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15 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

But don't worry... it's just R/W extremest thing:

Well, the solution is obvious.  No prosecutors?  Just stop charging the accused.  Voila!  Problem solved!

We're well on the way to anarchy anyway: defended police forces, no prosecutors and judges under threat of assault and violence in their own homes.

Hmmm, I wonder where this goes?

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2 hours ago, Wolfhunter said:

 

Rioters in downtown Portland graffiti, smash windows following Supreme Court abortion case: 'Death to SCOTUS'

 

Where are the violent white nationalists and white supremacists the media in Canada and the US have been warning us about?

All I see is liberals with gas cans and matches. I'm ready for those white nationalists... I bet police departments, fire services, insurance companies, and business owners  are too.

 

You could also quote the source of your post, Rioters in downtown Portland graffiti, smash windows following Supreme Court abortion case: 'Death to SCOTUS' | Fox News

The actual details are a little different from what you post.'

 

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I usually just  post headlines now. it's an effort to get people to do their own homework. They can do it or not at their pleasure. It's the issue (and often the underlying issue) that's important, not necessarily the media/government spin.

Mostly I look only at the main stream headlines anyway and use them to seek out reports from the source, like city papers and local news outlets. I don't trust any of the MSM outlets. Again, you can do that or not at your pleasure.

More to the point, the question of where all of those white supremacists and white nationalist extremists are remains an issue of some importance though. Intelligence sources in Canada and the US have named them public enemy number one. That seems more based on trinity narrative than reality IMO.

Regardless though, I don't like them a bit and they need to be hammered into submission... but all I see is liberals with gas cans and those details are pretty much undeniable. The issue isn't the SCOTUS decision (to me) it's a question of who's carrying the gas can. In the long run, and IMO, we will soon see that as more of a "burning issue" than the SCOTUS decision itself... which was irrelevant to the point I was clumsily trying to make.

 

 

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In the same vein, here's a short interview that's worth watching. The lack of journalistic integrity is at the heart of many divisive and polarizing issues. They should be asking the questions that we would be asking if we were there to ask the questions.

instead of being a card carrying member of the trinity, they should be holding the government to account in a way the Conservative party has utterly failed to do. 

 https://www.rebelnews.com/former_cbc_journalist_you_re_not_allowed_to_question_the_narrative

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Racist or just a political statement re the NDP and their support of the Liberals.?

Unapproved racist float snuck into Sundre rodeo parade, say organizers

Michael Rodriguez - Yesterday 5:02 p.m.
 
 
image.png.001046b3ae071c80f469b3fa7f28e583.png
A float being condemned as racist joined the Sundre Pro Rodeo parade without approval from parade officials on June 25, 2022.
© Provided by Calgary HeraldA float being condemned as racist joined the Sundre Pro Rodeo parade without approval from parade officials on June 25, 2022.

The Sundre Pro Rodeo is apologizing after photos surfaced from the event’s Saturday morning parade of a racist and politically charged float, which parade officials say joined the procession without approval.

The float showed a tractor, driven by a man in a mask holding an Alberta flag, pulling a manure spreader marked “The Liberal” which carried another man wearing a fake beard and a turban, brandishing what appeared to be a pitchfork. While the exact message the float was attempting to convey remains unclear, several from the Sikh community have condemned it as a racist act.

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2 minutes ago, Kargokings said:

While the exact message the float was attempting to convey remains unclear, several from the Sikh community have condemned it as a racist act

You would have to be some kind of stupid to not see the intended message in this photo.

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Violence, threats, property destruction, and intimidation in support of political goals.... guess what that's called?

How many white nationalists were in the group? Let's compare the amount of property damaged by liberal/ANTIFA activists over the last two years with that of white nationalists. If they are truly the number one enemy of the state, it should be obvious in the answer. 

It's not just an intelligence error... it's a lie. 

Portland abortion protesters target pregnancy support center: 'The violence was horrible'

Rioters target family and pregnancy centers nationwide

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10 hours ago, Jaydee said:

You would have to be some kind of stupid to not see the intended message in this photo.

