Coronavirus_2020.01.28


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4 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

What I should have said is I am not entirely sold....on that video.

How this pandemic was / is being handled, where it came from etc etc is a distraction from the real problem....Covid is real and people are dying from it. Who benefits or not from it will be talked about and investigated for years and if there is malfeasance involved, I say bring back the public guillotine. 

What I'm referring to is that I posted the exact same video yesterday and you replied to it!

Not that I care - just poking you in the ribs.

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Diversity is our strength....let’s see...Jews or Muslims...time to choose Justin...but he won’t...he’ll say he takes the situation very seriously, they are watching it closely, and call for important

You haven't noticed this?  It came in the same Liberal box labeled law abiding, daily vetted gun owners being compared to a pyromaniac serial killer, wife abusing,  police impersonator with illeg

If diversity is our strength, how do you rationalize Islamic extremism??? It’s a diverse point of view...but one should not hide behind the proclamation “a Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian”...why

Posted Images

November 18th COVID-19 figures from the front page of the New York Times:

https://www.nytimes.com/

 

United States ›

On Nov. 18

14-day
change

Trend

New cases

172,391

+77%

 

New deaths

1,923

+52%

 

Where cases per capita are highest

 

N.D.

S.D.

Wyo.

Iowa

Neb.

Wis.

Minn.

Mont.

Utah

 

New Cases: 7,1882 per hour or 119 new cases each minute or 1.99 new cases each second

Mortality:          32 deaths per hour .5 deaths each minute or .0089 deaths per second

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I honestly don't understand the curfew thing (2200 to 0500). Surely Covid spread isn't time of day dependant or a function of darkness. I can grasp the concept of limited movement across the board but restricting it for a seven hour period each day does what exactly?

Maybe a cell phone ban in upscale French restaurants would better serve the Governor's career longevity. 

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/californias-newsom-imposes-new-lockdown-includes-county-where-he-dined-at-upscale-french-laundry-restaurant

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Just now, Wolfhunter said:

I honestly don't understand the curfew thing (2200 to 0500). Surely Covid spread isn't time of day dependant or a function of darkness. I can grasp the concept of limited movement across the board but restricting it for a seven hour period each day does what exactly?

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/californias-newsom-imposes-new-lockdown-includes-county-where-he-dined-at-upscale-french-laundry-restaurant

Perhaps it has something to do with the consumption of alcohol and the resulting effect on inhabitations the later and the more you consume?

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9 minutes ago, Malcolm said:

Perhaps it has something to do with the consumption of alcohol and the resulting effect on inhabitations the later and the more you consume?

So what do you call a guy who has had too much to drink?

 The answer is: a cab...

So, will cabs, busses, ferries, subways, aircraft (etc) movements be restricted during that period? What about delayed/late flight arrivals and departures, overseas departures, diversions.... I could go on at some length, but frankly the logic escapes me. 

 

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A fine example of out of touch government thinking here that I think is ill advised and likely to backfire. IMO it runs contrary to the basics of leadership and I would never (personally) endorse such a plan for that reason. First reactions are telling, in my case it was two words that translate to "go away quickly." 

https://www.thoroldnews.com/coronavirus-covid-19-local-news/violators-of-covid-19-bylaws-will-be-named-publicly-says-niagara-regional-council-2891603

Lost on these folks is the potential for backlash from reasonable people, the ones who conform to the rules out of respect for their neighbours, the community at large and the rule of law.

Clearly, I can only speak for myself but I do wonder about the attitude of others. Politicians of all stripes should consider that for the most part, public compliance is not based, in any way or on any galaxy, by fear of what they think they may be able to do in terms of public shaming. I (and I’m sure many others) don’t fear rules or the rule makers, we respect them and comply out of a sense of duty.   

Intrude too far into that sense of duty, cheapen it with idle threats, prevail on their good nature and community spirit in a churlish and cynical manner, propose the notion of grade three shaming ploys and see all of the cooperation and goodwill you previously enjoyed (and could have continued to expect) from them evaporate.

Rolling up your newspaper and whacking people on the bridge of the nose with it while shouting “bad citizen” is likely to garner more resistance and deliberate noncompliance than it ever will cooperation.

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A horrible scenario is unfolding before our very eyes. Good luck to whom ever eventually wins the US Election...Inauguration day will be your last day of sanity.


