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Jaydee
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At 76, i am def taking precautions and amazed at those who think they are immune. 

But again we can only control / be worried about what is happening here in Canada but not even outside of our own Province, I guess we could take a page from those representing Quebec and blame everything on the federal Liberals but that is dumb.

Our provinces must take responsibility and I for one back our our Premier in Alberta who has chosen a path that hopefully will reduce the risk while at the same time saving the mom and pop businesses (and their employees) who under more strict measures would go under without likely reducing any risk of exposure to the virus.  We like most provinces have to deal with "stupid" and of course somehow mitigate the exposures caused by those whose culture and jobs make it hard to self isolate.

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https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/25/world/europe/france-macron-muslims-police-laws.html

On a completely different front, I would observe that In the past, we have discussed this very thing (predominantly about immigration policy) right here on the forum. The context of the discussion was the importance of doing things right, being willing to pay the price for doing them right.... and paying it gladly because the cost of doing it wrong is to trash the very values you profess allegiance to.

Some may recall that my fear was the predictable backlash from raving liberals after they came to realize they got it wrong. The danger is that the backlash becomes far (far, far) worse than the cautious approach suggested by the very people they once ridiculed and vilified as racist. Whether the sponsors of the law that reflects this backlash are liberal or conservative is irrelevant (at least to me) because they were elected by people with buyers remorse.

The time is at hand when the sort of people who screamed racist (in my face) are the very ones guilty of it on a scale they would have considered unimaginable a few years ago. In short, and exactly as predicted, the situation has utterly reversed itself and I stand opposed to the draconian limitations on basic freedoms they feel are required to correct the consequences of their own predictable folly. 

I don't fear immigration and I don't fear immigrants, yet I recall being accused of that by the people who now legislate away my freedoms out of fear.

What I do fear, what I have always feared, is the good intentions of liberal zealots who who refuse to consider the possible consequences of their own "good idea fairy" crap gone wrong. So my simple answer is NO. No you don't get to suspend the constitution and limit individual freedoms just because YOU feel the need to "do something now" or because you see me (or people like me) as an obstacle to your willingness to trade our collective freedoms for your security. 

The option to pay now or pay later was always there, the costs were known in advance... you chose later. Muslims now represent 10% of the French population and that number will continue to grow. Open up your wallet and pay the bill. Now is the time to muster the tolerance, generosity and compassion you previously accused me of lacking... and I suggest getting on with that sooner rather than later.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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 Interesting to watch the percentage of increased crime compared with the percentage of police defunding efforts.

Nothing in my experience suggests that the the crime spree will reverse itself with further defunding, even tough some Democrats suggest that's exactly what's needed..

In that vein, may I suggest that a return to heating your house with coal as a method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and eating ice-cream to lose weight takes on an aura of credibility that common sense previously suggested that it lacked.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/seattle-homicides-police-budget

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Fat people should be alarmed by this. But instead of being horrified by the very notion of it, they seem to be the ones leading the charge. I'm of the mind that medical resources are already strained.... I don't have a doctor and can't get one. So let's start with this; If you are obese, you should forfeit your doctor and give me the slot. watcha think?

The only reason I oppose this type of nonsense is out of concern for other people.... but I'm starting to think y'all deserve a full measure of what you seem to be asking for.

Ethicists debate whether anti-mask protestors should forfeit COVID-19 medical care when medical resources are strained

'If you are a real believer in liberty, then you have to say, "I’ll pay the price" '

Edited by Wolfhunter
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31 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

Fat people should be alarmed by this. But instead of being horrified by the very notion of it, they seem to be the ones leading the charge. I'm of the mind that medical resources are already strained.... I don't have a doctor and can't get one. So let's start with this; If you are obese, you should forfeit your doctor and give me the slot. watcha think?

The only reason I oppose this type of nonsense is out of concern for other people.... but I'm starting to think y'all deserve a full measure of what you seem to be asking for.

Ethicists debate whether anti-mask protestors should forfeit COVID-19 medical care when medical resources are strained

'If you are a real believer in liberty, then you have to say, "I’ll pay the price" '

medical treatment should be denied if you are not wearing a helmet in a motorcycle crash is another example.  

