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Mitch Cronin

Sorry Albertans, stuff your fossil fuel

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Wolfhunter, re buying goods etc. made in China.  The problem we have in not buying them is to find alternate goods to buy.  I too check the label before I purchase the goods, looking firstly for Made in Canada, Product of the USA , Product of Mexico and then I branch out to goods made in other countries.  I also refuse agricultural goods made in India as I have no confidence in their quality.

There are however times when I have to buy made in China if I can not find an alternate source.

 

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2 hours ago, Marshall said:

Wolfhunter, re buying goods etc. made in China.  The problem we have in not buying them is to find alternate goods to buy.  I too check the label before I purchase the goods, looking firstly for Made in Canada, Product of the USA , Product of Mexico and then I branch out to goods made in other countries.  I also refuse agricultural goods made in India as I have no confidence in their quality.

There are however times when I have to buy made in China if I can not find an alternate source.

 

Hello again,

I include Mexico in my list of things and places to be avoided, but that’s just me. California and Toronto are also recent additions to the motorcycle no go list; clearly, some folks like these places and I say God bless them, I have no interest or inclination. It’s all their’s and I wish them the best.

The lack of alternatives to Chinese produce is of no consequence to me; I’d rather eat squirrels... again though, that’s just me being me and I would not wish to foist my views on others.The debacle of “made in Canada” vs “product of Canada” is a deliberate construct (IMO) intended to create confusion.

Regardless, buying these things only amounts to hypocrisy if you choose to flaunt your virtue in other venues and present yourself as a paragon of virtue to others as you snarf back Chinese products (with a condescending, finger wagging countenance) as you rail against oil from Alberta. It's only when you spend extended periods in other countries (and I don't mean the vacation circuit), that you come to realize what a treasure Canada really is. Don't take my word for it either.... go to the Legion, find a veteran with lots of medals and ask him. 

Edited by Wolfhunter

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18 minutes ago, Wolfhunter said:

Hello again,

I include Mexico in my list of things and places to be avoided, but that’s just me. California and Toronto are also recent additions to the motorcycle no go list; clearly, some folks like these places and I say God bless them, I have no interest or inclination. It’s all their’s and I wish them the best.

The lack of alternatives to Chinese produce is of no consequence to me; I’d rather eat squirrels... again though, that’s just me being me and I would not wish to foist my views on others.The debacle of “made in Canada” vs “product of Canada” is a deliberate construct (IMO) intended to create confusion.

Regardless, buying these things only amounts to hypocrisy if you choose to flaunt your virtue in other venues and present yourself as a paragon of virtue to others as you snarf back Chinese products (with a condescending, finger wagging countenance) as you rail against oil from Alberta. It's only when you spend extended periods in other countries (and I don't mean the vacation circuit), that you come to realize what a treasure Canada really is. Don't take my word for it either.... go to the Legion, find a veteran with lots of medals and ask him. 

I think you meant "Chinese Products" ? And of course I don't rail against oil from Alberta (I guess that remark was directed to perhaps the author is this thread?  ?   )  Cheers.  

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3 hours ago, Marshall said:

I think you meant "Chinese Products" ? And of course I don't rail against oil from Alberta (I guess that remark was directed to perhaps the author is this thread?  ?   )  Cheers.  

No, I did meant produce.it gets lost and  confused with the "product of Canada" label.... it's done deliberately; wash it and put it in a plastic bag that was made in Canada and PRESTO, it becomes a product of Canada. Checkout the "Canadian pineapple" supply.... must be global warming eh? But produce are products and anything made in China amounts to the same thing.

My remarks were directed to no one in particular and I'm often guilty of saying YOU, when I really mean you, we and us. I have been trying to curb that as I fear it comes off in a way I never intended it to. Sorry.

None the less, most hypocrites are blissfully unaware of their own hypocrisy and flaunt their "correctness" with more impunity than I would like to see them enjoy. If you like "products" from China, then by all means get them with my blessings. But, and it's a big BUTT..... don't snow the Snow Queen.

I often end up watching The Wiggles" with my grandkids...."Say the Dance Do the Dance" is one of my favs and it stands as a metaphor for life in general. Available on YOUTUBE for those interested in a catchy tune that stays in your head for days.