Thursday Nov 19 2020

 

E57A0BB3-0968-4B58-B6C3-F668B3C928DC.jpeg


Friday Nov 20 2020

2D232D4E-0D97-4FAF-8C52-728F319165ED.jpeg

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9 hours ago, Jaydee said:

New restrictions

The logic truly escapes me.

Anyone who believes isolated lockdowns actually work would have to agree with the notion that they should have been invoked much, much sooner and include draconian travel restrictions. Yet it seems to me that they don't. 

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Coronavirus Australia live news: Victorians ditch face masks outside and welcome eased COVID-19 restrictions

By Michael Doyle and Yasmin Jeffery

Posted 2hhours ago, updated 2hhours ago
Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to seek, up and down arrows for volume.
Play Video
 

Victoria records no new coronavirus cases or deaths for 24 days

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-11-23/victoria-records-no-new-coronavirus-cases-and-no-deaths/12909854

Posted 1hhour ago, updated 21mminutes ago

A woman jogs along a path with Melbourne's city skyline in the background.
Victoria hasn't recorded a new case of coronavirus for more than three weeks.(ABC News: Darryl Torpy)
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Victoria has recorded no new cases of coronavirus or deaths for the 24th day in a row, the state's health department says.

Key points:

    The health department says 7,261 tests have been received since the last update
    Epidemiologist Tony Blakely says Victorians should feel confident they've eliminated the virus
    The Victoria-New South Wales border has reopened meaning travellers don't have to quarantine

One case remains active in the state.

The Department of Health and Human Services said 7,261 tests had been received since the last update.

Melbourne University epidemiologist Tony Blakely said Victoria was edging closer every day to eliminating the virus.

"Twenty-eight days is the official or working definition (of elimination) and that will happen on Thursday or Friday depending on how you count it and that will be our celebration of elimination day," Professor Blakely said.

"What we’ve also learned is that we have to expect that it will get back in at some point between now and when we get the vaccine but we’re learning to live with this virus and stamp it out."
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Professor Blakely said Victorians should feel confident it had eliminated the virus, even though the number of people getting tested had dropped.

He said the widespread sewage testing being carried out would identify any areas where there may be active cases.

"Most of the results that come up at the moment will be what we call 'false positives' and that’s because we don't think there is any community transmission out there, so any positive tests are likely to be someone infected a long time ago, shedding."
LIVE UPDATES: Read our blog for the latest news on the COVID-19 pandemic.
Victoria-NSW border reopens

Travellers have begun taking advantage of the reopening of the New South Wales-Victoria border, which has been closed for four-and-a-half months.

The border officially opened at 12.01am, meaning people no longer have to go through two weeks of quarantine.
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Mark Nochete is a registered nurse who is returning to NSW this morning for the first time in months.

"I came in August to help out with all the COVID in the nursing homes and now I can go back without quarantine," he said.

Mr Nochete said he heard some horror stories about the NSW hotel quarantine arrangements and was happy to avoid being confined for two weeks.

"Some colleagues, they did quarantine in Darwin just to avoid New South Wales quarantine," he said.
A photo of Lesley Lees at Melbourne Airport.
Lesley Lees is happy she can now visit her sick father in Victoria without having to go through two weeks of quarantine.(ABC News: Stephanie Ferrier)

Lesley Lees has been in Victoria visiting her father, who is recovering from coronavirus, and was glad she didn't have to go through a fortnight of hotel quarantine when she returns to NSW.

"Obviously now I can come and visit my father when I need to without having to worry about when I can get home," she said.

Ms Lees was expecting bigger queues at Melbourne Airport this morning, given how long many people had waited for the border to reopen.
What you need to know about coronavirus:

    The symptoms
    The number of cases in Australia
    Global cases, deaths and testing rates

 

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Look, once and for all.  The lockdows are not for the PUBLIC HEALTH.  They have one single purpose and one alone.  To prevent the hospitals from being overrun beyond capacity.  That is it that is all.  No one cares if you get sick and die (besides your fiends and family of course)  It is about overwhelming hospitals.  Just imagine the out cry if there were no masks and no lockdowns and all of a sudden people started dying in the hallways at your local hospital.  The public outcry would be swift and loud.

WE WILL ALL GET THIS VIRUS.  Period.  nothing can prevent that except a vaccine which would need at least 75% of the population to receive if the efficacy rates are to be believed.

 

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Boris Johnson sets out new three-tier system of Covid restrictions for England
Peter Walker Political correspondent  1 hour ago
Boris Johnson has set out a three-tier system of Covid restrictions to run to the spring, including an easing in some areas, such as reopening shops and gyms and letting crowds return to sporting events, but toughening earlier rules on pubs and restaurants.