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1 hour ago, boestar said:

medical treatment should be denied if you are not wearing a helmet in a motorcycle crash is another example.  

Indeed, and I could fill an entire thread with other idiotic examples.

Frankly, I've grown a bit weary of hearing this noise from people who haven't taken a moment to consider the consequences of their foolishness.

I'm starting to transition to the notion of give em what they say they want until they groan under the weight of it.... I don't see that as a good transition BTW but it's born out of a sense of frustration. The question quickly becomes "do you really want what you seem to be asking for?" Like the drunk university tough guy who breaks into tears when the handcuffs come out, I submit that the answer is a resounding NO.

IMO, the only reason more people don't see that is because they have been (largely) insulated from bad consequences for most of their lives simply due to where they were born. Consider the difference in perspective between legitimate refugees in Canada and their adult children who were born and educated here. Or perhaps that of the general public compared to first responders and soldiers.... at a minimum, there is a disconnect worthy of consideration before embracing "good ideas" that profoundly alter our society.

By way of example, were it not for my simmering (and slowly waning) concern for others, I'm perfectly willing to defund the police until those who wanted it in the first place have tears in their eyes, stand on a chair and publicly apologize. It doesn't affect me at all.... my emergency response time is absolute crap anyway and I still don't have a doctor. 

Here's the real point though (at least IMO), when that "screw you" sentiment becomes the norm, in other words much more so than it is now.... I think we will all be the poorer for it. That seems to be the trajectory here and I simply don't believe people actually want to experience these things for themselves.

If anyone does, there are plenty of vacation spots I can recommend. The fact that headlines like this are newsworthy and considered "pearls of wisdom" should shock and dismay every sensible person who reads it.... but it doesn't, and I'm left with a sense of awe wondering WTF it will actually take.

Georgia Rep.-elect Carolyn Bourdeaux, only Democrat to flip seat, says party should talk to Trump supporters

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Please keep doing what you have been doing. 

Being as I don't want this anywhere near me, I find myself in full support of your efforts toward easy bail conditions, the disbandment of TAVIS, the defunding of the department, and the cessation of street checks (etc). 

Keep this where it belongs, in your back yard and not mine:

HUNTER: Hamilton has highest murder rate per capita in east

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14 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

 

HUNTER: Hamilton has highest murder rate per capita in east

As long as what happens in Hamilton, stays in Hamilton, I will be happy  🙃

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14 hours ago, Wolfhunter said:

Please keep doing what you have been doing. 

Being as I don't want this anywhere near me, I find myself in full support of your efforts toward easy bail conditions, the disbandment of TAVIS, the defunding of the department, and the cessation of street checks (etc). 

Keep this where it belongs, in your back yard and not mine:

HUNTER: Hamilton has highest murder rate per capita in east

not news

 

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This may be a dup. post, if so tell me and I will delete it.

US House passes federal cannabis decriminalisation bill

Published
1 hour agoaIMAGE COPYRIGHTREUTERS
image captionA cannabis flower in bloom

The US House of Representatives has passed a bill to decriminalise cannabis at the federal level for the first time.

It calls for removing cannabis from the list of federally controlled substances and erasing certain federal convictions.

It also supports reinvestment in communities adversely impacted by the decades-long "war on drugs".

The bill is very unlikely to be taken up in the Republican-controlled Senate.

The Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (More) Act was passed in the lower chamber 228 to 164 on Friday afternoon, with just five Republicans - and one independent - supporting the measure.

Many Republican lawmakers said the bill's implications are potentially harmful to American youth and called it a "waste of time", complaining that they should have focused on Covid relief instead.

Cannabis reform advocates hailed the vote as "historic" and "long overdue", but still needs to pass the Senate and be signed into law by the president. If that happens, it could help bridge a major disconnect between federal and state drug policy in the US.

Cannabis is still prohibited by the federal Controlled Substances Act and classed as a Schedule I narcotic - defined as having no medical value and a high potential for abuse - but one in three Americans currently live in states where cannabis is legal for adult use.

In addition, 38 states have passed measures that allow its use for medicinal purposes.

