Sign in to follow this  
Jaydee

Coronavirus_2020.01.28

Recommended Posts

*** At this point it’s still unconfirmed***
Received this from a friend at Western.

“ Tons of chatter today that there is a confirmed Coronavirus case for a student at western “

then this....

https://www.google.ca/amp/s/lfpress.com/news/local-news/coronavirus-london-public-health-officials-bracing-for-high-likelihood-virus-will-be-found-here/amp

 

Edited by Jaydee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In today's world of international travel / commerce , I wonder if any passenger carriers will cease flying / sailing into / out of China / Hong Kong until the outbreak is cured / controlled? I shudder to think what the outcome would be if one of today's mega cruise ships serving that area had an  outbreak with 3 or more thousand folks exposed  to the virus.

An update, evidently some cruise lines have already cancelled some of their sailings:  https://www.express.co.uk/travel/cruise/1233695/coronavirus-cruise-cancelled-cruises-china-royal-caribbean-msc-news-latest

Coronavirus: Major cruise lines cancel multiple cruises as virus spreads - 41 dead

CORONAVIRUS is one of the biggest global health concerns right now and has the potential to spread like wildfire. Major cruise lines including Royal Caribbean and MSC Cruises have cancelled sailings - is your cruise holiday affected?

PUBLISHED: 07:28, Mon, Jan 27, 2020 | UPDATED: 07:54, Mon, Jan 27, 2020

Coronavirus has so far killed at least 41 people and infected 1,300 300 since being discovered in Wuhan, China last month. The mysterious disease has spread across 12 countries in that short time. A plethora of travel warnings have been issued by the UK government for holidaymakers travelling to affected countries.

Now cruise lines are taking preventative measure as they start to cancel cruises.

Costa Crociere, MSC Cruises, Royal Caribbean and Genting Cruise Lines have all immediately suspended cruise operations in mainland China.

Royal Caribbean

Royal Caribbean cancelled its January 27 sailing on cruise ship the Spectrum of the Seas, scheduled to depart from Shanghai.

"The decision was made to fully coordinate with disease prevention and ensure the health and safety of passengers and crews," Royal Caribbean said in a statement.

Royal Caribbean also said: “Along with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention & The World Health Organization, we’ve been closely monitoring the recent news of the coronavirus in Asia. The concern is only with the Asian Ports,” reported Cruise Hive.

READ MORE: Coronavirus outbreak: Virus to 'spread with rapid increases'Coronavirus: MSC cancelled its January 28 departure on the Splendida, also from Shanghai (Image: MSC)

MSC Cruises

MSC cancelled its January 28 departure on the Splendida, also from Shanghai, previously scheduled to sail four nights.

The Italian-founded, Switzerland-based cruise line said in a statement: “Due to urgent guidelines from the Chinese government to combat the spread of the coronavirus, MSC Cruises is required to cancel the upcoming cruise with MSC Splendida on Jan. 28,"

"Guests booked on this cruise have the option to receive a full refund of their cruise ticket and port charges, or book an alternative sailing with an equivalent price and receiving additional onboard credit – with an embarkation date before the end of the year.

“At the time of writing, MSC Splendida is planned to remain in port for the duration of the cruise from January 2 to February 1.

 
 
 

“We will continue to closely monitor the public health and safety situation in China and are consulting with international and local health authorities, as well as the Ministry of Transport of the People's Republic of China, and strictly follow their advice and recommendations. Guests and Travel Partners have been informed and will be kept abreast of any further changes as the situation evolves.”

Costa Cruises

Costa Crociere has cancelled sailings on four of its cruise ship. The following Costa cruises have been axed - the Serena for January 25 and 31; the Atlantica on January 27 and 31; the Venezia on January 26 and February 2 and the neoRomantica on January 25, 30 and February 2.

Italian cruise line Costa has said guests are eligible for a full refund; or can choose an alternative sailing date before the end of the year along with a $50 onboard credit.

The Costa Venezia returned to Shenzhen port, southeastern China, this morning. On arrival, the ship was boarded by a medical team who checked all 4,973 passengers and 1,249 crew for symptoms of fever and pneumonia, reported Maritime Bulletin.