PS.: Here ya go. Those who say the dance and do the dance are few in number and I guess that was my point.... albeit clumsily made.

 

Edited by Wolfhunter

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Now I know that we have something in common, grandchildren who are going to have to, sadly, pay back the enormous debt our current Government is creating for them.

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1 hour ago, Marshall said:

Now I know that we have something in common, grandchildren who are going to have to, sadly, pay back the enormous debt our current Government is creating for them.

This is the exact point I have been (unsuccessfully) trying to get through to those on the LEFT here for years now. The rampant over spending on unnecessary, feel good,  social programs combined with the constant global hand outs with BORROWED money has to  come full ?  ?  , but it’s like talking to a brick wall.

 

>>>>>>>>>.   https://www.debtclock.ca/.       God help us if a recession ever happens.

Edited by Jaydee
  • Thanks 1

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My favourite marking on a Box Seen at a Store in the US:

Engineered in the USA

Made in China

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There is also a distinct difference between a Chinese Products and Products that are just manufactured in China.

Many products are designed and engineered in other countries and are then Manufactured in China using components specified by the Engineers.  These are usually the higher quality products.

Then there are the Chinese products which are a similar product or even a knockoff that is made with cheaper components that would not meet the specs of the higher end product.

Chinese culture produces more people that work in factories are are well trained in high tech manufacturing.  North America doesn't train to that standard.

 

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back to fossil fuels and their effect on the environment.

Edmonton

'Playing God': Exploring the depths of the oil industry's compensation lakes

Compelled to compensate for fish habitat destroyed by their mining operations, some of the biggest players in the oilsands are constructing man-made lakes 

The lakes are fake but researchers say the benefits are real

 
wallis-snowdon.jpg
Wallis Snowdon · CBC News · Posted: Nov 24, 2019 8:00 AM MT | Last Updated: an hour ago
 
compensation-lake.JPG
Researchers have been working with operators to construct viable fish habitats from scratch. (Submitted by Mark Poesch)

Compelled to compensate for fish habitat destroyed by their mining operations, some of the biggest players in the oilsands are constructing man-made lakes.

Compensation lakes are designed to emulate every aspect of their naturally-occurring counterparts. 

"If you destroy fish or fish habitat, fisheries law says you have to put it back, and often it says you have to put twice as much back because making something from scratch is a lot harder than keeping what's existing," said Mark Poesch, an associate professor in the University of Alberta's department of renewable resources.

 

The lakes provide habitat for small vegetation, invertebrates, amphibians and fish. Researchers like Poesch are working with operators to ensure they become self-sustaining ecosystems that won't create imbalances in the surrounding watershed. 

"The engineering of a compensation lake actually quite straightforward," Poesch said in an interview with CBC Radio's Edmonton AM.

"The hard part is, how do you replicate a natural system?  And how do you replicate it in a way that's going to stay there for years, if not decades to come, because that's the intent. 

"We're really, in a way, playing God, putting things in the lake that we think are going to be there for Albertans to enjoy throughout time." 

Ecosystems 'from scratch'

As the geographical footprint of the oilsands continues to grow, there has been increasing interest in compensation lakes as a reclamation strategy.

Alberta already has five, and at least five more are planned for construction.

 

Imperial's compensation lake, Muskeg Lake, was completed in 2010, filled with water pumped from adjacent Kearl Lake. A connector channel, built in 2013, allowed fish to migrate into the new lake, which is now home to northern pike and northern redbelly.

Suncor is planning to construct a compensation lake in the Beaver River watershed as part of its habitat rehabilitation plan for the Voyageur South Mine north of Fort McMurray. 

CNRL was the first to construct a compensation lake. Built in 2008 at its Horizon site near Fort McMurray, Horizon Lake covers 80 hectares and, at its centre, plunges more than 20 metres deep. 

It was established beside the Tar River in the lower Athabasca watershed. The company plans to eventually connect the lake to the river.

CNRL describes Horizon Lake as a self-sustaining ecosystem that has seen native fish species "repopulate and thrive." The lake will sustain twice the fisheries habitat that will be lost during the life of the mining operation, the company said. 