Thank god it was not a Scotsman  with a kilt and a bag pipe......

political satire': Lynne Hoff discusses her controversial parade float

Lynne Hoff was behind a controversial float in the Sundre Pro Rodeo's parade on Saturday, June 25, 2022.Lynne Hoff was behind a controversial float in the Sundre Pro Rodeo's parade on Saturday, June 25, 2022.
Tyson Fedor

The owner of a contentious Alberta parade float that sparked controversy after photos of it began circulating online this weekend is speaking out.

Lynne Hoff was behind the float, which appeared in the Sundre Pro Rodeo's parade on Saturday.  

It was a John Deere tractor pulling a manure spreader with the phrase ‘The Liberal’ on it in red lettering, driven by one volunteer dressed as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau while another volunteer, dressed as NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, sat on the back of it. 

Hoff says it was political satire. 

"The last thing it was, was racist," she told CTV News.  

"If the leader of the NDP party would have been a blond woman, I'd have been in there. It wasn't anything to do with the Sikh community."

Hoff says Sundre is a very welcoming and inclusive town and that the float was motivated by a tumultuous two years of COVID-19 restrictions, federally and provincially. 

"These lockdowns have kept Sundre from having their parade for two years," Hoff said.  

"We just wanted to bring some levity and showcase that a little bit. There was laughter all the way down the parade route."

sundre-rodeo-parade-float---trudeau-and-Unsanctioned entry in the Sundre Rode Parade in the Alberta town that including depictions of Prime Minister Trudeau and NDP leader Jagmeet Singh. (Twitter)On Sunday, both the Sundre Pro Rodeo and the parade committee said they did not approve Hoff's entry. 

"The entry was not approved and, upon further investigation, joined the parade without passing through any registration," the committee wrote in a statement that was posted on the Sundre Pro Rodeo's Facebook page.

Hoff says she is a supporter of the rodeo, but believes there may have been a miscommunication between organizers and herself. 

"I was a little surprised," she said. "I don’t sneak around about anything."

"The Sundre Rodeo Committee is a wonderful group of people, they're all volunteers and I am not going to contradict what they said, but I think that there was a mistake."

Hoff says those who found the float offensive have a right to be offended. 

"I don’t think it was done in poor taste," she said. "It was political satire."

She says Canada has seen political satire dating back a century, referencing The Milch Cow, a political cartoon from 1915 depicting easterners raking in rewards from hard working western Canadians. 

the-milch-cow--canada--political-cartoonA copy of The Milch Cow, a political cartoon from 1915."It shows the cow that is Canada," she said.  "It shows Alberta feeding all the hay, Saskatchewan and Manitoba doing more work, and central Canada getting all the milk and that really hasn’t changed for 100 years."

Hoff says anyone who found the float racist or offensive is welcome to visit Sundre. 

Mayor Richard Warnock says the town does not condone any type of racism.

"We are extremely disappointed to learn about an unauthorized float and their attempt at a political statement gained access this past weekend to an event that our community has celebrated for years," said Warnock. 

When questioned if felt racism was not the intention of the float, Warnock said no.

"I don't believe that racism was intended against the Sikh community," he said. 

"But nevertheless, it was taken that way, and therefore, we just can't have that." 

Sundre resident Neran Persaud says he is dismayed people suggested the float had racist undertones. 

"Come out here and see for yourself," he said. 

"Don't just sit in Calgary and yell 'racism' because you see something that you don't like. That was a political statement."

Persaud says he has lived in Sundre for five years and has always felt welcomed. 

"I don't like it when people say that this is racism, and this town is racist," he said. 

"Look at me, I'm a man of colour, living in this town. I'm well accepted here and I've never had anything derogatory said to me."

The parade committee does say that it is putting in place measures that will stop similar floats from showing up in the parade in the future. 

Calgary’s mayor Jyoti Gondek reinforced her view on Monday that the float had racist undertones. 

She says it drives people away from Alberta, a province she believes can have a bad reputation for similar events.

