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Jaydee

Coronavirus_2020.01.28

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3 hours ago, Jaydee said:

Orange County Doctor Breaks His Silence on COVID-19

 

 

 

 

This guy makes sense.

Far more than our own appointed health 'experts'.

 

 

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With this kind of difference, it only highlights how much better the Canadian response has been...

https://www.pressherald.com/2020/05/09/how-new-brunswick-stopped-covid-19/

This story and all coronavirus stories are free to the public. Please support us as we do our part to keep the community safe and informed.

AP17258534601071-1024x624.jpg

Workers position their boats at a salmon farm near Blacks Harbour, New Brunswick, in July 2017. Associated Press/Robert F. Bukaty

Maine and New Brunswick have a lot of similarities: a population that is elderly, low density and overwhelmingly rural; an economy dependent on forestry, fisheries and tourism; and an absence of large cities. Their first confirmed coronavirus cases came on back-to-back days in mid-March.

 

MaineVsNewBrunswickCOVID0520.jpg

Yet their experiences in the pandemic have radically diverged over the past eight weeks.

As of Friday, Maine had a total of 1,374 cases, 474 of them still active, and 63 deaths.

New Brunswick had 120 cases, two of them active, and not a single death or nursing home outbreak. From April 19 to May 4, there were no active cases in the province of 747,000, where the median age – 45.7 – is even higher than Maine’s and the population is more concentrated in urban areas.

Our neighbor to the east accomplished this feat through a combination of early action by public officials, strict border closures, near universal public compliance, geographical advantages and dumb luck. While COVID-19 could still flare up and overwhelm the province, New Brunswick has weathered the first phase off the pandemic so well that its officials are able to think in terms of containing new cases rather than monitoring them.

“The population was a really big factor in the sense that people were very quick to adhere to the directions given by government, and from the government perspective they were also very quick to align decisions with the public health folks,” says Stephane Robichaud, CEO of the New Brunswick Health Council, a provincial government entity that evaluates the performance of the health system. “You have your asymptomatic people who are a huge factor, and if in the early days we had waited another week we probably would have been in a very different place today.”

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Drivers line up at the border of Calais, Maine, and St. Stephen, New Brunswick, on August 2, 2018. Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Staff Photographer

Maine acted earlier than most rural states and has had far less transmission of the disease than New Hampshire or Massachusetts. Gov. Janet Mills declared a state of emergency March 15 and recommended a statewide closure of schools March 18, though it did not become mandatory until her stay-at-home order took effect April 2. Mills issued an executive order banning public-facing activities at nonessential businesses March 24, and restaurant dining rooms have been closed since March 18. The state’s most popular coastal state parks were closed March 27.

But New Brunswick acted even faster. It confirmed its first case March 11, the day before Maine: a woman in her 50s who had traveled to France. Two days later, before any additional cases were confirmed, officials announced they were shutting down all public schools. Nonessential government services closed March 17 and provincial parks March 19.

Canada also sealed off the U.S. border for nonessential travel March 20, and on March 25 New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs banned nonessential travelers from entering the province from the rest of Canada as well. Higgs, a member of the Conservative Party, introduced border controls on the province’s frontiers with Quebec, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, where police continue to turn away an average of 38 vehicles a day, Higgs said last week. Seasonal homeowners are being turned away at the border and airport checkpoints as well.

“The biggest thing that allowed us to control the pandemic – and I hate to say this – is closing the borders, because most of the cases in New Brunswick were travel-related and from people returning from the U.S.,” says Dr. Eilish Cleary, a physician and New Brunswick’s former chief medical officer. “This allowed us to control the amount of disease that was brought in and reduced the risk.”

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Princess Street in Saint John, New Brunswick. Staff photo by Dieter Bradbury

The province’s relative isolation also proved an asset. There are very few international flights into the province’s three primary cities – Fredericton, Moncton and Saint John – which may have helped it avoid the worse situation in Nova Scotia, where there have been 1,008 cases and 46 deaths, most of them clustered in the Halifax area. It’s far from North American hotspots in Boston, New York City and Montreal.

Luck was also at play. Even though community transmission began to occur – starting with a school bus driver from suburban Saint John who hadn’t traveled out of the province recently – somehow nobody brought the virus into a nursing home, prison or factory. “Senior homes have been where most of the deaths have occurred in Quebec and Nova Scotia, but our senior care centers have been spared,” Robichaud says. “That could have been a huge factor that would have made us more like Nova Scotia.”