Four were found to have high temperatures while 148 passengers who were residents of Wuhan or visited Wuhan recently were isolated for a stricter screening.

Costa said in a statement: “Costa Crociere is dedicated to the health and safety of all guests and crew. We are strictly monitoring the situation of the so-called ‘Wuhan Pneumonia’ which is causing concern among Public Health Authorities and the travelling public.

“The safety, security and welfare of all guests and crew are our absolute priority has increased health and safety measures as a matter of caution. The company adopts a specific protocol to help prevent the introduction and/or spread of any infectious diseases.

“All guests and embarking crew are given a pre-boarding health questionnaire and medical staff are available to conduct additional screening of guests, crew and visitors. Anyone who has an illness of international public health concern will not be permitted to sail.

“Costa maintains close coordination with the relevant Public Health Authority. All ships in our fleet are subjected to strict hygienic precautions.”

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Factbox: Countries evacuating nationals from China virus areas

 

(Reuters) - Countries around the world are planning to evacuate diplomatic staff and private citizens from Chinese areas hit by the new coronavirus, which is spreading quickly.

 

Wuhan, a city of 11 million in the province of Hubei and the epicentre of the outbreak is in virtual lockdown and much of Hubei, home to nearly 60 million people, is under some kind of travel curb.

Following are some countries’ evacuation plans, and how they are planning to manage the health risk from those who are returning.

- Germany will evacuate 90 citizens living in China’s Wuhan region.

- Morocco will evacuate 100 citizens, mostly students, from the Wuhan area.

- France expects to repatriate up to a few hundred of its 800 citizens living in the Wuhan area. Evacuees will have to spend 14 days in quarantine to avoid spreading the virus in France.

- Japan is expected to arrange charter flights as early as Tuesday for any of its citizens who wish to return from Wuhan, two sources familiar with the matter said. Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi said about 430 Japanese nationals have been confirmed to be in Hubei province.

- Spain’s government is working with China and the European Union to repatriate Spanish nationals from the Wuhan area, Foreign Minister Arancha Gonzalez Laya said.

- The U.S. State Department said it will evacuate personnel from its Wuhan consulate to the United States and offer a limited number of seats to private U.S. citizens on a flight. Some private citizens will be able to board the “single flight” leaving Wuhan on Jan. 28 for San Francisco, it said.

- Britain is talking to international partners to find solutions to help British and other foreign nationals leave Wuhan, a spokesman for Prime Minister Boris Johnson said.

- Canada has about 167 nationals in the Wuhan area, Foreign Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne said on Monday, and eight people have sought consular assistance, which is being provided. While the minister did not rule out possible evacuations, he did not indicate there were any planned at the moment, adding that each consular request would be evaluated on a “case by case basis”.

- Russia has been in talks with China about evacuating its nationals from Wuhan and Hubei province, Russia’s embassy in China said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coronavirus ‘whistleblower’ nurse says China has 90,000 sick

The coronavirus now has a whistleblower — a nurse in Wuhan who insists in a shocking online video that close to 90,000 people in China have the disease, far more than the 1,975 reported by officials.

“I am in the area where the coronavirus started,” her video begins. Wuhan is the epicenter of the outbreak.

“I’m here to tell the truth,” the anonymous nurse says in the video, which shows her wearing a full-head face mask.

“At this moment, Hubei province, including the Wuhan area, even China, 90,000 people have been infected by a coronavirus.”

She does not reveal how she arrived at the sobering statistic

https://nypost.com/2020/01/26/coronavirus-whistleblower-nurse-says-china-has-90000-sick/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coronavirus: Major cruise lines cancel multiple cruises as virus spreads - 41 dead

CORONAVIRUS is one of the biggest global health concerns right now and has the potential to spread like wildfire. Major cruise lines including Royal Caribbean and MSC Cruises have cancelled sailings - is your cruise holiday affected?

PUBLISHED: 07:28, Mon, Jan 27, 2020 | UPDATED: 07:54, Mon, Jan 27, 2020

 

Coronavirus has so far killed at least 41 people and infected 1,300 300 since being discovered in Wuhan, China last month. The mysterious disease has spread across 12 countries in that short time. A plethora of travel warnings have been issued by the UK government for holidaymakers travelling to affected countries.

 

Now cruise lines are taking preventative measure as they start to cancel cruises.