“It’s not funny, it’s not amusing, you’re killing our economy by perpetuating this stereotype,” said Gondek. 

When asked what measures are in place to prevent a rogue float from joining the upcoming Calgary Stampede Parade, officials with the organization issued the following statement:

The volunteer Parade Committee has a thorough selection process for its entrants, along with on route security to ensure the safety of participants and guests.

"The Calgary Stampede Parade has been taking place for over 100 years and has always embodied the spirit of our community."

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It's clearly not racist.  The dude dressed up as a Sikh was dressed as a Sikh because Jagmeet is a Sikh.  It's simply to help the audience identify who the character is.  Any claim that it's racist is BS.  They know it, we know it, everyone knows it.  Of course the CBC will run with the "racist" angle anyways.

The same goes for the "pitchfork is violence" angle - complete BS.  The pitchfork is for shovelling the **bleep**.  Anyone who grew up on a farm (like me) will know that.  I've cleaned a lot of stalls and shovelled a lot of **bleep** - it's done with a pitchfork!

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Not usually a fan but he sure got this right:

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/conrad-black-the-gradual-civic-suicide-of-a-society-of-rights

I couldn't possibly be more disappointed with the Conservative Party. Weak, absent, unfit to govern and an embarrassment to fiscal and social conservatives alike IMO.

Canada now exists in a leadership vacuum and we worked hard to get here, hopefully the PPC can mature as a party and fill the void. 

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BBC hires consultants to educate staff on 150+ genders

Remember the good old days when there were only 75 genders?

What are we going to do about those cardio machines at the gym that only offer a male/female option for calorie computations.... why do liberals refuse to address this discriminatory practice?

Fear not, the BBC will soon be armed with reporters ready to take on the challenge.

 

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This is how you make your country ungovernable.

Ask a liberal to name a place were this had a happy ending. Then... ask a soldier (in a blue hat) if he's seen this anywhere else. One will answer immediately and the other won't answer at all.

Here we see the effect of experience...L/W loons are getting people killed now and the mayhem needs to come directly to their doorstep, only then will they connect the dots. 

 

 

Atlanta suburb pushes to secede from city due to surging crime: 'This is a war zone'

Buckhead City Committee CEO Bill White called the surging crime 'murder and mayhem'

 

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18 hours ago, Wolfhunter said:

....ask a soldier in a blue hat

If you can find one.

https://www.rebelnews.com/us_military_struggles_to_meet_2022_goals_lowers_standards

The predictable result of woke recruiting and virtue signalling that extends all the way to preferred pronouns in signature blocks. 

People are also retiring early which creates the double whammy of retention and recruiting squeezes simultaneously. Analogous to police defunding as well, you will lose the people you most want to retain and gain people you wouldn't have previously selected. There are long term consequences to that when careers are measured in decades and promotion comes from within.

MBA Crew finger prints are all over this...  They don't understand soldiers any better than they do pilots and police officers.

Seriously now, when you see experienced older pilots driving trucks and working on fishing boats it's worth taking a moment and asking why. Most (actually all that I'm acquainted with) have no desire to return to flying so it's not about luring them back... there are important lessons to be learned from the "why" though.

As a PS, I mentioned pilots only because it's an aviation forum, it's the same deal with soldiers and police officers though, albeit for different reasons, but there's a common thread here... inexplicably lost on those with MBAs for some reason. 

The problem becomes replacing "experience" in occupations that are highly experience dependant and have long training times. Growing experience quickly is like hatching chickens for supper... hungry days are coming. 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Posted (edited)

“ Since Roe was overturned, some on the left are now arguing that voting simply doesn’t work — a message that has been mostly spread on the internet and litigated through memes and Twitter. From their perspective, if democratic institutions can’t deliver the results they want, the solution is not to win stronger democratic mandates, but to instead burn down the said institutions. “
 

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/adam-zivo-to-win-the-abortion-debate-democrats-need-to-be-persuasive?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR3aNBBIsyyoCAkcH1aKaZsDFtFrXthO8lifvGfcFDjhBNS2cMdnEpnWcso#Echobox=1656498629

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Quote

Kristopher Kinsinger: The rot in Canada’s constitutional culture runs deep

Special to National Post - 3h ago
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A person holds a copy of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms during a rally against COVID-19 restrictions on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, on Jan. 29.
© Provided by National PostA person holds a copy of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms during a rally against COVID-19 restrictions on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, on Jan. 29.

