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Mitch Cronin

Sorry Albertans, stuff your fossil fuel

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I'm still waiting to hear from the climate change crowd... 

Instead of celebrating the blockade as a trial run of what they yearn for, they seem upset by the trivial effect it is having. They should compare this effect with what they want the government to actually do. 

Anecdotal at best, but at the gym (when asked) these folks  grow silent. 

Edited by Wolfhunter

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9 hours ago, Jaydee said:

almost all households in Alberta are enriched by the carbon tax

I live in Alberta and neither myself or my wife has received a cheque from the government.

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3 hours ago, Fido said:

I live in Alberta and neither myself or my wife has received a cheque from the government.

You must be making too much money, our cheque came from the Alberta Government and that was a couple of months ago . Mind you we are retired (15 plus years) on a non indexed pension 😀

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19 hours ago, Marshall said:

You must be making too much money, our cheque came from the Alberta Government and that was a couple of months ago . Mind you we are retired (15 plus years) on a non indexed pension 😀

I don't consider ourselves as making too much.

My wife and I are both on unindexed pensions.

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1 hour ago, Fido said:

I don't consider ourselves as making too much.

My wife and I are both on unindexed pensions.

It all depends upon the combined income.

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Not getting stuffed, just getting agreements with those most closely involved  😀

Teck project environmental deal reached between First Nation and Alberta government

allison-bench-pic.jpg?quality=70&strip=all&w=68&h=68&crop=1
BY ALLISON BENCH GLOBAL NEWS
Posted February 23, 2020 1:20 pm
Updated February 23, 2020 1:29 pm
On Sunday, Feb. 22, the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation said it had reached an agreement with the Government of Alberta regarding the Teck Resources Frontier oilsands mine project. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

A deal has been reached between the Alberta government and a First Nation that had raised environmental concerns around the Teck Resources Frontier project.

In an announcement Sunday, the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation announced the agreement and expressed “support for approval of the project.”

Athabasca Chipewyan Chief Allan Adam had previously called out the UCP over its failure to consult and take meaningful action on environmental concerns around the Teck Frontier mine project.

“After many productive discussions, the Alberta government has responded to our concerns with a comprehensive and meaningful package of action items,” Adam said in the news release.

“I am now confident that this Project is a net benefit to my community and the entire region.”

“The environmental and cultural mitigations agreed to are unprecedented for a project of this kind,” Adam said.
 

In public letters sent on Feb. 7 to the federal government and to other chiefs, Adam highlighted environmental concerns — ranging from caribou habitat to water issues — saying the government and company had failed to consult the First Nation.

But now, the First Nation hails Teck Frontier as a “model” for how companies planning major projects should move forward in the future.

“Given the recent discussions with the Government of Alberta and their fresh and positive approach, we reconfirm our support of the Project and encourage the Canadian government to approve the Project without further delay,” Allan said.

Alberta Minister of Environment and Parks Jason Nixon said Sunday that the government had also secured agreements with the Mikisew Cree First Nation.

“Together these First Nations and Alberta have been able to do what Alberta has always said we can: become true partners in prosperity by developing our resources while protecting the land and culture of our Indigenous people,” Nixon said in a news release.

“To reinforce our commitment to create this wealth responsibly, we have been able to address and sustain bison and caribou habitats, protections for Wood Buffalo National Park, and we have set out a path for cooperative management of the Kitaskino Nuwenëné Wildland and the Ronald Lake Bison Herd,” Nixon said.

 

Athabasca Chipewyan and the Mikisew Cree are two of 14 First Nations and Metis communities that have signed participation agreements on the Teck mine.

TeckPHOTO.jpg?w=1040&quality=70&strip=all1:57Teck’s proposed oilsands mine generating political debate

 Teck’s proposed oilsands mine generating political debate

The mine, planned for north of Fort McMurray, Alta., would produce 260,000 barrels of oil a day and about four million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions every year, for more than 40 years. The company said it would employ 7,000 people during construction and 2,500 during operation.

Nixon said Sunday that he was “once again” calling on the federal government to approve the project.

“The opportunity that this project presents for our Indigenous communities, our province and the thousands of jobs it would create cannot be killed for political reasons. This project has played by the rules. It has followed the process. It’s time to get it done.”