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There has also been broad public compliance, with neighbors even applying social pressure to returning snowbirds to ensure they strictly adhere to 14-day quarantine requirements. While following scientific advice on how to minimize the effects of the pandemic has become politicized in the United States, parties across the Canadian political spectrum have agreed on the strategy, and their federal government has acted to purchase personal protective equipment, tests and other key products, and distribute it based on need.

“What you find here is a society that, while less deferential than 40 or 50 years ago, is still more deferential to government and the role of provincial, federal, and public health authority figures,” says former federal senator Hugh Segal, who served as chief of staff for Conservative Party Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and is now a fellow at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. He says this makes Canada distinct from the United States.

“The founding values of peace, order, and good government and of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness have had different impacts on the ways in which the societies have grown and the way in which their underlying political and social values have operated,” Segal notes, with Canada’s more communitarian ethos proving an asset in responding to the pandemic.

The province has moved cautiously to reopen, and was expected to announce Friday a plan to allow the resumption of elective surgeries and to open day cares, offices, retail stores and other businesses. Officials have said they will reintroduce restrictions if they see three new, unconnected community cases over a six-day period.

It’s also considering allowing travel to and from Prince Edward Island, an island province connected to the rest of Canada only via a bridge and ferries to New Brunswick that has only one active COVID-19 case and has seen no deaths. But officials remain on guard.

“What we’re appreciating more with each passing week is just how fast this can spread,” says Robichaud.

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Coronavirus: Hydroxychloroquine trial begins in the UK

By Rachel SchraerHealth reporter
Anti-malarial drugsImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES

A trial to see whether two anti-malarial drugs could prevent Covid-19 has begun in Brighton and Oxford.

Chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine or a placebo will be given to more than 40,000 healthcare workers from Europe, Africa, Asia and South America.

All the participants are staff who are in contact with Covid-19 patients.

US President Donald Trump was criticised this week after he said he had been taking hydroxychloroquine, despite warnings it might be unsafe.

The first UK participants in the global trial are being enrolled on Thursday at the Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals and the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford.

They will be given either hydroxychloroquine or a placebo for three months. At sites in Asia, participants will be given chloroquine or a placebo.

These are the first of a planned 25 UK sites, with results expected by the end of the year.

The trial is open to anyone delivering direct care to coronavirus patients in the UK, as long as they have not been diagnosed with Covid-19.

It will test whether the drugs can prevent healthcare workers exposed to the virus from contracting it.

'Beneficial or harmful'

One of the study's leaders, Prof Nicholas White at the University of Oxford said: "We really do not know if chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine are beneficial or harmful against Covid-19."

But, he said, a randomised controlled trial such as this one, where neither the participant nor the researchers know who has been given the drug or a placebo, was the best way to find out.

"A widely available, safe and effective vaccine may be a long way off," said Prof Martin Llewelyn from Brighton and Sussex Medical School, who is also leading the study.

"If drugs as well-tolerated as chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine could reduce the chances of catching Covid-19, this would be incredibly valuable."

The drugs can reduce fever and inflammation and are used as both a prevention and a treatment for malaria.

Hydroxychloroquine regulates the body's immune response and is also used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and Lupus - an inflammatory disease caused by an overactive immune system.

Lupus charities in the UK and US have raised concerns that demand for the drug associated with coronavirus could threaten the supply for patients who already rely on it.

The drug gained attention after US President Donald Trump suggested it may be beneficial, and this week said he was taking hydroxychloroquine to ward off coronavirus.

Media captionTrump: "If it's not good, I'll tell you right, I'm not going to get hurt by it"

The US Food and Drug Administration warned against use of the medication outside hospitals, where the agency has granted temporary authorisation for its use in some cases, or clinical trials.

While the University of Oxford trial is taking place in a controlled clinical environment, the World Health Organization has warned that some individuals were self-medicating and risked causing themselves serious harm.

It has not yet been shown to be safe and effective in the prevention or treatment of coronavirus and can cause dangerous heart arrhythmias.

The trial also involves researchers from the UK, Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia and Italy.

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So someone explain this to me:  March 15  they started the "lockdown"----  On March 15 there were 172 known cases (possibly a couple hundred more unknown)  of COVID in Ontario .Today there are 26000 known cases  (possibly another hundred thousand or so unknown) in Ontario.  We are no more immune than we were in March, there is no known effective treatment as of today, Yet it is now safe to start opening up.    How could this possibly be?  Are they saying without saying that they shouldn't have locked down in the first place  or is this a "political thing" or is there some magic that I am missing???

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I think the government has walked themselves into a corner.....shutting the country down because “Canadians safety is jt’s #1 priority”. The virus is not going away and bankrupting the country is not realistic..so trudeau is going to have to walk back his position before the premiers revolt.

