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Mitch Cronin

Sorry Albertans, stuff your fossil fuel

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1 hour ago, boestar said:

sometimes just because you can doesn't mean you should.  That thing does not deserve the Mustang name.

 

Agreed!

I have never liked the SUV style.  Give me a capable sedan, and when I needed it I drove a 'loser-cruiser' (minivan).

Reliability, economy, and comfort don't sell anymore...….

Edited by deicer

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Just now, deicer said:

You and I think the same.  Think of the range if you detuned the electric motors!

Unfortunately, what society wants is what (as Mazda advertised) is Zoom Zoom!  With Apple Car Play.

 

Well, I knew (hoped?) it would happen eventually - we actually found something to agree on!  It's a red-letter day!  ??

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Seeing as how Air Canada gave Mitch a pretty nice career with its oil powered planes , tugs, vans  etc.,

 I find it a little hypocritical he stayed there after he saw the light.

   

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More demand erosion now wiith science and technology contributing...

https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/19/business/heliogen-solar-energy-bill-gates/index.html

Secretive energy startup backed by Bill Gates achieves solar breakthrough

 

New York (CNN Business)A secretive startup backed by Bill Gates has achieved a solar breakthrough aimed at saving the planet.

Heliogen, a clean energy company that emerged from stealth mode on Tuesday, said it has discovered a way to use artificial intelligence and a field of mirrors to reflect so much sunlight that it generates extreme heat above 1,000 degrees Celsius.

This is an existential issue for your children, for my children and our grandchildren."

biotech billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong

Essentially, Heliogen created a solar oven — one capable of reaching temperatures that are roughly a quarter of what you'd find on the surface of the sun.
The breakthrough means that, for the first time, concentrated solar energy can be used to create the extreme heat required to make cement, steel, glass and other industrial processes. In other words, carbon-free sunlight can replace fossil fuels in a heavy carbon-emitting corner of the economy that has been untouched by the clean energy revolution.
 
 
"We are rolling out technology that can beat the price of fossil fuels and also not make the CO2 emissions," Bill Gross, Heliogen's founder and CEO, told CNN Business. "And that's really the holy grail."
Heliogen, which is also backed by billionaire Los Angeles Times owner Patrick Soon-Shiong, believes the patented technology will be able to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions from industry. Cement, for example, accounts for 7% of global CO2 emissions, according to the International Energy Agency.
"Bill and the team have truly now harnessed the sun," Soon-Shiong, who also sits on the Heliogen board, told CNN Business. "The potential to humankind is enormous. ... The potential to business is unfathomable."
Heliogen, backed by Bill Gates, has achieved a breakthrough that could allow cement makers to transition away from fossil fuels. The company uses artifical intelligence and an array of mirrors to create vast amounts of heat, essentially harnessing the power of the sun.
 
Heliogen, backed by Bill Gates, has achieved a breakthrough that could allow cement makers to transition away from fossil fuels. The company uses artifical intelligence and an array of mirrors to create vast amounts of heat, essentially harnessing the power of the sun.
 
Unlike traditional solar power, which uses rooftop panels to capture the energy from the sun, Heliogen is improving on what's known as concentrated solar power. This technology, which uses mirrors to reflect the sun to a single point, is not new.
Concentrated solar has been used in the past to produce electricity and, in some limited fashion, to create heat for industry. It's even used in Oman to provide the power needed to drill for oil.
The problem is that in the past concentrated solar couldn't get temperatures hot enough to make cement and steel.
"You've ended up with technologies that can't really deliver super-heated systems," said Olav Junttila, a partner at Greentech Capital Advisors, a clean energy investment bank that has advised concentrated solar companies in the past.

Using artificial intelligence to solve the climate crisis

That means renewable energy has not yet disrupted industrial processes such as cement and steelmaking. And that's a problem because the world has an insatiable appetite for those materials. Cement, for instance, is used to make the concrete required to build homes, hospitals and schools. These industries are responsible for more than a fifth of global emissions, according to the EPA.
That's why the potential of Los Angeles-based Heliogen attracted investment from Gates, the Microsoft (MSFT) co-founder who recently surpassed Amazon (AMZN) CEO Jeff Bezos as the world's richest person.
"I'm pleased to have been an early backer of Bill Gross's novel solar concentration technology," Gates said in a statement. "Its capacity to achieve the high temperatures required for these processes is a promising development in the quest to one day replace fossil fuel."
Heliogen, founded by Bill Gross, must convince industrial companies it's worth the investment to switch over to its solar technology.
 