The so-called Covid Winter Plan, 56 pages of which were being published as Johnson set out the scheme to MPs on Monday, expires at the end of March and puts areas in England into one of three tiers.

When the four-week national lockdown across England ends on 2 December, non-essential shops in all areas can reopen, as can gyms, hairdressers and other personal care businesses, with the formal instruction to stay at home coming to an end. The “rule of six” will again apply for outdoor gatherings.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson appears via video link from 10 Downing Street to make a statement to the House of Commons in London, setting out plans for a new three-tier system of controls for coronavirus, which will come into place once lockdown ends in England.© House of Commons/PA Wire/PA Images Prime Minister Boris Johnson appears via video link from 10 Downing Street to make a statement to the House of Commons in London, setting out plans for a new three-tier system of controls for coronavirus, which will come into place once lockdown ends in England.
In tier 1, the rule of six will be the same both indoors and outdoors, allowing people from across households to see each other indoors. In tiers 2 and 3, such meetings will only be allowed outdoors, with no household mixing inside, beyond the expected relaxation of rules over Christmas.

Places of worship will also open and weddings will be allowed within local restrictions. Limited and socially distanced numbers of spectators will also be allowed at both indoor and outdoor sports events, although not in the more stringent tier.

For hospitality businesses in tier 2, alcohol can only be served with a “substantial meal”, while in tier 3 all pubs, restaurants and cafes must close apart from for delivery or takeaway.

Downing Street has also confirmed the change to the previous 10pm closing time for pubs and restaurants. Instead, they must stop serving at 10pm, but people can stay until up to 11pm, to stagger departures times and avoid overcrowding.

For sports events outdoors, in tier 1 up to 4,000 people or 50% of the usual capacity can gather, whichever is smaller, while in tier 2 the number is 2,000 people, or 50% of usual capacity. With indoor events, the ceiling is 1,000 people.

On Christmas, while Downing Street has confirmed the basic plan to allow some households to mix over a few days, details about this are not due until later this week. MPs are expected to vote on the overall plans early next week.

The allocation of regions to tiers will not be announced until Thursday after more local data on coronavirus is assessed. Conditions will be the same for all areas in the same tier, with no local negotiations, in an attempt to prevent the wrangling that featured strongly under the previous tiered system.

The one area in which local authorities will get a say is whether to take part in expanded trials of mass and rapid testing for Covid, as is currently being tried out in Liverpool.

A pedestrian wearing a protective face covering to combat the spread of the coronavirus, as they walk past shops in central London, on November 22, 2020, as the four-week national shutdown imposed in England continues, forcing people to stay home and businesses to close owing to a second wave of the Covid-19 pandemic. - British Prime Minister Boris Johnson will confirm that coronavirus lockdown restrictions across England are to end on December 2, his office said Saturday. The lockdown will be followed by a return to a three-tiered set of regional restrictions as part of the government's "COVID Winter Plan", it added in a statement. (Photo by Tolga Akmen / AFP) (Photo by TOLGA AKMEN/AFP via Getty Images)A pedestrian wearing a protective face covering to combat the spread of the coronavirus, as they walk past shops in central London, on November 22, 2020, as the four-week national shutdown imposed in England continues, forcing people to stay home and businesses to close owing to a second wave of the Covid-19 pandemic. - British Prime Minister Boris Johnson will confirm that coronavirus lockdown restrictions across England are to end on December 2, his office said Saturday. The lockdown will be followed by a return to a three-tiered set of regional restrictions as part of the government's "COVID Winter Plan", it added in a statement.
Tier positions will be reviewed every 14 days, and will be based on five criteria: case numbers across all age groups; cases in those aged over 60; the rate of rise or fall in infections; the percentage of those tested who have the virus; and current and projected pressures on the NHS locally.

However, the overall system is designed to take England to the spring – by which time it is hoped vaccines will have been rolled out quite widely – and is not expected to be reviewed before then.

 

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ATLANTIC COVID BUBBLE BURSTS

P.E.I. and N.L. exit coronavirus arrangement

  • Calgary Herald
  • 24 Nov 2020
  • RYAN TUMILTY National Post rtumilty@postmedia.com
img?regionKey=ZkQAyqelu2stRhh41bO%2b3A%3d%3dANDREW VAUGHAN/THE CANADIAN PRESS Pedestrians stroll along Spring Garden Road in Halifax on Thursday. Atlantic Canada has experienced low numbers of COVID-19 cases, but officials are concerned with rising numbers in the last couple of months.