Costa Crociere, MSC Cruises, Royal Caribbean and Genting Cruise Lines have all immediately suspended cruise operations in mainland China.

Royal Caribbean

Royal Caribbean cancelled its January 27 sailing on cruise ship the Spectrum of the Seas, scheduled to depart from Shanghai.

"The decision was made to fully coordinate with disease prevention and ensure the health and safety of passengers and crews," Royal Caribbean said in a statement.

Royal Caribbean also said: “Along with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention & The World Health Organization, we’ve been closely monitoring the recent news of the coronavirus in Asia. The concern is only with the Asian Ports,” reported Cruise Hive.

READ MORE: Coronavirus outbreak: Virus to 'spread with rapid increases'Coronavirus: MSC cancelled its January 28 departure on the Splendida, also from Shanghai (Image: MSC)

MSC Cruises

MSC cancelled its January 28 departure on the Splendida, also from Shanghai, previously scheduled to sail four nights.

The Italian-founded, Switzerland-based cruise line said in a statement: “Due to urgent guidelines from the Chinese government to combat the spread of the coronavirus, MSC Cruises is required to cancel the upcoming cruise with MSC Splendida on Jan. 28,"

"Guests booked on this cruise have the option to receive a full refund of their cruise ticket and port charges, or book an alternative sailing with an equivalent price and receiving additional onboard credit – with an embarkation date before the end of the year.

“At the time of writing, MSC Splendida is planned to remain in port for the duration of the cruise from January 2 to February 1.

“We will continue to closely monitor the public health and safety situation in China and are consulting with international and local health authorities, as well as the Ministry of Transport of the People's Republic of China, and strictly follow their advice and recommendations. Guests and Travel Partners have been informed and will be kept abreast of any further changes as the situation evolves.”

Costa Cruises

Costa Crociere has cancelled sailings on four of its cruise ship. The following Costa cruises have been axed - the Serena for January 25 and 31; the Atlantica on January 27 and 31; the Venezia on January 26 and February 2 and the neoRomantica on January 25, 30 and February 2.

Italian cruise line Costa has said guests are eligible for a full refund; or can choose an alternative sailing date before the end of the year along with a $50 onboard credit.

The Costa Venezia returned to Shenzhen port, southeastern China, this morning. On arrival, the ship was boarded by a medical team who checked all 4,973 passengers and 1,249 crew for symptoms of fever and pneumonia, reported Maritime Bulletin.

Four were found to have high temperatures while 148 passengers who were residents of Wuhan or visited Wuhan recently were isolated for a stricter screening.Coronavirus: Cruises from Shanghai have been axed by cruise lines including Royal Caribbean (Image: Getty Images)

 

Costa said in a statement: “Costa Crociere is dedicated to the health and safety of all guests and crew. We are strictly monitoring the situation of the so-called ‘Wuhan Pneumonia’ which is causing concern among Public Health Authorities and the travelling public.

“The safety, security and welfare of all guests and crew are our absolute priority has increased health and safety measures as a matter of caution. The company adopts a specific protocol to help prevent the introduction and/or spread of any infectious diseases.

“All guests and embarking crew are given a pre-boarding health questionnaire and medical staff are available to conduct additional screening of guests, crew and visitors. Anyone who has an illness of international public health concern will not be permitted to sail.

“Costa maintains close coordination with the relevant Public Health Authority. All ships in our fleet are subjected to strict hygienic precautions.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Japan confirms coronavirus in man who hadn't been to China

 

Published Tuesday, January 28, 2020 11:38AM EST
coronavirus Japan

A commuter wearing a mask waits for a train to depart at Shinjuku Station in Tokyo, Monday, Jan. 27, 2020. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

 

 

Japanese authorities said Tuesday a man with no recent travel to China has contracted the novel strain of coronavirus -- apparently after driving tourists visiting from Wuhan, where a deadly outbreak began.

The man in his sixties from Nara in western Japan drove two groups of Wuhan tourists earlier in January and was hospitalised on Saturday with flu-like symptoms, the health ministry said.

Health Minister Katsunobu Kato said the country had confirmed two new cases, bringing the total so far in Japan to six.

