative party, just four years ago, promised to implement a national drug plan? During the 2004 election, with health care a top priority for Canadians, the Conservatives made a commitment of $2.8 billion for a federal program to cover drug costs for individuals who had to pay more than $5,000 a year for their prescription drugs. It was part of a promise to spend a total of $13 billion of new federal money over five years on health care.

Given the record of the minority Conservative government since it took office, it’s hard to imagine that the Harper Tories once proposed any new federal social program. It runs counter to all that this government has done since January 2006 to undermine the role of the federal government in providing national programs that benefit all Canadians. Conservative policies have ensured a minimalist federal government by implementing massive tax cuts, thereby reducing revenue and leading inevitably to the curtailing of national programs.

Since October 2007, the Conservative government has committed to $60 billion in tax cuts through to 2012. Corporations in particular have had a bonanza of government support, with tax cuts that will reduce their tax payments by one-third from 2006 to 2012. The most recent budget, last February, further eroded public finances, with Finance Minister Jim Flaherty boasting that he had reduced Canada’s federal taxes to the level they were at 50 years ago. (He didn’t mention that 50 years ago there was no national Medicare, no Canada/Quebec Pension Plan, and no subsidized post-secondary education.)

In the 2007 Throne Speech, Prime Minister Stephen Harper went further and outlined his government’s intention to legally restrict federal involvement in social programs for all Canadians. “Our government, he said, “will introduce legislation to place formal limits on the use of federal spending power for new shared-cost programs in areas of exclusive provincial jurisdiction.” This would prevent the federal government from introducing further nation-building programs, such as child care or Pharmacare. It also ignores the reality that provinces have chosen to opt into national programs with federal standards, both to access federal funds and to provide equitable country-wide benefits to everyone. The provinces have not given up jurisdiction over health care, for example, by participating in the national Medicare system.

In the case of prescription drugs, the provinces have been calling for federal leadership. In 2003, a meeting of First Ministers cited prescription drugs as a problem that needed to be resolved. A year later, the First Ministers from both levels of government established a Ministerial Task Force to develop a national strategy for pharmaceuticals. So, at the time of the election of the minority Conservative government in 2006, a process to increase federal involvement in prescription drugs was already underway, initiated by the provinces.

But since then the Harper government has withdrawn from its promise to initiate a national drug program, has systematically undermined the capacity of the federal government to implement such a program, and has fallaciously argued that national social programs undermine provincial jurisdiction.

* * *

There are two major problems with prescription drugs¬: rapidly rising costs and unequal access. Solving these problems requires federal government involvement.

The rising cost of drugs is driving provincial and territorial governments to call for federal help. Between 1997 and 2005, expenditure on prescribed drugs by the public sector grew at an average annual rate of 12.2%, sucking money away from other areas of health care and straining provincial budgets. This might be acceptable if these expenditures were cost-effective and appropriate, but they are not.

The way it works is that a drug company develops a so-called “new” product, which is not actually new. About 85% of all drug approvals by Health Canada are drugs that are the same, or similar, to drugs already on the market, with no therapeutic advantage. It should be noted that drug companies pay for more than half the cost of the approval process at Health Canada; that research on drug safety is not made available to the public or to health professionals; and that, to be approved, a drug need only be better than a placebo, not better than an existing drug. It is hardly an independent, transparent, or cost-effective process.

These so called “new” drugs are also considerably more expensive than existing brand-name or generic drugs. Why buy more expensive versions which are no more effective? Because of massive marketing and promotion by the drug companies. The big pharmaceutical companies (known collectively as Big Pharma) spend three times more on marketing than on research. It’s not just the advertising bombardment on television and in magazines, but also direct promotion to doctors through sales reps, giveaways, samples, trips to conferences, payment for papers, and so on--an estimated $30,000 per doctor per year.

Research has shown that marketing is effective in influencing what doctors prescribe. Research has also shown that prescribing less expensive but therapeutically equivalent drugs, either brand-name or generic, would save millions of dollars.

