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Mitch Cronin

Sorry Albertans, stuff your fossil fuel

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The world needs it to stay right where it is, so give it up. Stop raping forests and pumping filthy oil for temporary profit. Start thinking of priorities other than cash... you know, things that really matter, like long term survivability for our next generations.

Resistance to fossil fuel industry is growing and will keep doing so, so best you just give it up. 

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The problem we have with getting away from fossil fuels is the reluctance from those who are against it to lead the way by example.

1. getting rid of all fossil fueled vehicles, lawn mowers, emergency generators etc.

2. going off the electrical grid so as to reduce / eliminate any need to use electricity produced by using fossil fuels.

3. never using any public transportation (including airplanes) if they run on fossil fuels.

and the list goes on.

Re raping forests, now sure how you link that to Alberta, ( https://open.alberta.ca/dataset/annual-status-of-reforestation-in-alberta-report).  

Quote

 

Which province is Canada's largest producer of lumber products?
British Columbia produces roughly two-thirds of the softwood lumber supply, and as a result, softwood plywood is manufactured predominantly in that province.  Canada’s lumber and wood industries convert logs into various products, from lumber to wood chips. Softwood, derived from coniferous trees, supplies most of the manufacturers in these industries and is cut primarily in British Columbia. The remainder of the industry is supplied by hardwood (from deciduous trees, e.g., birch, maple, oak) found mainly in southern Ontario and Québec and the Maritimes.

 

 
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We would also be giving up plastic, a HUGE mainstay in modern manufacturing.  Not using plastic would hurt the economy.

I am all for going electric but we just arent there yet.

 

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6 minutes ago, boestar said:

We would also be giving up plastic, a HUGE mainstay in modern manufacturing.  Not using plastic would hurt the economy.

I am all for going electric but we just arent there yet.

 

Unless I read Mitch incorrectly, I think he was only against the use of fossil fuels, so I guess you could use electricity to crack petroleum and thus release the components that would not be used for fuel.  Of course then I guess the unusable fuel distillates would have to be dumped or burnt off.  https://www.e-education.psu.edu/eme801/node/470

image.png.8f88f6799dbfee4ece97fe821d24c53a.png

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I know there are a lot of Tesla haters in the world but I respect what Elon is doing.

I allows the use of Tesla patents without royalty which means anyone and their dog can build a Tesla or at least an electric car using Tesla technology.  In doing this he has spurred a competition from major car manufactrers to build a better Electric car.  This has sparked innovation.  Some times you need a kick in the rear to move forward.

I fully expect Tesla to step away from making cars at some point and just being the Major Battery and drive system supplier to everyone else.  I could be wrong there as they have now announced a pickup truck that is supposed to challenge the #1 selling F-150

We will see.

As long as there is good competition, the electric vehicle market will continue to grow and for that we can thank Elon

 

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Recently changed cars, so will be  a few more years before replacement.  Will let you know how the electric car is at that time.

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4 hours ago, Mitch Cronin said:

Stop raping forests and pumping filthy oil for temporary profit. Start thinking of priorities other than cash... you know, things that really matter, like long term survivability for our next generations.

If Canadians were really worried about long term survivability for our next generations, they would have voted in the Conservatives.

 

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Edited by Jaydee
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5 hours ago, Mitch Cronin said:

The world needs it to stay right where it is, so give it up. Stop raping forests and pumping filthy oil for temporary profit. Start thinking of priorities other than cash... you know, things that really matter, like long term survivability for our next generations.

Resistance to fossil fuel industry is growing and will keep doing so, so best you just give it up. 

 

If you actually knew something instead of parroting others you might actually be worth reading.

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2 hours ago, Airband said:

Let us know when you buy one.

 

Without a government subsidy impossible. 

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Everyone is entitled to their own opinion.  Everyone is not entitled to their own facts.  Alberta oil is cleaner than the oil we will import in it's place.  It's also more ethical, from a human right POV, and benefits us economically - Kind of a tri-fecta.

 

Edited by seeker
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Just now, seeker said:

Everyone is entitled to their own opinion.  Everyone is not entitled to their own facts.  Alberta oil is cleaner than the oil we will import in it's place.  

 

The dirtiest oil comes from downtown Los Angeles.