Heliogen, founded by Bill Gross, must convince industrial companies it's worth the investment to switch over to its solar technology.
While other concentrated solar companies attacked this temperature problem by adding steel to make the technology stiffer and sturdier, Heliogen and its team of scientists and engineers turned to artificial intelligence.
Heliogen uses computer vision software, automatic edge detection and other sophisticated technology to train a field of mirrors to reflect solar beams to one single spot.
"If you take a thousand mirrors and have them align exactly to a single point, you can achieve extremely, extremely high temperatures," Gross said, who added that Heliogen made its breakthrough on the first day it turned its plant on.
Heliogen said it is generating so much heat that its technology could eventually be used to create clean hydrogen at scale. That carbon-free hydrogen could then be turned into a fuel for trucks and airplanes.
"If you can make hydrogen that's green, that's a gamechanger," said Gross. "Long term, we want to be the green hydrogen company."

'No-brainer'

For now, Heliogen is squarely focused on solar. One problem with solar is that the sun doesn't always shine, yet industrial companies like cement makers have a constant need for heat. Heliogen said it would solve that issue by relying on storage systems that can hold the solar energy for rainy days.
Now that it has made this breakthrough, Heliogen will focus on demonstrating how the technology can be used in a large-scale application, such as making cement.
"We're in a race. We just want to scale as fast as possible," said Gross.
After the large-scale application, Soon-Shiong said Heliogen would likely be ready to go public.
In the meantime, Heliogen will require a healthy dose of capital to scale and it's working with investors on a private round of funding. Soon-Shiong signaled he plans to invest more in Heliogen. Heliogen declined to provide information on how much money it has raised so far.
"This is an existential issue for your children, for my children and our grandchildren," Soon-Shiong said.
Heliogen's biggest challenge will be convincing industrial companies using fossil fuels to make the investment required to switch over. Gross said the company has been talking to potential customers privately and plans to soon announce its first customers.
"If we go to a cement company and say we'll give you green heat, no CO2, but we'll also save you money, then it becomes a no-brainer," said Gross.
Its biggest selling point is the fact that, unlike fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas, sunlight is free. And Heliogen argues its technology is already economical against fossil fuels because of its reliance on AI.
"The only way to compete is to be extremely clever in how you use your materials. And by using software, we're able to do that," Gross said.

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Some 89% of Canadians want to see more action on climate change, 77% believe strongly that we are facing a climate emergency. 

Get ready now....... only 8% are willing to pay more to curtail it. That leaves me wondering how many people really understand the impact and cost of reducing our emissions by 79 megatons per year in order to reduce our global impact by  0.7%.  I don't believe for one second that people are actually willing to pay for what they say they want.... and that's why you will never..... NEVER EVER, get an answer about where those cuts (79MTs and rising) will come from. This is a huge undertaking for a country that only produces 1.7% of global emissions.

The Liberals were very clever in agreeing to achieve "net zero" because we are already there anyway (at net zero)..... in fact we are net zero minus another 20% of our total yearly emission output left over for some other country to purchase from us. My guess is they will embark on a tree planting effort and claim victory early in the fight.

Only when blatant hypocrisy comes to an end will there be grounds for further (and hopefully rational) discussion.... we are nowhere close to that point. In fact, the Ontario government has just spent more than $230 million dollars to tear up green energy contracts.... not only are people not willing to pay for what they say they want, they are willing to pay more to avoid paying for what they previously said they might maybe think they could possibly want..... perhaps.

https://business.financialpost.com/opinion/monte-solberg-quebec-is-as-much-an-oil-state-as-alberta-even-though-quebecers-let-others-produce-it

Edited by Wolfhunter
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1 hour ago, Wolfhunter said:

The Liberals were very clever in agreeing to achieve "net zero" because we are already there anyway (at net zero)..... in fact we are net zero minus another 20% of our total yearly emission output left over for some other country to purchase from us. My guess is they will embark on a tree planting effort and claim victory early in the fight.

 

Very few people realize the truth.

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On 11/18/2019 at 11:27 AM, Mitch Cronin said:

The world needs it to stay right where it is, so give it up. Stop raping forests and pumping filthy oil for temporary profit. Start thinking of priorities other than cash... you know, things that really matter, like long term survivability for our next generations.

Resistance to fossil fuel industry is growing and will keep doing so, so best you just give it up. 