2:32Kenney has message for Ottawa on Teck Frontier Mine

 Kenney has message for Ottawa on Teck Frontier Mine

The federal government must make a decision on the project by the end of February under the Environmental Assessment Act.

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Quote

"Unfortunately, the growing debate around this issue has placed Frontier and our company squarely at the nexus of much broader issues that need to be resolved. In that context, it is now evident that there is no constructive path forward for the project," he wrote.

Teck withdraws application for Frontier oilsands mine, citing debate around climate policy

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So, after spending 10 years designing the project and the environmental protection strategies.  Ten years of unprecedented effort to achieve the support and address the concerns of the local First Nation communities:

14 First Nations and Métis communities supported Frontier mine and signed participation agreements.

We are pleased to announce that ACFN has now reached an agreement with the Alberta Government re the Teck Frontier

In a statement, Mikisew Cree Chief Archie Waquan called work by Teck and Alberta to resolve their concerns “groundbreaking.”

 

What do we get? Cancelled.

Loss of approximately $70B in royalties over the life of the project.

Loss of 7000 construction jobs,  2500 ongoing jobs, untold loss of anciliary jobs and investment.

All this lost due to a bunch of out-of-touch, entitled, Starbucks sipping, iPhone swiping, urban, non-taxpaying idiots.

For me?  Just looking for somewhere to move to that doesn't put up with this sort of nonsense and isn't on the road to economic collapse because Canada surely is.

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27 minutes ago, seeker said:

What do we get? Cancelled.

Loss of approximately $70B in royalties over the life of the project.

Loss of 7000 construction jobs,  2500 ongoing jobs, untold loss of anciliary jobs and investment.

All this lost due to a bunch of out-of-touch, entitled, Starbucks sipping, iPhone swiping, urban, non-taxpaying idiots.

All thanks to Trudeau and his inability to lead....but he does have nice hair and is concerned about your “feelings”.... what more could we ask for ?? 🤬🤬

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So, after 10 years of hard work and literally hours away from a cabinet decision on the project (which is now cancelled).... they pull out. No negotiations, no discussions, and the cabinet approval meeting is cancelled 15 seconds later, right?

I don't believe it for a moment. It's in the same package as regional pilot negotiations; if you don't take this pay cut we won't be getting those 747s that we never told you about until now; and all the while, you were better off driving a dump truck.

If ever there was cause to believe in fake news this would be it IMO. You never know, there may be an outside chance that Justin will don his cape, plant some trees to offset the carbon and save the day. Go JT....

deicer will be sure to tell us about the remarkable negotiation skills JT employed to gain consensus, promote gender equality and save the nation from Alberta separation.

Edited by Wolfhunter

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Having been in Florida for the winter, it is most refreshing not to have to listen to the constant messaging regarding the end of the world, CO2 emissions, climate change,  (who is Greta Thunberg?), the guilt from not meeting the expectations of the UN, the plight of new Canadians, indigenous reconciliation and a woke pm telling us how to think and live...blah blah blah. 
Instead, people go about their business,......fill their tanks with gas at $2.30/gal, buy beer at $18/30 pack, and smile ....people are happy.

I know, there are problems down here (I don’t mention the Trump factor) but it’s great to get away from all that. IMO, it’s embarrassing to watch our country implode. It’s the old expression coming true......we are destroying the country proving how democratic we can be.

I’m not looking fwd to come back. Oh yeah, can’t wait to write a big check to these idiots for my income tax.

And fwiw.....don’t miss the pissn and moaning from the Ontario teachers union...average teacher salary in FL is $48k/yr.

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It sends a message to foreign investors that sovereign risk in Canada’s energy sector is comparable to a banana republic.

Teck decision proves Canada is inhospitable to energy development

A critical responsibility of prime ministerial leadership is to set priorities in the national interest and advance them with determination and integrity. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s recent performance has been the opposite: a haphazard and indecisive pursuit of misplaced priorities that severely damage our economy, undermine public confidence in our institutions and inflame regional resentment. Ironically, his failure relates to an issue he sermonizes about constantly: balancing resource development, environmental protection and Aboriginal reconciliation

Trudeau’s latest catastrophic failure relates to Teck Resources’ decision to cancel its $20.6-billion Frontier oilsands mine in northeast Alberta, a project that received regulatory approval and support from all 14 First Nations and Métis communities the mine would have impacted, who are bitterly disappointed by the news. The company wrote off $1.13 billion in sunk costs for the same reason Enbridge and TransCanada wrote off comparably staggering amounts and Kinder Morgan would have done, too, had it not been bailed out by the Canadian taxpayers. The inability of the government to reconcile resource development and climate change put Teck in an untenable position. Well over $120 billion of projects have been cancelled in the past three years of Liberal hostility and incompetence. The latest may signal the death knell for further projects.