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18 hours ago, Mitch Cronin said:

The world needs it to stay right where it is, so give it up. Stop raping forests and pumping filthy oil for temporary profit. Start thinking of priorities other than cash... you know, things that really matter, like long term survivability for our next generations.

Resistance to fossil fuel industry is growing and will keep doing so, so best you just give it up. 

“ Alberta is facing a full-blown economic crisis and it needs support, not condescension”

“ Alberta’s billions in transfer payments have helped other provinces hurt by economic troubles, so where's the compassion for the province now?”

Western Canada is currently facing uncertain times not witnessed since the Petro-Canada Centre, better known as Red Square, was built to house the then Crown Corporation in downtown Calgary in 1983. And with no resolution in sight for the five-year-long rout in oil and natural gas prices, things are going to get a lot worse before they get better.

While Encana’s decision to move its headquarters to Denver made headlines, the reality is that business are leaving the province in droves. One local realtor, Robert Graham at Arrowstar, told Global News recently that Arrowstar alone has helped 100 Western Canadian companies relocate to the Houston area, 40 of those in the past year and a half.

Others are shutting up shop completely, or closing locations in the province: Chili’s shut all but three of its Alberta locations in 2017; Red Robin has plans to pull out of Alberta by year-end; and Starbucks has announced numerous closures in both Edmonton and Calgary. That on top of the multitude of mom-and-pop businesses that are simply going bust.

In total, we calculate that business insolvencies in Alberta have skyrocketed by more than 70 per cent from their 2015 lows, as compared to a 13.5 per cent decrease on average for the country as whole over the same period. Here in Calgary the mood is outright abysmal, with 89 per cent of businesses saying the current economic situation has deteriorated since last summer, according to city’s annual citizen satisfaction survey.

Adding it all up, at the end of 2018, Alberta’s real GDP was one per cent below where it was in 2014 and six per cent lower on a per capita basis, according to ATB Financial. And it isn’t looking much better with what could be negative real GDP growth in 2019, according to the Conference Board of Canada. In fact, a recent Conference Board study showed that Edmonton and Calgary will post the weakest economic performance among 13 major Canadian cities this year.

The result has been job losses — and a lot of them — sending unemployment rates in Calgary and Edmonton north of seven per cent, well above the Canadian average of 5.5 per cent. However, this really doesn’t tell you just how dire it is for many Albertans as we calculate that personal insolvencies are up nearly 28 per cent from their 2014 lows as compared to a 15 per cent decrease in Canada over the same period.

While some economists are still citing our historically above-average “per-capita income” levels, consider this: one in four people using food banks in Alberta is employed or was recently employed — the highest level in the country.

foodbank.jpg?w=590&quality=60&strip=allA volunteer stocks shopping carts at the Wood Buffalo Food Bank in Fort McMurray, Alberta.Jason Franson/Bloomberg files

All of this may sound like preaching to those not affected but the fact of the matter is Alberta is facing a full-on crisis, and there is a real need for support and assistance, rather than condescension.

A great place to start is with pipelines, and I mean more than just the Trans Mountain. Federal government policies are going to have to shift from being anti-resource development to ones that indicate the province is open for business, not only to attract foreign capital but also to stop the current exodus.

Adjusting equalization so that struggling provinces such as Alberta and Saskatchewan can use more of their federal tax dollars for large infrastructure projects that are currently on hold would also send a very strong message.

Regular Albertans also need to do everything they can to make sure they have the financial wherewithal to weather the storm. That means ensuring that savings and RSPs are topped up (if you’re still fortunate enough to have money to put away), diversifying your holdings and avoiding illiquid private investments. Also, make sure you have a personal financial plan, mapping out contingencies in the event of potential economic impacts.

We didn’t invent hardship but Alberta is a province built on sweat, tears and hard work. Our founders each took a small piece of land leased from the railroad, including my grandfather who came here in 1905 from Montreal, and together turned the province into what was more recently one of the economic engines of Canada.

This meant we were able to be huge financial contributors to confederation to the tune of $611 billion in transfer payments from 1967 to 2017, and lend a helping hand offering tens of thousands of jobs to those impacted by economic troubles in their own respective provinces.

Asking for bit of compassion during tough times shouldn’t be considered a slap in the face but rather something most Canadians can understand.