We don't just study the fish, we study the entire food web.- Mark Poesch

Poesch and his team have been studying the lake and the surrounding watershed for more than five years. Now its final year, the study has focused on building lakes that sustain diverse fish stocks and mimic the ecosystems of nearby natural wetlands. 

"We want fisheries that don't crash," he said. "We study all aspects of the lake. We don't just study the fish, we study the entire food web." 

The CNRL lake has experienced a marked increase in species diversity with populations of brook stickleback, lake chub, fathead minnows and longnose suckers — and dozens of invertebrate species. 

"Many of the lakes in that area end up having winter kill because they're shallow and lose oxygen so it was purposely designed to be quite deep in the middle," Poesch said.

"It houses a broad range of species including one that's sensitive called the Arctic grayling that people are concerned about."

 
compensation-lake.JPG
Poesch and his team have been researching existing lakes in the Athabasca watershed to better understand the ecosystem of the CNRL compensation lake. (Submitted by Mark Poesch)

Fish populations in Horizon Lake are being tracked through netting and the use of an echosounder. The instrument collects 2D images of fish, allowing researchers to categorize populations by species.

While the lake is supporting a relatively diverse population, it is home to a food web unlike those seen elsewhere in the watershed. For instance, there is a lack of predator fish and overall fish populations have experienced unpredictable fluctuations, suggesting an imbalance in the ecosystem.

There are also concerns about the survivability of the Arctic grayling once the lake is connected to the river. Introducing predator species could destabilize the food chain. 

Poesch is hopeful that with a deeper commitment to ongoing scientific research, operators will be able to strike the right balance so nature can take its course. 

"Each lake is different," he said. "In the beginning, they tend to go through boom and bust cycles so the companies are meant to keep monitoring.

"Right now were just making sure that it's doing what it's supposed to be doing and providing advice so that this lake, in the long term, will be robust." 

'Higher risk of failure'

In a recently published study, Poesch reviewed 577 compensation projects in freshwater ecosystems across North America and Europe and found a troubling trend.

Although billions of dollars are spent on biodiversity offset projects each year, studies evaluating their overall effectiveness remain rare, the study found.

To create sustainable ecosystems, operators and regulators need to move beyond basic regulatory guidelines and focus on diverse management practices, Poesch said. 

And in the end, rehabilitating a damaged ecosystem is always going to be easier than creating entirely new ecosystems.

"A high level of compliance did not guarantee a high degree of function," the study found. "Despite considerable investment in offsetting projects, crucial problems persisted."

A fake lake with real benefits. We'll hear about a researcher working to reclaim wetlands in northern Alberta. 5:26  https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/compensation-lakes-reclamation-alberta-oilsands-research-1.5367776?cmp=rss

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On 11/18/2019 at 12:16 PM, boestar said:

I know there are a lot of Tesla haters in the world but I respect what Elon is doing.

I allows the use of Tesla patents without royalty which means anyone and their dog can build a Tesla or at least an electric car using Tesla technology.  In doing this he has spurred a competition from major car manufactrers to build a better Electric car.  This has sparked innovation.  Some times you need a kick in the rear to move forward.

I fully expect Tesla to step away from making cars at some point and just being the Major Battery and drive system supplier to everyone else.  I could be wrong there as they have now announced a pickup truck that is supposed to challenge the #1 selling F-150

We will see.

As long as there is good competition, the electric vehicle market will continue to grow and for that we can thank Elon

 

 

Tesla driver says he was checking on his dog when the car crashed

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎8, ‎2019, ‏‎3 hours ago | The Associated Press
The driver of a Tesla says the car was on autopilot when it struck a police cruiser and a disabled vehicle on Saturday in Connecticut, according to police.

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I can't fathom the notion of putting multi-layered automation at the disposal of the average driver and expecting them to manage it with no training. Even conditioning pilots to select the appropriate level (to the task at hand) can be problematic... at some point, every sim instructor has seen crews respond to RAs with ALT SEL and vertical speed selections.

 LOL, "I Was on autopilot and checking on my dog when I hit the police cruiser"..... the only question to be asked here is "what did you think was going to happen?"

