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Dad was a pilot, he purchased what we called a hobby farm but for him it was an relaxation from his very long flights and duty time.  We moved there when I was 10, as dad was away quite often and as I was the oldest at home, I quickly picked up some new skills.

  How to drive a tractor / truck / manure spreader, plow / till a field,  fix a broken well pump, ensure when freezing that the animals had access to water,  help a cow give birth (darned things never wanted to co operate), treat animal wounds when dogs and other creature attacked, put badly injured animals out of their misery, how to ride a horse, how to control a bull who wanted to visit the dairy farm next door, dig out after a a large snow fall, fix drainage systems, string barbed wire  and electric fences, raise 3000 boiler chickens the first year we were on the farm, repair ancient electrical wiring, paint a barn with whitewash, ,muck out stalls, fix a barn roof, fill a silo, to walk 1/2 mile to catch the bus to school (we were on swing shifts, school was overcrowded) so that was done at 6:30 in the morning after breakfast and looking after our animals. . Riding a stone boat during haying (much better than working in the mow,etc etc etc   I look fondly back on those days 

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She asked him, 'How much are you selling the eggs for?' The old seller replied, '$.25 an egg, Madam.' She said to him, 'I will take 6 eggs for $1.25 or I will leave.' The old seller replied, 'Co

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7 hours ago, Marshall said:

I look fondly back on those days and Jaydee, I commend you and your wife / I know when Sam grows up he will understand and value the life experience you are giving him. 

Just so we are clear....I am not that farmer in the article, The article was titled ....from a farmer.... although my background was similar to yours as a young child and that’s probably why the article struck me. My entire family history is rooted in farming and still to this day a number  of my cousins run successful farms.....HUGE operations worth mega millions. Having that history is probably why we had ended up with successful careers later in life. 
 

Having a work ethic is a “taught” art passed through generations. Just 6 weeks ago I watched a grandson riding on an asparagus picking machine similar to the one in the link below, along with four other teens as one of his summer jobs. Yes, he enjoys everything else teens have in 2020, but he also know the value of a dollar and what it takes to make one. He has a bright future IMO, compared to the wusses being raised in big cities but helicopter parents. 
 

 

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Kids that grow up working a farm with their families tend to be hard workers and far healthier than their city counterparts.  They start young and work hard.

Take a city kid today and send them to a farm for a week in Hay season.  they wont last long

 

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14 hours ago, Marshall said:

Riding a stone boat during haying (much better than working in the mow,etc etc etc   I look fondly back on those days 

Great post - not many people know the joys of a stone boat!  Spent many happy(?) hours picking rocks and stooking hay bales in my youth on the farm.

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4 hours ago, boestar said:

Kids that grow up working a farm with their families tend to be hard workers and far healthier than their city counterparts.  They start young and work hard.

Take a city kid today and send them to a farm for a week in Hay season.  they wont last long

 

I used to watch my uncle perform what I still believe to be heroic feats of strength.  We'd go out out with the hay wagon to bring in the haybales, which generally weigh about 50 lbs.  As teenagers we could mange the first 5 or 6 levels - basically grab the bale by the two twines and throw it up to the guy standing on top to stack.  This is throwing 50 lbs up 6 or 8 feet.  I was always pretty impressed with my performance but when it got too high for us I'd watch my uncle who would use a pitch fork - stab the bale and toss, yes, toss the bales up to levels beyond our ability!  One time we forgot the pitchfork and he used a fencepost instead!  Stab a 50 lb haybale with a fencepost and toss it 12 feet into the air.  Incredible!  Basically a farmer version of Arnold Schwarzenegger.

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5 hours ago, boestar said:

Kids that grow up working a farm with their families tend to be hard workers and far healthier than their city counterparts.  They start young and work hard.