Martin Pelletier, CFA is a Portfolio Manager and OCIO at TriVest Wealth Counsel Ltd, a Calgary-based private client and institutional investment firm specializing in discretionary risk-managed portfolios as well as investment audit and oversight services.

https://business.financialpost.com/investing/investing-pro/alberta-is-facing-a-full-blown-economic-crisis-and-it-needs-support-not-condescension

Edited by Jaydee
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18 hours ago, Mitch Cronin said:

The world needs it to stay right where it is, so give it up. Stop raping forests and pumping filthy oil for temporary profit. Start thinking of priorities other than cash... you know, things that really matter, like long term survivability for our next generations.

Resistance to fossil fuel industry is growing and will keep doing so, so best you just give it up. 

“ Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s father rolled out the National Energy Program in 1980 — a punitive tax grab for Alberta’s oil revenues to pay for the Liberal welfare state. Years later, Justin Trudeau did a redo by discriminating against Alberta’s oil industry to pay for his welfare state, phoney climate agenda and Quebec goodies.

But again, the jig’s up and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney came out fighting this weekend and, as many of us have recommended, embarked on a “workaround” strategy to get out from under Trudeau and the Laurentian elites who still control Canada.

Instead of a national energy grab, this Trudeau has cloaked himself in green by attacking the oil industry without even addressing the real problem which is demand.”

 

https://business.financialpost.com/diane-francis/diane-francis-kenneys-plan-to-get-alberta-out-from-under-trudeau-before-he-completely-destroys-it

Edited by Jaydee
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18 hours ago, Mitch Cronin said:

The world needs it to stay right where it is, so give it up. Stop raping forests and pumping filthy oil for temporary profit. Start thinking of priorities other than cash... you know, things that really matter, like long term survivability for our next generations.

Resistance to fossil fuel industry is growing and will keep doing so, so best you just give it up. 

There's a tragedy unfolding in the oilpatch, but Ottawa doesn't even seem to get it

Martin Pelletier: Encana pulled the plug on Canada right after the election, and we expect more to follow

The news of Encana’s name change and relocation to the U.S. on Halloween may have spooked Albertans, but the bigger question is whether the developments are enough to finally scare Ottawa into realizing just how precarious the situation unfolding in the oil patch — a sector responsible for 11 per cent of our country’s GDP — really is.

What many forget is that capital is highly mobile and takes the path of least resistance. This means that alongside ROI, risk is one of the most critical factors taken into account when making capital allocation decisions.

Foreign capital divestitures have amounted to more than $30 billion in the past three years

 

Unfortunately, when it comes to investing in our energy sector Canada is now viewed as a very high risk region with a low return. In total, foreign capital divestitures have amounted to more than $30 billion in the past three years. Kinder Morgan, Statoil, ConcocoPhilips, Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Marathon Oil Corp., Devon Energy, Equinor ASA, Koch Oil Sands and Total SA have all either reduced their exposure or have left altogether.

Investors have also hit the sell button with carnage for those who chose to stay put and ride it out as many E&P and Serviceco share prices are now trading at half to one-quarter of their 2014 highs. That said, while investors have the ability to move their positions abroad quite easily it’s a different story for the remaining Canadian energy companies especially for those with domestic operations.

Instead many are now forced to harvest their internal cash flow to either pay down debt, return it to shareholders via dividends or undertake share buybacks which only compounds the contraction of the industry by returning capital instead of putting it in the ground. Maybe this is the outcome certain environmental lobby groups desire but it does come at a huge cost.

All of this capital could have been used to fuel economic growth at a time when according to Bank of Canada governor Stephen Poloz, “the resilience of Canada’s economy will be increasingly tested as trade conflicts and uncertainty persist.” Capital is also vital if we want to transform ourselves into a low-carbon economy such as investing in net-zero production technology thereby providing an alternative to other more environmentally unfriendly resource extraction regions.

Instead of assigning blame for how we got here — and in our opinion industry deserves some of the blame due to its complacency in the face of the disruption caused by U.S. shale — we need to look forward as to how we can attract capital in an environment characterized by slowing global economic growth and weaker oil and gas prices.

We don't think it’s a coincidence that Encana decided to pull the plug immediately following the election

 

Changing the narrative is a great place to start and that means de-risking the sector through sound government policy rather than introducing anti-infrastructure and anti-oil export legislation such as Bills C69 and C48. While many may argue Ottawa’s support is evident via the nationalization of the TransMountain pipeline we think it completely misses the bigger picture. Taxpayer capital would have generated a significantly higher ROI if it was put to work fostering an environment where companies like Kinder Morgan can facilitate pipeline development on their own.