Per Normal, Quebec could care less about the future of Canada
“ Majority of Canadians in every province (except Quebec) agree: Ottawa must do more to help Alberta's oilpatch“

Stuff you need to know

As Justin Trudeau’s minority government announces a new Cabinet Wednesday, a new poll underscores the expectations of Canadians, especially on the all-important economic file.

A majority of residents in every region other than Quebec say that the federal government should do more to help Alberta’s natural resource industry, according to a new survey by the Angus Reid Institute.

“That said, few outside of CPC supporters consider the TransMountain pipeline expansion a top priority,” according to the survey published this morning.

Climate change, taxation and healthcare — issues that were often discussed during the federal election — remain top priorities for those surveyed.

Post-election, however, there are two other issues that have come to the fore: Western representation and the federal deficit.

Tax cuts for lower- and middle-income Canadians was seen as priority by 31 per cent of respondents, while 28 per cent felt ensuring Canada meets its 2030 emission reduction targets was a top priority.

While expanding the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline was seen as the most important priority by just under a quarter of those surveyed, Canadians are generally sympathetic towards Alberta’s economic plight.

 

The sense that Alberta needs help is widespread. In fact, a majority everywhere in the country aside from Quebec would like the federal government to do more to help Alberta’s resource industry get back on track,” the survey noted.

As many as 57 per cent of Canadians said the government should do more to help Alberta, with majority of respondents in Saskatchewan (72 per cent), Ontario (63 per cent), Atlantic Canada (59 per cent) and British Columbia (54 per cent) of the view that the minority government should do more to Alberta’s natural resource industry. Only 33 per cent of those polled in Quebec agree with that assessment.

 

Financial Post

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That's an interesting headline Jaydee... Somehow I wonder where it says "oil patch" in the poll questions though? I'd count myself among those Ontarians that would agree Alberta may need help... maybe some cash should flow that way, but definitely not for the "oil patch".

Albertans may be surprised to know that other Canadians actually do care that Alberta doesn't hurt, even while they want the bitumen left where it is, and the boreal forest left undisturbed for the myriad of critters that live in that habitat . 

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Something for you to ponder on Mitch:

Alberta's real per capita GDP
US$75,000)—by far the highest of any Canadian province—61% higher than the Canadian average of C$46,441 and more than twice that of all the Maritime provinces. In 2017, Alberta's real per capita GDP—the economic output per person—was $71,092, compared to the Canadian average of $47,417.

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Mitch, I am curious as to where you are getting your input re Boreal forests in Canada? This is where my information comes from.  https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/our-natural-resources/forests-forestry/sustainable-forest-management/boreal-forest/8-facts-about-canadas-boreal-forest/17394

8 facts about Canada's boreal forest

 
Snow covered trees in the boreal forest.

Canada’s boreal forest covers a vast part of our country, yet there are many things you may not know about it.

For example, do you know the difference between the “boreal forest” and the “boreal zone”? The boreal zone is the wide area that lies between the treeless tundra of the arctic zone in northern Canada and the temperate zone in southern Canada. The boreal forest is the forested area within the larger boreal zone.

Here are 8 more facts about the boreal zone and Canada’s boreal forest.

1. The boreal zone circles the world

The world’s boreal zone is often called “circumpolar” because it circles the Northern Hemisphere, forming a ring around the North Pole, just south of the Arctic Circle. Countries with forests and land in the boreal zone include Canada, the United States, Norway, Sweden, Russia, China and a few others.

Worldwide, the boreal zone covers:

  • 1.9 billion hectares
  • 14% of Earth’s land
  • 33% of Earth’s forested area

Canada has:

  • 28% of the world’s boreal zone – that's 552 million hectares
  • 75% of all of its forests and woodlands in the boreal zone – that’s 307 million hectares in total

2. Mapping of North America’s boreal zone is based on science

Boreal zone map of North America

As the map shows, Canada’s boreal zone stretches from Yukon and northern British Columbia to Newfoundland & Labrador. Canadian Forest Service researchers have used the most current science to map the North American part of the boreal zone.

This map gives scientists, governments and others a common tool for discussing the boreal region.

Download a printable version of the map as a PDF [2.2 Mb] or the shapefiles.