Imagine how shocked these folks are going to be when gang members in Toronto don't turn in their banned weapons next year..... how did we get here, GPS database error maybe?

Edited by Wolfhunter

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8 hours ago, Wolfhunter said:

I can't fathom the notion of putting multi-layered automation at the disposal of the average driver and expecting them to manage it with no training. Even conditioning pilots to select the appropriate level (to the task at hand) can be problematic... at some point, every sim instructor has seen crews respond to RAs with ALT SEL and vertical speed selections.

 LOL, "I Was on autopilot and checking on my dog when I hit the police cruiser"..... the only question to be asked here is "what did you think was going to happen?"

Imagine how shocked these folks are going to be when gang members in Toronto don't turn in their banned weapons next year..... how did we get here, GPS database error maybe?

Yup, the truth is - people are stupid!  As you said - even highly trained professional pilots will mishandle automation to (potentially) serious implications.  This idea of unleashing complicated technical systems on the untrained public and hoping for a "good" outcome is ludicrious.  A few years ago I was shopping for new vehicle.  This was when the new collision avoidance systems were first being introduced.  I went from dealership to dealership looking for information about how the systems (front collision detection, lane change warning systems, etc) worked and could not find out if they were RADAR, SONAR, LASER, magnetic interference).  The salespeople did. not. know. how the systems worked or what the limitations were and the companies were not providing any information.  The "front collision system" detected a potential collision.  Period.  At what speed or distance or closure rate the "system" detected a potential collision was not disclosed.  How the system might fail, how to detect a failure or what to do to prevent/manage/control a failure - no information.  I'm a technically sophisticated guy and I couldn't figure out the systems.  Is it any wonder that the average soccer mom or random dude can't figure them out?  We hear about people all the time who follow their GPS system's commands to drive into a lake or off a cliff - a system that's 99.9% accurate still results in 1 out of 1000 being mislead.

 

Interestingly enough after posting this I happened to watched the movie First Man which prompted me to research the meaning of code "1202" and lead me to this article:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/lanceeliot/2019/07/16/apollo-11s-infamous-landing-error-code-1202-offers-earthly-lessons-for-self-driving-cars/#6e3b403834bc

 

 

 

Edited by seeker

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9 hours ago, Marshall said:
 

Tesla driver says he was checking on his dog when the car crashed

 
‎Today, ‎December ‎8, ‎2019, ‏‎3 hours ago | The Associated Press
The driver of a Tesla says the car was on autopilot when it struck a police cruiser and a disabled vehicle on Saturday in Connecticut, according to police.

That's not an issue with the car.  Thats an issue with the seat to steering wheel interface unit

 

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https://north99.org/2019/10/30/nobel-prize-winning-economist-debunks-rightwing-economics/

Nobel prize-winning economists debunks right-wing economics

Increasing taxes will do more to spur growth than decreasing them.
 

By now we are all familiar with the usual economic talking points of right-wing politicians. They tell us, with the utmost confidence, that cutting taxes for the rich will incentivize investment and job creation. The lower the corporate tax rate the more people these benevolent corporations will employ. That, in a nutshell, is the mantra of conservative economics.

Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo, this year’s winners of the Nobel prize for economics, beg to differ. Their work suggests that not only does this strategy intensify economic inequality, it also doesn’t do much to induce economic growth.

As Banerjee puts it, “You don’t boost growth by cutting taxes, you do that by giving money to people.” Modest increases to the taxes paid by the wealthiest could fund welfare programs that put more money into the pockets of average folks. They, in turn, return this money into the economy in the form of consumption. It is their spending which increases demand for goods and services and boosts investment, jobs, and overall growth.

Banerjee and Duflo’s advice flies in the face of right-wing economic policy. Conservatives, in Canada and abroad, are reducing taxes for corporations and wealthy elites in the hopes that they will invest some of the cash they are hoarding.

