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Jaydee
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The donkey told the tiger, "The grass is blue." 

The tiger replied, "No, the grass is green ."

The discussion became heated, and the two decided to submit the issue to arbitration, so they approached the lion. 

As they approached the lion on his throne, the donkey started screaming: ′′Your Highness, isn't it true that the grass is blue?" 

The lion replied: "If you believe it is true, the grass is blue." 

The donkey rushed forward and continued: ′′The tiger disagrees with me, contradicts me and annoys me. Please punish him."

The king then declared: ′′The tiger will be punished with 3 days of silence." 

The donkey jumped with joy and went on his way, content and repeating ′′The grass is blue, the grass is blue..." 

The tiger asked the lion, "Your Majesty, why have you punished me, after all, the grass is green?" 

The lion replied, ′′You've known and seen the grass is green."

The tiger asked, ′′So why do you punish me?" 

The lion replied, "That has nothing to do with the question of whether the grass is blue or green. The punishment is because it is degrading for a brave, intelligent creature like you to waste time arguing with an ass, and on top of that, you came and bothered me with that question just to validate something you already knew was true!"

The biggest waste of time is arguing with the fool and fanatic who doesn't care about truth or reality, but only the victory of his beliefs and illusions. Never waste time on discussions that make no sense. There are people who, for all the evidence presented to them, do not have the ability to understand. Others who are blinded by ego, hatred and resentment, and the only thing that they want is to be right even if they aren’t. 

When IGNORANCE SCREAMS, intelligence moves on.

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Edited by Jaydee
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The only safe way to use an ATM in Trinidad. True story…NEVER take an unauthorized cab in POS Trinidad or there’s a VERY good chance you end up at a bank machine with a gun to your head. Advice given to me by the hotel Bell man.

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Edited by Jaydee
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Cutting out the middleman...

While church attendance among Canadians plunges, belief in God stays nearly the same

All provinces saw declines in the number of people attending services, but Quebec saw the biggest drop, with people going to church often and occasionally falling from 33% to 8%

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Fri Dec 24, 2021 - National Post
by Jessica Mundie

Quote

Jedwab said younger people are less likely to believe in God because they are still forming their own ideas about religion. He also said because they spend more time online, they may not encounter religion as much in their day or consider it as important as older generations do.

Throughout the pandemic, there has been a sharp decline in Canadians attending religious services despite only a slight drop in their belief in God, a new survey has found.

The Association for Canadian Studies (ACS) and Leger recently released findings from a survey that looked into how Canadians kept their faith during the pandemic when many places of worship have had to close their doors or severely limit capacity to comply with public health rules. The survey was conducted through a web panel between Nov. 19 to 21, with 1,565 Canadians 18 years of age or older. The results of the survey are compared to a similar pre-pandemic survey of 2,215 Canadians that was conducted in May 2019.

The most significant finding of the 2021 survey is the decrease in Canadians attending religious services since the pandemic began. Respondents who said they never attend services increased from 30 per cent pre-pandemic to 67 per cent. The survey also found that 60.5 per cent of Canadians who say they strongly believe in God never or rarely attended a religious service since the beginning of the pandemic.

Although attendance has dropped, the survey found that one-third of respondents still say religion is important in their lives. The survey found only a slight decrease in the belief in God — down six per cent from May 2019 to November 2021.

Jack Jedwab, president and CEO of ACS, said the drop in attendance reveals that Canadians have been able to separate their religious beliefs and the physical act of attending church service.

“It is possible that people made recourse to virtual platforms for attending religious services,” Jedwab said in an email. “Still, it speaks to the personal side of religious conviction as opposed to the need for the group or communal feeling.”

While restrictions on places of worship due to COVID-19 were seen as unfair for four in ten Canadian faithful according to one poll, 50 per cent said the restrictions were fairly balanced.

While all provinces saw declines in the number of people attending religious services, Quebec saw the biggest drop, with people attending church often and occasionally falling from 33 per cent to eight per cent. Comparatively, Francophones have the lowest rate of attendance — 91 per cent said they have rarely or never attended religious services since the beginning of the pandemic.

The survey also points to interesting trends in religious beliefs within different populations in the country. Belief in God is lower among men (50 per cent) than women (57 per cent). Younger people also believe less, only 41 per cent of respondents aged 18 to 34 say they believe compared to 64 per cent of those 55 years of age or older.