"One of them has no record of visiting Wuhan, and drove tourists from Wuhan on a bus twice in January," he told reporters.

A health ministry official confirmed to AFP that there was "no information" that the man had been anywhere in China recently, including Wuhan.

"If this is true then he might have been infected by tourists from Wuhan. And if so, this would be the first person-to-person transmission in Japan," the official added.

The other cases so far confirmed in Japan all involve people who have been to Wuhan.

Japan has imposed new checks on travellers arriving from China, and is planning to dispatch a plane to Wuhan on Tuesday night to evacuate Japanese nationals from the city.

The plane is expected to bring back around 200 nationals, of some 650 who have asked to be repatriated, authorities said.

https://www.dw.com/en/germany-confirms-human-transmission-of-coronavirus/a-52169007

Germany confirms human transmission of coronavirus

Health authorities say a Bavarian man contracted the virus from a colleague visiting from China. It is believed to be the first case of human-to-human transmission in Europe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First case of Wuhan coronavirus confirmed in B.C.

BY KATHRYNTINDALE

Posted Jan 28, 2020 10:06 am MST

 
 
 

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – The first case of the Wuhan coronavirus has been confirmed in the Vancouver Coastal Health region.

A man in his 40s returned from China last week and is now in isolation at home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

United Airlines cancels some China flights due to ‘significant decline in demand’ as corornavirus spreads

PUBLISHED TUE, JAN 28 202012:52 PM ESTUPDATED 11 MIN AGO
 
 
 
 
KEY POINTS
  • United will slash U.S. flights to and from China for just over a week, starting Feb. 1.
  • The airline said it has experienced a sharp drop in demand for China service.
  • The carrier will maintain some service.47
United Airlines suspends some flights China starting Feb. 1
 

United Airlines on Tuesday said it would suspend dozens of China flights next month because of a “significant decline in demand” to the country as it battles the growing number of coronavirus cases.

United has the most service to China of the U.S. airlines.

The flight cancellations take effect Feb. 1 and last through Feb. 8. It wasn’t immediately clear if United would cancel more flights.

We will continue to monitor the situation as it develops and will adjust our schedule as needed,” United said in a statement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seeing people in China wearing face masks is NOT shocking.

Seeing Asian people in Canada is NOT shocking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Created here because it is as much an aviation-related story as any, given the effect of SARS on our industry.

From Melbourne, Australia:

Australian lab first outside of China to re-create coronavirus, helping vaccine push

Exclusive by national medical reporter Sophie Scott and the Specialist Reporting Team's Penny Timms and Loretta Florance

Updated about 2 hours ago

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to seek, up and down arrows for volume.

In a major breakthrough in the global fight against coronavirus, scientists in Australia have developed a lab-grown version of the disease.

Key points:

  • Australian scientists have become the world's first outside of China to recreate the coronavirus
  • The discovery will enable scientists to develop a test to identify people who might be infected, even before they show any symptoms
  • It will also help speed up work towards a vaccine for the disease, which has claimed more than 100 lives in China and infected five Australians

 

Described as a "game changer" that will help scientists determine whether a future vaccine is effective, experts at Melbourne's Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity on Tuesday became the world's first scientific lab outside of China to recreate the virus.

They will now share it with the World Health Organisation (WHO) in Europe, which will in turn share it with labs worldwide — including one from Queensland — involved in the worldwide race to develop a vaccine.

The team of scientists grew the virus from a patient who had been infected since Friday.

The ABC was in the lab the moment scientists discovered they had successfully grown the virus, with Mike Catton, the co-deputy director of the Doherty Institute, confirming it with three words.

"We got it," he said. "Fantastic."

 

Dr Catton told the ABC the discovery was "vitally important" and would become a critical part of the tool kit to show if vaccines work, with scientists able to test any potential vaccine against a lab-grown version of the disease.

It will also enable researchers to develop a test to identify people who might be infected with the virus, even before they show any symptoms.

Right now in Australia, patients with initial coronavirus symptoms undergo testing in hospital, with samples sent to the Doherty Institute, the only lab in Australia that can test samples a second time and give a 100 per cent answer about whether someone is infected or not.

But this could all change following Tuesday's discovery.

 

Doherty Institute lead scientist Julian Druce, who was there with Dr Catton at the moment of discovery, described it as a significant development in the global understanding of the virus, and for the response to it.