Finally, it costs nothing to at least offer verbal support to a struggling industry and yet barely a word came out of the PMO regarding the Encana announcement. Such silence only adds to perception that Canada is not open for business if it has anything to do with energy. It’s hard to imagine Ottawa would have taken the same approach if SNC Lavalin had decided to move to Boston, Saputo decided to make cheese in New Jersey, or Bombardier to build its planes in Michigan.

 

https://business.financialpost.com/investing/investing-pro/theres-a-tragedy-unfolding-in-the-oilpatch-but-ottawa-doesnt-even-seem-to-get-it

 

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Canadians voted for a bunch of hypocritical greenies and their naive, suicidal platforms

Voters who want to make a real impact should turn off all air conditioning, stop having children, downsize, sell their vehicles and lower their thermostats

 

The election was disheartening: 65.6 per cent of the Canadian electorate voted for the Liberals, NDP, Greens the Bloc Québécois and their naive, suicidal platforms.

None proposed a viable job-creation or economic growth roadmap. They were all about taxing and spending. Ergo, nearly two-thirds of Canadians voted for free root canals or free daycare or free pharmaceuticals or free college. And 7.7 per cent voted for the Bloc, or to get more free stuff for Quebec. This is a nation that thinks like a bunch of trust fund kids, who despoil the environment more than our parents or grandparents did, and believe the world owes them a living.

The poster boy was Canada’s most prominent trust funder, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who flitted around in two fuel-guzzling aircraft during his election campaign while endlessly repeating the mantra “climate change.”

And nearly two-thirds fell for it. He and the Liberal climate-change cohorts — the NDP and Greens — claimed that Canada would lead the world in averting the impending ecological Armageddon by simply declaring war against its principle wealth-creation sectors, resources and auto manufacturing.

Even if one is sympathetic to the need to transition from the old to the new economy, there is not a single entrepreneur, technology maven, scientist, or innovator among the ranks of the tax-and-spenders to lead us to their Promised Land. Their culprit is oil and pipelines.

But if serious, their platforms should have taxed anyone occupying more than 500 square feet of living space, those who drive, fly and consume more goods and resources, as Canadians do, than do most of the world’s residents.

Instead, Canadians vote for leaders who promise to save the planet, but allow them to continue to commute long distances along asphalt highways, drive SUVs, fly south, drink water out of plastic bottles, are addicted to electronic devices that consume huge amounts of electricity, live and work in oversized and air conditioned premises, eat packaged foods, use paper cups and towels, and pack landfill sites with manufactured goods shipped halfway around the world only to be prematurely discarded.

The surging demand in monster houses, empty condos built in Canada for money laundering purposes, the dominance of SUVs, and mass immigration to high-consumption Canada from low consumption countries more than cancels out any environmental benefit from electric cars or renewables or Trudeau’s foolish carbon tax.
 

The fact is that world and Canadian oil demand, like gasoline guzzlers and population, will be on the rise for years to come.

https://business.financialpost.com/diane-francis/diane-francis-canadians-voted-for-a-bunch-of-hypocritical-greenies-and-their-naive-suicidal-platforms

 

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18 hours ago, Mitch Cronin said:

The world needs it to stay right where it is, so give it up. Stop raping forests and pumping filthy oil for temporary profit. Start thinking of priorities other than cash... you know, things that really matter, like long term survivability for our next generations.

Resistance to fossil fuel industry is growing and will keep doing so, so best you just give it up. 

Leaders should be forced to take a course on markets, business and free enterprise

As it stands they want to turn Canada into a hotel where they can order anything they want, at any price, from room service then hand the bill over to taxpayers

 

Two fringe candidates — one from the Bloc Québécois and the other from the libertarian People’s Party — littered the English-language debates, sucking up airtime. Neither will ever become prime minister and neither should have been on the stage.

Also, a waste of time were leaders from the Green and New Democrat parties whose platforms are disconnected from economic realities.

The four illustrate that this election cycle in Canada has become the democratic version of tennis without a net. Norms and lines are crossed by granting undeserved attention to loopy fringe candidates. Then there’s the “invisible” incumbent, Justin Trudeau, who has two campaign planes, but dodged the other English-language debate and avoids questions from the press whenever feasible.