 

3. The boreal zone includes both forests and treeless areas

Much of Canada’s boreal zone is covered in forested lands that are made up of trees, such as pine, spruce, larch, fir, poplar and birch. More than just one big forest, the boreal zone also includes

  • thousands of lakes, rivers and wetlands
  • many naturally treeless areas such as on mountains and in coastal regions

4. The boreal zone is home to a wide range of animals

The boreal zone is home to an extensive range of mammals, insects, fungi and micro-organisms. Among them are:

  • 150 bird species – which is half of the bird species in Canada
  • Woodland caribou – or boreal caribou, as the population in the boreal zone is known, which like to stay in the forests rather than roam the tundra like other caribou.

5. Many people live and work in the boreal zone

  • 3.7 million people in the world live in the boreal zone, mostly in remote and rural communities.
  • 70% of Aboriginal communities in Canada are located in forested regions. The boreal forest is culturally and economically significant to Canada's Aboriginal peoples.

6. The boreal forest isn’t “ancient” wilderness

Canada’s boreal forest is often portrayed as one vast tract of ancient, pristine wilderness but this isn’t the case. Although the boreal region itself is ancient, the boreal forest:

  • is made up mostly of trees that are relatively young compared with many that grow in more temperate climates
  • is regularly affected by forest fire, insects and other natural disturbances
  • continually renews itself through these natural disturbances

Read more: “Is Canada's boreal forest ancient? ”

7. Forest fires, insects and diseases help the boreal forest

The boreal forest needs natural disturbances such as forest fires and outbreaks of insects and disease. These disturbances:

  • remove aged trees from the forest
  • expose the land to sunlight again
  • allow the next group of trees to germinate and grow into a new forest
  • release nutrients from the trees

Learn more about natural disturbances in our forests.

8. Canada’s boreal forest is sustainably managed

Sustainable forest management ensures that the boreal, and all of Canada’s forests, are healthy, safe and thriving. Forest companies have to replant or seed all the areas they harvest on public land, including in the boreal forest, or allow the forest to grow back.

Learn how Canada protects our boreal forest

The boreal forest is important to Canada’s environment, society and economy. Learn more about the ways Canada values and protects our boreal forest.

Find out more

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On 11/18/2019 at 11:27 AM, Mitch Cronin said:

The world needs it to stay right where it is, so give it up. Stop raping forests and pumping filthy oil for temporary profit. Start thinking of priorities other than cash... you know, things that really matter, like long term survivability for our next generations.

Resistance to fossil fuel industry is growing and will keep doing so, so best you just give it up. 

Myth: The oil sands are destroying Canada’s boreal forests

https://context.capp.ca/energy-matters/2019/mythbuster_oil-sands-extraction-and-canadas-boreal-forest

 

Myth:

The oil sands are found within Canada’s vast boreal forest, which stretches 5,000 kilometres from coast to coast and covers roughly 30 percent of this country’s land mass. Oil sands critics say extracting bitumen, especially using surface mining methods, is destroying Canada’s boreal forest. 

For example, an oft-repeated myth is that Canada’s oil sands have disturbed a land area larger than England. Another claim, by Global Forest Watch Canada, states “… industrial development and forest fires in Canada’s tar sands region have cleared or degraded 775,500 hectares (almost two million acres) of boreal forest since 2000 – six times the land area of New York City.” And according to the Boreal Songbird Initiative, “… the footprint of resource extraction in the boreal has already surpassed 180 million acres — around twice the size of Japan.” (This claim appears to apply across Canada, not just the oil sands region – but it’s still an unreasonably large number.)

Busted:

The actual land disturbance attributable to oil sands development is far different. Yes, there is disturbance but the magnitude of that impact is frequently exaggerated. Here is what you need to know: 

According to Natural Resources Canada, the total area of Western Canada’s oil sands resource accessible through surface mining represents 0.2 per cent of Canada’s boreal forest. That isn’t a typo. Since 1967, 0.03 per cent of Canada’s entire boreal forest has been disturbed by oil sands mining.

The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) uses a slightly different statistic: of the total area defined as having oil sands resources – 142,000 square kilometres (km2), only three per cent (4,800 km2) could be ever disturbed by surface mining. 

The actual current disturbed area is even smaller. To date, about 904 km2 of land has been disturbed by the oil sands, mostly through surface mining but also including drilling, in situ development and related infrastructure. 

The current oil sands land disturbance of about 904 km2 is closer to the size of Calgary (848 km2) than New York City (about 4,700 km2), England (about 130,000 km2), or Japan (about 765,000 km2)

In situ production is used to recover oil sands resources that are too deep to mine. Currently, in situ accounts for for 53 per cent of oil sands production by volume; from a land surface perspective, about 80 per cent of Canada’s bitumen despots are too deep to mine, so these resources could be recovered through in situ processes. 