"This will be a game changer for other labs within Australia," Dr Druce said.

Growing the virus will also help experts understand more about how coronavirus behaves.

The Doherty Institute is the second lab in the world to recreate the disease. A lab in China was the first, but did not share its discovery with the WHO.

However, the same lab released images of the genetic sequence of the disease, which helped scientists at the Doherty Institute recreate it.

Dr Druce said scientists at the institute had been working hard to understand more about the illness, which has already claimed at least 106 lives in China and infected another 4,200 people worldwide.

"It's been 10-12 hour days, 2:00am finishes; so it's been pretty full on," he said.

"We've designed and planned for an exercise like this for many years. This is what the Doherty Institute was built for.

"And that's really why we're able to get an answer from Friday to today [of] diagnosis, detection, sequencing, and isolation."

 

Australia 'alert not alarmed'

Dr Catton, who is also the pathologist supervising at The Doherty Institute, said Australian scientific facilities were well prepared to deal with outbreaks like the coronavirus.

"This virus qualifies as a three out of four, so it's a level three virus and that's based off our understanding of SARS (sudden acute respiratory syndrome) and MERS (Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome), which are its close cousins," Dr Catton said.

"It's dangerous, it does kill some people, but it hasn't got the lethality that viruses like Ebola do."

But he said early diagnosis of a disease outbreak like the coronavirus was important because it gave health authorities around the world a better chance of containing its spread or, at the least, its severity.

What is different is how much more mobile the world is, he said.

"I'd still say we're alert but not alarmed," Dr Catton said.

"We shared the view of national health authorities that it was likely there would be cases in Australia. That didn't happen with SARS, which is a similar virus.

"I think it's something like 150 million visits more each year with China to countries like Australia than was true back then."

 

At this stage, coronavirus does not have a death rate as high as SARS.

"SARS we know had a death rate — a mortality rate — of about 10 per cent. This [coronavirus] appears to be 3 per cent; my personal opinion is it will turn out to be lower than that," Dr Catton said.

Chief medical officer Brendan Murphy said in Australia there has been no known human-to-human transmission of the coronavirus.

"There is no cause for concern in the Australian public, there is no human to human transmission of this virus," he said.

"It's important to note because we had some media [ask] about masks today; there is no need for the Australian public to wear masks."

Those who have the illness are being kept in isolation.

All Australian-based patients are in stable conditions.

Coronavirus Infection: Symptoms and treatment

On this page

 

Government of Canada

About coronaviruses

Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases. Some coronaviruses transmit between animals, some between animals and people, and others from people to people.

Symptoms of coronavirus infections

Coronavirus infections are common and typically lead to the common cold. Gastrointestinal disease is possible for young infants. Symptoms are usually mild to moderate and can include:

  • runny nose
  • headache
  • cough
  • sore throat
  • fever
  • a general feeling of being unwell

Although rare, other types of coronavirus infections cause illnesses such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) can produce more severe illnesses such as pneumonia, respiratory failure, kidney failure, or even death.

If you get a coronavirus infection

If you have cold-like symptoms, you can help protect others by doing the following:

  • stay home while sick
  • avoid close contact with others
  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, then throw the tissue in the trash and wash your hands
  • clean and disinfect objects and surfaces

How coronavirus infections are diagnosed

Coronavirus infections are diagnosed by a health care provider based on symptoms and laboratory tests.

In some cases, travel history may be important.

Coronavirus infection treatment

For now, there is no specific treatments for most people with coronavirus infection. Most people with common coronavirus illness will recover on their own. Your health care provider may recommend steps you can take to relieve symptoms.

Consult your health care provider as soon as possible if you are concerned about your symptoms or have a travel history to a region where severe coronaviruses are known to occur. The sooner you get treatment, the better your chances are for recovery.

 
 
 
 
Date modified:
2020-01-21
Edited by Don Hudson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Fido said:

Seeing people in China wearing face masks is NOT shocking.

Seeing Asian people in Canada is NOT shocking.

I agree totally. Masks are an every day event in China and have been as long as I can remember because of the smog and pollution. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Kip Powick said:

Gotta be safe......I just took my set of Chinese Checkers away from my grand-kids ....☹️

You could have asked them to stop beating you instead of taking their checkers. 😀

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like the Australians have a solution but what about the aircrews?