The only grown-up in last week’s English language debate was Andrew Scheer who scored major punches before the inconsequentials cross-talked all night and ratings collapsed. He scored a knock-out punch with his opening: “Mr. Trudeau, you are a phony, you are a fraud, and you do not deserve to govern this country.”

As Politico noted: “Andrew Scheer passed the prime minister plausibility test.”

Trudeau isn’t the only leader on offer who doesn’t deserve support. The Green and NDP platforms are insultingly reckless. These parties do not deserve to govern a household budget or a pop stand.

The Greens pledge to balance Canada’s federal budget within five years. (So did Trudeau in 2015; he ran deficits annually). That aside, their promise is fantastical given their spending initiatives: A pharmacare plan that will cost $27 billion in 2020 and rise to $31 billion annually four years later. This is bigger than Canada’s defence budget.

Green party leader Elizabeth May said she also will waive post-secondary tuition for anybody to study anything anywhere. The cost? Another $16 billion in 2020 and thereafter.

(Not to be overdone, NDP leader Jagmeet Singh promises “free dental care for households making less than $70,000 a year” — a budget item that has yet to be costed.)

Even if such extravagances were necessary, the Greens’ boast of balancing the budget would be impossible given its plan to phase out the oilsands by 2030 (there goes 140,000 jobs and billions in investment dollars and taxes); reduce energy demand by 50 per cent across the board somehow or other (hundreds of thousands more jobs); and convert the mining industry to green technologies (half a million jobs). She also pledges to stop new resource development, drilling, exploration and pipelines.

This platform is suicidal, and will cause immediate trade deficits, budget deficits, unemployment and a massive brain drain.

The NDP’s leader is no better. He would give provinces the right (read B.C. and Quebec) to veto any pipeline project and said: “the future of our country cannot involve fracking. It cannot involve the burning of any fossil fuel.”

Well, there goes the auto industry. too.

Like May, Singh is economically challenged. His answer to cushion the blow is to hike employment insurance payouts and provide retraining. But for what?

As for the Liberals, let’s face it, they are a pale imitation of the NDP with their anti-business legislation and rhetoric.

This cycle demands new electoral laws: people who run for public office should sit an economic IQ test whose results will be published. They should be forced to take a course on markets, business and free enterprise.

They have not offered responsible ideas to manage the affairs of all Canadians. They want to turn Canada, metaphorically, into a hotel where they can order anything they want, at any price, from room service then hand the bill over to taxpayers.

And Trudeau wants to hand out a get out of jail free pass, and new refrigerators, to his Liberal corporate donors and cronies.

https://business.financialpost.com/news/election-2019/diane-francis-leaders-should-be-forced-to-take-a-course-on-markets-business-and-free-enterprise

 
 

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19 hours ago, Mitch Cronin said:

The world needs it to stay right where it is, so give it up. Stop raping forests and pumping filthy oil for temporary profit. Start thinking of priorities other than cash... you know, things that really matter, like long term survivability for our next generations.

Resistance to fossil fuel industry is growing and will keep doing so, so best you just give it up. 

The province with the highest energy sector contribution to the nominal gross domestic product in 2018 was Alberta, with over 71.5 billion dollars. Followed by Ontario with over 20.4 billion dollars, Quebec with over 16.9 billion, Saskatchewan with almost 12.4 billion, and British Columbia with over 14.6 billion.Aug 9, 2019
https://www.nrcan.gc.ca › energy-an...

 

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19 hours ago, Mitch Cronin said:

The world needs it to stay right where it is, so give it up. Stop raping forests and pumping filthy oil for temporary profit. Start thinking of priorities other than cash... you know, things that really matter, like long term survivability for our next generations.

Resistance to fossil fuel industry is growing and will keep doing so, so best you just give it up. 


Alberta contributes more to Canada than any other provinceCanada's economic success over the past decade has largely been thanks to Alberta's success.Jul 13, 2017

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19 hours ago, Mitch Cronin said:

The world needs it to stay right where it is, so give it up. Stop raping forests and pumping filthy oil for temporary profit. Start thinking of priorities other than cash... you know, things that really matter, like long term survivability for our next generations.