Frontier pitted majority Aboriginal support, jobs, growth and national unity against hereditary chiefs, environmental militants and intolerant groupthink. The political contest was between hard facts versus fear-mongering. The loss is staggering: 7,000 jobs during construction, 2,500 during operation and $70 billion in taxes to governments to fund health care, education and infrastructure. Rejection is another body blow to a resentful and beleaguered Alberta and a message to foreign investors that sovereign risk in Canada’s energy sector is comparable to a banana republic.

While Trudeau fiddled, the country burned.

Frontier’s opponents claim a climate emergency justifies its cancellation. But climatology is a highly complex and multi-faceted science and we have an imperfect knowledge of its myriad interrelationships. Computer models have consistently and significantly over-predicted global warming. In any event, Canada produces only 1.6 per cent of global emissions and cannot make a measurable difference to global temperatures. With fossil fuels predicted to represent three-quarter of global energy supply through 2040, no politically stable country would deliberately refuse to develop its natural resources.

Since the world’s largest countries are not doing their share on emissions reduction, why are we morally obliged to wreck our economy, especially when our natural gas could reduce net global emissions by helping lessen Asia’s use of higher-emitting coal? Historians will look back in bewilderment if Canada sacrificed so much for so little environmental return.

Then there are the ruinous implications of the blockades, which doubtless influenced the Teck decision. The prime minister looked like a deer in the headlights when protesters blocked train tracks, bridges and highways, seriously impeding trade and travel and creating a national crisis. When he finally came home to address the crisis, he could not clearly communicate what if anything he would do, beyond “dialogue.” While Trudeau fiddled, the country burned.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers a statement in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2020, regarding infrastructure disruptions caused by blockades across the country.

 

 

No democratic government can long maintain its legitimacy if it countenances blatant disregard for the rule of law based on identity or belief, however politically correct. Justice must be blind, both impartial and objective.

Today the demand for special treatment before the law is from a few dozen Ontario protesters who claim moral standing based on their support for hereditary chiefs, extreme environmentalism and anti-free enterprise ideology — which are opposed by elected Wet’suwet’en band councils, many First Nations leaders, a strong majority of British Columbians and most Canadians. Despite their supposedly noble cause, the non-Aboriginal protesters are just radical scofflaws.

Last Friday, the prime minister finally managed to state the obvious: protesters are hurting Canadians and the barricades must go. He needs to articulate the primacy of the rule of law directly to the RCMP and to the premiers, who have authority over the provincial police. He cannot order the RCMP or police to intervene, since they determine the rules of engagement. But their responsibility is to enforce a court order, which should be done after fair warning and with no more force than necessary. The illegal blockades must be removed and very soon. If the police do not act, legislation may be needed.

blockade3.jpg?quality=60&strip=all&w=780

 

The constructive attitude of Aboriginal leaders, who are understandably concerned they will lose public support if the blockades continue, reduces the risk of a negative reaction to the use of force.

Once the current crisis is resolved, Trudeau needs to focus on overarching priorities: growing the economy, building pipelines to tidewater so oil and gas can be sold to overseas markets, investing in science and technology and adapting to a changing climate. He must also forge a fair, constructive and practical relationship with Aboriginal peoples, one that recognizes their legitimate rights and responsibilities and provides them a better opportunity for self-reliance and prosperity. Consistent with those priorities, his government should immediately work to restart Energy East.

Unlike pious grandstanding, these actions would serve our national interests and the world’s. But if the prime minister continues to abdicate leadership, he should step aside for someone who would exercise it. This can’t go on.

Financial Post

Joe Oliver was minister of natural resources (2011-14) and minister of finance (2014-5).

https://business.financialpost.com/opinion/joe-oliver-teck-decision-proves-canada-is-inhospitable-to-energy-development?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook#Echobox=1582556691

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Similarly, Fort McKay First Nation Chief Mel Grandjamb said in a release Monday afternoon he was “disappointed” by Teck’s decision to shelve the project, adding that his nation had been working with the company on the project since 2008.