JANUARY 28, 2020 / 6:05 PM / UPDATED 29 MINUTES AGO

Australia to help some citizens leave China, quarantine them on Christmas Island

MELBOURNE (Reuters) - Australia will help some citizens leave Hubei province in China, the epicentre of the coronavirus outbreak, and quarantine them on Christmas Island, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said on Wednesday following a briefing by the Chinese government.

“We have taken a decision this morning to prepare a plan for an operation to provide some assisted departures for isolated and vulnerable Australians in Wuhan and the Hubei province,” Morrison told reporters in Canberra.

Reporting by Sonali Paul; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An informative article.

GOING VIRAL 

Coronavirus vs SARS, Spanish flu and Ebola – death toll and symptoms compared

  • 28 Jan 2020, 11:32
  • Updated: 29 Jan 2020, 9:14

THE deadly new coronavirus has killed more than 100 people - with the number of infections almost doubling in a day to more than 4,500.

A growing number of countries around the world have reported cases as governments scramble to control the spread.

The first image of the coronavirus was shared by China's National Microbiology Data Center and shows particles taken from a patient on January 22
5
The first image of the coronavirus was shared by China's National Microbiology Data Center and shows particles taken from a patient on January 22Credit: China's National Microbiology Data Center

Experts in China said tests proved humans first caught the bug from animals sold at a seafood market in Wuhan.

Scientists are concerned because it is closely related to other diseases including SARS, which killed nearly 800 people between 2002 and 2003.

But how does the new illness, dubbed 2019-nCoV, compare?

The new coronavirus

The new strain of coronavirus, 2019-nCoV, causes symptoms that may start as a cold and eventually end up developing into pneumonia
5
The new strain of coronavirus, 2019-nCoV, causes symptoms that may start as a cold and eventually end up developing into pneumonia

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that can cause infections ranging from the common cold to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

The new virus has a wide range of symptoms, including fever, coughing, shortness of breath and breathing difficulties.

Severe cases can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure and death.

Experts are still working to understand more about the new form, which emerged at the end of December, but believe that it jumped from animals to humans.

Like the viruses that cause SARS and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), the new one is an RNA virus - with RNA as its genetic material, rather than DNA.

That means the virus blends with its host’s DNA, and can mutate rapidly.

Where did coronavirus start? From bats to snakes - the theories on deadly virus' origins

The killer coronavirus was spread from bats to snakes to humans, experts have claimed.

An outbreak of the virus is understood to have started at an open air fish market in the Chinese city of Wuhan - which has since been put in lockdownafter 25 people died and more than 600 people were infected globally.

A new study published in the China Science Bulletin this week claimed that the new coronavirus shared a strain of virus found in bats.

Previous deadly outbreaks of SARS and Ebola were also believed to have originated in the flying mammal.

Experts had thought the new virus wasn't capable of causing an epidemic as serious as those outbreaks because its genes were different.

But this latest research appeared to prove otherwise - as scientists scrabble to produce a vaccine.

In a statement, the researchers said: “The Wuhan coronavirus’ natural host could be bats … but between bats and humans there may be an unknown intermediate."

Meanwhile, scientists at Peking University also claim that the deadly virus was passed to humans from bats - but say it was through a mutation in snakes.

The researchers said that the new strain is made up of a combination of one that affects bats and another unknown coronavirus.

They believe that combined genetic material from both bats and this unknown strain picked up a protein that allows viruses to bind to certain host cells - including those of humans.

After analysing the genes of the strains the team found that snakes were susceptible to the most similar version of the coronavirus.

It meant that they likely provided a "reservoir" for the viral strain to grow stronger and replicate.

Snakes are sold at the Huanan Seafood Market in central Wuhan and the strain may have jumped to other animals before passing to humans, they claim.

But a senior researcher at the Wuhan Institute of Virology, who asked not to be named, said the findings should be treated with caution.

He told the South China Morning Post: “It is based on calculation by a computer model.

“Whether it will match what happens in real life is inconclusive.

“The binding protein is important, but it is just one of the many things under investigation. There may be other proteins involved.”