Jedwab said younger people are less likely to believe in God because they are still forming their own ideas about religion. He also said because they spend more time online, they may not encounter religion as much in their day or consider it as important as older generations do.

While attendance at religious services was down in all provinces, some saw a rise in believers. In Atlantic Canada, respondents saying they attend services often and occasionally dropped from 38 per cent in May 2019 to 17 per cent in November 2021. Yet, throughout the pandemic, Atlantic respondents who say they believe in God rose nine per cent, from 54 per cent to 63 per cent.

“It is possible that the lesser impact of COVID-19 may have some positive impact on religious sentiment in the Atlantic,” said Jedwab.

The surveys have a margin of error of plus or minus 2.5 per cent (2019) and 2.9 per cent (2021)

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Maybe it’s just me or has the Order of Canada become a political token of correctness and diversity:

Quote

Also of note is Judy Cameron, of Oakville, Ont., who is the mother of Newstalk 580 CFRA host Kristy Cameron.

Cameron was appointed as a member of the Order of Canada for her groundbreaking career in the aviation industry and for her inspirational leadership as the first Canadian woman to be hired as a pilot for a national airline.

https://ottawa.ctvnews.ca/11-people-from-ottawa-and-region-named-to-order-of-canada-1.5722372

 

Really??? Getting hired  by a Crown Corporation that had a “quota” for new hires…..and benefitting from a rigid seniority system that virtually guaranteed promotion, train to standard….

I have nothing against the individual, just questioning the appointment that should have been given to a number o& people at that point in time. I wonder how other pilots feel  that were hired around the same time? I know of 2 that were rejected by AC because they weren’t “tall” enough… or how about another pilot that had an even more groundbreaking experience?
 

Quote

Rosella Marie Bjornson, AOE (born July 13, 1947) is a retired Canadian airline pilot, who was the first female pilot for a commercial airline in North America and the first woman member of the Canadian Air Line Pilots Association, International.[1]

In 1997, Bjornson was inducted into the Canadian Aviation Hall of Fame.[4] In 2004, she was inducted into the Women in Aviation, International Hall of Fame.[5]

In 2014, Bjornson was honoured with a commemorative postage stamp. In 2018, she was appointed to the Alberta Order of Excellence.[6]

In 2017 Capt Bjornson was awarded a Masters Commendation by The Honourable Company of Air Pilots for her contributions to equality for women in the airlines in Canada.

 


I guess because it’s 2021…..no chance of the current PMO having any input.

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National Post

John Robson: California is a mess. And wishing it otherwise won't change anything

John Robson  1 day ago

Here’s something we could definitely dispense with in the New Year, along with those extra pounds and, ahem, the habit of recycling resolutions: News stories that say wishing something would happen is tantamount to making it happen.

For instance this news alert email from NBC with the subject line “Showdown shapes up in California over growing housing crisis” and the text “Immediate relief from California’s affordable housing crisis may not come next year even though a series of new laws is scheduled to go into effect Jan. 1,” to which the linked news story added “advocates and experts warn.”

Which prompts me to observe that we could also do without “experts say” in news stories. Not to mention quoting “advocates” in the lead as though opinions were news. As we could do without metaphors that cannot survive the light of day, like a showdown shaping up. But I do not wish to get sidetracked into resolutions about shaping up grammatically as well as physically.

So let’s start with economically. How can adults go about believing a complex problem could vanish immediately just because the same people who got us into this mess passed another law saying they don’t want it to be?

Make no mistake, California is a mess. It’s so bad Michael Shellenberger, a lifelong progressive who has lately been hitting Old Reality pretty hard, moved on from his heretical “Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All” to “San Fransicko: Why Progressives Ruin Cities.”

In a review, The New York Times excommunicated him again, saying he “does exactly what he accuses his left-wing enemies of doing: ignoring facts, best practices and complicated and heterodox approaches in favor of dogma.” But abuse is not argument. And if California is following best practices, give me dogma any day. Especially free market dogma.

Schellenberger places much blame on the ideology of “victimology.” And fair enough, because paranoia works as badly in public as private life. Indeed, ironically, the habit of conjuring up cosmic air castles of malevolence to explain why things like homelessness and drug addiction are bad rather gets in the way of attending to facts, complexities and “heterodox approaches,” whatever those might be. It sounds like making inconsistency a virtue. But I digress.