A huge issue for the provinces is that the federal government has major control over the cost of drugs, but the provinces pay the bills. The federal government approves drugs, regulates price protection for drug companies through patents, and is supposed to control drug advertising. But the feds contribute only 3% of total national expenditure on drugs.

Big pharmaceutical firms are among the most profitable companies in the world, and they continuously lobby governments to influence policy--in this case, a government that does not pay for the results of its decisions.

A national drug plan with meaningful federal involvement would rectify this imbalance and give the federal government a reason to bring Big Pharma under tighter control. We need a more rational approval process, stricter controls on advertising, and more independent information for doctors on both research and costs.

As for access to needed drugs, Canadians are not well served by our patchwork of provincial programs and work-based plans that offer inequitable and/or partial coverage. Getting the drugs you need depends upon where you live and where you work. Some provincial drug programs are more generous than others, and work-based plans vary from one employer to another. Recent public hearings across the country by the Canadian Health Coalition found that many Canadians are in serious difficulty, facing high costs for drugs that they cannot afford.

Drugs should be a part of our universal health system, as is the case in nearly all other Western countries. Prescription drugs should be publicly provided to all Canadians, with some national standards and federal financial involvement, under provincial administration. There is no reason why this should not be a reality, and it would also be cost-effective. Currently, half of all Canadians are covered by work-based plans through private insurance. This involves thousands of different work-based plans and millions of individual claims that have to be processed. Clearly, a single universal plan would be both more equitable and more cost-efficient. Other countries with national systems use their single-payer buying power to negotiate significantly reduced prices from the drug companies.

* * *

One of the most disturbing characteristics of the Harper government is its close personal relationship with corporate interests. Minister of Health Tony Clement, for example, owned a 25% stake in a pharmaceutical chemicals company, Prudential Chem Inc. Even as Health Minister, Clement initially saw no conflict of interest, saying he would simply absent himself from decisions affecting the company. Given that policy affecting pharmaceutical companies is a major part of the operation of Health Canada, Clement’s remarks caused a storm of protest. “It is hard to think of a more flagrant conflict of interest,” was one newspaper comment. “Hardly a week goes by during which Clement does not deliberate over an issue affecting the pharmaceutical industry.”

After pressure exerted on him, both in and out of Parliament, Clement belatedly transferred his financial stake in the company to the company’s president, with no compensation.

Similarly, the Harper government appears to be highly responsive to the influence of certain well-known and well placed lobyists for the pharmaceutical industry. In March 2007, for example, the government announced a $300 million fund for the controversial HPV vaccine Gardasil, made by Merck-Frosst Canada. This is the vaccine for young women that allegedly can prevent some types of cervical cancer. There has been criticism that not enough is known about the drug’s long-term effects and that there was no public health crisis warranting such government largesse.

The funding was provided with remarkable speed. It took just eight months from approval of the drug by Health Canada to the announcement of a $300 million federal contribution for provinces wanting to provide the vaccine to young women. This was no accident. Merck-Frosst hired the big public relations firm Hill & Knowlton to push the immunization approach. Ken Boessenkool, a vice-president at Hill and Knowlton, worked on the vaccine campaign, but, as reported by The Toronto Star, he is also a close friend and advisor to Stephen Harper. He was the architect of the unpopular flat-tax proposal by Stockwell Day and a chief advisor to the Conservatives during the 2004 federal election campaign.

After his successful involvement in the cancer drug lobby, Boessenkool moved on to register as a lobbyist for Taser International, promoting the controversial police weapon. Such close relationships between lobbyists for the pharmaceutical industry and the Conservative government are cause for concern.

* * *

It is also discouraging to find, after a review of the record, that Harper`s minority Conservative government has undermined provincial and territorial movement toward a cross-Canada program for prescription drugs.

In 2004, federal, provincial and territorial First Ministers agreed to work on a national approach to drugs, called the National Pharmaceutical Strategy (NPS). A nine-point list of goals was developed to improve access to drugs, relieve financial hardship, and obtain better value for money. A Ministerial Task Force was established to determine how to implement the goals, with the federal government as co-chair and Quebec as an observer.