The expert believes that the new strain was an RNA virus, meaning that its mutation speed was 100 times faster than that of a DNA virus such as smallpox.

It can be transmitted from person to person through coughing and sneezing, which increases the risk of it being passed on.

Chinese health authorities also said it can spread before symptoms show up and its incubation period can range from one to 14 days.

So far, the new coronavirus doesn't seem to spread as easily among people as SARS or influenza.

Most of the cases so far that spread between people were of family members and health workers who had contact with patients.

That suggests the new virus isn't well adapted to infect people.

The World Health Organisation called the outbreak an emergency for China, but stopped short of designating it a global emergency.

Cases have been reported in Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Thailand and the United States, as well as Australia, Canada, France, Japan, Malaysia, Nepal, Singapore, South Korea and Vietnam.

So far, no deaths have been reported outside China.

Death toll: 106

Infections: 4,500

SARS

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is caused by coronavirus, computer image of the infection
5
Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is caused by coronavirus, computer image of the infectionCredit: Getty Images - Getty

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first appeared during a pandemic in China in 2002.

Like the current outbreak, it's caused by a coronavirus and displayed similar flu-like symptoms such as a fever, cough and breathing difficulties.

It can also result in a highly contagious and potentially life-threatening form of pneumonia.

SARS is an airborne virus which is spread in small droplets of saliva coughed or sneezed into the air by an infected person.

It can also be spread indirectly via surfaces and even through poo if an infected person doesn't wash their hands properly.

Evidence from the SARS pandemic of 2002 to 2003 showed people living with or caring for someone with a known SARS infection were most at risk of developing the infection themselves.

It's thought that a strain of the coronavirus usually only found in small mammals mutated, enabling it to infect humans.

The SARS infection quickly spread from China to other Asian countries and there were also a small number of cases in several other countries, including four in the UK.

It was eventually brought under control in July 2003, when people suspected of having the condition were isolated and passengers travelling by air were screened.

In 2004 there was another smaller SARS outbreak linked to a medical laboratory in China.

It was thought to have been the result of someone coming into direct contact with a sample of the SARS virus, rather than being caused by animal-to-human or human-to-human transmission.

There's currently no cure for SARS, but research to find a vaccine is ongoing.

Death toll: 774

Infections: 8,098

Spanish flu

The Spanish flu pandemic, file image of an influenza virus, was the deadliest outbreak in history
The Spanish flu pandemic, file image of an influenza virus, was the deadliest outbreak in historyCredit: Getty - Contributor

The 1918 Spanish flu pandemic was the deadliest outbreak of the virus in history killing the most people in the shortest timeframe.

It was first observed in Europe, the US and parts of Asia before it quickly spread throughout the world.

The spread was aided by modern ships and a world war that required moving huge armies quickly across the globe.

It was wrongly named the Spanish flu because it was first reported by a newspaper in Madrid, but it's now believed to have started in Kansas, US.

The virus caused typical flu symptoms, including fever, nausea, aches and diarrhoea but many developed severe pneumonia, which ultimately became fatal.

Dark spots would appear on the cheeks and patients would turn blue, suffocating from a lack of oxygen as lungs filled with a frothy, bloody substance, NPR reports.

Research reconstructing the virus suggested it began in birds, then rapidly mutated, leaping to humans.

Unlike the typical flu, where the highest mortality is in infants and the elderly, the 1918 flu also struck down young, healthy adults.

The military, with its overcrowded camps and troops ships, took a particularly bad hit.

In 2014, scientists revealed that they had solved the mystery of how the Spanish flu started and why it became so deadly.

A study by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that people born after 1889 had not been exposed to the kind of virus which devastated the world in 1918.

This explains why the deadly pandemic largely targeted young adults while older patients, who had built up some immunity, would often make a full recovery.

Also a sudden movement of avian flu genes at the time– causing a change in the kind of haemagglutinin in an already existent flu strain – likely led to the pandemic.

Haemagglutinin is a kind of protein which binds the virus to cells.

There was also no vaccine for the strain in 1918.

Experts say that most people living today would have some immunity to viruses in the 1918 virus' family, called H1N1, while modern antiviral drugs may also be effective.