Watch a message from the North99 co-founder Taylor

 

Take the United Conservative government in Alberta for instance. This year they announced plans to slash the corporate tax rate from 12 percent down to 8 percent. They call it the “Job Creation Tax Cut”. This year a 1% reduction was implemented, which did indeed cut costs for corporations and leave them with more cash on hand. Husky Energy which had benefited to the tune of $233 million from the tax cuts, then proceeded to lay off hundreds of workers. Far from creating employment, the “Job Creation Tax Cut” did nothing to save Albertan jobs from the chopping block.

Worst yet, the tax cuts resulted in a loss of government revenues. To offset these losses, the Conservative government in Alberta is gutting welfare programs that would have left more money in the hands of consumers. If Banerjee is even slightly correct, these changes will not only do little to attract investment and employment, they will have adverse effects on economic growth and inequality.

So, on one side we have a Nobel prize-winning economists that tell us to increase taxes and give more money to average folks who will spend it. On the other side, we have Conservatives like Jason Kenney that are decreasing welfare spending and giving more money to rich folks who are hoarding it. Take your pick. It’s not a hard choice.

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^^^^^^^^.  Spoken like a true socialist. Been to Venezuela lately?

If governments didn’t rob you blind in the first place they wouldn’t have to give you back YOUR MONEY.....but if they didn’t do that they couldn’t play the game of being the “good guy” in the scam. Reverse psych at its finest.

From Deicers article...

” You don’t boost growth by cutting taxes, you do that by giving money to people.” Modest increases to the taxes paid by the wealthiest could fund welfare programs that put more money into the pockets of average folks.“

Edited by Jaydee

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28 minutes ago, deicer said:

Immigration is up in Canada, just sayin'......

Simply look at your tax bill for living  proof.

Edited by Jaydee

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1 hour ago, Jaydee said:

Simply look at your tax bill for living  proof.

I challenge your reality, and fight back with facts. Just in case you were wondering why Canada's economy is weathering so well.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/immigrant-owned-firms-create-more-jobs-than-those-with-canadian-born-owners-statcan-1.4393134

Immigrant-owned firms create more jobs than those with Canadian-born owners: StatCan

Immigrant-owned firms create more net jobs and have higher growth than businesses with owners born in Canada, according to newly-released research.

The decade-long research, released Wednesday by Statistics Canada, distinguishes between firms owned by immigrants who entered Canada since 1980 and businesses with Canadian-born owners.

During the period of the study, 2003 to 2013, companies owned by immigrant entrepreneurs accounted for a quarter of all net new jobs created in the private sector, while representing just 17 per cent of firms.

“The results revealed that private incorporated immigrant-owned firms were much more likely than firms with Canadian-born owners to be job creators than job destroyers,” the study authors wrote.

“Based on the raw data, immigrant-owned firms had a higher level of net job creation per firm, and were more likely to be high-growth firms than those with Canadian-born owners.

“But most or all of this gap was due to differences in the characteristics of the firms. Most notably, immigrant-owned firms were younger, and younger firms are more dynamic regarding job creation.”

More than three-quarters of the immigrant-owned firms were less than 10 years old, compared with just over half of those run by someone born in Canada.

Earlier research has shown that younger firms grow faster and create jobs at a higher rate than older firms, the study authors wrote.

But when adjustments were made to account for differences in firm age and other characteristics, the gap between immigrant-owned firms and Canadian-born-owned firms narrowed substantially.

“Young firms accounted for 40.5 per cent of gross job creation, but only 17 per cent of gross job losses in the period studied,” the authors wrote.

“Even if entrants were excluded, since by definition they cannot shed employment, the tendency among young firms was very much toward gross job creation.”

Immigrant-owned companies were also 1.3 times as likely to be high-growth firms, with annual employment growth exceeding 20 per cent, than were those owned by the Canadian-born.

Immigration leads to the creation of new, young and dynamic private incorporated firms, the authors claim.

The authors also wrote about a “years since immigration” effect.

They quoted earlier research that found that immigrants had lower business ownership rates during their first few years in Canada than the Canadian-born population.

But after a number of years in Canada, immigrants had a higher propensity to be business owners than the Canadian-born population.

“In 2012, 90 per cent of firms owned by immigrants who had lived in Canada for five years were young firms,” the report reads.

“Even among firms owned by immigrants who had lived in Canada for 20 years, 43 per cent were young.