The deeper cause of California’s woes, and ours, is actually so simple it could well be called dogmatic. It is the mindset, which Thomas Sowell calls “unconstrained” but which can fairly be described as “liberal” or “progressive,” that intentions rather than methods determine outcomes.

It sounds simplistic. The summary, I mean. But in fact it’s the ideology that, for all the sophistication, pseudo-sophistication and college degrees of its adherents, is simplistic. How else could you expect “immediate relief” from a massive housing crisis in an economy as big, wealthy and complicated as California’s because not just one new law but a series of them will be added to the massive existing pile Jan. 1?

It’s not as though California lacks laws. I Googled, and according to the USC Gould School of Law, “There are 29 separate statutory codes in California. Each code covers one or more major subject areas (e.g., the Family Code covers family law topics, the Penal Code covers criminal law, etc.). There is no official print version of the California statutory codes. There are, however, two commercially published multi-volume sets containing the text of the codes.” Multi-volume. Yeah. I’ll bet. Not to mention the estimated 400,000 regulations.

Also, Wikipedia informs us, California’s Gross State Product, $3.2 trillion, is “the largest sub-national economy in the world” and if it were a country it would rank 5th. But it also has massive poverty and social dysfunction, partly because among the laws it no longer has is one making shoplifting a felony. Or defecating in public.

So who can believe that when you’re that rich and have an affordable housing crisis anyway you can make it disappear instantly by putting more good intentions on a piece of paper? And the answer is: a lot of people. Not just the NBC writer, but her editors. And readers. And voters. And professors. And anybody who says “There oughta be a law” without first asking “What incentives are at play here?”

Neither California nor NBC are outliers here. If you look at the promises of almost any politician they consist overwhelmingly of what they want, not how they’re going to make it happen. Then news stories discuss how they might work electorally without mentioning that the person seemed to have no clue about how they might work in practice. Hence we get things like “the budget will balance itself” or ending on-reserve boil-water advisories that fail not because the methods were faulty but because there weren’t any.

So repeat after me: “In 2022 I will not mistake wishes for horses.”

National Post

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Kelly McParland: The Canada clause that Quebec just loves

Kelly McParland  9 hrs ago

If you ever find yourself in a situation where you have to prove your Canadian bona fides and haven’t a lick of documentation to do so, just start talking about the notwithstanding clause. No one but a Canadian would think of such a thing. Or would spend so much effort fighting about it.

I’m a member of the fraternity of Canadians ancient enough to recall the country before the Constitution and its Charter came along in 1982. It was a peaceful, tolerant, prosperous place that embraced immigration and moderation, and was filled with people who generally tried to get along with one another.

But Pierre Trudeau had a vision, and was determined the country would be a better, more advanced, more civilized place if the rights and freedoms we took for granted were written down on paper so that courts could regularly offer updated interpretations and rule on whether those interpretations were or weren’t being observed. A number of big rulings have come down since then, on legal rights, religious freedom, abortion access, hate speech, sex and gender-based discrimination and others. Whether Canada would have been any less open-minded on these issues if court justices hadn’t been there to pass judgment is impossible to know. Would we all be happily discriminating against same-sex marriages or dismissing religious freedoms if the Charter hadn’t been written up?

In any case, it’s there and is coming under duress at the moment because its authors included a clause allowing provincial premiers to ignore it. The notwithstanding clause makes charter mavens wrinkle up their nose in displeasure. They see it as a “get-out-of-jail-free” card, an excuse for allowing exactly the sort of abuses a rights document is supposed to protect against. Our prime minister says his dad didn’t like it and he doesn’t either. It’s “basically a loophole that allows a majority to override fundamental rights of a minority,” he says.

He doesn’t dislike it enough to take more aggressive action on the issue that is causing the current friction, though. Not surprisingly, it has to do with Quebec, and its determination to follow its own inclinations no matter what the rest of the country thinks. Quebec never signed the Constitution, and it is the most frequent user of the notwithstanding clause. And why wouldn’t it be? If it was there for a purpose, why not use it?