OTTAWA • The Atlantic bubble is the latest casualty of rising numbers of COVID cases across the country, as two provinces quit the pact on Monday.

Both Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador pulled out of the bubble arrangement that has been operating since early in the pandemic. The provinces require anyone coming from outside to quarantine for 14 days, but anyone travelling between Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick had been left exempt.

That will end this week. Anyone coming to the two provinces will need prior approval unless they are a resident and, regardless of whether it is home, they will have to quarantine for two weeks.

Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Andrew Furey said his province would implement a two-week “circuit break” restricting travel from outside.

He said he was doing this to ensure COVID cases remained low and schools and businesses in the province were not forced into restrictive lockdowns.

“We must be responsive now and address this situation today,” he said. “The circuit break means that all travel to and from the province must be only for essential reasons.”

The bubble concept has worked well for the provinces, with them seeing only small numbers of cases. But New Brunswick reported 15 new cases Monday and Nova Scotia saw 11 new people diagnosed with COVID-19.

Furey said as he saw new cases increase it was setting off alarm bells and he needed to take this step to ensure schools, hospitals and longterm care homes remained protected.

New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs said he would not be making the same step to restrict travel, but cautioned that people should only be travelling for essential reasons and should mostly be staying close to home.

“Now's not the time to travel to other areas, or to do your holiday shopping. We need to shop local,” he said.

The increase in cases in Atlantic Canada is dwarfed by growth in western provinces. Alberta announced 1,549 new cases Monday after seeing 1,584 cases on Sunday. Manitoba set a new record for that province Monday, with 543 new cases and seven new deaths from the virus.

Alberta, the only province without a mask mandate, was expected to bring in new restrictions on Tuesday. The province's chief medical officer of health, Deena Hinshaw, said the province's contact-tracing system was overwhelmed with new cases and would not do any tracing on people if they didn't reach them within 10 days of their diagnosis.

“We must focus on looking forward and using our contact tracers to where they will have the most impact.”

She said the virus was picking up speed in the province and was beginning to swamp hospitals.

“This is like a snowball rolling down a hill, growing faster and larger.”

There was more promising vaccine news on Monday as a candidate vaccine from Oxford University and pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca showed results that revealed it was up to 90 per cent effective in preventing the virus.

Canada has ordered 20 million doses of that vaccine, and has large deals in place from Moderna and Pfizer who have already shown promising results.

Some countries have indicated that their citizens could begin receiving vaccines in December. Health Minister Patty Hadju said the government was working to ensure Canada would be ready to administer the vaccines, as soon as they are ready.

“All of our departments are working right now, round the clock actually, on making sure that we have a concrete plan with the provinces and territories that we are ready to deploy the vaccines as soon as they arrive on Canadian soil, and I'm confident that we'll be able to do that.”

As the Atlantic provinces restrict travel, people were still arriving from around the world Monday on flights into major Canadian airports.

Hadju said the government has no plans to restrict those flights any further.

Currently, the number of people arriving from outside the country is restricted and anyone arriving must quarantine for 14 days to ensure they have no symptoms.

Hadju said she has heard no concern from provinces that the system isn't working and she is confident there have been few cases related to travel since the restrictions were put in place.

“It in fact has demonstrated a very low rate of importation and I've worked extensively with provinces and territories to make sure those quarantines are being followed.”

Still, the government is recommending against all non- essential travel. Foreign Affairs Minister François- Philippe Champagne said Monday that people should think seriously before leaving the country because the government won't be coming to get them if things go badly.

“We're not going to do another repatriation. People should be thinking twice about whether they have insurance coverage, where they're going, what's the COVID situation,” he said. “If COVID has taught us anything over the last six to nine months, is that things can change rapidly and dramatically.”

THIS IS LIKE A SNOWBALL ROLLING DOWN A HILL.

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This should not be a surprise to anyone who did not heed the advice to not to leave Canada during the pandemic.

Quote

Canada will not be doing another repatriation amid coronavirus pandemic: 

The federal government will not be repatriating any more travelling Canadians as the novel coronavirus pandemic continues to wreak havoc around the world, the country’s foreign affairs minister said.


Francois-Philippe Champagne made the remarks ahead of Question Period on Monday, saying that the government's "travel advisory is very clear."