Last month, voters in three states - Arizona, Montana and New Jersey - overwhelmingly approved ballot measures to legalise recreational use, with voters in Mississippi supporting its medicinal use. South Dakota, a traditionally conservative state, made history when voters there simultaneously backed initiatives for the medicinal and recreational use of the drug.

Support for federal cannabis legalisation is now at an all-time high, with a Gallup poll last month showing more than two-thirds of American adults support it.

Several lawmakers took to the House floor ahead of the vote, arguing the bill had less to do with legalising marijuana and more to do with how the enforcement of cannabis prohibition has hurt communities of colour, leaving behind "a legacy of racial and ethnic injustices".

Black Americans are more than three times as likely to be arrested for cannabis-related offenses as white Americans, despite similar rates of usage, according to a study last year from the American Civil Liberties Union.

"We're not rushing to legalise marijuana. The American people have already done that," said Democrat Earl Blumenauer, from Oregon, who is the founder of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus and an original sponsor of the bill.

"We're here because Congress has failed to deal with the disastrous war on drugs and do its part for the over 50 million regular marijuana users in every one of your districts."

The bill was drafted in coordination with several cannabis justice advocates.

It includes measures to expunge the federal criminal records of those charged or convicted for non-violent cannabis offenses and provide cannabis business owners easier access to grants or loans. It would also tax cannabis retail sales and create a trust fund to reinvest in job training and other initiatives for communities of colour harmed by the drug war.

Incoming president Joe Biden and Democratic leadership have expressed a desire to end federal prohibition through decriminalisation, but neither Senate Republican leadership nor current President Donald Trump have indicated support for the legislation to become law.

In a preview of the bill's unclear future, Greg Murphy, from North Carolina, said the drug was "one of the most abused substances on the planet".

Adding a rare Republican voice of support, Matt Gaetz, from Florida, said: "The federal government has lied to the people of this country about marijuana for a generation... If we were measuring the success of the war on drugs, drugs have won."

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I'm going to stick to scotch but in case you are not:    😀

Your Guide to Cannabis Beverages for the Holiday Season — 7 Unexpected Ways to Celebrate This Year

 

How times have changed! The holidays are going to look highly unusual this year, and we’ll be celebrating the festive season in unexpected ways. So why not sip into something different too? Cannabis beverages are a twist on the old normal and the perfect toast to 2021. Here’s how you can create new traditions with these pandemic-friendly ideas for gathering with adult family and friends.

Sip Into Something Different

Cannabis beverages are a new adult beverage option just in time for the holiday season. One entrant in this new category is Truss, backed by 150 years of beverage experience from their Molson Coors partners. Truss has crafted a unique portfolio of cannabis beverages, focusing on great tastes with new, unexpected flavour stories. Not only are they beautiful, they’re easy to serve and consume in single portions. With surprising hints of naturally sourced flavours and botanicals, Truss beverages are a great way to explore cannabis.

Unlike traditional edibles, many new cannabis beverage products are made with a technology that allows for the cannabis to become tiny water-soluble droplets, which can be absorbed by the body more efficiently. Health Canada advises that you can start to feel the effects of edibles in as little as 30-120 minutes, but some may experience it faster.

THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol) are cannabinoids or chemical substances in cannabis. While THC is responsible for the way your brain and body respond to cannabis (including the high and intoxication), CBD does not produce a high or intoxication.

Truss_LittleVictory_BloodOrange_900x650.

Truss crafts their cannabis beverages in 4 potency (or strength) ranges:

  • CBD (15 mg CBD, 0.5 mg of THC)
  • Low (2.5 mg of CBD, 2.5 mg of THC)
  • Medium (5 mg of CBD, 5 mg of THC)
  • High (10 mg of THC)

Although the amounts of THC and CBD are controlled in these new beverage products, everyone’s experience with cannabis is personal, so it’s suggested to start with a low dose over a longer period of time and adjust as you feel necessary. And you should never mix cannabis beverages and alcohol. Now onto the extraordinary ways to celebrate:

1.      Terpene-Tasting Open House

Schedule times for friends of legal age to pop over on the porch or patio for terpene tasting. Food and drink connoisseurs will likely appreciate House of Terpenes, a range of medium-potency sparkling tonics that celebrate the aromatic essential oils of the cannabis plant. Limonene is bright and citrusy with notes of lemon, tangerine and thyme. Myrcene features earthy hints of clove and spice — all the right flavours of the season. All of these flavours are sourced from botanicals.