In July 2006, a conference of Ministers of Health released a progress report on the NPS and discussed its future. It was obvious that the process was in trouble when Tony Clement, Harper’s Minister of Health and co-chair of the Task Force, failed to attend the conference. Under Clement’s care, the NPS has languished. Provinces and territories continued working in good faith, but now acknowledge that the NPS can go nowhere without the federal government at the table to provide leadership and discuss the federal contribution. Clement no longer convenes regular meetings of health ministers.

According to a recent report issued by the Health Council of Canada in June 2008:

Significant gaps in coverage are still evident across Canada, and too many Canadians are vulnerable to personal hardship from needed drugs that cost more than they can afford. Canadians are also not adequately protected from inappropriate prescribing because we do not have the necessary systems in place to keep health care providers and consumers informed about drug safety and effectiveness. Governments have not made acceptable progress in creating the National Pharmaceuticals Strategy that was promised in 2004.

Instead of providing leadership to implement the NPS, the Harper government is sabotaging the process by neglect.

The government is also escalating its support for Big Pharma. Last April, in a blatant move to boost the drug companies’ profits, the government extended their patent protection. Brand-name drug companies already have 20 years patent protection, giving them a monopoly for that period to set prices with no market competition. But they had been extending this protection with court challenges against generic copies that resulted in giving them an automatic two-year patent extension. The generic drug companies contested this artificial extension of the patents, and the Supreme Court agreed with them in a decision in November 2007.

The Conservative government moved quickly to undermine the Supreme Court decision by proposing amendments to the regulations of Canada’s Patent Act. The changes would allow the drug companies to continue to get automatic injunctions, thereby preventing Health Canada from approving lower-cost generic drugs. The federal government proposed its new regulations on April 26, 2008, with no prior consultation with the provinces or the public and providing just 15 days for comments.

Provincial governments objected to both the change and the process. New Brunswick asked for further consultation, stating that “delays in accessing those generic drugs will have a direct cost impact on the provincial drug plan.” British Columbia’s Health Minister also asked for an extension to the deadline (which was refused) and said, “One can probably predict that this will not be a happy eventuality for budgeting.” The patent extensions are a multi-million-dollar gift to Big Pharma and an added cost burden to provinces, employer drug plans, and individuals.

* * *

The most troubling concession to Big Pharma by the Harper government comes in the form of Bill C-51, which was introduced in the House of Commons on April 8, 2008. The proposed legislation amends the Food and Drugs Act, in essence replacing the entire text on drugs. It is likely to adversely affect both cost and safety by:

  • speeding up drug approvals with lower standards for drug safety and effectiveness;
  • removing barriers to advertising of prescription drugs;
  • restricting access to natural health products;
  • enshrining corporate secrecy about the health effects of drugs; and
  • eliminating liability for regulatory negligence by Health Canada.

 

The proposed legislation permits bringing new drugs to market before research on effectiveness and safety are complete. Instead, research on safety would continue after drugs are widely prescribed and used. Usually, post-market studies are carried out by manufacturers. This introduces a bias, as manufacturers have an interest in presenting their products in a positive light, and there are fewer rules to ensure rigorous scientific methods in post-market studies than in pre-market clinical trials. In effect, Canadians will be exposed to drugs that have not been adequately tested.

This is unacceptable because, even in the current system, drugs are sometimes found to be dangerous. Thalidomide is remembered as one of the most tragic examples. Vioxx was recalled in 2004 in both Canada and the U.S., and is estimated to have caused between 88,000 and 139,000 extra heart attacks in the U.S. Recent research in the U.S. has shown that drugs that are approved faster are more likely to cause problems once on the market than drugs approved under less pressure. This research compared drugs approved under a deadline to speed up the process with drugs approved at other times. The deadlines produced "adverse effects," including more drugs recalled for safety reasons, more drugs later carrying warnings about negative side-effects, and more drugs voluntarily discontinued by the manufacturers. The research concluded that drugs subject to the deadlines "have a higher likelihood of unanticipated safety problems once they are in widespread use." This highlights the need to strengthen, rather than erode, safety standards for approval for marketing.