Another Canada Day is upon us. This year’s celebrations coincide with the 40th anniversary of the patriation of the Canadian Constitution and the enactment of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Such an important milestone offers a timely opportunity to reflect on the state of Canada’s constitutional culture. The report, however, is a decidedly mixed one.

Quebec’s Bill 96, which purports to unilaterally amend the Constitution Act, 1867 to declare French to be the sole official language of the Quebec “nation” is a sobering sign of our constitutional decline. The same goes for United Conservative Party of Alberta leadership candidate Danielle Smith’s absurd plan to side-step the Constitution’s division of powers through a proposed Alberta sovereignty act. Joanna Baron, in a recent article for the Hub, aptly describes both proposals as brazen attempts to “force … constitutional (crises) for flagrantly political ends.”

The rot in our constitutional culture, however, runs deeper than provincial obstinance. Indeed, while the charter continues to occupy a lofty position in our national imagination, far too many Canadians hold to superficial understandings of their constitutional rights and freedoms.

These absolutist conceptions of both freedom, and the state’s power to limit it, have become more widely entrenched during the pandemic, heightening the need for a serious national conversation about the role that the charter plays in our constitutional order.

On the one end of this increasingly polarized spectrum are those who view virtually all limits on constitutional freedoms as unjustifiable. This sentiment was given voice by many leaders of the Freedom Convoy. The idea that our constitutional commitment to “peace, order and good government” may at times require limits on individual freedom was, seemingly, rejected by these absolutists.

In contrast, those located on the other end of this spectrum appear ready to accept any limitations on constitutional freedoms that are pursued in the name of a legitimate public good — or at least those that align with their political prejudices.

Advocates of this view will frequently remind us that all charter guarantees are subject to “reasonable limits” under Section 1, as if such a trite assertion tells us what makes limits on freedom reasonable. Yet Section 1 serves a dual purpose. As law professor Brian Bird explains , this provision “both activates the rights and freedoms in the charter and articulates the standard by which they can be curtailed by state actors.”

Section 1 first “guarantees” the rights and freedoms in the charter and then says that these entitlements are “subject only to such reasonable limits … as can be demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society.” At a minimum, Section 1 tells us that democratic governance will always demand respect for a basic threshold of freedom, even if this freedom must occasionally be limited. Moreover, the state always bears the onus of proving why any resulting limitation on charter rights is justified; the “reasonable limits” clause isn’t a blank cheque.

This reading of Section 1 may strike some as novel, flowing from our Canadian tendency to mythologize the charter as the genesis and sole source of our constitutional rights and freedoms. While the charter no doubt marks an important and positive step in our constitutional evolution, civil liberties weren’t conjured into existence in Canada in 1982. Far from it.

Consider, for example, a mostly forgotten series of decisions handed down between the 1930s and ’50s, in which the Supreme Court of Canada considered whether provincial authority over “property and civil rights” encompasses such freedoms as expression and religion. Notably, several of the concurring judges in these cases held that our system of parliamentary democracy — inherited from and “similar in principle to that of the United Kingdom” — protects many of the fundamental freedoms that are now entrenched in Section 2 of the charter.

Then-chief justice Lyman Duff stated in one such ruling that the Constitution Act, 1867 “contemplates a Parliament working under the influence of public opinion and public discussion.” Justice Ivan Rand took this reasoning even further in a later decision , concluding that if public expression “is placed under license, its basic condition is destroyed; the government, as licensor, becomes disjointed from the citizenry.” In other words, parliamentary institutions can’t function without freedoms that protect democratic participation and expression.

