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13 hours ago, Wolfhunter said:

I have only two words for them.... roughly translated, it works out to "go away quickly."

You can now cut stupid with a knife and Demonrats are adding flour to the gravy..

"Civvies on Broughton Street in Savannah posted that it would require a refundable $20 deposit when booking an appointment to visit the boutique. However, the since-deleted post also wrote that people of color would be exempt from the fee, the New York Post reported."

Since White is a colour then no problem. 

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She asked him, 'How much are you selling the eggs for?' The old seller replied, '$.25 an egg, Madam.' She said to him, 'I will take 6 eggs for $1.25 or I will leave.' The old seller replied, 'Co

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As predicted. Right on course with zero cross track error, there could be no other outcome and it will continue and accelerate.

I think I understand the logic now, if the DG says "W" when the rising sun is in your eyes the W stands for Wonderful... 

https://nypost.com/2020/08/11/new-yorkers-flee-nyc-in-droves/

Worth noting that CNN (and their ilk) ignore this stuff completely. It also speaks to rising levels of fear among the silent majority and accounts for the massive increase (and I do mean massive) in first time gun owners. When 911 becomes useless people will seek other avenues of protection.... because they have to.

Over 60 Portland 911 calls go unheeded overnight as police respond to riot

Calls about theft, vandalism, suspicious activity, hit and runs, and burglary were put on hold

 

And if you think all of this was predictable, imagine how much you are going to enjoy watching the mail in ballot fiasco which will serve as a flashpoint for much more of this. 

No longer any use in talking to them, they can't hear you over the TERAIN, TERAIN whoops and pull up commands. It's still about "who started the fire" not how to put it out.

This quote from a senior Pastor (and he has a history) is telling.... negotiation and respectful dialog is over. The pre-start checklist (of required events) is progressing quicker than I anticipated. Turn this quote on its head, imagine a white person saying the exact same thing about him.... instant hate crime. The very foundations of law (justice is a better word) are being altered so slowly that no one will notice until it's done. I'm reminded of the painted amendments to the law in the novel Animal Farm:

"Dear Grim Reaper, You took the #wrongtrump," tweeted Bishop Talbert Swan, who is a pastor, radio host, and president of the Springfield, Mass., branch of the NAACP.

This quote is from a short chapter so he may have missed it:

Look among the nations and watch— Be utterly astounded! For I will work a work in your days Which you would not believe, though it were told you.

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How this scum of a human being has escaped being assassinated is beyond me! :head:
Kim Jong-un orders North Koreans to hand over pet dogs — so they can be used as meat

'Authorities have identified households with pet dogs and are forcing them to give them up or forcefully confiscating them and putting them down'

 

 

North Korean dictator Kim Kong-un has ordered citizens to hand over their pet dogs — so they can be killed for food.

The hermit state says pet dogs are now considered a “decadent” luxury and “a ‘tainted’ trend by bourgeois ideology,” and must be surrendered, according to a report by South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo media outlet.

The outlet says the move is likely designed to quell public anger over the country’s economic tailspin. A source told the outlet that Kim made the order in July.

“Authorities have identified households with pet dogs and are forcing them to give them up or forcefully confiscating them and putting them down,” the source said.

Once the pets are rounded up, it’s reported, some go to zoos and some are sold into the restaurant trade, where dogs are regularly consumed. Pyongyang, the Daily Mail reports, has a number of specialized dog eateries.

Chosun Ilbo reports that although pet ownership was long frowned upon in North Korea, the state had seemed to relent since the late 1990s, when the rich of Pyongyang started owning pets as symbols of superiority.

According to the source: “Ordinary people raise pigs and livestock on their porches, but high-ranking officials and the wealthy own pet dogs, which stoked some resentment.”

Crop damage

According to the Daily Mail, a recent report by the UN said up to 60 percent of North Koreans face “widespread food shortages.” In recent weeks, heavy rain and flooding have sparked concern about crop damage and food supplies in the isolated country.