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This would go just as well under the Trusted News Thread...

https://www.cs.cmu.edu/news/nearly-half-twitter-accounts-discussing-‘reopening-america’-may-be-bots

Nearly Half Of The Twitter Accounts Discussing ‘Reopening America’ May Be Bots

CMU Researchers Say Sophisticated, Orchestrated Bot Campaigns Aim To Sow Divide

Scrolling through your Twitter feed, it may not be obvious when you come upon a bot account — something that is more likely to occur in the era of COVID-19. Carnegie Mellon University researchers have discovered that much of the discussion around the pandemic and stay-at-home orders is being fueled by misinformation campaigns that use convincing bots.

To analyze bot activity around the pandemic, CMU researchers since January have collected more than 200 million tweets discussing coronavirus or COVID-19. Of the top 50 influential retweeters, 82% are bots, they found. Of the top 1,000 retweeters, 62% are bots.

The monitoring of tweets is ongoing and collections from Facebook, Reddit and YouTube have been added to the research.

"We're seeing up to two times as much bot activity as we'd predicted based on previous natural disasters, crises and elections," said Kathleen Carley, a professor in the School of Computer Science’s Institute for Software Research and director of the Center for Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems (CASOS) and Center for Informed Democracy & Social - Cybersecurity (IDeaS.)

Carley said multiple factors contribute to the surge. First, more individuals have time on their hands to create do-it-yourself bots. But the number of sophisticated groups that hire firms to run bot accounts also has increased. The nature of the pandemic matters, too. "Because it’s global, it’s being used by various countries and interest groups as an opportunity to meet political agendas," she said.

Carley's research team uses multiple methods to determine who is or isn't a bot. Artificial intelligence processes account information and looks at things such as the number of followers, frequency of tweeting and an account's mentions network.

"Tweeting more frequently than is humanly possible or appearing to be in one country and then another a few hours later is indicative of a bot," Carley said.

More than 100 types of inaccurate COVID-19 stories have been identified, such as those about potential cures. But bots are also dominating conversations about ending stay-at-home orders and "reopening America."

Many factors of the online discussions about “reopening America” suggest that bot activity is orchestrated. One indicator is the large number of bots, many of which are accounts that were recently created. Accounts that are possibly humans with bot assistants generate 66% of the tweets. Accounts that are definitely bots generate 34% of the tweets.

"When we see a whole bunch of tweets at the same time or back to back, it's like they're timed," Carley said. "We also look for use of the same exact hashtag, or messaging that appears to be copied and pasted from one bot to the next."

A subset of tweets about "reopening America" reference conspiracy theories, such as hospitals being filled with mannequins or the coronavirus being linked to 5G towers.

"Conspiracy theories increase polarization in groups. It’s what many misinformation campaigns aim to do," Carley said. "People have real concerns about health and the economy, and people are preying on that to create divides."

Carley said that spreading conspiracy theories leads to more extreme opinions, which can in turn lead to more extreme behavior and less rational thinking.

"Increased polarization will have a variety of real-world consequences, and play out in things like voting behavior and hostility towards ethnic groups," Carley said.

The research team cannot point to specific entities behind the orchestrated attempts to influence online conversations. "We do know that it looks like it's a propaganda machine, and it definitely matches the Russian and Chinese playbooks, but it would take a tremendous amount of resources to substantiate that," Carley said.

Carley adds that not enough is known to develop a counter measure. Blocked accounts can resurface, and the nature of the network is such that you can’t just attack at individual points.

But she said average users can do a lot to help protect themselves from bot influence. There is no guarantee, but closely examining an account can offer indications of a bot, such as sharing links with subtle typos, many tweets coming out very quickly, or a user name and profile image that don’t seem to match up.

"Even if someone appears to be from your community, if you don't know them personally, take a closer look, and always go to authoritative or trusted sources for information," Carley said. "Just be very vigilant."

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I didn't understand this while it was happening and I still don't.

People are upset about it after the fact, but really, what did you think was going to happen? Seriously, other than massive infection rates in the most vulnerable, what was the expected outcome here? I say there was no other outcome possible....

 https://globalnews.ca/news/6973406/coronavirus-recovering-patients-new-york-nursing-homes/

Edited by Wolfhunter

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12 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

I didn't understand this while it was happening and I still don't.

People are upset about it after the fact, but really, what did you think was going to happen? Seriously, other than massive infection rates in the most vulnerable, what was the expected outcome here? I say there was no other outcome possible....

 https://globalnews.ca/news/6973406/coronavirus-recovering-patients-new-york-nursing-homes/

 

Can’t wait to see how they spin this.
 