Distaste for invoking the clause derives, we’re told, from the fact it was included on the assumption it would seldom be used. I’m not sure who initiated that assumption, or whether it’s ever been valid in any minds other than those who profess it. According to the Canadian Encyclopedia the clause was a last-minute addition cooked up when it looked like talks might fail, which convinced some reluctant premiers to sign on but incensed Quebec even at the time. The idea that premiers have hesitated to pursue legislative plans if achieving them required invoking the clause is not entirely obvious. In addition to Quebec it has also been used in Saskatchewan, Alberta, Ontario and the Yukon.image.png.9bf3f91b9beca975827fc8c78bd089c7.png

If you ever find yourself in a situation where you have to prove your Canadian bona fides and haven’t a lick of documentation to do so, just start talking about the notwithstanding clause. No one but a Canadian would think of such a thing. Or would spend so much effort fighting about it.

I’m a member of the fraternity of Canadians ancient enough to recall the country before the Constitution and its Charter came along in 1982. It was a peaceful, tolerant, prosperous place that embraced immigration and moderation, and was filled with people who generally tried to get along with one another.

But Pierre Trudeau had a vision, and was determined the country would be a better, more advanced, more civilized place if the rights and freedoms we took for granted were written down on paper so that courts could regularly offer updated interpretations and rule on whether those interpretations were or weren’t being observed. A number of big rulings have come down since then, on legal rights, religious freedom, abortion access, hate speech, sex and gender-based discrimination and others. Whether Canada would have been any less open-minded on these issues if court justices hadn’t been there to pass judgment is impossible to know. Would we all be happily discriminating against same-sex marriages or dismissing religious freedoms if the Charter hadn’t been written up?

In any case, it’s there and is coming under duress at the moment because its authors included a clause allowing provincial premiers to ignore it. The notwithstanding clause makes charter mavens wrinkle up their nose in displeasure. They see it as a “get-out-of-jail-free” card, an excuse for allowing exactly the sort of abuses a rights document is supposed to protect against. Our prime minister says his dad didn’t like it and he doesn’t either. It’s “basically a loophole that allows a majority to override fundamental rights of a minority,” he says.

He doesn’t dislike it enough to take more aggressive action on the issue that is causing the current friction, though. Not surprisingly, it has to do with Quebec, and its determination to follow its own inclinations no matter what the rest of the country thinks. Quebec never signed the Constitution, and it is the most frequent user of the notwithstanding clause. And why wouldn’t it be? If it was there for a purpose, why not use it?

Distaste for invoking the clause derives, we’re told, from the fact it was included on the assumption it would seldom be used. I’m not sure who initiated that assumption, or whether it’s ever been valid in any minds other than those who profess it. According to the Canadian Encyclopedia the clause was a last-minute addition cooked up when it looked like talks might fail, which convinced some reluctant premiers to sign on but incensed Quebec even at the time. The idea that premiers have hesitated to pursue legislative plans if achieving them required invoking the clause is not entirely obvious. In addition to Quebec it has also been used in Saskatchewan, Alberta, Ontario and the Yukon.

The fate of Fatemeh Anvari, the Grade 3 teacher who was told her hijab violated Quebec’s Bill 21, which bans workers in some public-sector positions from wearing visible religious symbols, has Ottawa in an uproar.

. Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole, who can’t seem to go a week without having to face down his own caucus, has told Tory members to clam up about the controversy while the party conducts an internal consultation and forms a position — more than two years after the law took effect. The prime minister, Justin Trudeau, says he hasn’t ruled out intervening in the case, though he’s been saying that since the bill was passed and has yet to do anything substantial to back it up. The reason for their reluctance is shared: they’re afraid of upsetting Quebec, in a way that isn’t the case with any other province or territory.

Trudeau wouldn’t be prime minister without Quebec votes, and has only a minority government at that. O’Toole understands he’s unlikely to ever get Trudeau’s job without support from the province. He’s already made a number of concessions to Quebec sensitivities that don’t sit particularly well in some corners of his caucus. Liberals are showing greater discipline in swallowing their principles than the restive Tories, though whether that’s a good thing or not is up for debate.

Trudeau’s hope is that Quebec courts will ultimately rule the law is discriminatory, and save him the trouble that would come from intervention. He has good reason to assume a federal move would complicate things: Quebec pundits are already claiming any outside intrusion by English Canada would be just the thing to stir a rebirth of separatist fervour.  That may or may not be true, but it’s pretty certain a skilled operator like Premier François Legault would know how to use a conflict to extract more concessions from Ottawa and further maximize his province’s special treatment, especially when today’s federal leaders are so willing to give in to the pressure.