Take a city kid today and send them to a farm for a week in Hay season.  they wont last long

 

Of course the same can  be said of most young adults.  I guess that is why we dole out money without requiring work but of course this does keep the flow of temporary seasonal farm workers arriving from outside Canada.  Just imagine how many students we could hire with that 900 million to perform the seasonal work. Who knows, we might have even  avoided this: https://globalnews.ca/news/7173993/coronavirus-windsor-migrant-workers/

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Granddaughter helps grandma go green

  • Calgary Herald
  • 14 Jul 2020
  • SHELLEY FRALIC shelleyfralic@gmail.comSHAUGHN BUTTS/POSTMEDIA
Activist Greta Thunberg represents a young generation bent on environmental change — but all generations must accept responsibility for the planet’s health.

The story goes like this: A young supermarket cashier is chastising an elderly woman for using plastic bags to carry her groceries.

“I am sorry,” the older woman says, “but we didn’t have the green thing in my day.”

“That’s the problem,” says the cashier. “Your generation didn’t care enough to save our environment for future generations.”

Ah, but what my generation did, the elderly woman replies, was recycle milk bottles, use cloth diapers and clothesline. What we did was watch our one television while wearing hand-me-downs. What we did was mail packages without bubble wrap, drink water from the tap, cook unprocessed food instead of getting takeout, and ride a bicycle to school.

What we did was manage without fast food, fast fashion, fast cars, cellphones and every other imaginable industrialized convenience and electronic diversion that created the disposable lives we lead today.

Oh, and while we’re at it, we would have been taken out behind the wood shed if we had littered.

The older woman had, in fact, lived a life of green.

I am of an age where I have shared much of that women’s “green” history — the cloth diapers, paper not plastic, tap not bottled. And, not bragging, but I have never owned dishwasher. In fact, for much of my teens, in the 1960s, I was laser-focused on saving whales and peace on Earth. And then, like millions of others maturing into adulthood, I fell headlong under the magic spell of Madison Avenue, where postwar optimism and cheap overseas labour heralded a new age of rampant consumerism.

Soon, my First World life was awash in excess. So much plastic. So many possessions. So. Much. Stuff.

Today, I am busy de-accumulating while grappling with a new-found green guilt, courtesy of my granddaughter Charley, who at 15 is naturally much smarter than her grandmother and who is not shy about saying, Nana, the whales are mostly saved these days, so let’s talk about all those mid-20th-century-generated ignominies like climate change, child labour, big oil and, well, the list goes on.

And so we talk. And debate. And don’t always agree. About Greta Thunberg lighting a brush fire across a somnolent, smouldering planet. About alternatives to fracking. About where our recycling ends up. About changing habits and raising awareness.

We talk about big issues, but also small, like is it better to dam a river to produce electricity for public washroom hand dryers or cut down a renewable resource like a tree to make recyclable paper towels?

Like what happens to discarded batteries from electric cars?

Like acknowledging that so much of what constitutes a modern household is manufactured from oil — from electronics and sneakers to make up and detergent — and if you are not willing to give those up, and you know you are not, then let’s stop the blame game and talk about solutions, about personal responsibility. For starters, young and old, how about we skip Skip the Dishes and cook our own dinner? How about curtailing the online shopping, and overpackaged, gas-guzzling, front-door deliveries? How about protesting against businesses that don’t offer recycling bins, against governments that pump raw sewage into the ocean, against the epidemic of litter on our streets?

And it is in those conversations that my granddaughter and I have come to an understanding, from one generation to another.

We are all guilty of messing up this planet. All of us. We consume too much. We waste too much. We are mostly unmindful of our impact.

And we all need to smarten the hell up.

Or, as she puts it: “If you’re not going to be alive in 30 years, Nana, maybe help clean up the mess you helped create.

“We all have to step in. There’s only one Earth.”

Wise girl.

We are all guilty of messing up this planet. All of us. We consume too much. We waste too much. We are mostly unmindful of our impact.

 

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Here's the perfect opportunity to tax Toronto's 1%. 

I keep hearing about this but never see it. You knew that being a sanctuary city was going to be costly when you did it, so get er done, show me the concept works.... or speak of it no more. 