Another problem with Bill C-51 is that it will eliminate the current restrictions on direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs. As it stands, the Food and Drugs Act recognizes that drugs are not the same as clothes or detergents or automobiles. Someone with a grim diagnosis or a seriously ill child needs accurate information about treatment options, not advertising hype that can lead them to less effective, less safe, or more costly products.

The massive advertising of drugs allowed in the U.S. has added enormously and unnecessarily to drug costs. In Canada, we are bombarded with ads on U.S. television channels, but this should be controlled to comply with our more restrictive legislation. We should strengthen and enforce our controls on drug advertising, not weaken them.

Third, Bill C-51 would impose severe restrictions on natural health products that are low-risk, while weakening the regulation of prescription drugs. The legislation would give Health Canada officials unprecedented and arbitrary enforcement powers to force natural health products off the market and impose fines up to $5,000,000 on family-owned businesses. Many Canadians rely on natural health products to help prevent disease and illness.

Fourth, Bill C-51 would enshrine secrecy and commercial confidentiality for the first time in the Food and Drugs Act. It introduces a definition of confidential business information into the Act, so that anything that affects a company’s bottom line may be kept secret. Bill C-51 defines as confidential any information--

a) that is not publicly available,
b) in respect of which the person has taken measures that are reasonable in the circumstances to ensure that it remains not publicly available, and
c) that has actual or potential economic value to the person or their competitors because it is not publicly available and its disclosure would result in a material financial loss to the person or a material financial gain to their competitors.

In other words, pharmaceutical companies will have the right to keep information secret if it is already secret, if the company is actively keeping it secret, and if making it public could affect their bottom line.

Access to independent research information is already limited, leaving doctors prescribing drugs on the basis of information from drug companies. This Bill would make the situation worse. Instead of enshrining rights for Canadians and health professionals to information about drugs, Bill C-51 would give drug companies the right to maintain secrecy about key health and safety information, including less than stellar clinical trial results and serious side-effects.

Last but not least, Bill C-51 would lower the Minister of Health’s “duty of care,” so that Health Canada can evade liability for regulatory negligence when Canadians are harmed by inadequately tested prescription drugs. If this Bill becomes law, Canadians could lose recourse to the courts for claims of regulatory negligence. This is of particular concern, given the lower standards set by other parts of Bill C-51, which increase the likelihood that Canadians will need recourse to the courts.

Bill C-51 poses a threat to the safety of Canadians. It denies the public's right to information on drug research, adds to the high cost of drugs through advertising, restricts access to natural health products, and reduces the responsibility of Health Canada for protecting our health.

* * *

The Canadian Health Coalition has just completed hearings across Canada on the problems of access to affordable prescription drugs. Many Canadians went to the hearings to explain how their health is being put at risk because of the high cost of drugs.

Stories were told by people seldom heard in the corridors of Parliament Hill, such as Gretta Ross and Tracy Gilles:

“The burden of a loved one being sick in front of you and going down with dementia is bad enough. Last year we were $6,000 in debt with drug bills. Now we are faced with losing our home. We both worked hard all our lives and I don’t think that’s right.”—Gretta Ross, Sarnia, Ontario.

“According to the government, we make too much money to qualify for drug coverage. But I don’t know too many people who can take $1,000 a month off their net income and not have it have an effect. I think there’s something wrong. And I also think I’m not unique. We need to start to look at the stories behind the numbers... Generally it’s the sickest of the sick who have to deal with all this stuff. The people who need it the most are the people least able to fight for it. And it is a fight.” -- Tracy Gilles, Charlottetown, PEI.

Prime Minister Harper and his Minister of Health, Tony Clement, are failing to provide for the well-being of Canadians. They are systematically placing the profits of pharmaceutical companies ahead of the needs of people like Gretta Ross and Tracy Gilles.

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And how did the Trudeau liberals correct this problem in the 5 years that they have been in power?? They must have been aware of this since the article has been out for 12 years. I get tired of governments, especially the current one, blaming previous governments for problems that the current gov’t has failed to correct.