Truss_HoT_Myrcene_900x650.jpg

2.      Fireside Chillin’

Baby, it’s cold outside but the fire is so delightful. Have you ever actually roasted chestnuts on an open fire? Throw some logs on and unwind with a couple of friends and some Mollo. Crisp with an easy-drinking taste, Mollo is a reminder to take a pause and be in the moment. They’re available in low (Mollo 2.5) and medium (Mollo 5) potencies.

3.      Après-Holiday Hiking

Craving an uplifting wellness hike for your mind, body and soul this stressful season? Invite a friend to go walking in a winter wonderland. Post-hike, unpop the refreshing flavours of VeryVell sparkling waters. These lightly carbonated, CBD-dominant sparkling waters come in 2 delicate flavours: Strawberry Hibiscus and Sicilian Lemon. Ideal just after a stroll — simply unpop and enjoy.

(Psst! For those of legal age who love unusual surprises, Truss cannabis beverages make a perfect gift or stocking stuffer – Just keep those stockings out of reach of children and pets!)

4.      Social Distan-Sing Tea Party

Tired of silent nights? Arrange a cybercarolling session via video call. Build your song list and send it to friends in advance. Wet your whistles with a delicious, low-potency Veryvell Lemon Black Iced Tea and sing to your heart’s content.

Truss_MasterBrand_900x650.jpg

5.      Merry Movie Night

The weather outside is frightful… so throw a holiday flick night on your favourite streaming platform! Watch together online and group chat at the same time, wherever you all are. Share the oldies or laugh it out with cult classics. Just pop some corn and make it a Mollo.

6.      Sparkling Soirée

Come gather ‘round the tablet for a virtual shindig. Whether it’s for Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa or ringing in the near year, decorate, dine and dance it out. Give your party a theme, like Flattening the Curve Ball or Midnight Mask-erade, and get dressed up for the occasion. What better way to celebrate than with something bubbly?

Little Victory is a line of vibrant, lower-potency sparkling beverages in 4 divine flavours. Turn bitter into sweet with Dry Grapefruit or Dry Lemon, which have a slight tannic mouthfeel — or opt for Dark Cherry or Blood Orange, which burst with flavour. And cheers to the start of delicious new traditions!

Start Your Holiday Shopping!

Ready to stock up and knock beverage shopping off your to-do list? First, stop looking at the liquor store! You may be surprised to learn that, in most provinces, you can’t buy cannabis beverages at liquor stores. Cannabis beverages are sold at authorized cannabis retailers or you can shop online at provincial wholesalers.

Consider shopping local this holiday season and supporting your neighbourhood authorized cannabis retailer. The best part about dedicated retailers is that they employ experts — budtenders — who focus on cannabis products. They can help guide you through cannabinoids and terpenes to find the tastes and potencies suitable for your out-of-the-ordinary holiday happenings. Many retailers also provide helpful product information on their websites and the ability to reserve curbside pickup. Easy peasy!

Your Guide to Cannabis Beverages for the Holiday Season — 7 Unexpected Ways to Celebrate This Year - Everything Zoomer

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35 minutes ago, Malcolm said:

 

How times have changed! The holidays are going to look highly unusual this year, and we’ll be celebrating the festive season in unexpected ways. So why not sip into something different too? Cannabis beverages are a twist on the old normal and the perfect toast to 2021. 

It must be my old age or maybe my conservative upbringing but this article angers me.  "Why not sip into something different?"  Why not indeed - maybe because if you ever want to cross the border into the USA you will be either forced to lie (which if discovered would make inadmissible for the rest of your life) or tell the truth (which may make you inadmissible, depending on the mood of the officer).

It doesn't matter what your personal feelings might be - there are serious implications to choosing to use cannabis products that are never highlighted.