Resistance to fossil fuel industry is growing and will keep doing so, so best you just give it up. 

What Canada's economy would look like if Alberta's recession never happened......
 

“ In this age of partisan talking points repeated ad infinitum, variations on the "strong Alberta, strong Canada" theme represent a rare turn of phrase that cuts across provinces, government jurisdictions and party lines. If you listen for it, you'll hear politicians of all stripes make the point, and with good reason. The evidence bears it out.”

 

"There are very deep and important interconnections between Alberta's economy and the rest of the country," says University of Calgary economist Trevor Tombe, who recently completed a quantitative analysis on just that topic.

Just how deep are those connections? Think $130 billion — per year. Think a federal deficit that would be virtually wiped out. Think an unemployment rate that would have dropped to levels never before seen in this country.

This is what Canada missed out on, Tombe says, because of Alberta's latest recession.

'Significant impact on the national economy'

That recession, by most measures, started with the oil-price slump in late 2014 and lasted until late 2016. Alberta's economy then bounced back, to a degree, in 2017, but that recovery started to sputter in 2018.

Multiple economic forecasts for 2019 are pointing to another weak year, with the Conference Board of Canada saying a second, "mild recession" may even be in the cards for Alberta.

Tombe's peer-reviewed analysis, produced at CBC's request, was released today by the University of Calgary's School of Public Policy. It looks at how Canada's economy would have fared if Alberta's recent recession had never happened and, instead, the provincial economy had simply matched British Columbia's growth from 2014 to 2019.”

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/alberta-trevor-tombe-recession-analysis-1.5299896

 

Edited by Jaydee

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16 hours ago, deicer said:

Ford announced their new Mustang on Sunday.  It is an all electric SUV.  The way of the future...

https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/17/cars/ford-mustang-mach-e/index.html

sometimes just because you can doesn't mean you should.  That thing does not deserve the Mustang name.

 

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1 hour ago, Jaydee said:

Voters who want to make a real impact should turn off all air conditioning, stop having children, downsize, sell their vehicles and lower their thermostats

 

As this progresses, people will be forced to confront the question of what they are willing to give up to go from 1.7% of global emissions down to 1%.

It's a huge cost, emissions are currently rising (not lowering) and as yet, no one has said where the 79 megatons of current accord deficits are to come from. Until those discussions start taking place, good intentions amount to nothing more than fluff in a belly button. Shutting down the entire agricultural sector (in its entirety) is currently not enough to do the job and with each passing day we are losing ground.

Liberal platitudes about filthy oil are less than meaningless without huge sacrifices that liberals themselves will balk at. If you are a carbon tax fan (and I'm not) it needs to be at  about $300.00 per ton. I will believe this is an emergency when those screaming emergency begin to act like it's an emergency. If you want to get my attention and support, you need to say where you want those 79 Mts to come from..... when you are willing to pay the price, I'm ready to listen. Until then, strident screams into a pillow is about all ya got.    

Edited by Wolfhunter
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A $50K (US) SUV with a 450 HP engine that goes from 0-60 in 3.5 seconds.  Who needs that?  Produce a 200HP SUV that can tow a small utility trailer and costs $25K (US) and it will replace 80% of the vehicles on the road.

I don't get that manufacturers.  Tesla, BMW and now Ford.  All of them.  Designing and producing these stupid vehicles - don't need (or want) a vehicle that can do F-14 carrier launches.  What I want is a vehicle to drive to the Sobey's and Home Depot.

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6 minutes ago, seeker said:

A $50K (US) SUV with a 450 HP engine that goes from 0-60 in 3.5 seconds.  Who needs that?  Produce a 200HP SUV that can tow a small utility trailer and costs $25K (US) and it will replace 80% of the vehicles on the road.

I don't get that manufacturers.  Tesla, BMW and now Ford.  All of them.  Designing and producing these stupid vehicles - don't need (or want) a vehicle that can do F-14 carrier launches.  What I want is a vehicle to drive to the Sobey's and Home Depot.

You and I think the same.  Think of the range if you detuned the electric motors!

Unfortunately, what society wants is what (as Mazda advertised) is Zoom Zoom!  With Apple Car Play.

It's the same with all wheel drive.  Just complicating a simple process with sh!t that breaks and 99 percent of drivers never leave the city anyway.  

 

Edited by deicer

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