“ Whatever the full number, nursing home administrators, residents’ advocates and relatives say it has added up to a big and indefensible problem for facilities that even Gov. Andrew Cuomo — the main proponent of the policy — called “the optimum feeding ground for this virus.”

“It was the single dumbest decision anyone could make if they wanted to kill people,” Daniel Arbeeny said of the directive, which prompted him to pull his 88-year-old father out of a Brooklyn nursing home where more than 50 people have died. His father later died of COVID-19 at home.

“This isn’t rocket science,” Arbeeny said.

“We knew the most vulnerable — the elderly and compromised — are in nursing homes and rehab centers.”

Told of the AP’s tally, the Health Department said late Thursday it “can’t comment on data we haven’t had a chance to review, particularly while we’re still validating our own comprehensive survey of nursing homes admission and re-admission data in the middle of responding to this global pandemic.”

Cuomo, a Democrat, on May 10 reversed the directive, which had been intended to help free up hospital beds for the sickest patients as cases surged. But he continued to defend it this week, saying he didn’t believe it contributed to the more than 5,800 nursing and adult care facility deaths in New York — more than in any other state — and that homes should have spoken up if it was a problem.” 

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47 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

Can’t wait to see how they spin this.

Best guess is Trump made them do it.... at a minimum, it will have been his idea.

They will say 'just be glad we didn't inject them with bleach.'

 

Edited by Wolfhunter

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28 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

BC0E2708-09FD-4856-9F58-3E6C39589C86.jpeg

 

they do work but to protect others from you in case you have the virus.  So that is why we should be wearing them.

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48 minutes ago, Marshall said:

 

they do work but to protect others from you in case you have the virus.  So that is why we should be wearing them.

Since they now work ( this week), Trudeau could have bought every Canadian a lifetime supply of N95, that do work  at a fraction of the cost of killing Canada’s economy

Edited by Jaydee
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A Liberal stronghold?  'Toronto:

Physical distancing rules appeared to have been ignored at some of Toronto's parks and beaches, where thousands of people gathered Saturday to enjoy the summer-like weather.

Trinity Bellwoods Park, located near Queen Street West and Ossington Avenue, was packed with people who seemed to be disregarding physical distancing by-laws.

image.png.15680d21f6fa55c52539cace61809599.png

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I look around me and I see people relaxing their Guard against this virus on a daily basis. The above picture is an example of that stupidity. Smack dab in the Middle of Liberal Central.  I am all for returning to somewhat of normalcy but for gods sake use your brain!

Some sobering stats from today’s news...

“ Coronavirus Infections Jump by More Than a Million Globally in Two Weeks “

 

“ 81% of deaths in Canada occurred in long term care homes“

In our quest to get outside and become human again, we rushing headlong into a self induced Sept crisis, or is this just the normal course of events which have to occur?

D73950A8-B152-4DB5-B54B-D8B9A7C567D0.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee

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3 hours ago, Jaydee said:

s this just the normal course of events which have to occur?

I now think that it is. 

Given the level of deliberate noncompliance I see all around me, and given the lock down efforts to date and the ease with which those efforts can be undone, I now think this will become the single biggest self-inflicted economic disaster to occur in the course of human history and the entire effort will be rendered moot (after the fact) by those deliberate actions. 

It's instructive on many levels, indicative of what we have become as a society and illustrative of the inevitable future trajectory.... it doesn't matter where you stand on the issue, the lesson remains; reality doesn't care about narrative, opinion, or what Trump had for breakfast. The people screaming about anti-malarials now had little sympathy for veterans who gobbled them (and other stuff) on deployments. 

An 'Tommy ain't a bloomin' fool - you bet that Tommy sees!
 

Edited by Wolfhunter

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News today (may 24) says that Ontario has  https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/ontario-records-another-spike-in-new-covid-19-cases-1.4952266

TORONTO -- Ontario health officials have reported another spike in the number of new COVID-19 cases.

The province recorded 460 new cases of the novel coronavirus Sunday morning, the fourth straight day that daily case numbers have been above 400. 

Sunday’s report marks the highest number of new cases reported in Ontario since May 8. when 477 new cases were confirmed. The rise represents a 1.8 per cent increase over yesterday's total, and the daily growth rate has hovered between 1.5 and 1.9 per cent over most of the last two weeks.

