2020 Middle East Wars


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Team activated to support global airline safety as Middle East tensions rise

 
 

MONTREAL (Reuters) - An international aviation team has been activated to support “effective coordination and communication” between airlines and countries as tensions mount in the Middle East after a U.S. drone strike killed an Iranian military commander, global airlines body IATA said on Tuesday.

Airlines and the United Nations’ aviation agency have started to monitor strategic airspace over Iran and Iraq. With some commercial carriers still serving those countries and others flying over their airspace, the International Air Transport Association also issued a statement reminding countries of their obligation to communicate potential risks to civil aviation.

“It is critical that states live up to this obligation as tensions in the Middle East rise,” the group said, days after the killing of General Qassem Soleimani on Friday plunged the region into a new crisis.

On Monday, Germany published a new warning for Iraq, indicating areas of concern for overflying traffic, according to a report published by the site OPSGROUP.

The coordination team operated by IATA and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) was activated as a “standard precautionary measure,” in the event that contingency measures are required by airlines, IATA said in a statement to Reuters.

The team brings together airlines, regulators and air navigation service providers to ensure any potential risks to aviation are shared quickly, an industry source familiar with the group said.

“Everyone’s urging restraint,” said the source who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the matter.

Carriers are increasingly taking steps to uncover threats to their planes after Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 was shot down in 2014 by a missile over Ukraine, killing all 298 people on board.

Airspace controlled by Iran and Iraq are seen as strategic for commercial aviation in the Middle East. If there were the need to shut down the airspace, carriers would have to be rerouted which would lead to greater congestion and fuel costs, said the source.

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When compared to wearing blackface and dancing like an ape, or standing under a terrorist flag while mourning one of the most ruthless terrorists of the decade..... I pick cheating at golf; I'd even a

This takes the all inclusive bs too far in my honest opinion! Then again, they are NDP.

A historic moment IMO, here we have Canadian Politicians standing under a terrorist flag mourning the death of a notorious terrorist and purveyor of death..... I didn't expect to see such a thing in m

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U.S. FAA bans airlines from flying over Iraq, Iran after missile attack on U.S. troops

 

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WASHINGTON/MONTREAL (Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration said it would ban U.S. carriers from operating in the airspace over Iraq, Iran, the Gulf of Oman and the waters between Iran and Saudi Arabia after Iran launched a missile attack on U.S.-led forces in Iraq.

Tehran fired more than a dozen ballistic missiles from Iranian territory against at least two Iraqi military bases hosting U.S.-led coalition personnel, the U.S. military said on Tuesday.

The FAA said it issued the airspace ban “due to heightened military activities and increased political tensions in the Middle East, which present an inadvertent risk to U.S. civil aviation operations.”

Several non-U.S. airlines had flights over parts of Iraq and Iran at the time, according to FlightRadar24 data. They are not directly affected by the FAA ban, but foreign carriers and their national regulators typically consider U.S. advice carefully when deciding where to fly.

Before the latest guidance, the FAA had already prohibited U.S. carriers from flying below 26,000 feet over Iraq and from flying over an area of Iranian airspace above the Gulf and Gulf of Oman since Iran shot down a high-altitude U.S. drone last June.

Singapore Airlines Ltd said after the attack on U.S. bases in Iraq that all of its flights would be diverted from Iranian airspace.

Carriers are increasingly taking steps to limit threats to their planes after Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 was shot down in 2014 by a missile over Ukraine, killing all 298 people on board.

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An international aviation team has been activated to support “effective coordination and communication” between airlines and countries as tensions mount in the Middle East after a U.S. drone strike killed an Iranian military commander, global airlines body IATA said on Tuesday.

Airlines and the United Nations’ aviation agency have started to monitor strategic airspace over Iran and Iraq. With some commercial carriers still serving those countries and others flying over their airspace, the International Air Transport Association also issued a statement reminding countries of their obligation to communicate potential risks to civil aviation.

“It is critical that states live up to this obligation as tensions in the Middle East rise,” the group said, days after the killing of General Qassem Soleimani on Friday plunged the region into a new crisis.

On Monday, Germany published a new warning for Iraq, indicating areas of concern for overflying traffic, according to a report published by the site OPSGROUP.

The coordination team operated by IATA and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) was activated as a “standard precautionary measure,” in the event that contingency measures are required by airlines, IATA said in a statement to Reuters.

The team brings together airlines, regulators and air navigation service providers to ensure any potential risks to aviation are shared quickly, an industry source familiar with the group said.

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“Everyone’s urging restraint,” said the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the matter.