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18 minutes ago, st27 said:

And how did the Trudeau liberals correct this problem in the 5 years that they have been in power?? They must have been aware of this since the article has been out for 12 years. I get tired of governments, especially the current one, blaming previous governments for problems that the current gov’t has failed to correct.

Trudeau and the entire Liberal government along with ALL their supporters will never take responsibility for their screw ups....it will always be some one elses fault. We've  seen it on this very forum for years, ignore, deflect or blame some one else.

B2674823-AB3A-4B52-A81F-7AB2E33A24EF.jpeg

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13 hours ago, st27 said:

And how did the Trudeau liberals correct this problem in the 5 years that they have been in power?? They must have been aware of this since the article has been out for 12 years. I get tired of governments, especially the current one, blaming previous governments for problems that the current gov’t has failed to correct.

I will once again state, all politicians are greasy.

However, I don't agree with your argument that Trudeau is to blame for not having corrected it while in power.  That's not how governments work these days imo.

Yet, I do see a difference in a government that does nothing as opposed to one that actively works to dismantle existing rights and protections. 

Those are the ones we shouldn't vote for.

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EVERY duly elected government in the last 40 years, regardless of the colour of their team, has been responsible for the issues faced today.  ANY one of them could have fixed the problem but chose not to.  Low drug prices are necessary to keep the cost of healthcare down and every one of them knew it.

to fix the issue would be akin to political suicide because the cost to taxpayers would have increased.  increased taxes do not equate to increased votes.  quite the opposite.

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29 minutes ago, boestar said:

increased taxes do not equate to increased votes.  quite the opposite.

Yet to be determined....Trudeau has basically bankrupted the country and he could probably slaughter people in the streets and Liberals would support him. ...all because his ONLY redeeming quality is he has nice hair.

He will have no choice BUT to raise taxes....that....or sell off Alberta to the US :stirthepot: )

I predict he will be re-elected with a majority.

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22 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

Trudeau has basically bankrupted the country and he could probably slaughter people in the streets and Liberals would support him.

Sounds just like the guy you support.  Only he hasn't said it out loud.  

And as it stands, because of his inaction, trump is responsible for over 270,000 deaths and counting and still people support him.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/cheats/2016/01/23/trump-i-could-murder-and-not-lose-votes

Trump: I Could Murder and Not Lose Votes

While bragging about his standing in the national polls, Donald Trump told supporters Saturday at a campaign rally that he could shoot someone and he would still be on top. "I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn't lose voters," Trump said.

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Cyberattacks target COVID-19 vaccine distribution effort

 

IBM says phishing campaign focused on organizations associated with 'cold chain' supply process

Thomson Reuters · Posted: Dec 03, 2020 10:57 AM ET | Last Updated: 1 hour ago
 
health-coronavirus-belgium-vaccines.JPG
A worker packs boxes with dry ice on Tuesday as Brussels International Airport and its partners prepare a massive logistical operation of carrying COVID-19 vaccines through the airport in Belgium's capital. IBM is warning that hackers are targeting the vaccine 'cold chain' — the process needed to keep vaccine doses at extremely cold temperatures. (Johanna Geron/Reuters)

IBM is sounding the alarm over hackers targeting companies critical to the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines, a sign that digital spies are turning their attention to the complex logistical work involved in inoculating the world's population against the novel coronavirus.

The information technology company said in a blog post published on Thursday that it had uncovered "a global phishing campaign" focused on organizations associated with the COVID-19 vaccine "cold chain" — the process needed to keep vaccine doses at extremely cold temperatures as they travel from manufacturers to people's arms.

 

The U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency reposted the report, warning members of Operation Warp Speed — the U.S. government's national vaccine mission — to be on the lookout.

Understanding how to build a secure cold chain is fundamental to distributing vaccines developed by the likes of Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE because the shots need to be stored at –70 C or below to avoid spoiling.

'An exceptional amount of effort' 

IBM's cybersecurity unit said it had detected an advanced group of hackers working to gather information about different aspects of the cold chain, using meticulously crafted booby-trapped emails sent in the name of an executive with Haier Biomedical, a Chinese cold chain provider that specializes in vaccine transport and biological sample storage.