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The Headline says 

Quote

As all 50 states relax coronavirus restrictions, American death toll nears 100,000

It appears that an acceptable level of deaths has been reached and the economy needs to restart.  Is this wrong or just the new reality?  After all the annual flu toll in the US is  

24,000 – 62,000
flu deaths

 

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12 hours ago, Marshall said:

The Headline says 

It appears that an acceptable level of deaths has been reached and the economy needs to restart.  Is this wrong or just the new reality?  After all the annual flu toll in the US is  

24,000 – 62,000
flu deaths

 

the deaths are on a CURVE not a cliff.  if 100,000 die on the way up another 100,000 die on the way down.

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Still More Evidence That Lockdowns Were A Massive Waste Of Time, Money, And Lives

The nation’s economy is on track to drop by more than 30% in the second quarter. Unemployment is well into the double digits. Half of small businesses might close in the next six months. All for naught, it would appear, giving the growing pile of evidence that the economic lockdowns didn’t work.

The latest evidence comes from a report out of JP Morgan Chase & Co. this week. It finds that there’s been no increase in cases or deaths as other nations and U.S. states start reopening. This flies directly in the face of all the public health expert predictions of a major spike once people started moving about

Virtually everywhere, infection rates have declined after reopening, even after allowing for an appropriate measurement lag,” says the report’s author, Marko Kolanovic, a quantitative strategist at JPMorgan. “This means that the pandemic and COVID-19 likely have (their) own dynamics unrelated to often inconsistent lockdown measures that were being implemented.”

Another research paper released in early May, this one by Thomas A. J. Meunier of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, found that the lockdowns in western Europe had no evident impact on the epidemic.

“Comparing the trajectory of the epidemic before and after the lockdown, we find no evidence of any discontinuity in the growth rate, doubling time, and reproduction number trends,” Meunier says.

In the United Kingdom, the disease reached its peak on April 8, which, given the way it progresses, means the peak infection was around March 18, according to Oxford University professor Carl Heneghan. That’s almost a week before the UK went into lockdown mode.

Bloomberg’s Elaine He looked at the data from Europe, compared it with their different strategies to deal with the outbreak, and concluded that “there’s little correlation between the severity of a nation’s restrictions and whether it managed to curb excess fatalities.

Meanwhile, India’s massive lockdown – the largest in the world – is coming under attack for being ineffective. India now has more than 100,000 confirmed cases and is seeing the fastest growth in South Asia.

“There is no doubt in my mind that the lockdown has failed,” an epidemiologist who is a member of the Indian government’s coronavirus task force told The Caravan magazine. “Social distancing, wearing masks, and hand hygiene work. Together, these measures reduce the rate of transmission. However, to date, there is no evidence that lockdowns can cut down transmission.”

And Sweden, which had come under harsh attack from public health experts for not imposing an all-out lockdown, is now being held up by the World Health Organization as a model for the future.

 

Dr. Mike Ryan, the WHO’s top emergencies expert, said that “Sweden represents a model if we wish to get back to a society in which we don’t have lockdowns.”

Instead of issuing stay-at-home orders and forced business closures, Ryan said Sweden “put in place a very strong public policy around social distancing, around caring and protecting people in long-term care facilities.”

As we noted recently, Swedish infectious disease expert Johan Giesecke, writing in the medical journal Lancet, says “It has become clear that a hard lockdown does not protect old and frail people living in care homes — a population the lockdown was designed to protect. Neither does it decrease mortality from COVID-19, which is evident when comparing the United Kingdom’s experience with that of other European countries.”

We also pointed to a paper by Lyman Stone, an adjunct fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, which looked at the available evidence and concluded simply that “lockdowns don’t work.” Stone found the death rate climbing after the lockdowns went into effect in the U.S.

Don’t expect anyone to admit they were wrong. The public health community – which has been peddling wildly exaggerated predictions of deaths – will never do so. Nor will Democrats and the press – which are committed to the narrative that every death in the U.S. is President Donald Trump’s fault. Trump isn’t likely to, either, since he agreed to shutting down the economy after he started taking his cues from public health doomsayers.

This isn’t to say that no action was needed to cope with this uncharted virus. That’s not the argument any of these researchers are making. What they are saying is that the lockdowns weren’t based on sound science, and that far less intrusive measures would likely have been just as effective, if not more so, without destroying T the economy.To be sure, there are studies claiming that the lockdowns reduced infections and saved lives. 

But as JP Morgan’s Kolanovic noted, “Unlike rigorous testing of potential new drugs, lockdowns were administered with little consideration that they might not only cause economic devastation but potentially more deaths than COVID-19 itself.”

https://issuesinsights.com/2020/05/23/still-more-evidence-that-lockdowns-were-a-massive-waste/

 

 

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