Airspace controlled by Iran and Iraq are seen as strategic for commercial aviation in the Middle East. If there were the need to shut down the airspace, carriers would have to be rerouted which would lead to greater congestion and fuel costs, said the source.

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Let’s hope the Ukraine accident has nothing to do with terrorists.

Iran crash: Ukraine Boeing with 176 onboard comes down near Tehran

 

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1 hour ago, Jaydee said:

Yep......

 

I could not care any less about Hillary.  Insignificant spec in the political world made larger by the media.  She would be nothing at all if bill didn't get a BJ in the Oval Office

 

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You know what.  Bomb Iran.  But first get congressional approval and declare war on the state.  Until then you are just another Terrorist and no better than the guy you bombed.

Zero Respect for the rules.

Cheats at golf too.

 

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On ‎1‎/‎9‎/‎2020 at 7:48 AM, boestar said:

You know what.  Bomb Iran.  But first get congressional approval and declare war on the state.  Until then you are just another Terrorist and no better than the guy you bombed.

Zero Respect for the rules.

Cheats at golf too.

 

 Cheats at golf - well - Putin catches the biggest pike in the lake, and, he got there on horseback!

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21 minutes ago, QFE said:

WOLFHUNTER - When I said cheats at golf I was quoting Boestar!

I know.... and it was funny both times. 

I bet he does cheat at golf. For me, it's all about the Harley Davidson carts and who can get through the sand traps.

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Canada’s De facto ruling party, the lunatic NDP are officially nutso!!

NDP statement on plane tragedy condemns Trump, not Iran 

“ Now, with tensions so high in the region and the unpredictability and President Trump’s actions, it will not be easy to get back to that work, but we have a responsibility to make sure that we do. Canada can be a leader in making the horrific tragedy of Flight 752 the end of the latest increase in violence and not the beginning of another misguided and disastrous war.”

https://www.thepostmillennial.com/ndp-statement-on-plane-tragedy-condemns-trump-not-iran/

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8 hours ago, Jaydee said:

Canada’s De facto ruling party, the lunatic NDP are officially nutso!!

IMO,  they are more tactical than nuts.... I would be willing to forgive mental illness.

Had Soleimani died of a heart attack instead of a drone attack, would those NDP MLA’s have stood under a terrorist flag while mourning his passing?

Even though I remain in absolute awe over their actions (and the lack of blow back), my guess is no. IMO, this was purely an anti-Trump sentiment and that’s the only reason they got away with it. That means “outrage” has become selective, and even worse, synonymous with partisan politics… and thus rendered moot. In the absence of a raving anti-Trump sentiment, their actions would be widely seen as treasonous. Don’t simply take my word for it, try it out for yourself, hang a Hezbollah (or ISIS) flag at the end of your driveway and see how supportive your neighbours are.

The latest Democratic position in the US seems to be that the strike was wrong because there was no evidence he was going to attack anything. Pause for a moment, think about that perspective; take a look at this guys resume… now apply that same logic to targeted strikes during the Obama years and judge the current level of “outrage” rationally.

Lets go a step further and use a Toronto analogy that most Canadians can relate to. Trying to convince a soldier there was no credible evidence he was planning an attack is akin to telling Toronto residents there’s no evidence to support the notion that street gangs plan to sell drugs, carry weapons or target rival gang members.        

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US military presence in the Middle East and Afghanistan

Washington has more than 60,000 troops in the Middle East and is planning to deploy more forces amid tensions with Iran.

Alia Chughtai | 13 Jan 2020 15:28 GMT | Interactive, Middle East, War, United States, US-Iran escalation

 

Days after the United States assassinated top Iranian military commander, Qassem Soleimani, in Baghdad, Iran fired more than a dozen missiles at two Iraqi bases housing US troops.

Following the retaliatory attack on January 8, Iran's President Hassan Rouhani said Tehran's "final answer" to Soleimani's killing will "be to kick all US forces out of the region", while Iran's elite Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corp said the missile assaults were just the start of a series of attacks across the region. 

The US has between 60,000 and 70,000 troops in the Middle East, according to the US Central Command, and has announced plans to deploy thousands of additional troops to the region amid the heightened tensions.

This map shows where US soldiers are deployed in the Middle East and Afghanistan, as well as some of the major bases they are stationed at in the region.

 

INTERACTIVE: US forces in the Middle East and Afghanistan

   

INTERACTIVE: US bases in the Middle East

 

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15 hours ago, boestar said:

Hey Trump...Mind your own damned business.  Who elected you world police

 

Hey Trudeau....Mind your own damned business. Who elected you world police.
 

 

Canada considers new international push to oust Venezuela's Nicholas Maduro

Canada is considering convening a high-level meeting of the Lima Group to refocus efforts to bring about a democratic transition in Venezuela following days of drama at the National Assembly in Caracas. 