North Korea’s national Red Cross Society is the only organization with access to all nine provinces, and more than 43,000 volunteers have been working alongside health teams on COVID-19 prevention efforts as well as helping flood-related work, said Antony Balmain of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

“Hundreds of homes have been damaged and large areas of rice fields have been submerged due to heavy rain and some flash flooding,” Balmain said, according to Reuters.

North Korea’s Red Cross has deployed 43,000 volunteers to help communities prevent outbreaks of the coronavirus and provide flood assistance.

Kim declared an emergency last month and imposed a lockdown on Kaesong, near the inter-Korean border, after a man who defected to the South in 2017 returned to the city showing coronavirus symptoms

 

https://nationalpost.com/news/world/kim-jong-un-orders-north-koreans-to-hand-over-pet-dogs-so-they-can-be-used-as-meat

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The end of American history begins in America

America's aggressions around the globe have now come full circle and boomeranged into its domestic affairs.

Hamid Dabashiby Hamid Dabashi
3 hours ago
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A protester waves an American flag with "Black Lives Matter" spray painted on it, near the White House in Washington, June 19, 2020 [AP Photo/Andrew Harnik]
A protester waves an American flag with "Black Lives Matter" spray painted on it, near the White House in Washington, June 19, 2020 [AP Photo/Andrew Harnik]
 

Therefore, good Brutus, be prepared to hear.

And since you know you cannot see yourself

So well as by reflection, I, your glass,  

Will modestly discover to yourself  

That of yourself which you yet know not of.    

Cassius, in Shakespeare's Julius Cesare (Act 1 Scene 2)   

Has the American experiment failed and ended? Are we on the cusp of a post-American world? In the late 1980s, Francis Fukuyama, a bureaucratic functionary at the US Department of State, had declared, with much pomp and ceremony, that "history" had ended and America was the triumphant trophy of liberal democracy. Had he inadvertently played a satirical spoof to the end of American history itself?   

A mere quarter of a century later, with Donald Trump leading the United States in one calamity after another, people have begun speculating the very end of America.  

While North American and Western European observers are deeply concerned about the end of the American empire, the rest of the world oscillates between a sigh of relief at the prospect and a sense of wonder and amusement as to what exactly this "ending" means. Will it be with a big bang or just a pathetic whimper? And while we are at it, when, prithee do tell, did this "leadership of the free world" begin, for it now to end, except with brute military might and a constellation of military bases around the globe to exercise it? 

In a thoughtful recent essay, End of Empire, the eminent American historian Andrew Bacevich has put forward his argument as to why he believes "the sun has set on the American empire".  

As a cogent critic of American imperialism, Bacevich's surgically precise and honest conclusion is now corroborated by the massive uprising against structural poverty and endemic racism setting the streets of major urban areas on fire from coast to coast.    

"The era of US dominion has now passed," Bacevich observes, "So Americans can no longer afford to indulge in the fiction of their indispensability, cherished in elite circles [...] Subordinating the wellbeing of the American people to ostensible imperatives of global leadership - thereby allowing racism, inequality and other problems to fester at home - has become intolerable."  

What Bacevich outlines in this crucial essay is a constellation of facts - of racism and poverty at home and pathetic and dysfunctional attempts at world domination - that much of the world and in fact, most Americans themselves have known, but which today, during the presidency of Donald Trump and this criminally negligent handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, has been thrown into stark relief.   

Was this America ever a leader or just a bully? Did it ever have the moral authority to shepherd a terrorised Earth?    

Between Fukuyama's pompous and absurd prognostication and Bacevich's bold and brilliant insights, we may now wonder when did America begin and where is it wending.  

What happened to the American Century?    

America as an experiment is failing. Perhaps it was destined to fail from its very beginning. An idea that began with the genocide of Native Americans, thrived on the sustained course of African slavery, extended its genocidal and racist foregrounding to generations of immigrants who came to its shores to toil and suffer so that the white supremacist settler colonists prosper and enrich generations after generations, had to pay for its continued sins at some point. 