"You know you see COVID around the world, you see second waves in many places and we've been very clear to Canadians. I think the (Prime Minister) has spoken, (and) has been very, very clear: We are not going to be doing another repatriation," he said.

Read more: How risky is going home for the holidays amid coronavirus? There’s a tool for that

Champagne said people should "be thinking twice [about] whether they have insurance coverage, where they're going," and what the COVID-19 situation is at their destination.

"If COVID has taught us anything over the last six to nine months it's that things can change rapidly and dramatically," he continued.

"I think Canadians this year should really take extreme caution, and the best way is to follow, obviously, public health advice."

Champagne said he doesn't think travelling this year is "appropriate," adding that staying home is the "right thing to do when you're looking at the COVID situation around the world."

"As foreign governments implement strict travel restrictions and as fewer international transportation options are available, you may have difficulty returning to Canada or may have to remain abroad for an indeterminate period," the advisory reads.

The agency's website says there are "no plans to offer additional repatriation flights."

"Should you decide to travel despite our advisories, know that you might have to remain abroad longer than you expected."

The agency also says it may have "limited capacity" to offer consular services to those abroad.

In the first few months of the pandemic, Global Affairs Canada (GAC) coordinated with commercial airlines and the leaders of other countries to repatriate Canadians who found themselves stranded outside of the country due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

GAC told Global News that between Feb. 8, 2020, and July 16, it supported the repatriation of more than 62,500 individuals from 109 countries.


Coronavirus: New projection says Canada could see 20,000 daily cases by end of December 
Champagne's remarks come as the country continues to struggle to contain the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.

By 5:30 p.m. ET, on Monday, the country had seen a total of 335,320 confirmed cases of the virus. 

To date, 11,500 have died in Canada after testing positive for the respiratory illness. 

Meanwhile, globally, the total number of COVID-19 infections has topped 59 million.

Since the virus was first detected, it has claimed 1,393,886 lives around the world.

 

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I do wonder who will get these doses, not a large % of the Canadian Population ....... Perhaps some of our present government? 😀😀

NOVEMBER 24, 202012:00 PMUPDATED 8 HOURS AGO

Eli Lilly to supply 26,000 doses of COVID-19 antibody drug to Canada

By Reuters Staff

1 Reuters) - Eli Lilly and Co said on Tuesday it has signed an agreement with the Canadian government to supply 26,000 doses of its antibody drug to treat COVID-19 patients for $32.5 million.

The treatment, bamlanivimab, which was developed in partnership with Canadian biotech company AbCellera, will be supplied to Canada over a three-month period between December and February.

The drugmaker said additional doses will be supplied to Canada on a monthly basis according to the medical need of the country and the availability of supply.

Last week, Canada granted an interim authorization to bamlanivimab for treating COVID-19 in patients who are not hospitalized but are at risk of serious illness because of their age or other conditions.

Reporting by Dania Nadeem in Bengaluru; Editing by Amy Caren Daniel

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Defiance in Toronto

 

Adam Skelly, owner of popular Etobicoke restaurant Adamson Barbecue, was issued a closure order by Toronto Public Health on Tuesday night after taking a defiant stand against Ontario's lockdown measures and opening up his restaurant for indoor dining.

 

Skelly said he would review the order and see what the implications are but told The Post Millennial that he will be reopening tomorrow.

"One hundred percent, yeah we will be here, I mean everyone will have to accept the risks, they come into a place that Toronto Public Health said has been closed."

Toronto Police spoke to media after the public health agency issued the closure and said they would enforce compliance with the Reopening Ontario Act if Skelly was to open tomorrow. That includes removing people by force, if necessary.

Skelly added that his plan is that he will wait until he gets fined, then push back in court.

Toronto City Counsellor Mark Grimes from Ward 3 Etobicoke-Lakeshore told The Post Millennial that fines could be anywhere from $750 to $100,000

 

https://thepostmillennial.com/defiant-owner-of-toronto-restaurant-issued-closure-order-will-re-open-tomorrow?fbclid=IwAR1uxgbMJKiofoYaWglCmlSaok-poawagV04S2jazrVbGskkc2NDZa1-xnQ

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12 hours ago, seeker said:

I'm hoping there's typo in the article because that works out to $1250/dose.  Even for our government with the bottomless wallet that seems a bit high.

Cost is no object for Justin but who will get the limited 25,000 doses should be a concern to all Canadians.  There is also of course a question of why spend that much on a limited supply that can not help very many people throughout Canada and then of course who makes the selection and how does the vaccine get to the selected patient? 

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