The man Canada considers Venezuela's legitimate president, Juan Guiado, was able to take his seat in the legislature this month in spite of attempts by the government of Nicolas Maduro to keep him out.

 

And the move to prevent opposition deputies from taking their seats by surrounding the building with police appeared to backfire on Maduro, when it was condemned by Latin American governments normally considered sympathetic to Venezuela's "Bolivarian revolution."

A Canadian official speaking on background told CBC News that Ottawa interprets the decision of the Mexican government of President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador to sign one of two Lima Group statements condemning the Maduro government as a sign that the hemispheric coalition Ottawa helped build to oppose Maduro hasn't completely fractured.

Venezuelan paramilitary police used force to try to keep the opposition majority out of the National Assembly, injuring four deputies slightly and tearing Opposition Leader Guaido's suit jacket. But they seemed reluctant to go beyond pushing, shoving, and trying to bar doors.

When a crush of opposition deputies finally succeeded in pushing open the main door of the legislative palace, police gave way.

Guaido and his supporters — all elected in the last Venezuelan election to be recognized by Canada as legitimate — rushed into the chamber and quickly swore Guaido into office for a second term as president of the National Assembly.

 
venezuela.jpg
Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro waves as he arrives at the National Constituent Assembly's building during the celebration rally of the 20th anniversary of the Venezuelan Constitution in Caracas, Venezuela, on Dec. 15, 2019. (Matias Delacroix/The Associated Press)

The opposition has argued that, under Venezuela's constitution, Guaido's role as assembly president also makes him president of the republic, because the claims to office of Maduro and his vice-president, Delcy Rodriguez, are based on the results of a fraudulent election in 2018. Canada, which also rejected the results of the 2018 election, supports that position.

The Maduro regime's reluctance to use greater force against the pro-Guaido deputies may reflect the fact that the U.S. has repeatedly warned Venezuela that any move to arrest or harm Guaido would cross a red line.

"I think you would see even additional action far beyond what we have pushed out to date" if there were a move to detain Guaido, U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Cuba and Venezuela Carrie Filipetti, told reporters at the U.S. Embassy in Colombia on Tuesday.

Maduro's allies

The events cap a year in which the opposition began strongly, but then seemed to lose momentum, as regional shifts of power brought cracks to the Lima Group alliance of nations.

The Lima Group was set up in August 2017 in response to a violent crackdown on dissent in Venezuela. It united Canada with the biggest nations of Latin America: Brazil, Mexico, Argentina and Colombia, but excluded the United States.

That exclusion reflected an important difference of opinion: the U.S. was unwilling to rule out the use of military force to eject the Maduro government, while Lima Group members said they were committed to peaceful change.

 
venezuela-fading-opposition.jpg
In this Feb. 2, 2019 file photo, anti-government protesters take part in a nationwide demonstration demanding the resignation of President Nicolas Maduro, in Caracas, Venezuela. (Rodrigo Abd/The Associated Press)

Taken together, the Lima Group governments and the U.S. represented about 95 per cent of the people of the hemisphere, while the Maduro government enjoyed the support of a handful of smaller nations: Cuba, Nicaragua, Bolivia and El Salvador (along with Russia and China).

But 2019 would bring changes that took some of the heat off Maduro. 

When Guaido took the presidential oath on Jan. 23, 2019, he received an avalanche of recognition from about 60 countries. Canada was the second to extend recognition, but Lima Group founding member Mexico, the world's most populous Spanish-speaking country, held back.

That was because eight weeks before Guaido's assumption, a new president had taken Mexico in a new, leftward, direction. President Andres Lopez Obrador (often known as AMLO) replaced Enrique Peña Nieto, whose government had a mostly positive relationship with the Trudeau government and was an early backer of the Lima Group.

AMLO gave an early sign that Mexico's position would be changing when he invited Maduro to personally attend his inauguration.

Another Lima Group dropout was Argentina, where voters turned against Trudeau ally Mauricio Macri, and restored to power a Peronist government that has historically been close to Maduro and former Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez (and had once received a suitcase full of cash as an illegal campaign contribution from its friends in Caracas). 

The inauguration of that new government last month effectively took Argentina out of the Lima Group.

Region condemns the move

But the decision to bar elected deputies from their seats seems to have been a bridge too far for some of Maduro's Latin American allies.

Mexico's Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard joined the chorus of condemnation over this week's attempted closure of Venezuela's elected assembly, saying "the legitimate functioning of the legislative branch is an inviolable pillar of democracies."

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-venezuela-maduro-1.5418058

 

 

 

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