That America is failing is not a new idea or a recent discovery. It is just that over the last three years, in the course of Trump's presidency, this fact has become glaringly clear for the whole world to see. This particular president has exposed not merely his own personal vulgarity and criminal charlatanism, but also, far more importantly, the self-destructive forces that have shaped and defined this country long before he assumed office. The viral racism to which Trump caters, and to which millions of Americans respond favourably, and which is the undoing of America, arrived in America from Europe like all other diseases the settler-colonialists brought with them.   

Every country and every clime has its own peculiar political disease. Egypt has given birth to el-Sisi, Russia to Putin, China to Xi, India to Modi, Brazil to Bolsonaro, Myanmar to Aung San Suu Kyi, Iran to Khamenei, Syria to Assad, ad nauseam. But the point here is the mighty and powerful US and its particular brand of imperial corruption and hubris marking its final dissolution into nullity.    

The open discussions about the end of the American experiment, of course, predate Trump. David S Mason's The End of the American Century (2009) is a typical example of such analysis in which we read about the various interrelated phases of social, economic and global unravelling of the US that had begun with World War II. In his essay, The End of the American Century (2019) George Packer considers the span of the American diplomat Richard Holbrooke's life (1941-2010) as the period of the height of American empire, after which things began to fall apart.   

Meanwhile, the delusional imperialists at the political core of the US were busy thinking otherwise. The Project for the New American Century (PNAC) was a neoconservative scheme based in Washington, DC in the late 1990s triumphantly declaring the victory of US-led neoconservative and neoliberal projects, promoting, as they put it, "American global leadership". Led by William Kristol and Robert Kagan, all those PNAC characters today look positively ridiculous in their delusions.   

Most of them staunch Zionists, they had translated the pathological colonial interests of Israel into US foreign policy and called it "a new American century!". Before they were all exposed for their pitiful banality, they had convinced George W Bush and Dick Cheney of their prophetic missions. They destroyed an entire country, Iraq, with criminal intent, propagating their delusional myth of "American leadership".   

Today, there are sober Americans like Martin Kaplan who in his 2017 essay Trump and the End of the American Century mourns the decline of US leadership, denounces Trump, and then concludes: "We all must respond to the unexpected and depressing challenge of the United States forsaking its historical democratic and human rights leadership, both internationally and within the United States." But what leadership, the rest of the world may wonder, when, how?  

The ruling caste of the US - from its slave owner founding fathers to its current president - have been the unqualified source of misery inside and outside of the country. The ending of the calamitous delusion of that history is not something to be mourned.       

The world after the American empire 

A mere 20 years ago the cleanshaven neoconservative gangsters thought they were about to rule the world. Three years into the Trump presidency, amid disastrous public health failures that have exposed millions of Americans to a deadly pandemic, the very economic and human foundation of their republic is going to pieces. Massive social protest aims at an irrevocable dismantling of American racism. Streets of Oregon, Seattle, Oakland, Chicago and New York look like scenes from a military coup in Guatemala or Chile. Meanwhile, like a tinpot dictator American racism made us believe could only emerge in Asia, Africa or Latin America, the US president is dismantling the US postal system to be able to cheat and get himself re-elected.  

America's aggressions, brutal militarism, and disregard for people's democratic will around the globe have now come full circle and boomeranged into its domestic affairs. With Trump and his Republican followers "kneecapping" the post office, as former President Obama put it, to suppress votes and guarantee the president's re-election, the US is now en route to an election as ridiculous as the ones we have witnessed in Syria, Egypt or even Iran in the past.   

The post-American world will paradoxically liberate America from its own dangerous delusions and bring American people back to the bosom of humanity at large. America will only be liberated when it comes to terms with its irredeemable racist history and dismantles all its racist institutions. And the coast to coast uprising we are witnessing today is aiming to do just that: to retrieve the repressed republican aspirations of the best of Americans and use them to dismantle the imperial arrogance of the worst.

The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera's editorial stance.      

 
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When one considers that America's troubles are all caused by America, here are some questions for one to consider.

Why is Iran such an enemy?  Why do the Americans hate them so much?  When did it all start and why?

Why is North Korea an enemy?  Why did it get in that position when it is a bankrupt isolated country?

Why did the Americans get involved in Vietnam?

Why did the Americans get involved in Afghanistan?