“Only among immigrant owners who had lived in Canada for over 30 years did the proportion of young firms in 2012 approach that of Canadian-born owners, at roughly 29 per cent.”

The full paper “Immigrant Entrepreneurs as Job Creators: The Case of Canadian Private Incorporated Companies,” can be found here

“Although the linked data file currently ends in 2013, the information in this study provides a useful first step in understanding the role of immigrant entrepreneurs in the Canadian economy,” Statistics Canada wrote in a media release.

The study used data from Statistics Canada’s Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database. 

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Immigrants are living the Canadian dream while you whine....

 

https://globalnews.ca/news/5369168/immigration-employment-canada/

Employment rate of recent immigrants to Canada reached new high last year: Memo

The share of recent immigrants of prime working age who had employment reached a new high last year, even though Canada has been opening its doors to more newcomers than ever before, according to an internal federal analysis.

The increase was likely driven in part by the country’s strong job-creation run, which has encouraged companies to hire more people who usually find themselves at the margins of the workforce, says the document prepared for Finance Minister Bill Morneau. Immigrants who arrived less than five years ago fall into that category.

The analysis provides a closer look at the impact of immigration on a labour force that has posted big gains in recent years.

After economic slowdown last winter the unemployment rate has hovered near 40-year lows. As a result, employers have reported challenges when trying to fill job vacancies.

Story continues below advertisement

“The performance of recent immigrants on the labour market has markedly improved in recent years, especially when considering the scale of immigrants arriving in Canada every year,” reads the January briefing note, obtained through access-to-information law.

WATCH: Ahmed Hussen addresses latest issues affecting Canada’s immigration system

NOON%20HUSSEN%20ANNOUNCEMENT%20PRETAPE%20STILL.jpg?w=1040&quality=70&strip=all 3:25Ahmed Hussen addresses latest issues affecting Canada’s immigration system

Ahmed Hussen addresses latest issues affecting Canada’s immigration system

The memo says the employment rate for immigrants aged 25 to 54 who landed less than five years ago, was 71 per cent last year. It was the indicator’s highest level since 2006 — which is as far back as the data goes.

“Similar trends are witnessed for immigrants that landed between five and 10 years ago,” the briefing said.

The labour-force participation and unemployment rates of recent immigrants were better than before the last recession, over a decade ago. Selection criteria have targeted immigrants with better earnings prospects and recent newcomers to Canada are more highly educated, the analysis said.

The share of prime-aged immigrants with post-secondary educations rose from 75 per cent in 2006 to 80 per cent in 2018. That’s nine percentage points higher than the share in the general population in the same age range.

Canada has welcomed more immigrants in recent years — and the government intends to bring in more. It has set targets of nearly 331,000 newcomers this year, 341,000 in 2020 and 350,000 in 2021.

Story continues below advertisement

The numbers are rising at a time of growing public debate about some aspects of immigration. It could become an issue in the lead-up to the October federal vote.

A lobby group representing chief executives of Canada biggest companies has urged political parties to avoid aggravating public concerns about immigration during the campaign.

Business leaders made clear the economic case in favour of immigration, especially as baby boomers age and the country seeks workers to help fund social programs, like public health care, through taxes.

The Finance Department document argues that, in general, immigrants in Canada have done well because the country has maintained a positive attitude towards immigration.

“The topic of immigration has become more polarized in a number of countries, which may reflect the poor socio-economic outcomes for immigrants and economic stagnation of the middle class who use immigration as a scapegoat,” it says.

“The economic benefits of immigration are largely dependent on how well newcomers integrate into the labour market. Increasing immigration — or any increase in the population — will drive demand for goods and services, contributing to economic growth.”

The document also noted the strong economic and education outcomes for second-generation Canadians, compared to children of two Canadian-born parents.

Among individuals aged 25 to 44, 95 per cent of second-generation Canadians had completed high school compared to 89 per cent of those whose parents were both Canadian-born. Forty-one per cent of second-generation Canadians had university degrees versus 24 per cent of people with two Canadian-born parents.

In 2017, second-generation Canadians earned average employment incomes of $55,500, versus $51,600 for children of Canadian-born parents.

 

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