Taxing the rich sounds like such a great plan until it's time to pay the bill, then the slogan bearers and meme writers find out it's them... that's when they "demand help."

https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/city-faces-dire-times-without-help-to-pay-1-9-b-covid-tab-tory

 

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3 hours ago, Wolfhunter said:

More of this now going on than being reported, this years trip is cancelled.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/pei-tourism-negative-news-mackay-1.5634915

Right back at ya PEI.... 

image.thumb.png.f37f9bd5cb3f384d23d52e9482faffd3.png

Well, this page might explain why someone from PEI might have a negative reaction to Nova Scotian visitors:

https://covid-19-status.ca/pe.html

Two whole months with zero cases, open to Atlantic visitors on July 3rd, now 9 cases - 7 from Nova Scotia.  I'm not saying I agree and there's more to the story but, still, you can see where it comes from.   

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22 minutes ago, seeker said:

Well, this page might explain why someone from PEI might have a negative reaction to Nova Scotian visitors:

https://covid-19-status.ca/pe.html

Two whole months with zero cases, open to Atlantic visitors on July 3rd, now 9 cases - 7 from Nova Scotia.  I'm not saying I agree and there's more to the story but, still, you can see where it comes from.   

Atlantic premiers not ready to lift travel restrictions on rest of Canada

By Staff The Canadian Press
Posted July 15, 2020 8:44 am
 Updated July 15, 2020 8:46 am
 
Provincial health department workers stop traffic that has crossed the Confederation Bridge in Borden-Carleton, P.E.I., Sunday, March 22, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Nearly two weeks after a loosened travel agreement between their provinces came into effect, Atlantic Canadian premiers are not rushing to set a date to welcome visitors from the rest of the country.

The Atlantic travel “bubble” that opened on July 3 allows residents of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island to travel between the four provinces without being required to self-isolate for 14 days.

READ MORE: Fredericton’s hospitality industry hopeful despite not seeing benefit of Atlantic travel bubble

Newfoundland and Labrador’s premier had floated the idea of lifting restrictions for other Canadians on July 17, but a statement from Dwight Ball’s office says that was a rough estimate of the earliest possible date.

The premier’s office says the travel bubble is being monitored by the chief medical officer of health, and decisions will consider each jurisdiction’s circumstances.

Prince Edward Island Premier Dennis King said Tuesday he is comfortable with the regional bubble and isn’t looking to expand it beyond Atlantic Canada any time soon.

In a statement Tuesday, New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs said the issue would be discussed with the other premiers and medical officers, and any decision would be made as a group.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 15, 2020.

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2 hours ago, seeker said:

....but, still, you can see where it comes from. 

Nope.

I'm a simple law and order guy, it's pretty easy. I follow the rules even if I don't agree with them, I expect the same in return. Otherwise anarchy reigns and we are collectively the poorer for it.

If ever there was an example of that it would be the firearm storage and transport regulations. I exceed all of them in spades, it's why I particularly resent the notion that gun owners and competitive shooters should serve as scapegoats for the self-inflicted madness occurring in places like Toronto. 

If you are attacking your neighbours, either verbally or physically, keying their cars and leaving intimidating and/or threatening notes, you get no sympathy from me. I want no part of it. That doesn't mean I'm afraid of it either.

When I am, I'll know that I'm old... It will happen sometime and that's a certainty, but it sure as hell isn't today.

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1 hour ago, Wolfhunter said:

If you are attacking your neighbours, either verbally or physically, keying their cars and leaving intimidating and/or threatening notes, you get no sympathy from me. I want no part of it. 

Didn't say I agree with it nor was I justifying it.  I said you can see where it comes from - going from zero cases to having seven cases by way of Nova Scotia might make some people wish Nova Scotians would stay away.  Yes, I do know that is a bonehead conclusion.  

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42 minutes ago, seeker said:

Yes, I do know that is a bonehead conclusion.  

It's actually thoughtful and understanding. In truth, the world needs more of that.

My world tends to be black and white... we are all victims of our own experience and I don't pretend to elevate my own (bad ones) as a model for others, in fact, I want to be wrong on all counts.