Why did the Americans get involved in Kuwait?

Why did the Americans get involved in Iraq?

Why do the Americans still have such a hardon for Cuba?  What threat do they pose?

 

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Proof of what trump supporters are really like....

https://www.comicsands.com/trump-supporter-gun-crotch-liberals-2647034315.html

Trump Supporter Trying To 'Trigger Liberals' By Aiming Gun At His Crotch Ends Up Shooting Himself In The Groin

Some Trump supporters will stop at absolutely nothing to show liberals they mean business. Including, apparently, shooting themselves in the crotch. At least, that's what one man in San Diego did.

The man is a member of a Facebook group called, for whatever reason, "Loaded Guns Pointed at enis," and it's... well exactly what it sounds like--a group where Trump- and gun-loving gents post photos and videos of themselves pointing guns at their genitals, to prove some kind of point.

But for this particular man, things went very sideways, and he accidentally shot himself in the testicles while filming.

 

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/y3zeew/gun-enthusiasts-celebrate-man-who-shot-himself-in-the-balls-as-their-king

Gun Enthusiasts Celebrate Man Who Shot Himself in the Balls as Their King

 
A guy who shot himself in the balls posted his journey from discharge to hospital visit, and it’s made him a king online.
 
 
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Not as bad as the right wants you to be fearful of....

https://canada.constructconnect.com/dcn/news/economic/2020/08/bmo-forecasts-full-recovery-of-canadian-economy-next-year

BMO forecasts full recovery of Canadian economy next year

The Liberals’ July fiscal snapshot anticipated a 6.8 per cent drop in GDP this year and a 5.5 per cent rebound year, while the Bank of Canada’s July Monetary Policy Report predicted a 7.8 per cent contraction in GDP this year and a moderate 5.1 per cent recovery in 2021.

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Referenced in the article above posted by Marshall entitled, "The end of American history begins in America", by Hamid Dabashi, Al Jazeera

End of empire
The era of US dominion has now passed
Andrew Bacevich

June 29, 2020 9:32 AM

The end of World War Two inaugurated the era of American dominion, with the United States politically, economically and militarily the most powerful nation on the planet. Yet throughout the subsequent period of American global ascendency, the American people endured a seemingly endless sequence of domestic crises, upheavals and disasters. Primacy abroad did not insulate them, convinced of their unique place in human history, from the trials and tribulations routinely befalling other, more ‘ordinary’ nations.

Yet neither did trials at home undermine the deep-seated belief that history had summoned the United States — and no one else — to lead the world. So even as presidents from Harry Truman to Barack Obama wrestled with pressing challenges at home (for Truman there was race and McCarthyism, for Obama race and the Great Recession), they all, without exception, testified to the nation’s indispensability. They deemed it their duty to do so. All, therefore, found ways to prevent domestic problems from encroaching upon America’s assertion of singularity among nations. Leading the world took precedence over addressing the contradictions and shortcomings affecting the American way of life. So from 1945 until the end of the 20th century, creating ‘a more perfect Union’ took a back seat to venturing ‘abroad, in search of monsters to destroy’.

Whatever the turmoil on the home front, this conviction that the United States was called upon to exercise global leadership remained unwavering. Even in 1968, when assassinations, racial unrest and widespread opposition to a deeply unpopular war brought the nation precariously close to unraveling, the conviction held. Two decades later, the fall of the Berlin Wall seemingly validated that conviction for all time. We were indeed, as presumably serious US officials proclaimed, the ‘indispensable nation’ and destined to remain so until the end of time. So we were led to believe.

Now, a mere three decades since the end of the Cold War delivered its seemingly decisive verdict, the barrier between what happens ‘out there’ and what happens ‘back here’ has been breached. Foreign policy and domestic matters are becoming intermingled. As a direct consequence, American global leadership appears noticeably rickety.

At a moment when media coverage suggests that Trump is everything and everything is Trump, it’s important to note that this intermingling dates from long before his presidency. It commenced on 9/11 when an event that was never supposed to happen — a devastating attack on the United States itself — did happen. Americans suddenly awakened to the fact that global leadership as practiced by the United States can produce painful blowback.