In the end the prime minister may get his wish, though the legal journey could take years and end up before the same Supreme Court the clause is a means of evading. It’s possible neither Trudeau nor O’Toole will still be in their jobs by then, while, in the interim, minorities in Quebec will still be banned from certain jobs for the sake of their religion. In any case the result isn’t likely to change the enduring reality of Canada, that Quebec has consistently seen its powers and prerogatives enhanced by regular compromises and concessions from Ottawa, which isn’t willing to defend its proclaimed principles with the same ferocity as Quebecers defend theirs.

National Post

• Twitter: KellyMcParland

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MANDEL: Billion-dollar class action wins go-ahead against alleged nationwide bread price-fixing

Maybe in the fullness of time someone will walk down the street and observe (with wonder and awe)that all gas stations have exactly the same price per litre... right down to one tenth of one cent. 

And this is pretty cool, the one thing CNN and FOX can agree on is the timing of their commercials.

Yup... we could do a whole thread on this eh?

Edited by Wolfhunter
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For a society that considers itself pretty tech savvy, it's remarkable how many people fail to see the potential vulnerabilities or even give those vulnerabilities a moments consideration. 

https://www.foxbusiness.com/technology/customers-explicit-photos-stolen-phone-store-employee

I bet (but don't know) that this lady used to say "if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear" and I bet she doesn't say that anymore.

That's not specifically the issue here though IMO, the real issue is that it was her own lack of awareness that would have lead her to make such a statement in the first place. I bet she had never considered that "trusted agents" might use her device against her.

Yes, in fairness I am putting words in her mouth, maybe she didn't subscribe to that theory at all, who knows? I just don't think she was aware of her own vulnerability and believe she would have acted differently if she were. 

Put another way, I'm a bit surprised that (in general) the people willing to trade their rights for a measure of security will so easily trade that hard won security for personal convenience. 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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Posted (edited)

“ Rather than putting race at the front of every conversation, we should focus on the things that matter about a person – their character, their competency, their effort and their abilities.

Making math teachers know math is not racist. It’s common sense. It’s about finding competent, qualified people to teach the next generation of Canadians.”

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Edited by Jaydee
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On 1/5/2022 at 12:48 PM, deicer said:

internet exist.jpg

Every time I read that I wonder if the person writing it really doesn't understand the difference between smallpox and Covid or if they do understand and are maliciously trying to gaslight those around them.

What's your opinion deicer?  Do you think Bradley P. Moss is ignorant or evil?  It's got to be one or the other.

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The Fence Test
 
Which side of the fence are you?

If you ever wondered which side of the fence you sit on, this is a great test!

==================================

If a Conservative doesn't like guns, he doesn't buy one.

If a Liberal or NDP doesn't like guns, he wants all guns outlawed.

 

===============================

If a Conservative is a vegetarian, he doesn't eat meat.

 

If a Liberal or NDP is a vegetarian, he wants all meat products banned for everyone.

===============================

If a Conservative is homosexual, he quietly leads his life.

If a Liberal or NDP is homosexual, he demands legislated respect.

===============================

If a Conservative is down-and-out, he thinks about how to better his situation.

If a Liberal or NDP is down-and-out he wonders who is going to take care of him.

===============================

If a Conservative doesn't like a talk show host, he switches channels.

A Liberal or NDP demands that those they don't like be shut down.

===============================

If a Conservative is a non-believer, he doesn't go to church.

A Liberal or NDP non-believer wants any mention of God and religion silenced.

===============================

If a Conservative decides he needs health care, he goes about shopping for it, or may choose a job that provides it.

If a Liberal or NDP decides he needs health care, he demands that the rest of us pay for his.

 
==================================
 

If a Conservative is unhappy with an election, he grumbles and goes to work the next day.

 

If a Liberal or NDP is unhappy with an election, he burns down a Starbucks, throws rocks at cops and takes two-weeks off for therapy.

===============================

If a Conservative reads this, he'll forward it so his friends can have a good laugh.

 

A Liberal or NDP will delete it because he's "offended."