 Some things are complex and others aren't, dumb grunts thrive on simplicity. I'm working on it.

 

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If someone lodges a complaint, IMO authorities should be forced to reveal the identity to the affected party. Why can't people MYOB?? In every neighbourhood there's always that ONE !!!

 

Toronto family forced to dismantle, move backyard 'pirate ship' after complaint to city

It was a labour of love when John Konstantinidis built a large "pirate ship" in his backyard to bring his kids joy in the middle of a pandemic. 

But the Toronto family says in the past couple of weeks a complaint from a neighbour led to city officials knocking on their door. Now, Konstantinidis has to dismantle the structure — which is actually part swimming pool and part deck — move it, and reassemble it.

 

"The kids went crazy. I mean, bawling ... They were very sad about it," he said. 

"Kids always tend to be victims in such situations."

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/toronto-pirate-ship-neighbour-complaint-covid-1.5651127

 

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Here's an article from 2 years ago that asks if the US is on the road to becoming ungovernable. IMO, it's the fate of all great civilizations that become too liberal, too comfortable, and too reliant on government. Watch any town hall, virtually every question asked has an undercurrent of "what are you going to do for me?" When voters openly admit to voting for the candidate who offers them the biggest cut of other peoples money... the clock begins to tick.

Add to that the the open defiance of federal/state law under sanctuary status (be it immigration, guns, masks, virus restrictions.... doesn't matter) and you set the stage for smaller and smaller venues to do exactly the same. Soon you have enclaves with armed militias and an utterly horrific version of the very conditions you sought to avoid by establishing sanctuary status in the first place.  

"Sadly, the truth is that Barack Obama and Donald Trump are “the middle” today.  There is no longer a single set of values that unites our nation, and America is becoming more deeply divided with each passing day."

https://www.globalresearch.ca/is-the-united-states-on-a-road-to-becoming-ungovernable/5644975

Few in the US can now find fault with the Taliban and ISIS proclivity for erasing historically significant "things" they found offensive. Selective offence and censorship of history (good and bad) feeds on its own tail.... "long ranks of the new oppressors" is a timeless quote and Newtons third law remains a reality whether people believe it or not.

White House portraits of Bill Clinton and George W. Bush moved from prominent space to rarely used room

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Reject capital gains tax on home sales

 

  • Calgary Sun
  • 19 Jul 2020
  •  

If Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his government have no plans to impose a capital gains tax on the sale of residential homes, why is the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. — a federal Crown agency — spending $250,000 to study a capital gains tax on residential homes?

“The objective is to identify solutions that could level the playing field between renters and owners,” a CMHC spokesperson told Blacklock’s Reporter last week.

The research is being conducted by the University of British Columbia’s

School of Population.

“Many Canadians bank on profits from home ownership to secure their financial future and gain wealth,” the UBC project Generation Squeeze said.

UBC researchers previously described homeowners as “lottery winners.”

“We need to make it so that no Canadian relies on gains in housing wealth to feel secure, and we need to rethink policies that by encouraging the financialization of housing push the cost to buy or rent a home even further out of reach.”

Trudeau has denied he intends to impose a capital gains tax on residential homes that would rake in billions of dollars annually for the federal treasury.

A November 2018 Liberal policy proposal handout suggested a 50% capital gains tax on the sale of residential homes after one year, gradually dropping to 5% after five years to discourage housing speculation.

But in last year’s election, Trudeau denied in a tweet what he said were “lies” by the Conservatives that the Liberals were planning to impose a 50% tax on residential home sales.

“To be clear: We will NOT put a 50% tax on the sale of your home,” Trudeau tweeted.

Instead he said the Liberals would make home ownership easier for Canadians by lowering the price of a first home by 10%, giving more money to people in places where houses cost more and taxing vacant homes owned by people who don’t live in Canada.

We believe any tax on the sale of residential homes would be a betrayal of the vast majority of home buyers who are not speculators, but who have worked long and hard and scrimped and saved to be able to afford home ownership.

Doing it in the middle of a global recession caused by the COVID-19 pandemic would be disgraceful.

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