The Government of Alberta requires that companies remediate and reclaim all disturbed land after the oil sands have been extracted by either mining or in situ production. Reclamation means land is returned to a self-sustaining ecosystem with local vegetation and wildlife. Today, about 11 per cent of disturbed land has been reclaimed, including wetland and water features. Some examples:

Syncrude was the first operator to receive government certification for reclaimed land. To date, the company has permanently reclaimed more than 3,800 hectares of land, with an additional 1,000 hectares capped with soil and ready for revegetation. Syncrude has also planted more than 8.5 million tree and shrub seedlings.

Suncor also has a strong track record, reclaiming about 10 per cent of the 22,205 hectares of the land disturbed, including 2,179 hectares of terrestrial reclamation and 48 hectares of wetlands and aquatic reclamation. (For comparison, one hectare is equal to 0.01 km2, or 2.5 acres.)

Among the research focus areas for Canada’s Oil Sands Innovation Alliance (COSIA) is accelerating the reclamation process. COSIA member companies are involved with a variety of projects from topsoil reconstruction to rebuilding fens and wetlands.

The bottom line:

The Canadian boreal forest is the largest intact forest on earth. In fact, 91 per cent of the forest is still intact and more than three million square kilometres are totally undisturbed. The actual land area disturbed by oil sands development currently amounts to 0.01 per cent of the land mass covered by Canada's boreal forest.

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Jaydee: Iwould be very surprised if Mitch responds any post disputing his belief re the Boreal Forest.  He is coming across as a born again environmentalist who is fixated on his belief although the facts do not support his position.    Cheers

I have not had any replies to my questions re his beliefs so I don't know if he has any fact to back up his position or perhaps I am on his "Ignore" list and therefore should not expect any replies. ?

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2 hours ago, Marshall said:

I have not had any replies to my questions re his beliefs

That’s because he’s working off the typical Leftists playbook. They never reply to a fact, but always with a non answer...then when that goes no where they then throw another grenade in the air to see who it lands on.  It’s always smoke and mirrors and “what if’s”

We are no doubt both wasting our time....Like Deicer, their minds are closed to only what they perceive to be reality. I have one blocked, soon to be two.

B6BB7224-CB85-4BFF-93DA-708DD2680B84.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee

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Well, I don't necessarily think Mitch and Deicer are wrong with their end goal.  Society will eventually evolve (devolve?) to an environmentally-friendly state.  My problem with environmentalists is that they want it to happen NOW without any process to get there.  I do believe we (society) should move towards a sustainable future but you can't just switch off the taps without something ready to replace the energy needs.

IMO, we should build the pipelines and use the resources we have while simultaneaously working towards the end goal.  The oil revenues will/can provide the bridge to the electric future.  I do not see a contradiction in this.  The environmentalists have it right but are simply wrong about the path to get there.

Imagine some sort of massive infrastructure project like elctricfying the rail system between  Windsor and Quebec City.  This would have a huge benefit for society and massively reduce CO2 but can we afford the 50 gazillion dollars to do it?  No, we can't.  However we could use the oil revenue to fund the replacement for the oil industry.  The greens want to eliminate the oil industry before building the replacement system.  That's a problem.

Edited by seeker

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I have posted this before. I do not seriously believe anyone on this forum is dead against the concept of climate change,.....but just the idiotic, moronic, stupid, crazy, half brained insane way the Turd is going about responding to it.

 

Taxing the **bleep** out of people, robbing them of their future IS NOT THE WAY TO GO.

Edited by Jaydee
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10 hours ago, Jaydee said:

Taxing the **bleep** out of people, robbing them of their future IS NOT THE WAY TO GO.

The people advocating for climate action don't really want it either. Globally, projected deficits in Paris accord targets are now measured in giga tonnes. It simply won't happen. By way of example, in Canada, we could take every single vehicle off the road, shutdown our entire agricultural sector and it still wouldn't be enough. Calls for action without articulating (even in basic terms) what you are willing to do without will go no where. People seem to think that banning plastic straws and changing lightbulbs will get us there and they act as if Canada (at 1.7% of global emissions) is even a player in this.

Let's just take a soft example, suppose I suggested that we ban all agricultural exports (production in excess of domestic requirements) and that everyone in the country could only drive their vehicles (non electric) three days a week. That is far below what it takes to hit the targets but how would that (minimal) effort serve me as an election platform? This is why no one will tell you what they want to see cut.