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1 hour ago, seeker said:

It must be my old age or maybe my conservative upbringing but this article angers me.  "Why not sip into something different?"  Why not indeed - maybe because if you ever want to cross the border into the USA you will be either forced to lie (which if discovered would make inadmissible for the rest of your life) or tell the truth (which may make you inadmissible, depending on the mood of the officer).

It doesn't matter what your personal feelings might be - there are serious implications to choosing to use cannabis products that are never highlighted.

As I said the source was . , Zoomer magazine which is a lifestyle glossy dedicated to the issues of Canadians 45 and up. ... Published nine times a year, Zoomer is available on newsstands across Canada. It has a paid circulation of more than 200,000 and reaches nearly 700,000 readers. So I guess, if they know their readership, you and I are out of step with reality 2020.  😀

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14 hours ago, seeker said:

It must be my old age or maybe my conservative upbringing but this article angers me.  "Why not sip into something different?"  Why not indeed - maybe because if you ever want to cross the border into the USA you will be either forced to lie (which if discovered would make inadmissible for the rest of your life) or tell the truth (which may make you inadmissible, depending on the mood of the officer).

It doesn't matter what your personal feelings might be - there are serious implications to choosing to use cannabis products that are never highlighted.

To quote Heraclitus:  “The only constant in life is change”

Pot is looked down on because it literally is a weed.  Big pharma et al can't patent it and make big money, that's why they fight against it.

When it comes to generations, I know more younger adults partake of weed than drink.  It's 'their' thing unlike our generations of alcoholics.  Besides, one way to look at it is you get all the benefits of the warm glow using weed without having to go pee.

The other issue can be summed up nicely by this meme...

 

Booze vs Weed.jpg

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2 hours ago, deicer said:

To quote Heraclitus:  “The only constant in life is change”

 

Booze vs Weed.jpg

Sure, pot makes people mellow, alcohol makes people aggressive.  The problem is that society is lagging the issue.  How many job interviews would end immediately upon disclosure of using pot?  It's legal, and by most accounts is less destructive overall than alcohol but there are serious implications in using it that aren't discussed - crossing borders, employment are just two of them. 

When I can tell my father-in-law, priest, doctor or employer that I smoked a joint and get the same reaction as if I told them I drank a beer I'll know it's become acceptable to partake.

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You have hit on the main point.  It is generational.

Older people don't accept it because they were brought up being taught that it was a horrible 'drug'.  Yet they openly accept alcohol because it was their 'drug'.  Either way it is self medication.  Science is showing that the benefits of pot are only being discovered.  And overall, it isn't as damaging as alcohol.

Pot is like racism, anti-LGTBQ, etc.  It takes education and experience to realise that all that you grew up with and understand may not still be relevant in a changing society.

Heck, Willie Nelson isn't that wrong, is he?

Willie Nelson - Toby Keith - Scott Emerick - YouTube

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9 minutes ago, deicer said:

You have hit on the main point.  It is generational.

Older people don't accept it because they were brought up being taught that it was a horrible 'drug'.  Yet they openly accept alcohol because it was their 'drug'. 

That's not the issue I see.  I see an issue of not being able to accurately measure how much is ingested, how to test accurately for impairment and how to calculate metabolization times.  The dosing, testing and metabolization of alcohol is well established - not so for cannabis.  I could have a beer on a Saturday night and not worry about impairment or testing the next day, certainly not on Monday.  This is not true for cannabis as it is stored in the body's fat cells and can be detected up to 30 days later. 

I think the factors go a little beyond old people's ignorance or bias.

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21 minutes ago, seeker said:

That's not the issue I see.  I see an issue of not being able to accurately measure how much is ingested, how to test accurately for impairment and how to calculate metabolization times.  The dosing, testing and metabolization of alcohol is well established - not so for cannabis.  I could have a beer on a Saturday night and not worry about impairment or testing the next day, certainly not on Monday.  This is not true for cannabis as it is stored in the body's fat cells and can be detected up to 30 days later. 

I think the factors go a little beyond old people's ignorance or bias.

Quite right which is why I will stick to Scotch.  

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