In many respects, this so-called implied bill of rights paved the way for the enactment of the 1960 Bill of Rights and, eventually, the charter itself. The point here isn’t that these rulings made freedoms absolute; rather, the Supreme Court recognized the minimal but inexorable necessity of freedom in our constitutional order. As Justice Louis LeBel remarked in a 2004 dissent , “This communal will toward recognizing and entrenching fundamental rights was a gradual evolution, and not a ‘rights revolution’ as some would have it.”

Canada’s constitutional heritage makes neither freedom nor its limitation absolute. In a quintessentially Canadian fashion, ours is a constitutionalism that strives for compromise — in this case, between rights and responsibilities. Recovering and embracing this inheritance will be the first step toward restoring our constitutional culture.

National Post

Kristopher Kinsinger is an Ontario lawyer and the national director of the Runnymede Society. The views expressed here are his own.

 

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I guess it's official now. Progressives are certifiably insane.

Cornell University removes Gettysburg Address, Lincoln bust from library after alleged complaint

A biology professor says the display was removed after 'someone complained'

Cornell has a hand written copy of the Gettysburg address in Lincoln's hand... maybe the fools should burn that eh? They have more in common with ISIS than the Taliban do.

 
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1 minute ago, Wolfhunter said:

I guess it's official now. Progressives are certifiably insane.

Cornell University removes Gettysburg Address, Lincoln bust from library after alleged complaint

A biology professor says the display was removed after 'someone complained'

Cornell has a hand written copy of the Gettysburg address in Lincoln's hand... maybe the fools should burn that eh? They have more in common with ISIS than the Taliban do.

 

So since the criteria for removal seems to be "someone complained" I wonder if that would work for some of our current politicians?  😀

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https://torontosun.com/opinion/editorials/editorial-federal-services-collapsing-under-trudeau

Just like a a banana republic... the ones where the unholy trinity rules and they can't seem to get the simplest of things right.

People will rightly question the connection between basic services and the trinity... I have no explanation. But where you see the trinity you will also see lineups, shortages, supply line failures, inflation, rising crime rates, a robust black market, etc. The sort of things that defy logic... how can there be a shortage of flour in the bread basket of Africa? Why is meat so expensive when farmers are killing off stock they can't sell (or even afford to feed)?

I'm not suggesting it's causal, I don't know that it is, in fact, I don't understand the process... other than asserting that it always seems to be in attendance where banana conditions exist. On the plus side though, it makes outcomes predictable. That's why I filled two freezers to the brim before all this took off... it's the only reason, it had nothing to do with being a savvy market analyst or member of the MBA crew. Soldier 101 seems to apply to all people in all nations, I like the predictability it provides and my universe would collapse without it.

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https://www.rebelnews.com/democrats_propose_transgender_bill_of_rights_to_codify_constitutional_protections_for_transgendered_individuals

Remember when everyone thought this was about sharing bathrooms?

A cynical person would say It was never about sharing bathrooms, but it certainly serves as a lesson in the dangers of not thinking things through, and the effect of unintended consequences.

Seems to me that the same young women who called me a racist homophobe a few years ago (for pointing that out) are now leading the charge against trans rights. Cool eh?

I expect the defund police crowd will have a similar epiphany as soon as violent crime collides with abysmal response times in the burbs (and affluent parts of uptown)... in other words, when it hurts them. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

A brand new level of absurdity.   

Here we have a white man calling a black man a white supremacist. He can't tell you what a woman is though because he's not a biologist... but he sure recognizes a black white guy when he sees one; and somehow, the biological parameters of the former don't apply to the latter. No confusion at all in his mind, no sense of the absurdity he proclaims as truth. The black guy isn't just white, he's a white supremacist... and roosters lay eggs, right?

If you are a student of scripture, things are going exactly according to plan. Something about the days of Noah as I recall...

Rex Chapman suggests Clarence Thomas is a 'Black White Supremacist'

Liberals have berated Justice Clarence Thomas following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade

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