Reinforcing this shock to the system were other unpleasant surprises. First came wars in Afghanistan and Iraq that the world’s mightiest military was supposed to win but did not, despite sustaining terrible casualties and expending trillions of dollars. Second came episodes of stunning ineptitude by political authorities. Hurricane Katrina provided one example among many, showing that the people in charge were clueless about how to protect the population for which they were responsible. Hard on the heels of Katrina came the worst economic crisis since the Depression, suggesting that the people charged with managing the economy were incompetent, on the take, or both.

In 2016, the electorate responded by repudiating the establishment, voting into office a thoroughly unqualified presidential wannabe who promised to ‘drain the swamp’ and put ‘America First’. Donald Trump has kept neither of those promises. As the end of his first term approaches, the actual legacy of his presidency has now become clear: yet more ineptitude, cluelessness and incompetence, all reinforced by Trump’s trademark narcissism, vulgarity, blustering tough-guy posturing and casual dissembling.

History will doubtless judge Trump harshly. As US president, he has proven to be an abysmal flop. Trump has failed to end the wars he vowed to end. For all his self- touted skills as a dealmaker, his record consists chiefly of unfulfilled promises. He also failed to address effectively — or even acknowledge — the threat posed by COVID-19. As a direct consequence of his administration’s belated and bungling response to the pandemic, the death toll in the United States now exceeds a staggering 125,000. Trump, of course, accepts no responsibility for that outcome. Coming hard on the heels of the pandemic is the worst economic calamity since Herbert Hoover occupied the White House almost a century ago. Hoover ‘owned’ the Great Depression. So too Trump ‘owns’ the economic consequences of the Great Lockdown. Yet again he refuses accountability.

And finally, there is Trump’s typically callous and ham-handed response to the wave of civil unrest triggered by the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Looking back on the nation’s recent past, baffled Americans are left to ponder two questions: how could this have happened? And what can we do to escape from the terrible straits in which we find ourselves?

A partial answer to the first question is this: for too long, ruling elites allowed the purported obligations of global leadership to take precedence over tending to the collective wellbeing of the American people. This was a conscious choice made by leaders of both political parties. We are now living with the consequences of that choice, with the persistence of racism offering just one example of what neglect has produced. Yet it deserves to be emphasized: the neglect was not Trump’s doing; he was merely its ironic beneficiary. We are its victims.

A preliminary answer to the second question must begin with this admission: the era of US dominion has now passed. So Americans can no longer afford to indulge in the fiction of their indispensability, cherished in elite circles. In fact, the sun has set on the American empire. Subordinating the wellbeing of the American people to ostensible imperatives of global leadership — thereby allowing racism, inequality, and other problems to fester at home — has become intolerable.

A massive reordering of national priorities is required. It goes without saying that Trump is incapable of presiding over any such reordering. Yet whether anyone else in mainstream politics is capable of doing so remains very much an open question.

Andrew Bacevich is president of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft. This article is in The Spectator’s July 2020 US edition.

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A SF book written in 1993 :Parable of the Sower

The Nebula Award–winning author of Kindred presents a "gripping" dystopian novel about a woman fleeing Los Angeles as America spirals into chaos (The New York Times Book Review). Lauren Olamina and her family live in one of the only safe neighborhoods remaining on the outskirts of Los Angeles. Behind the walls of their defended enclave, Lauren's father, a preacher, and a handful of other citizens try to salvage what remains of a culture that has been destroyed by drugs, war, and chronic shortages of water, gasoline, and more. While her father tries to lead people on the righteous path, Lauren struggles with hyperempathy, a condition that makes her extraordinarily sensitive to the pain of others. When fire destroys their compound, Lauren's family is killed and she is forced out into a world that is facing apocalypse. With a handful of other refugees, Lauren must make her way north to safety, along the way conceiving a revolutionary idea that may mean salvation for all mankind. From a recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship who has won multiple Nebula and Hugo Awards, this iconic novel is "a gripping tale of survival and a poignant account of growing up sane in a disintegrating world" (The New York Times Book Review).  

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