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Posted (edited)

The Show Isn’t Woke’: Meghan McCain Explains ‘Yellowstone’ Becoming A Smash Success

Yellowstone” is one of the most-watched shows on television right now and Hollywood execs can’t figure out why. With network TV and streaming services, viewers have never had more options available to them, which makes it that much harder for studios to create a hit. But Taylor Sheridan’s cowboy drama somehow captured the nation’s attention.

Conservative personality Meghan McCain has a theory why “Yellowstone” is such a huge success. According to her, it’s because the series appeals to the majority of Americans who are fed up with Hollywood pushing a progressive agenda in every single show and movie. That’s one running theory why “Spider-Man: No Way Home” was such a mega hit; because unlike other contemporary superhero movies, it didn’t go woke.

 

McCain penned a piece for The Daily Mail explaining her thoughts on “Yellowstone’s” popularity. She compared the show to HBO’s “Succession,” a drama which is a lot more typical in terms of entertainment fare these days. It was created by “avowed leftist Adam McKay.” 

McCain wrote, “We live in an era where what is considered a critical hit often ends up on one cover after another, winning Hollywood awards many times over, while at the same time barely breaking over a few million viewers.”

She went on to explain how “Yellowstone” is a “bonafide commercial success” but lacks all the splashy thinkpieces, celebrity promotion, and magazine cover stories like “Succession” gets. And the country-Western drama is still breaking records in spite of that. 

The former “View” co-host says this all proves how, “the appetite among Americans for tales of the West is still alive and well.”

And while McCain predicts the series probably won’t be nominated for major awards, it is going to continue drawing bigger and bigger audiences by nature of the content. 

“The show isn’t woke, it isn’t trying to lecture anyone about everything that is wrong with our culture,” she writes. “It doesn’t portray the elitist perspective of coastal television writers and where they think America should be going.”

 

What is critically celebrated in Hollywood and the media is more determined by the values and tastes of television writers, than the tastes of the masses. The dominant Hollywood, left media cohort should be asking: Why does something like this happen?”

She goes on to say how characters on “Yellowstone” are complex and interesting rather than insulting, inaccurate caricatures of Midwesterners. 

“A major part of the answer is that Americans love Westerns, and people in the heartland like having their culture, lifestyle and history reflected in entertainment – and not to just have it denigrated,” McCain continued. “Most Americans don’t live in the blue bubbles of urban communities where Hollywood focuses their energies.”

 

She concluded, “They enjoy entertainment with values that they share and characters that they can relate to – and if that’s something you’d rather ignore as a leftist in media, well, then maybe it’s you who is living in the bubble.”

Interestingly, some “Yellowstone” fans have accused the series of heading in a direction that’s too progressive, including the addition of Piper Picabo as Summer Higgins in season 4. The cast addition was touted as an “Antifa character” when Picabo admitted Sheridan wrote her in to highlight “a story of civil disobedience.”

But even with these criticisms and overall underwhelming reviews for season 4 overall, “Yellowstone” annihilated viewership records. The season 4 finale attracted an incredible 9.3 million viewers.

 

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Edited by Jaydee
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Looks like the insanity is going to continue into 2022.

 

B.C. woman ticketed for distracted driving in 2-hour COVID testing lineup 

Holding the phone on speaker wasn't cutting it for the officer on duty

https://driving.ca/auto-news/local-content/b-c-woman-ticketed-for-distracted-driving-in-2-hour-covid-testing-lineup?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=driving_promo_AO&fbclid=IwAR30RqDcwfOTeONie4Hzz8d2iOYIRABfVKfTuXyfFKKdh_53ivPolwQt7tA#Echobox=1641579026

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43 minutes ago, Jaydee said:

Looks like the insanity is going to continue into 2022.

And beyond...

It's notoriously hard to teach discretion. But sometimes it's deliberate too.

I know of jurisdictions who annually wave the tipping fees associated with dropping off garbage at waste collection sites. It makes sense because it's cheeper than the twice yearly (spring and fall) cleanup efforts conducted by other municipalities.

Anyway, there's a catch in the free drop off, the police park outside the collection site and rigidly enforce cargo tarp regulations, even on loads that clearly don't require it.

The true joy in watching this is seeing the most ridiculous, rudimentary, weak sister, grade 3 tarp efforts pass muster with ease. The rest of the year (unless you are a lunatic), tarp rules only apply to commercial vehicles.

 

 

 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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