The hackers went through "an exceptional amount of effort," said IBM analyst Claire Zaboeva, who helped draft the report. Hackers researched the correct make, model and pricing of various Haier refrigeration units, Zaboeva said.

"Whoever put together this campaign was intimately aware of whatever products were involved in the supply chain to deliver a vaccine for a global pandemic," she said.

Haier Medical did not return messages seeking comment.

Messages sent to the email addresses used by the hackers were not returned.

IBM said the bogus Haier emails were sent to around 10 different organizations but only identified one target by name: the European Commission's Directorate-General for Taxation and Customs Union, which handles tax and customs issues across the EU and has helped set rules on the import of vaccines.

Representatives for the directorate-general could not immediately be reached for comment.

IBM said other targets included companies involved in the manufacture of solar panels, which are used to power vaccine refrigerators in warm countries, and petrochemical products that could be used to derive dry ice.

Canada a target of previous hacking attempts

Who is behind the vaccine supply chain espionage campaign isn't clear.

Reuters has previously documented how hackers linked to Iran, Vietnam, North Korea, South Korea, China, and Russia have on separate occasions been accused by cybersecurity experts or government officials of trying to steal information about the virus and its potential treatments.

IBM's Zaboeva said there was no shortage of potential suspects. Figuring out how to swiftly distribute an economy-saving vaccine "should be topping the lists of nation states across the world," she said.

Last month, Microsoft said it had detected mostly unsuccessful attempts by state-backed Russian and North Korean hackers to steal data from leading pharmaceutical companies and vaccine researchers. It gave no information on how many succeeded or how serious those breaches were. Chinese state-backed hackers have also targeted vaccine makers, the U.S. government said in announcing criminal charges in July.

Microsoft said most of the targets — located in Canada, France, India, South Korea and the United States — were researching vaccines and COVID-19 treatments. It did not name the targets.

On Wednesday, Britain became the first to country to authorize a rigorously tested COVID-19 vaccine, the one developed by American drugmaker Pfizer and Germany's BioNTech.

Other countries aren't far behind: Regulators in Canada, the U.S. and the European Union also are vetting the Pfizer vaccine along with a shot made by Moderna Inc. British and Canadian regulators are also considering a vaccine made by AstraZeneca and Oxford University.

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Good Afternoon All:

The following information was mailed out to our retiree group on COVID-19 on November 30th.

As this situation is rapidly evolving please consider this as information only.


 

For this pandemic there’s a greater chance of survival for those getting infected 6 months later....say,  September 2020 versus 6 months earlier, say February 2020. The reason for this is that doctors and scientists know more about Covid-19 now than 6 months ago and hence are able to treat patients better. I will list 5 important things that we know now that we didn’t know in February 2020 for your understanding.
 
1.  
COVID-19 was initially thought to cause deaths due to pneumonia - a lung infection and so Ventilators were thought to be the best way to treat sick patients who couldn’t breathe Now we are realizing that the virus causes blood clots in the blood vessels of the lungs and other parts of the body and this causes the reduced oxygenation. Now we know that just providing oxygen by ventilators will not help but we have to prevent and dissolve the micro clots in the lungs. This is why we are using drugs like Aspirin and Heparin (blood thinners that prevents clotting) as protocol in treatment regimens starting in June 2020.
 
2.  Previously patients used to drop dead on the road or even before reaching a hospital due to reduced oxygen in their blood - OXYGEN SATURATION. This was because of HAPPY HYPOXIA where, even though the oxygen saturation was gradually reducing, the COVID-19 patients did not have symptoms until it became critically less, like sometimes even 70%. Normally we become breathless if oxygen saturation reduces below 90%. This breathlessness is not triggered in COVID-19 patients and so we were getting the sick patients very late to the hospitals in February 2020. Now since knowing about happy hypoxia we are monitoring oxygen saturation of all COVID-19 patients with a simple home use pulse oximeter and getting them to hospital if their oxygen saturation drops to 93% or less. This gives more time for doctors to correct the oxygen deficiency in the blood and a better survival chance since June 2020.
 