Net zero, which was previously dismissed as irresponsible by Liberals, will become the new darling. They will proceed with the easy stuff like single use plastics, incentives for electric vehicles and mass transit, reducing coal consumption etc..... all things that make sense anyway. Personally, I would settle for a 5 year timeline to stop dumping raw sewage into our oceans.... but that's just me. The real effort will be in tree planting. It will be sold as a tough battle, but by the time the next election roles around we will have made great strides. The government will compare the number of trees planted on their watch with the amount of carbon those trees absorb and relate it to our landmass. There will even be talk of selling credits with our newfound success in trapping emissions.....the numbers will look great.

No one will care that even now (like today), our land mass scrubs 20% more carbon than we produce. Victory will be proclaimed and anyone who points out the realities here will be deemed a "denier." by the very people who will proclaim you a denier if you point it out now. 

 

Edited by Wolfhunter
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2 hours ago, Wolfhunter said:

The people advocating for climate action don't really want it either

 If Liberals did not have double standards, they would’t have any standards at all!   Here is a prime example of the double speak from the “woke” crowd. 
 Electric cars have been available for what, ...about a decade now in Canada.?

 

7BF41E3A-58D0-466A-9BB3-70C70DEB1AC4.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee

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2 hours ago, Jaydee said:

 If Liberals did not have double standards, they would’t have any standards at all!   Here is a prime example of the double speak from the “woke” crowd. 
 Electric cars have been available for what, ...about a decade now in Canada.?

 

7BF41E3A-58D0-466A-9BB3-70C70DEB1AC4.jpeg

You really have to have a villain don't you?  

Without knowing anything about anyone, you make assumptions and throw stones.

The election didn't go your way and you are still pitching a fit.

Maybe you should just stick to putting up Russian supplied memes.  It is about all you're good for.

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25 minutes ago, deicer said:

The election didn't go your way and you are still pitching a fit.

Ummmmmmmmm. Sorry (NOT) if pointing out an obvious double standard  bothers you ....but If the shoe fits..

E45C0D80-6FA0-4645-9416-62D7A5F3D440.jpeg

Edited by Jaydee

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Doesn't bother me at all, I just feel sorry for your sad existence.

Then again, empathy is a liberal thing, isn't it?

 

Edited by deicer

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57 minutes ago, deicer said:

The election didn't go your way and you are still pitching a fit.

Yeah, a lot of it going around...

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14 hours ago, Jaydee said:

I have posted this before. I do not seriously believe anyone on this forum is dead against the concept of climate change,.....but just the idiotic, moronic, stupid, crazy, half brained insane way the Turd is going about responding to it.

 

Taxing the **bleep** out of people, robbing them of their future IS NOT THE WAY TO GO.

Just received my Enbrige gas bill- HST on the carbon tax?

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Even small (short term)l disruptions can have a large affect and everything is interconnected.... guess where 90% of your propane comes from.

 Shutting down our entire transportation network will not get us to accord targets either. The Paris Accord comes with costs that (IMO) the most strident supporter is simply unwilling to pay and the evidence of that is everywhere you look. 

https://business.financialpost.com/transportation/rail/quebec-running-out-of-propane-as-cn-strike-chokes-off-supply

I know that propane burns clean.... if you were about to tell me that it means you missed the point.

 

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Perhaps someone who supports the theme of this thread can explain to me the Canadian appetite for Chinese products. When I buy (virtually) anything, my first question remains “is it made in China?”

It seems to me that people who are willing to boycott oil from Alberta are willing to line up to buy Chinese goods (of all types) without batting an eye. Please take a moment to look at China’s record on any (AND I DO MEAN ANY) principals that you espouse. Tell me how it’s even remotely possible that their record and actions fail to offend your stated sensibilities. BTW, Canada ships $4.7 billion dollars worth of agricultural products to China every year....that's a lot of carbon! Any trade Canada loses as a result of retaliation has the added benefit of lowering our carbon footprint and must (by the logic espoused by green activists) be a good thing. If you stand in favour boycotting anyone for cause, how could they not be at the top of your list?

 Coming from China, any statement that begins with "Ottawa should" is well worthy of contempt IMO. 

https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/ottawa-should-keep-quiet-about-hong-kong-chinas-new-ambassador-to-canada-says

Edited by Wolfhunter
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