“Teck’s decision follows in the wake of a national debate about resource development, climate change, environmental protections and Indigenous interests,” Grandjamb said, adding, “Responsible resource development can be a meaningful tool for reconciliation when it also recognizes Canada’s obligation to protect Treaty rights.”

Now that Teck has pulled the plug and the LNG pipeline is doubtful, I imagine the indigenous people that were counting on these jobs are relieved to know we are on the transition to a green economy...just look how well Ontario did with the Green Energy plan...where is Catherine McKenna when we need her??

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37 minutes ago, st27 said:

I imagine the indigenous people that were counting on these jobs are relieved to know we are on the transition to a green economy...just look how well Ontario did with the Green Energy plan...where is Catherine McKenna when we need her??

Since the new green economy is based on fairy dust, unicorn tears and wishes (no mines or pipelines involved) I'm sure everyone will be a lot better off.  I think lithium is part of it too, not that we'll benefit from that since it requires a mine.

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37 minutes ago, seeker said:

Since the new green economy is based on fairy dust, unicorn tears and wishes (no mines or pipelines involved) I'm sure everyone will be a lot better off.  I think lithium is part of it too, not that we'll benefit from that since it requires a mine.

Should we expect that Mitch will be happy?  

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11 hours ago, Marshall said:

Should we expect that Mitch will be happy?  

And there in lies the problem. He is probably thrilled Alberta is going down the tubes. 

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23 hours ago, st27 said:

where is Catherine McKenna when we need her??

She is still there leading the blockade against Western Oil.

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Supreme Court of Canada will not hear B.C. groups' challenges against Trans Mountain pipeline expansion

 

Previous judicial review of project's approval was unfairly denied, argued First Nations, environmental groups

CBC News · Posted: Mar 05, 2020 6:54 AM PT | Last Updated: 37 minutes ago
 

The Supreme Court of Canada has declined to hear five B.C.-based challenges against the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.

The groups fighting the project had argued a previous judicial review of the pipeline's second federal approval was unfairly denied by a single judge from the Federal Court of Appeal. 

 

B.C. Nature, the Raincoast Conservation Foundation, the Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations and a number of youth applied to the country's top court for leave to appeal that dismissal.

The Supreme Court of Canada declined to grant the leave in a decision posted Thursday. As is custom, the court did not provide reasons for its decision.

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“ The beauty of this pandemic is how quickly the circle has come. Truck drivers and their fossil burning rigs are of vital importance and an essential service. Farmers are now being asked by the Agriculture minister to contact them to see how they can help so we can keep the food chain going. Funny. As little as 3 weeks ago we were blockading trucks and rail to shut down the country. The government was imposing huge restrictions on farmers. Now both have become the top of the circle and people are realizing that farmers and truckers are needed. I hope this is a big slap in the face of all you protesters to see what happens when the world shuts down.”

Edited by Jaydee
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 We gambled on the wrong threat — climate change
 

"One of the key lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic is that for at least the past decade, we focused disproportionately, or rather our governments did, on one potential global threat — human-induced climate change — to the exclusion of all others.

Anthropogenic climate change became the issue that sucked up all the oxygen in the room when it came to a global crisis.

At the expense of, for example, a contagious and deadly virus becoming a pandemic, which public health experts have been warning us about for decades.

In Canada, our political leaders, have long ignored — perhaps the fairer word is “downplayed” — the health care threat posed by the fact our hospitals are chronically overcrowded, with thousands of patients being treated in hallways, year after year."

https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/goldstein-we-gambled-on-the-wrong-threat-climate-change

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1 hour ago, Jaydee said:

we focused disproportionately...

In a world of stark realities, governments, businesses and armies, have several things in common. Asset availability, asset capacity and the ability to deploy assets where and when they are required is crucial to a robust response.

Put in an aviation context, the government (you, we and us) is currently dumping fuel in a desperate effort to avoid aerodynamic lock point (where maximum thrust available and minimum thrust required intersect). At low altitude, raising the nose to climb causes a stall, lowering it to gain speed causes CFIT….  low altitude and rising terrain becomes the very definition of intensity.

Shake hands with this adversary once and a wise man will take pains never to do it again. We will come out of this wiser than we went in....

Edited by Wolfhunter

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