3.  We did not have drugs to fight COVID-19 in February 2020.  We were only treating the complications caused by it.. hypoxia. Hence most patients became severely infected. Now we have 2 important medicines FAVIPIRAVIR & REMDESIVIR. These are ANTIVIRALS that can kill the corona virus. By using these two medicines we can prevent patients from becoming severely infected and therefore cure them BEFORE THEY GO TO HYPOXIA. This knowledge we had in JUNE 2020... not in February 2020.

 4.  Many COVID-19 patients die not just because of the virus but also due to the patient’s own immune system responding in an exaggerated manner called CYTOKINE STORM. This stormy, strong immune response not only kills the virus but also kills the patients. In February 2020 we didn’t know how to prevent it from happening. Now in September 2020, we know that easily available medicines called STEROIDS, that doctors around the world have been using for almost 80 years, can be used to prevent the cytokine storm in some patients.

5.  Now we also know that people with hypoxia became better just by making them lie down on their belly - known as prone position. Apart from this, a few months ago Israeli scientists discovered that a chemical known as Alpha Defensin produced by the patients' White blood cells can cause the micro clots in blood vessels of the lungs and this could possibly be prevented by a drug called Colchicine used over many decades in the treatment of Gout.

So now we know for sure that patients have a better chance at surviving the COVID-19 infection in September 2020 than in February 2020.
 
Going forward there’s nothing to panic about COVID-19 if we remember that a person who gets infected later has a better chance at survival than one who got infected early.

Let’s continue to follow precautions, wear masks, practice social distancing, and wash your hands frequently.
 
Please distribute this message, as we all need some positive news.

"Thoughts create actions.  Actions create habits.  Habits create character.  And character creates your destiny."

  

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Listened to talk radio today and realized one of the guest interviews was the gentleman that wrote the body of boestars post, so as the government prattles on and answers questions with non answers, I go back to climate barbies (where is she now??) drunken admission: if you tell people a lie over and over again, they will believe it. Boestars post is worth a re read:

Quote

The Canadian public should, and probably will be, outraged. It appears that many countries are well ahead of us with respect to vaccine access. Countries such as Spain, Mexico, Indonesia, India, Germany, the U.K., etc. As Terrence Corcoran suggests in his opinion piece on Saturday November 28 this is due to Canada’s slow-off-the-mark contact and negotiation with Global Pharmaceutical companies. Government dithered and naively tried to find a way to develop a vaccine in Canada. As a result of our poor positioning on the priority list, the government knows it has a real political problem which could lead to them losing the next election. So the political rhetoric is spinning out of control and Trudeau and his cabinet are out spinning and bending the truth. They are in panic mode and are blaming other countries, pharmaceutical companies, and the Conservatives for our poor position. Dominic Leblanc stated on Power Play on CTV this week that GSK had closed its manufacturing for vaccines during the Harper years which is blatantly false. They have also stated numerous times that Canada has no vaccine manufacturing capability because it left over the last few decades. That is also false.

Quote

Successive Liberal governments of Pierre Trudeau, Jean Chretien and Justin Trudeau have created an environment which has discouraged innovative pharmaceutical investment in research, development and manufacturing in Canada. They have consistently put the Canadian CEO’s of global companies in a weak position to attract investment to Canada from their global corporations. In addition to weaker patent protection compared with other Western countries, Health Canada continues to be one of the slowest regulatory agencies in approving new medications and vaccines.  The pricing regime has deteriorated over the years with successive Liberal governments focused on ratcheting down the prices of innovative medicines. In fact, on January 1, 2021 the Trudeau government will enact new PMPRB ( Patented Medicines Pricing Review Board) regulations to drive prices down further. Not a good move during a pandemic when it is that industry that is ultimately going to save your bacon. It is already apparent that these pricing regulation changes will impact when and if new innovative treatments for cancer and other critical diseases will come to Canada. How many more lives will be lost due to a lack of early access to new medicines because Canada is only looking for the best price and doesn’t want to pay for new innovations.

Remember this the next time you hear the broken record of the pm, health, procurement, and house leader misleading Canadians.

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