Death toll: 20-50 million (estimate)

Infections: 500 million (estimate)

Ebola

The Ebola virus, file microscope image, causes an acute, serious illness which is often fatal if untreated
The Ebola virus, file microscope image, causes an acute, serious illness which is often fatal if untreatedCredit: Getty - Contributor

Ebola virus disease is a serious viral infection that originated in sub-Saharan Africa.

It was first detected in 1976 in an outbreak near the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The virus is thought to have originated in fruit bats, which are considered a delicacy in the area where the outbreak started.

A person infected with Ebola will typically develop a high temperature, a headache, joint and muscle pain, a sore throat and severe muscle weakness.

Symptoms start suddenly - between two and 21 days after becoming infected.

Diarrhoea, being sick, a rash, stomach pain and reduced kidney and liver function can follow.

The infection may then cause internal bleeding as well as bleeding from the ears, eyes, nose or mouth.

Unlike the new coronavirus, Ebola is not an airborne disease, and as such it is impossible for a person to become infected by inhaling the same air as a patient.

People can become infected through direct contact with bodily fluids of someone with the virus.

Those at highest risk are typically healthcare workers, family members of those infected and other people who come into close contact with an infected person.

Sexual transmission can occur, from men to women or men, after a person's symptoms have disappeared and they are declared free from the disease.

No one has caught Ebola from someone else in the UK.

There is no proven cure for the virus but in December 2016, it was reported that a new and effective vaccine had been developed.

It started in Guinea and then moved across land borders to Sierra Leone and Liberia.

The current 2018-2019 outbreak in eastern DRC is highly complex, with insecurity adversely affecting public health response activities.

Death toll (2014-2016): 11,325

Cases (2014-2016): 28,600

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Marshall said:

Democratic Republic of Congo

The only place where I used bottled water to  brush my teeth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coronavirus: 6,000 tourists in lockdown on Italian cruise ship

Ship held in quarantine over suspected case of the deadly virus, after doctors tend to woman from Macau running a fever.

2 hours ago
  •  
  •  
 
The Costa Smeralda cruise ship is docked at the Italian port of Civitavecchia [Guglielmo Mangiapane/Reuters]
The Costa Smeralda cruise ship is docked at the Italian port of Civitavecchia [Guglielmo Mangiapane/Reuters]

More than 6,000 tourists have been put on lockdown on a cruise ship in Italy on Thursday after a suspected case of coronavirus was detected on board the vast liner.

Samples taken from a Chinese couple were sent for testing after three doctors and a nurse boarded the Costa Crociere ship in the port of Civitavecchia, near Rome, to tend to a woman running a fever, local health authorities said.

Costa Crociere has confirmed that its ship, the Costa Smeralda, carrying some 7,000 people including crew, was in lockdown.

"There is one suspect case, a woman from Macau. Public health authorities are verifying the situation," a spokesman from the cruise line told DPA news agency.

"We arrived in [Civitavecchia] with the Costa Smeralda cruise ship and they are not letting us off the boat. They say it's due to a health inspection," a passenger named Gaby tweeted.

The Costa Smeralda departed from Savona in northern Italy and stopped in Marseille, Barcelona and Palma de Mallorca before reaching Civitavecchia.

According to ANSA news agency, test results for the suspected patient should be ready in the afternoon. The woman, 54, has been put in isolation with her husband, who does not appear to have any symptoms.

"We did all that we needed to do. The situation is under control and at the moment it does not seem like there are any reasons for concern on board," coastguard commander Vincenzo Leone was quoted as saying by ANSA.

In a statement, Costa Crociere said its priority is "to guarantee the health and safety of guests and crew" and that it would "strictly comply" with regulations from health authorities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hong Kong braces for spread of coronavirus

Coronavirus outbreak, which has killed 170 people and infected thousands across mainland China, has now spread to every part of the country.

by Wayne Hay
3 hours ago
  •  
  •  
 

The coronavirus outbreak which has killed 170 people and infected thousands across mainland China has now spread to every part of the country.

The World Health Organization is preparing to hold another urgent meeting later on Thursday, to decide whether the outbreak should be considered a global emergency.

 

Al Jazeera's Wayne Hay has more from Hong Kong.  https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/01/hong-kong-braces-spreading-coronavirus-200130121200201.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this